Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1559529473

Best 10 JavaScript Charting Libraries for Every Data Visualization Need

If you’re interested in learning how to visualize your findings, read on for a list of great data viz libraries to help get you started. In this article, you’ll see best 10 JavaScript charting libraries for every data visualization need

Nowadays, the amount of data grows exponentially, and the more information we see, the harder it gets to process it. That’s why we need data visualization — in charts and dashboards, preferably interactive. It helps us humans save a lot of time and effort to view, analyze, and understand data, and make the right, informed decisions based on that.

In the modern HTML5 web, one can hardly deny that JavaScript is the most versatile and simplest technology to make use of for visualizing data. So if you are a front-end web developer, you either already know what JS charts are all about, or your first task to make them will come in a (short) while.

There are numerous JavaScript charting libraries out there, each with their specific pros and cons as with any tools. To make your life easier, I decided to tell you about my favorite ones. I think the following ten are the best JS libraries for creating charts and can be really helpful in solving one or another particular data visualization task, whether it’s basic or advanced. Follow me and check them out to make sure you know the basics about them and have not missed out on some good one for your current or next big project.

Without more ado, let’s go meet the top JS libraries for data visualization!

amCharts

amCharts is one of the JavaScript charting libraries that are helpful when you need a simple, and at the same time, flexible data visualization solution.

Key features

  • A pretty big number of chart types including maps and Gantt charts.
  • A drill down feature along with other great interactivity options.
  • Documentation containing all the needed methods is quite well-written, but from my point of view, it’s not really convenient to use.
  • Awesome chart animation.
  • Can be integrated with React, Angular, Vue, Ember, etc.
  • A WordPress plugin is available.
  • Export as an image or PDF.
  • Live charts, full customization, and W3C-approved accessibility functions.
  • Full support with priority one for licensed customers.
  • Customers: Microsoft, Amazon, eBay, NASA, Samsung, Yandex, AT&T, etc.

Pricing

Free for any use, but all charts will include a small, branded link. To remove the link, you need to purchase a paid license (from $180), which also gives you access to priority support.

Learn more about amCharts

AnyChart

AnyChart is a robust, lightweight and feature-rich JS chart library with rendering in SVG/VML. It actually gives web developers a great opportunity to create any different charts that will help to make decisions based on what is seen.

Key features

  • More than 80 JS chart types, including basic charts, stock charts, maps, as well as Gantt and PERT charts.
  • Many ways to set data: XML, JSON, CSV, JS API, Google Sheets, HTML Table.
  • Drill down into chart data.
  • Stock technical analysis indicators and annotations (drawing tools) out-of-the-box.
  • Rich documentation, API, and friendly support.
  • Can be integrated with Angular, Qlik, Oracle APEX, React, Elasticsearch, Vue.js, Android, iOS, etc.
  • A lot of samples and dashboards and a dedicated playground with code autocompletion.
  • Old browsers support.
  • Exporting charts to various formats including PDF; JPG, PNG, or SVG images; chart data in XSLX or CSV files.
  • Customers: Oracle, Microsoft, Citi, Samsung, Nokia, AT&T, Ford, Volkswagen, Lockheed Martin, etc.

Pricing

The watermarked version is free. To get rid of the branding, as well as to use AnyChart for any commercial purpose, it’s necessary to buy a license (from $49).

Learn more about AnyChart

Chart.js

Chart.js is a simple yet quite flexible JavaScript library for data viz, popular among web designers and developers. It’s a great basic solution for those who don’t need lots of chart types and customization features but want their charts to look neat, clear and informative at a glance.

Key features

  • 8 chart types: line, area, bar, pie, radar, polar, bubble, and scatter.
  • All chart types can be customized and animated, and when used online, all charts are responsive.
  • Functionality can be extended through the use of plugins.
  • Documentation is good.
  • Support via Stack Overflow.
  • Browsers support IE9+.

Pricing

A free open-source JS charts library. Released under the MIT license.

Learn more about Chart.js

Chartist.js

Chartist.js is an open-source, unintrusive JS library which can also be used to create nice responsive charts. Generally, Chartist is good for those who need a very simple chart — line, bar, or pie — and who do not require much in terms of data visualization. Good appearance, no need to have many great features in this case.

Key features

  • Only 3 chart types: line, bar, and pie charts.
  • Great animation.
  • API documentation contains all the necessary information, but it’s not quite convenient to use, requiring long scrolls to navigate.
  • Allows using plugins to extend the functionality.
  • Uses SVG to draw the charts (future compatible).
  • Old browsers support.

Pricing

Open source, free for all kinds of use.

Learn more about chartist.js

D3.js

D3.js is a powerful open-source JavaScript library for data visualization. It has been forked more than 20,000 times on GitHub so far. Basically, D3 is more like a framework than a library. It may well be not that simple to work with, which can look quite critical at the beginning. But there are a lot of helpful information resources available out there. And at the end, you can get so awesome visualizations and graphics of any kind from scratch, making D3 totally worth it.

Key features

  • Supports numerous chart types, much more than the vast majority of the other JavaScript charting libraries (e.g. Voronoi diagrams).
  • Steep learning curve. Less clear and obvious than some commercial libraries on the list (for example, AnyChart). But there are many tutorials, and the API is truly awesome.
  • Combines powerful visualization components and a data-driven approach to DOM manipulation.
  • Easy to debug using the in-browser element inspector.
  • Hundreds of examples.
  • Curve generating functions.
  • Drag and drop.

Pricing

D3 is an open source JavaScript library for charts, which is free for all kinds of use.

Learn more about D3.js

FusionCharts

FusionCharts is another good interactive charting library with hundreds of charts ready for use out of the box. The charts accept both JSON and XML data formats and are rendered via HTML5/SVG or VML.

Key features

  • Dozens of chart types, in both 2D and 3D, and 950+ maps covering all continents.
  • Animated and fully interactive charts and maps.
  • Server-side APIs for ASP.NET, PHP, and Ruby on Rails.
  • Compatible with jQuery, Angular, PHP, ASP.NET, React Native, Django, React, Ruby on Rails, Java, etc.
  • Quite detailed user’s guide and API reference.
  • A lot of samples and dashboards to check out.
  • Old browsers support.
  • Export to PNG, JPG or PDF format.
  • Support via the knowledge base and community forum.
  • Unlimited priority support for license holders.
  • Customers: Apple, IBM, Google, Intel, Microsoft, PayPal, Oracle, Adobe, etc.

Pricing

Free for non-commercial, paid for commercial use (from $497).

Learn more about FusionCharts

Google Charts

Google Charts is an excellent choice for projects that do not require complicated customization and prefer simplicity and stability.

Key features

  • The charts are based on HTML5/SVG and VML.
  • A lot of samples and dashboards to check out.
  • All charts are interactive, and some are pannable/zoomable as well.
  • Comprehensive documentation.
  • Old browsers support.
  • Support via FAQ, GitHub, and forum.

Pricing

The license is free, but the library is not open source. It does not allow you to host Google’s JS files on your server, so it may not suit you if you have some sensitive data.

Learn more about Google Charts

Highcharts

Highcharts is one of the most comprehensive and popular JavaScript charting libraries based on HTML5, rendering in SVG/VML. It is lightweight, supports a wide range of diverse chart types, and ensures high performance.

Key features

  • Uses pure JavaScript, and data can be loaded externally.
  • Robust documentation, API reference, and community showcase.
  • Drill down into chart data and other interactivity options.
  • Can be used with React, Angular, Meteor, .NET, iOS, etc.
  • Export to PNG, JPG, PDF, or SVG format.
  • Supports free version users via forum and Stack Overflow, with premium email and Skype support only available for commercial users with the appropriate license.
  • Customers: Visa, Yahoo!, Facebook, Twitter, Groupon, Nokia, Ericsson, Mastercard, Yandex, etc.

Pricing

Free for use by nonprofits. Paid for commercial use (from $50).

Learn more about Highcharts

Plotly.js

Plotly.js is a high-level JavaScript library, free and open-source. It is built on D3.js and WebGL, so can be used to create many different chart types including 3D charts to statistical graphs.

Key features

  • 20 chart types that can be embedded in websites or used to create dynamic presentations.
  • Used as a browser-based charting library for Python, R, and MATLAB by abstracting charts to a declarative JSON structure.
  • Extensive API documentation.
  • Good animation.
  • Uses React.
  • Exporting charts to PNG and JPG; EPS, SVG, and PDF are available on subscription.
  • A lot of different samples to check out.
  • Allows using Excel spreadsheets, or connect to your database.
  • Support forum.

Pricing

Open-source, free library.

Learn more about Plotly.js

ZingChart

ZingChart is a helpful tool for making interactive and responsive charts. This library is fast and flexible, and allows managing big data and generating charts with large amounts of data with ease.

Key features

  • Supports more than 30 chart types.
  • Fully customizable with CSS inspired styling.
  • Compatible with jQuery, Angular, Node.js, PHP, etc.
  • Real-time data, fast rendering of data sets of any size.
  • Data can be loaded via JS objects, JSON, CSV, PHP, AJAX, or MySQL.
  • Full yet quite easy-to-read API.
  • Free and premium support via ZingChart help center, Stack Overflow, email, and chat.
  • Customers: Microsoft, Boeing, Adobe, Apple, Cisco, Google, Alcatel, etc.

Pricing

The branded license provides full access to the ZingChart library for free. Commercial usage requires a paid license (from $199).

Learn more about ZingChart

Conclusion

I have listed the best JavaScript charting libraries out there, at least those I consider the top ones. It would be hard to compare all of them comprehensively. Each one of them has its own pros and cons depending on who is going to use it and for exactly what purpose.

Of course, there are some features that make one library faster, more beautiful or flexible than the other. But in the end, no matter what libraries this list contains, the overall winner is always the one that meets your specific requirements. For different people and companies, the choice of the best JS chart library can also be different.

My advice is — check out these top libraries as whenever you need JS charts and for whatever project, chances are extremely high that you will find one or several of them to be the best fit. For a longer list, look at a comparison on Wikipedia.

#javascript #web-development #data-science

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Best 10 JavaScript Charting Libraries for Every Data Visualization Need

Shreya Jadhav

1627885843

Hey I think you should also add LightningChart JS to that list.
https://www.lightningchart.com/
It comes with loads of features, with fast rendering utilising effective algorithms and GPU acceleration using WebGL. So, one can plot millions of data points – even 100 million data points in real-time, and not have performance issues.
Check this out as they have simple and flexible API’s with a bunch of chart types that offer a lot of customisation, you can create innumerable types of charts to visualise different kinds of data as per your requirements with good visualisations as well !

Siphiwe  Nair

Siphiwe Nair

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Sid  Schuppe

Sid Schuppe

1617988080

How To Blend Data in Google Data Studio For Better Data Analysis

Using data to inform decisions is essential to product management, or anything really. And thankfully, we aren’t short of it. Any online application generates an abundance of data and it’s up to us to collect it and then make sense of it.

Google Data Studio helps us understand the meaning behind data, enabling us to build beautiful visualizations and dashboards that transform data into stories. If it wasn’t already, data literacy is as much a fundamental skill as learning to read or write. Or it certainly will be.

Nothing is more powerful than data democracy, where anyone in your organization can regularly make decisions informed with data. As part of enabling this, we need to be able to visualize data in a way that brings it to life and makes it more accessible. I’ve recently been learning how to do this and wanted to share some of the cool ways you can do this in Google Data Studio.

#google-data-studio #blending-data #dashboard #data-visualization #creating-visualizations #how-to-visualize-data #data-analysis #data-visualisation

Mya  Lynch

Mya Lynch

1598065860

Top 5 JavaScript Libraries to Create an Organizational Chart

In this article, we’ll review five JavaScript libraries that allow you to create online organizational charts. To make this info useful for different categories of readers, we’ve gathered together libraries with different functionality and pricing policy. To help you decide whether one of them is worthy of your attention or not, we’ll take a look at the main features and check if the documentation is user-friendly.

DHTMLX Diagram Library

The DHTMLX diagram library allows creating easily configurable graphs for visualization of hierarchical data. Besides org charts, you can create almost any type of hierarchical diagrams. You can choose from organizational charts, flowcharts, block and network diagrams, decision trees, mind maps, UML Class diagrams, mixed diagrams, and any other types of diagrams. This variety of diagrams can be generated using a built-in set of shapes or with the help of custom shapes.

You can set up any diagram shape you need with text, icons, images, and any other custom content via templates in a few lines of code. All these parameters can be later changed from the UI via the sidebar options in the editor.

Top 9 JavaScript Charting Libraries

The edit mode gives an opportunity to make changes on-the-fly without messing with the source code. An interactive interface of the editor supports drag-and-drop and permits you to change each item of your diagram. You can drag diagram items with your mouse and set the size and position property of an item via the editor. The multiselection feature can help to speed up your work in the editor, as it enables you to manipulate several shapes.

The library has an exporting feature. You can export your diagram to a PDF, PNG, or JSON format. Zooming and scrolling options will be useful in case you work with diagrams containing a big number of items. There is also a search feature that helps you to quickly find the necessary shape and make your work with complex diagrams even more convenient by expanding and collapsing shapes when necessary. To show the structure of an organization compactly, you can use the vertical mode.

The documentation page will appeal both to beginners and experienced developers. A well-written beginner’s guide contains the source code with explanations. A bunch of guides will help with further configuration, so you’ll be able to create a diagram that better suits your needs. At the moment, there are three types of licenses available. The commercial license for the team of five or fewer developers costs $599, the enterprise license goes for $1299 per company, and the ultimate license has a price tag of $2899.

#javascript #web dev #data visualization #libraries #web app development #front end development #javascript libraries #org chart creator

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

1620629020

Getting Started With Data Lakes

Frameworks for Efficient Enterprise Analytics

The opportunities big data offers also come with very real challenges that many organizations are facing today. Often, it’s finding the most cost-effective, scalable way to store and process boundless volumes of data in multiple formats that come from a growing number of sources. Then organizations need the analytical capabilities and flexibility to turn this data into insights that can meet their specific business objectives.

This Refcard dives into how a data lake helps tackle these challenges at both ends — from its enhanced architecture that’s designed for efficient data ingestion, storage, and management to its advanced analytics functionality and performance flexibility. You’ll also explore key benefits and common use cases.

Introduction

As technology continues to evolve with new data sources, such as IoT sensors and social media churning out large volumes of data, there has never been a better time to discuss the possibilities and challenges of managing such data for varying analytical insights. In this Refcard, we dig deep into how data lakes solve the problem of storing and processing enormous amounts of data. While doing so, we also explore the benefits of data lakes, their use cases, and how they differ from data warehouses (DWHs).


This is a preview of the Getting Started With Data Lakes Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

#big data #data analytics #data analysis #business analytics #data warehouse #data storage #data lake #data lake architecture #data lake governance #data lake management

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623171540

Clash of Python Data Visualization Libraries

Seaborn, Altair, and Plotly

Data visualization is a fundamental ingredient of data science. It helps us understand the data better by providing insights. We also use data visualization to deliver the results or findings.

Python, being the predominant choice of programming language in the data science ecosystem, offers a rich selection of data visualization libraries. In this article, we will do a practical comparison of 3 popular ones.

The libraries we will cover are Seaborn, Altair, and Plotly. The examples will consist of 3 fundamental data visualization types which are scatter plot, histogram, and line plot.

We will do the comparison by creating the same visualizations with all 3 libraries. We will be using the Melbourne housing dataset available on Kaggle for the examples.

#data-visualization #python #data-science #programming #clash of python data visualization libraries #libraries