Leonard  Paucek

Leonard Paucek

1667247780

Database Centric Symfony2 Configuration Management Bundle

SettingsBundle

Bundle for storing configuration with Symfony in database using Doctrine2 ORM.

Features

  • Easy-to-use (Twig extension, container service)
  • Settings scopes per user, global or all
  • Settings validation by using the Symfony Form Component
  • 2 serialization mechanisms: PHP serialize() and JSON (+ you can write your own)
  • Settings caching (PSR-6)
  • Fast and extensible

Quick usage examples

Symfony controller:

// Global settings
$settingsManager->set('name', 'foo');
$settingsManager->get('name'); // returns 'foo'

// User settings
$settingsManager->get('name', $user); // returns global 'foo'
$settingsManager->set('name', 'bar', $user);
$settingsManager->get('name', $user); // returns 'bar'

Twig template:

{# Global setting #}
{{ get_setting('some_setting') }} {# => 'value' #}

{# User setting #}
{{ get_setting('some_user_setting', app.user) }} {# => 'value' #}

See the general usage documentation for more examples.

Installation (using Composer)

Add the following to your composer.json file:

// composer.json
{
    "require": {
        // ...
        "dmishh/settings-bundle": "2.0.*@dev"
    }
}

Update dependencies, run from command line:

php composer.phar update

Register the bundle in your AppKernel.php file:

<?php

// in AppKernel::registerBundles()
$bundles = array(
    // ...
    new Dmishh\SettingsBundle\DmishhSettingsBundle(),
);

Update your database for creating settings table:

Add following lines to your app/config/routing.yml (see how to override default routing and controller):

settings:
    resource: "@DmishhSettingsBundle/Resources/config/routing.yml"
    prefix: /settings

Configure first setting, add to app/config/config.yml:

dmishh_settings:
    settings:
        my_first_setting: ~

Open http://YOUR-PROJECT-URL/app_dev.php/settings/global and start managing your settings!

Note: If you're using Symfony 3, please see the instructions in Advanced configuration.

General usage

In controllers:

<?php

// GLOBAL SETTINGS

// Set setting value by its name
$settingsManager->set('my_first_setting', 'value');

// Get setting value by its name
$settingsManager->get('my_first_setting'); // => 'value'

// Get all settings
$settingsManager->all(); // => array('my_first_setting' => 'value')

// Set settings' values from associative name-value array
$settingsManager->setMany(array('my_first_setting' => 'new_value'));
$this->get('settings_manager')->get('my_first_setting'); // => 'new_value'$settingsManager
<?php

// PER USER SETTINGS

// Each of methods above has last optional $user parameter
// that allows to get/set per-user settings
// Your User Entity must implement SettingsOwnerInterface if you wish to use per-user settings

// class User implements SettingsOwnerInterface {
//     public function getSettingIdentifier() {
//         return $this->id;
//     }
// }

// These are same examples as above with only difference that they are for current user
$settingsManager->set('my_first_setting', 'user_value', $this->getUser());
$settingsManager->get('my_first_setting', $this->getUser()); // => 'user_value'
$settingsManager->all($this->getUser()); //  array('my_first_setting' => 'user_value')
$settingsManager->setMany(array('my_first_setting' => 'new_user_value'), $this->getUser());
$settingsManager->get('my_first_setting', $this->getUser()); // => 'new_user_value'


// PER ENTITY SETTINGS

// This is the most interesting part. You can have settings for any entity.
// Just make sure you have unique values for getSettingIdentifier()

// class Company implements SettingsOwnerInterface {
//     public function getSettingIdentifier() {
//         return 'company_' . $this->id;
//     }
// }

$myCompany = new Company();
$settingsManager->set('delivery_frequency_setting', 'daily', $myCompany);
$settingsManager->get('delivery_frequency_setting', $this->getUser()); // => 'daily'

In services: you must inject @settings_manager or the whole @service_container into your service and use it in the same way as in controllers (like in the example above)

In Twig templates:

{# Global setting #}
{{ get_setting('some_setting') }} {# => 'value' #}

{# User setting #}
{{ get_setting('some_user_setting', app.user) }} {# => 'value' #}

{# Getting all global settings #}
{% for setting in get_all_settings() %}
    {{ setting }} {# => 'value', ... #}
{% endfor %}

Understanding scopes

Bundle provides settings separation into 3 scopes: ALL, GLOBAL and USER.

  • GLOBAL and USER scopes are totally independent.
  • ALL scope provides you to inherit global settings when user setting with the same name is not setted.

Examples must give more clearance:

<?php

// Example with ALL scope
$settingsMaanger->set('all_scope_setting', 'value');
$settingsMaanger->get('all_scope_setting'); // => 'value'
$settingsMaanger->get('all_scope_setting', $this->getUser()); // => 'value'
$settingsMaanger->set('all_scope_setting', 'user_value', $this->getUser());
$settingsMaanger->get('all_scope_setting', $this->getUser()); // => 'user_value'

// Example #1 with GLOBAL and USER scopes
$settingsMaanger->set('global_scope_setting', 'value');
$settingsMaanger->get('global_scope_setting'); // => 'value'
$settingsMaanger->get('global_scope_setting', $this->getUser()); // => WrongScopeException
$settingsMaanger->set('global_scope_setting', 'value', $this->getUser()); // => WrongScopeException

// Example #2 with GLOBAL and USER scopes
$settingsMaanger->set('user_scope_setting', 'value', $this->getUser());
$settingsMaanger->get('user_scope_setting', $this->getUser()); // => 'value'
$settingsMaanger->get('user_scope_setting'); // => WrongScopeException
$settingsMaanger->set('user_scope_setting', 'value'); // => WrongScopeException

Configuring scope

You may configure a scope to each of your settings. You can use ALL (default), GLOBAL or USER scope.

dmishh_settings:
    settings:
        my_first_user_setting:
            scope: user # all, global

Documentation

Changelog, Roadmap and contribution

Please, do not hesitate to report bugs or send pull requests. It will help to motivate me to support library better than anything else :)

See CHANGELOG.md for all major changes.

Upgrade from 1.0.*

Make sure to read the UPGRADE.md to successfully migrate your application.


Download Details:

Author: dmishh
Source Code: https://github.com/dmishh/SettingsBundle

License: MIT license

#symfony 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Database Centric Symfony2 Configuration Management Bundle

Background Fetch for React Native Apps

react-native-background-fetch

Background Fetch is a very simple plugin which attempts to awaken an app in the background about every 15 minutes, providing a short period of background running-time. This plugin will execute your provided callbackFn whenever a background-fetch event occurs.

There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently or if an iOS user disables background refresh they may not happen at all.

:new: Background Fetch now provides a scheduleTask method for scheduling arbitrary "one-shot" or periodic tasks.

iOS

  • There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently.
  • scheduleTask seems only to fire when the device is plugged into power.
  • ⚠️ When your app is terminated, iOS no longer fires events — There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
  • iOS can take days before Apple's machine-learning algorithm settles in and begins regularly firing events. Do not sit staring at your logs waiting for an event to fire. If your simulated events work, that's all you need to know that everything is correctly configured.
  • If the user doesn't open your iOS app for long periods of time, iOS will stop firing events.

Android

Installing the plugin

⚠️ If you have a previous version of react-native-background-fetch < 2.7.0 installed into react-native >= 0.60, you should first unlink your previous version as react-native link is no longer required.

$ react-native unlink react-native-background-fetch

With yarn

$ yarn add react-native-background-fetch

With npm

$ npm install --save react-native-background-fetch

Setup Guides

iOS Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Android Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Example

ℹ️ This repo contains its own Example App. See /example

import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  StyleSheet,
  ScrollView,
  View,
  Text,
  FlatList,
  StatusBar,
} from 'react-native';

import {
  Header,
  Colors
} from 'react-native/Libraries/NewAppScreen';

import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      events: []
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    // Initialize BackgroundFetch ONLY ONCE when component mounts.
    this.initBackgroundFetch();
  }

  async initBackgroundFetch() {
    // BackgroundFetch event handler.
    const onEvent = async (taskId) => {
      console.log('[BackgroundFetch] task: ', taskId);
      // Do your background work...
      await this.addEvent(taskId);
      // IMPORTANT:  You must signal to the OS that your task is complete.
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Timeout callback is executed when your Task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId)
    const onTimeout = async (taskId) => {
      console.warn('[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT task: ', taskId);
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Initialize BackgroundFetch only once when component mounts.
    let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({minimumFetchInterval: 15}, onEvent, onTimeout);

    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] configure status: ', status);
  }

  // Add a BackgroundFetch event to <FlatList>
  addEvent(taskId) {
    // Simulate a possibly long-running asynchronous task with a Promise.
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      this.setState(state => ({
        events: [...state.events, {
          taskId: taskId,
          timestamp: (new Date()).toString()
        }]
      }));
      resolve();
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <>
        <StatusBar barStyle="dark-content" />
        <SafeAreaView>
          <ScrollView
            contentInsetAdjustmentBehavior="automatic"
            style={styles.scrollView}>
            <Header />

            <View style={styles.body}>
              <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
                <Text style={styles.sectionTitle}>BackgroundFetch Demo</Text>
              </View>
            </View>
          </ScrollView>
          <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
            <FlatList
              data={this.state.events}
              renderItem={({item}) => (<Text>[{item.taskId}]: {item.timestamp}</Text>)}
              keyExtractor={item => item.timestamp}
            />
          </View>
        </SafeAreaView>
      </>
    );
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  scrollView: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.lighter,
  },
  body: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.white,
  },
  sectionContainer: {
    marginTop: 32,
    paddingHorizontal: 24,
  },
  sectionTitle: {
    fontSize: 24,
    fontWeight: '600',
    color: Colors.black,
  },
  sectionDescription: {
    marginTop: 8,
    fontSize: 18,
    fontWeight: '400',
    color: Colors.dark,
  },
});

export default App;

Executing Custom Tasks

In addition to the default background-fetch task defined by BackgroundFetch.configure, you may also execute your own arbitrary "oneshot" or periodic tasks (iOS requires additional Setup Instructions). However, all events will be fired into the Callback provided to BackgroundFetch#configure:

⚠️ iOS:

  • scheduleTask on iOS seems only to run when the device is plugged into power.
  • scheduleTask on iOS are designed for low-priority tasks, such as purging cache files — they tend to be unreliable for mission-critical tasks. scheduleTask will never run as frequently as you want.
  • The default fetch event is much more reliable and fires far more often.
  • scheduleTask on iOS stop when the user terminates the app. There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
// Step 1:  Configure BackgroundFetch as usual.
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  // This is the fetch-event callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);

  // Use a switch statement to route task-handling.
  switch (taskId) {
    case 'com.foo.customtask':
      print("Received custom task");
      break;
    default:
      print("Default fetch task");
  }
  // Finish, providing received taskId.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});

// Step 2:  Schedule a custom "oneshot" task "com.foo.customtask" to execute 5000ms from now.
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: "com.foo.customtask",
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  delay: 5000  // <-- milliseconds
});

API Documentation

Config

Common Options

@param {Integer} minimumFetchInterval [15]

The minimum interval in minutes to execute background fetch events. Defaults to 15 minutes. Note: Background-fetch events will never occur at a frequency higher than every 15 minutes. Apple uses a secret algorithm to adjust the frequency of fetch events, presumably based upon usage patterns of the app. Fetch events can occur less often than your configured minimumFetchInterval.

@param {Integer} delay (milliseconds)

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. The minimum number of milliseconds in future that task should execute.

@param {Boolean} periodic [false]

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. Defaults to false. Set true to execute the task repeatedly. When false, the task will execute just once.

Android Options

@config {Boolean} stopOnTerminate [true]

Set false to continue background-fetch events after user terminates the app. Default to true.

@config {Boolean} startOnBoot [false]

Set true to initiate background-fetch events when the device is rebooted. Defaults to false.

NOTE: startOnBoot requires stopOnTerminate: false.

@config {Boolean} forceAlarmManager [false]

By default, the plugin will use Android's JobScheduler when possible. The JobScheduler API prioritizes for battery-life, throttling task-execution based upon device usage and battery level.

Configuring forceAlarmManager: true will bypass JobScheduler to use Android's older AlarmManager API, resulting in more accurate task-execution at the cost of higher battery usage.

let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15,
  forceAlarmManager: true
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
.
.
.
// And with with #scheduleTask
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: 'com.foo.customtask',
  delay: 5000,       // milliseconds
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  periodic: false
});

@config {Boolean} enableHeadless [false]

Set true to enable React Native's Headless JS mechanism, for handling fetch events after app termination.

  • 📂 index.js (MUST BE IN index.js):
import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

let MyHeadlessTask = async (event) => {
  // Get task id from event {}:
  let taskId = event.taskId;
  let isTimeout = event.timeout;  // <-- true when your background-time has expired.
  if (isTimeout) {
    // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately finish(taskId)
    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] Headless TIMEOUT:', taskId);
    BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    return;
  }
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] start: ', taskId);

  // Perform an example HTTP request.
  // Important:  await asychronous tasks when using HeadlessJS.
  let response = await fetch('https://reactnative.dev/movies.json');
  let responseJson = await response.json();
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] response: ', responseJson);

  // Required:  Signal to native code that your task is complete.
  // If you don't do this, your app could be terminated and/or assigned
  // battery-blame for consuming too much time in background.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}

// Register your BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask
BackgroundFetch.registerHeadlessTask(MyHeadlessTask);

@config {integer} requiredNetworkType [BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE]

Set basic description of the kind of network your job requires.

If your job doesn't need a network connection, you don't need to use this option as the default value is BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE.

NetworkTypeDescription
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONEThis job doesn't care about network constraints, either any or none.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_ANYThis job requires network connectivity.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_CELLULARThis job requires network connectivity that is a cellular network.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_UNMETEREDThis job requires network connectivity that is unmetered. Most WiFi networks are unmetered, as in "you can upload as much as you like".
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NOT_ROAMINGThis job requires network connectivity that is not roaming (being outside the country of origin)

@config {Boolean} requiresBatteryNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's battery level must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the battery level is not low, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low battery" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresStorageNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's available storage must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the device is not in a low storage state, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low storage" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresCharging [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device must be charging (or be a non-battery-powered device connected to permanent power, such as Android TV devices). This defaults to false.

@config {Boolean} requiresDeviceIdle [false]

When set true, ensure that this job will not run if the device is in active use.

The default state is false: that is, the for the job to be runnable even when someone is interacting with the device.

This state is a loose definition provided by the system. In general, it means that the device is not currently being used interactively, and has not been in use for some time. As such, it is a good time to perform resource heavy jobs. Bear in mind that battery usage will still be attributed to your application, and shown to the user in battery stats.


Methods

Method NameArgumentsReturnsNotes
configure{FetchConfig}, callbackFn, timeoutFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Configures the plugin's callbackFn and timeoutFn. This callback will fire each time a background-fetch event occurs in addition to events from #scheduleTask. The timeoutFn will be called when the OS reports your task is nearing the end of its allowed background-time.
scheduleTask{TaskConfig}Promise<boolean>Executes a custom task. The task will be executed in the same Callback function provided to #configure.
statuscallbackFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Your callback will be executed with the current status (Integer) 0: Restricted, 1: Denied, 2: Available. These constants are defined as BackgroundFetch.STATUS_RESTRICTED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_DENIED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_AVAILABLE (NOTE: Android will always return STATUS_AVAILABLE)
finishString taskIdVoidYou MUST call this method in your callbackFn provided to #configure in order to signal to the OS that your task is complete. iOS provides only 30s of background-time for a fetch-event -- if you exceed this 30s, iOS will kill your app.
startnonePromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Start the background-fetch API. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will be executed each time a background-fetch event occurs. NOTE the #configure method automatically calls #start. You do not have to call this method after you #configure the plugin
stop[taskId:String]Promise<boolean>Stop the background-fetch API and all #scheduleTask from firing events. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will no longer be executed. If you provide an optional taskId, only that #scheduleTask will be stopped.

Debugging

iOS

🆕 BGTaskScheduler API for iOS 13+

  • ⚠️ At the time of writing, the new task simulator does not yet work in Simulator; Only real devices.
  • See Apple docs Starting and Terminating Tasks During Development
  • After running your app in XCode, Click the [||] button to initiate a Breakpoint.
  • In the console (lldb), paste the following command (Note: use cursor up/down keys to cycle through previously run commands):
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateLaunchForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]
  • Click the [ > ] button to continue. The task will execute and the Callback function provided to BackgroundFetch.configure will receive the event.

Simulating task-timeout events

  • Only the new BGTaskScheduler api supports simulated task-timeout events. To simulate a task-timeout, your fetchCallback must not call BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId):
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback.
  // This is the task callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId", taskId);
  //BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId); // <-- Disable .finish(taskId) when simulating an iOS task timeout
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  print("[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT taskId:", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
  • Now simulate an iOS task timeout as follows, in the same manner as simulating an event above:
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateExpirationForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]

Old BackgroundFetch API

  • Simulate background fetch events in XCode using Debug->Simulate Background Fetch
  • iOS can take some hours or even days to start a consistently scheduling background-fetch events since iOS schedules fetch events based upon the user's patterns of activity. If Simulate Background Fetch works, your can be sure that everything is working fine. You just need to wait.

Android

  • Observe plugin logs in $ adb logcat:
$ adb logcat *:S ReactNative:V ReactNativeJS:V TSBackgroundFetch:V
  • Simulate a background-fetch event on a device (insert <your.application.id>) (only works for sdk 21+:
$ adb shell cmd jobscheduler run -f <your.application.id> 999
  • For devices with sdk <21, simulate a "Headless JS" event with (insert <your.application.id>)
$ adb shell am broadcast -a <your.application.id>.event.BACKGROUND_FETCH

Download Details:
Author: transistorsoft
Source Code: https://github.com/transistorsoft/react-native-background-fetch
License: MIT license

#react  #reactnative  #mobileapp  #javascript 

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1620640920

How to Efficiently Choose the Right Database for Your Applications

Finding the right database solution for your application is not easy. Learn how to efficiently find a database for your applications.

Finding the right database solution for your application is not easy. At iQIYI, one of the largest online video sites in the world, we’re experienced in database selection across several fields: Online Transactional Processing (OLTP), Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), Hybrid Transaction/Analytical Processing (HTAP), SQL, and NoSQL.

Today, I’ll share with you:

  • What criteria to use for selecting a database.
  • What databases we use at iQIYI.
  • Some decision models to help you efficiently pick a database.
  • Tips for choosing your database.

I hope this post can help you easily find the right database for your applications.

#database architecture #database application #database choice #database management system #database management tool

 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1625133780

SingleStore: The One Stop Shop For Everything Data

  • SingleStore works toward helping businesses embrace digital innovation by operationalising “all data through one platform for all the moments that matter”

The pandemic has brought a period of transformation across businesses globally, pushing data and analytics to the forefront of decision making. Starting from enabling advanced data-driven operations to creating intelligent workflows, enterprise leaders have been looking to transform every part of their organisation.

SingleStore is one of the leading companies in the world, offering a unified database to facilitate fast analytics for organisations looking to embrace diverse data and accelerate their innovations. It provides an SQL platform to help companies aggregate, manage, and use the vast trove of data distributed across silos in multiple clouds and on-premise environments.

**Your expertise needed! **Fill up our quick Survey

#featured #data analytics #data warehouse augmentation #database #database management #fast analytics #memsql #modern database #modernising data platforms #one stop shop for data #singlestore #singlestore data analytics #singlestore database #singlestore one stop shop for data #singlestore unified database #sql #sql database

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1620633584

System Databases in SQL Server

Introduction

In SSMS, we many of may noticed System Databases under the Database Folder. But how many of us knows its purpose?. In this article lets discuss about the System Databases in SQL Server.

System Database

Fig. 1 System Databases

There are five system databases, these databases are created while installing SQL Server.

  • Master
  • Model
  • MSDB
  • Tempdb
  • Resource
Master
  • This database contains all the System level Information in SQL Server. The Information in form of Meta data.
  • Because of this master database, we are able to access the SQL Server (On premise SQL Server)
Model
  • This database is used as a template for new databases.
  • Whenever a new database is created, initially a copy of model database is what created as new database.
MSDB
  • This database is where a service called SQL Server Agent stores its data.
  • SQL server Agent is in charge of automation, which includes entities such as jobs, schedules, and alerts.
TempDB
  • The Tempdb is where SQL Server stores temporary data such as work tables, sort space, row versioning information and etc.
  • User can create their own version of temporary tables and those are stored in Tempdb.
  • But this database is destroyed and recreated every time when we restart the instance of SQL Server.
Resource
  • The resource database is a hidden, read only database that holds the definitions of all system objects.
  • When we query system object in a database, they appear to reside in the sys schema of the local database, but in actually their definitions reside in the resource db.

#sql server #master system database #model system database #msdb system database #sql server system databases #ssms #system database #system databases in sql server #tempdb system database

Django-allauth: A simple Boilerplate to Setup Authentication

Django-Authentication 

A simple Boilerplate to Setup Authentication using Django-allauth, with a custom template for login and registration using django-crispy-forms.

Getting Started

Prerequisites

  • Python 3.8.6 or higher

Project setup

# clone the repo
$ git clone https://github.com/yezz123/Django-Authentication

# move to the project folder
$ cd Django-Authentication

Creating virtual environment

  • Create a virtual environment for this project:
# creating pipenv environment for python 3
$ virtualenv venv

# activating the pipenv environment
$ cd venv/bin #windows environment you activate from Scripts folder

# if you have multiple python 3 versions installed then
$ source ./activate

Configured Enviromment

Environment variables

SECRET_KEY = #random string
DEBUG = #True or False
ALLOWED_HOSTS = #localhost
DATABASE_NAME = #database name (You can just use the default if you want to use SQLite)
DATABASE_USER = #database user for postgres
DATABASE_PASSWORD = #database password for postgres
DATABASE_HOST = #database host for postgres
DATABASE_PORT = #database port for postgres
ACCOUNT_EMAIL_VERIFICATION = #mandatory or optional
EMAIL_BACKEND = #email backend
EMAIL_HOST = #email host
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = #email host password
EMAIL_USE_TLS = # if your email use tls
EMAIL_PORT = #email port

change all the environment variables in the .env.sample and don't forget to rename it to .env.

Run the project

After Setup the environment, you can run the project using the Makefile provided in the project folder.

help:
 @echo "Targets:"
 @echo "    make install" #install requirements
 @echo "    make makemigrations" #prepare migrations
 @echo "    make migrations" #migrate database
 @echo "    make createsuperuser" #create superuser
 @echo "    make run_server" #run the server
 @echo "    make lint" #lint the code using black
 @echo "    make test" #run the tests using Pytest

Preconfigured Packages

Includes preconfigured packages to kick start Django-Authentication by just setting appropriate configuration.

PackageUsage
django-allauthIntegrated set of Django applications addressing authentication, registration, account management as well as 3rd party (social) account authentication.
django-crispy-formsdjango-crispy-forms provides you with a crispy filter and {% crispy %} tag that will let you control the rendering behavior of your Django forms in a very elegant and DRY way.

Contributing

  • Django-Authentication is a simple project, so you can contribute to it by just adding your code to the project to improve it.
  • If you have any questions, please feel free to open an issue or create a pull request.

Download Details:
Author: yezz123
Source Code: https://github.com/yezz123/Django-Authentication
License: MIT License

#django #python