Range Setup

Range Setup

1659601292

How to Configure a Belkin Range Extender Setup [Step-by-Step Guide]

How to Configure a Belkin Range Extender Setup [Step-by-Step Guide]

It doesn't matter if you're just surfing the web for something unimportant, streaming videos, playing games, or doing something else; having a bad signal is one of the most frustrating things that can happen. One of the causes of this is a router that is unable to transmit a strong enough signal, necessitating the use of a range extender such as the Belkin Range Setup.

The range extender's purpose is to increase the strength of your router to areas that it may not be able to reach due to the nature of your building, the floor you are on, and the performance of the router itself. Furthermore, it aids in providing a consistent signal, which may typically fluctuate due to the aforementioned reasons, as well as eliminating dead spots without the use of cables.

How to Configure a Belkin Range Extender Setup

Setting up the Belkin range extender, also known as a wireless repeater, is not as difficult as one might think, but it can be a little confusing at times.

Here are the simple steps for wireless setup:

1. Plug the Belkin range extender into a power outlet. The outlet should be located where it will receive the strongest signal from your Wi-Fi network.

2. With your computer or mobile device's Wi-Fi turned on, search for and connect to Belkin setup from the available networks.

3. Once connected, open your web browser and navigate to the http Belkin range. This will take you to the configuration page.

4. On the Belkin setup Web page, click Get Started to see a list of available networks. Choose either your home or office network.

5. If it requires a password, you will be prompted to enter it before proceeding.

6. You must select your Wi-Fi network once more.

7. Select Next, then Create Extended Network.

 

WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup) Procedure:

You may choose to use the WPS PIN setup, but this is only possible if your router supports it, as not all routers do. If your device supports it, you will most likely see it at the bottom or back of the router, depending on the type. In fact, some of them will be visible in the utility. When you see the WPS PIN number, take note of it.

1. Open your browser and navigate to the http Belkin range.

2. Select Extended Network Settings, then Wi-Fi Protected (WPS)

3. Enter the copied WPS PIN in the Enter Client Device PIN field.

4. Continue with the configuration by clicking the Enroll button.

Here are the simple steps for cable installation:

There is the option for a cabled setup, though it may not be possible with the N300 F9K1015 Belkin range extender because the model does not support it.

1. Connect the range extender to your computer with an Ethernet cable.

2. Turn off your computer's Wi-Fi.

3. Connect the extender to a power source.

4. Repeat steps three through seven as shown above.

What is the procedure for resetting the Belkin range extender?

If you need to reset your range extender for any reason, the steps are straightforward. However, you must understand that this will reset your extender's settings to their factory defaults. There are two simple methods you can use to accomplish this:

Using the reset button

1. Locate the range extender's reset button. The location will differ depending on the model.

2. Hold the button down for at least 10 seconds.

3. When the light remains steady, your reset is complete. Prior to that, it will flash briefly and then blink.

What steps should I take to troubleshoot the range extender?

Before resorting to a factory reset, you should try troubleshooting the device if it is not working properly. Here are some simple troubleshooting steps for the Belkin Range Extender:

1. The first step is to restart your router and modem.

2. Unplug the range extender from the power outlet and turn it off for 20 to 30 seconds.

3. Reconnect the extender to the power supply and restart your router and modem.

 

Most of the time, this is all you need to do to get it to behave properly, but if it still doesn't work, you should reset it. To get more information about Belkin Range Extender Setup visits our official website.

 

Also, Visit these Links:

https://rangesetup.wordpress.com/2022/08/04/how-to-configure-a-belkin-range-extender-setup-step-by-step-guide/

https://www.scutify.com/articles/2022-08-04-how-to-configure-a-belkin-range-extender-setupstep-by-step-guide

https://gingkoapp.com/how-to-configure-a-belkin-range-extender-setup-step-by-step-guide.html

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

John  Smith

John Smith

1657107416

Find the Best Restaurant Mobile App Development Company in Abu Dhbai

The era of mobile app development has completely changed the scenario for businesses in regions like Abu Dhabi. Restaurants and food delivery businesses are experiencing huge benefits via smart business applications. The invention and development of the food ordering app have helped all-scale businesses reach new customers and boost sales and profit. 

As a result, many business owners are searching for the best restaurant mobile app development company in Abu Dhabi. If you are also searching for the same, this article is helpful for you. It will let you know the step-by-step process to hire the right team of restaurant mobile app developers. 

Step-by-Step Process to Find the Best Restaurant App Development Company

Searching for the top mobile app development company in Abu Dhabi? Don't know the best way to search for professionals? Don't panic! Here is the step-by-step process to hire the best professionals. 

#Step 1 – Know the Company's Culture

Knowing the organization's culture is very crucial before finalizing a food ordering app development company in Abu Dhabi. An organization's personality is shaped by its common beliefs, goals, practices, or company culture. So, digging into the company culture reveals the core beliefs of the organization, its objectives, and its development team. 

Now, you might be wondering, how will you identify the company's culture? Well, you can take reference from the following sources – 

  • Social media posts 
  • App development process
  • About us Page
  • Client testimonials

#Step 2 - Refer to Clients' Reviews

Another best way to choose the On-demand app development firm for your restaurant business is to refer to the clients' reviews. Reviews are frequently available on the organization's website with a tag of "Reviews" or "Testimonials." It's important to read the reviews as they will help you determine how happy customers are with the company's app development process. 

You can also assess a company's abilities through reviews and customer testimonials. They can let you know if the mobile app developers create a valuable app or not. 

#Step 3 – Analyze the App Development Process

Regardless of the company's size or scope, adhering to the restaurant delivery app development process will ensure the success of your business application. Knowing the processes an app developer follows in designing and producing a top-notch app will help you know the working process. Organizations follow different app development approaches, so getting well-versed in the process is essential before finalizing any mobile app development company. 

#Step 4 – Consider Previous Experience

Besides considering other factors, considering the previous experience of the developers is a must. You can obtain a broad sense of the developer's capacity to assist you in creating a unique mobile application for a restaurant business.

You can also find out if the developers' have contributed to the creation of other successful applications or not. It will help you know the working capacity of a particular developer or organization. Prior experience is essential to evaluating their work. For instance, whether they haven't previously produced an app similar to yours or not. 

#Step 5 – Check for Their Technical Support

As you expect a working and successful restaurant mobile app for your business, checking on this factor is a must. A well-established organization is nothing without a good technical support team. So, ensure whatever restaurant mobile app development company you choose they must be well-equipped with a team of dedicated developers, designers, and testers. 

Strong tech support from your mobile app developers will help you identify new bugs and fix them bugs on time. All this will ensure the application's success. 

#Step 6 – Analyze Design Standards

Besides focusing on an organization's development, testing, and technical support, you should check the design standards. An appealing design is crucial in attracting new users and keeping the existing ones stick to your services. So, spend some time analyzing the design standards of an organization. Now, you might be wondering, how will you do it? Simple! By looking at the organization's portfolio. 

Whether hiring an iPhone app development company or any other, these steps apply to all. So, don't miss these steps. 

#Step 7 – Know Their Location

Finally, the last yet very crucial factor that will not only help you finalize the right person for your restaurant mobile app development but will also decide the mobile app development cost. So, you have to choose the location of the developers wisely, as it is a crucial factor in defining the cost. 

Summing Up!!!

Restaurant mobile applications have taken the food industry to heights none have ever considered. As a result, the demand for restaurant mobile app development companies has risen greatly, which is why businesses find it difficult to finalize the right person. But, we hope that after referring to this article, it will now be easier to hire dedicated developers under the desired budget. So, begin the hiring process now and get a well-craft food ordering app in hand. 

Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1561523460

Matplotlib Cheat Sheet: Plotting in Python

This Matplotlib cheat sheet introduces you to the basics that you need to plot your data with Python and includes code samples.

Data visualization and storytelling with your data are essential skills that every data scientist needs to communicate insights gained from analyses effectively to any audience out there. 

For most beginners, the first package that they use to get in touch with data visualization and storytelling is, naturally, Matplotlib: it is a Python 2D plotting library that enables users to make publication-quality figures. But, what might be even more convincing is the fact that other packages, such as Pandas, intend to build more plotting integration with Matplotlib as time goes on.

However, what might slow down beginners is the fact that this package is pretty extensive. There is so much that you can do with it and it might be hard to still keep a structure when you're learning how to work with Matplotlib.   

DataCamp has created a Matplotlib cheat sheet for those who might already know how to use the package to their advantage to make beautiful plots in Python, but that still want to keep a one-page reference handy. Of course, for those who don't know how to work with Matplotlib, this might be the extra push be convinced and to finally get started with data visualization in Python. 

You'll see that this cheat sheet presents you with the six basic steps that you can go through to make beautiful plots. 

Check out the infographic by clicking on the button below:

Python Matplotlib cheat sheet

With this handy reference, you'll familiarize yourself in no time with the basics of Matplotlib: you'll learn how you can prepare your data, create a new plot, use some basic plotting routines to your advantage, add customizations to your plots, and save, show and close the plots that you make.

What might have looked difficult before will definitely be more clear once you start using this cheat sheet! Use it in combination with the Matplotlib Gallery, the documentation.

Matplotlib 

Matplotlib is a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hardcopy formats and interactive environments across platforms.

Prepare the Data 

1D Data 

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)
>>> y = np.cos(x)
>>> z = np.sin(x)

2D Data or Images 

>>> data = 2 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> data2 = 3 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> Y, X = np.mgrid[-3:3:100j, -3:3:100j]
>>> U = 1 X** 2 + Y
>>> V = 1 + X Y**2
>>> from matplotlib.cbook import get_sample_data
>>> img = np.load(get_sample_data('axes_grid/bivariate_normal.npy'))

Create Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Figure 

>>> fig = plt.figure()
>>> fig2 = plt.figure(figsize=plt.figaspect(2.0))

Axes 

>>> fig.add_axes()
>>> ax1 = fig.add_subplot(221) #row-col-num
>>> ax3 = fig.add_subplot(212)
>>> fig3, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,ncols=2)
>>> fig4, axes2 = plt.subplots(ncols=3)

Save Plot 

>>> plt.savefig('foo.png') #Save figures
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png',  transparent=True) #Save transparent figures

Show Plot

>>> plt.show()

Plotting Routines 

1D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> lines = ax.plot(x,y) #Draw points with lines or markers connecting them
>>> ax.scatter(x,y) #Draw unconnected points, scaled or colored
>>> axes[0,0].bar([1,2,3],[3,4,5]) #Plot vertical rectangles (constant width)
>>> axes[1,0].barh([0.5,1,2.5],[0,1,2]) #Plot horiontal rectangles (constant height)
>>> axes[1,1].axhline(0.45) #Draw a horizontal line across axes
>>> axes[0,1].axvline(0.65) #Draw a vertical line across axes
>>> ax.fill(x,y,color='blue') #Draw filled polygons
>>> ax.fill_between(x,y,color='yellow') #Fill between y values and 0

2D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> im = ax.imshow(img, #Colormapped or RGB arrays
      cmap= 'gist_earth', 
      interpolation= 'nearest',
      vmin=-2,
      vmax=2)
>>> axes2[0].pcolor(data2) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> axes2[0].pcolormesh(data) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> CS = plt.contour(Y,X,U) #Plot contours
>>> axes2[2].contourf(data1) #Plot filled contours
>>> axes2[2]= ax.clabel(CS) #Label a contour plot

Vector Fields 

>>> axes[0,1].arrow(0,0,0.5,0.5) #Add an arrow to the axes
>>> axes[1,1].quiver(y,z) #Plot a 2D field of arrows
>>> axes[0,1].streamplot(X,Y,U,V) #Plot a 2D field of arrows

Data Distributions 

>>> ax1.hist(y) #Plot a histogram
>>> ax3.boxplot(y) #Make a box and whisker plot
>>> ax3.violinplot(z)  #Make a violin plot

Plot Anatomy & Workflow 

Plot Anatomy 

 y-axis      

                           x-axis 

Workflow 

The basic steps to creating plots with matplotlib are:

1 Prepare Data
2 Create Plot
3 Plot
4 Customized Plot
5 Save Plot
6 Show Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> x = [1,2,3,4]  #Step 1
>>> y = [10,20,25,30] 
>>> fig = plt.figure() #Step 2
>>> ax = fig.add_subplot(111) #Step 3
>>> ax.plot(x, y, color= 'lightblue', linewidth=3)  #Step 3, 4
>>> ax.scatter([2,4,6],
          [5,15,25],
          color= 'darkgreen',
          marker= '^' )
>>> ax.set_xlim(1, 6.5)
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png' ) #Step 5
>>> plt.show() #Step 6

Close and Clear 

>>> plt.cla()  #Clear an axis
>>> plt.clf(). #Clear the entire figure
>>> plt.close(). #Close a window

Plotting Customize Plot 

Colors, Color Bars & Color Maps 

>>> plt.plot(x, x, x, x**2, x, x** 3)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, alpha = 0.4)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, c= 'k')
>>> fig.colorbar(im, orientation= 'horizontal')
>>> im = ax.imshow(img,
            cmap= 'seismic' )

Markers 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> ax.scatter(x,y,marker= ".")
>>> ax.plot(x,y,marker= "o")

Linestyles 

>>> plt.plot(x,y,linewidth=4.0)
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= 'solid') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= '--') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,'--' ,x**2,y**2,'-.' ) 
>>> plt.setp(lines,color= 'r',linewidth=4.0)

Text & Annotations 

>>> ax.text(1,
           -2.1, 
           'Example Graph', 
            style= 'italic' )
>>> ax.annotate("Sine", 
xy=(8, 0),
xycoords= 'data', 
xytext=(10.5, 0),
textcoords= 'data', 
arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle= "->", 
connectionstyle="arc3"),)

Mathtext 

>>> plt.title(r '$sigma_i=15$', fontsize=20)

Limits, Legends and Layouts 

Limits & Autoscaling 

>>> ax.margins(x=0.0,y=0.1) #Add padding to a plot
>>> ax.axis('equal')  #Set the aspect ratio of the plot to 1
>>> ax.set(xlim=[0,10.5],ylim=[-1.5,1.5])  #Set limits for x-and y-axis
>>> ax.set_xlim(0,10.5) #Set limits for x-axis

Legends 

>>> ax.set(title= 'An Example Axes',  #Set a title and x-and y-axis labels
            ylabel= 'Y-Axis', 
            xlabel= 'X-Axis')
>>> ax.legend(loc= 'best')  #No overlapping plot elements

Ticks 

>>> ax.xaxis.set(ticks=range(1,5),  #Manually set x-ticks
             ticklabels=[3,100, 12,"foo" ])
>>> ax.tick_params(axis= 'y', #Make y-ticks longer and go in and out
             direction= 'inout', 
              length=10)

Subplot Spacing 

>>> fig3.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.5,   #Adjust the spacing between subplots
             hspace=0.3,
             left=0.125,
             right=0.9,
             top=0.9,
             bottom=0.1)
>>> fig.tight_layout() #Fit subplot(s) in to the figure area

Axis Spines 

>>> ax1.spines[ 'top'].set_visible(False) #Make the top axis line for a plot invisible
>>> ax1.spines['bottom' ].set_position(( 'outward',10))  #Move the bottom axis line outward

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#matplotlib #cheatsheet #python

Background Fetch for React Native Apps

react-native-background-fetch

Background Fetch is a very simple plugin which attempts to awaken an app in the background about every 15 minutes, providing a short period of background running-time. This plugin will execute your provided callbackFn whenever a background-fetch event occurs.

There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently or if an iOS user disables background refresh they may not happen at all.

:new: Background Fetch now provides a scheduleTask method for scheduling arbitrary "one-shot" or periodic tasks.

iOS

  • There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently.
  • scheduleTask seems only to fire when the device is plugged into power.
  • ⚠️ When your app is terminated, iOS no longer fires events — There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
  • iOS can take days before Apple's machine-learning algorithm settles in and begins regularly firing events. Do not sit staring at your logs waiting for an event to fire. If your simulated events work, that's all you need to know that everything is correctly configured.
  • If the user doesn't open your iOS app for long periods of time, iOS will stop firing events.

Android

Installing the plugin

⚠️ If you have a previous version of react-native-background-fetch < 2.7.0 installed into react-native >= 0.60, you should first unlink your previous version as react-native link is no longer required.

$ react-native unlink react-native-background-fetch

With yarn

$ yarn add react-native-background-fetch

With npm

$ npm install --save react-native-background-fetch

Setup Guides

iOS Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Android Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Example

ℹ️ This repo contains its own Example App. See /example

import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  StyleSheet,
  ScrollView,
  View,
  Text,
  FlatList,
  StatusBar,
} from 'react-native';

import {
  Header,
  Colors
} from 'react-native/Libraries/NewAppScreen';

import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      events: []
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    // Initialize BackgroundFetch ONLY ONCE when component mounts.
    this.initBackgroundFetch();
  }

  async initBackgroundFetch() {
    // BackgroundFetch event handler.
    const onEvent = async (taskId) => {
      console.log('[BackgroundFetch] task: ', taskId);
      // Do your background work...
      await this.addEvent(taskId);
      // IMPORTANT:  You must signal to the OS that your task is complete.
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Timeout callback is executed when your Task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId)
    const onTimeout = async (taskId) => {
      console.warn('[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT task: ', taskId);
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Initialize BackgroundFetch only once when component mounts.
    let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({minimumFetchInterval: 15}, onEvent, onTimeout);

    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] configure status: ', status);
  }

  // Add a BackgroundFetch event to <FlatList>
  addEvent(taskId) {
    // Simulate a possibly long-running asynchronous task with a Promise.
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      this.setState(state => ({
        events: [...state.events, {
          taskId: taskId,
          timestamp: (new Date()).toString()
        }]
      }));
      resolve();
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <>
        <StatusBar barStyle="dark-content" />
        <SafeAreaView>
          <ScrollView
            contentInsetAdjustmentBehavior="automatic"
            style={styles.scrollView}>
            <Header />

            <View style={styles.body}>
              <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
                <Text style={styles.sectionTitle}>BackgroundFetch Demo</Text>
              </View>
            </View>
          </ScrollView>
          <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
            <FlatList
              data={this.state.events}
              renderItem={({item}) => (<Text>[{item.taskId}]: {item.timestamp}</Text>)}
              keyExtractor={item => item.timestamp}
            />
          </View>
        </SafeAreaView>
      </>
    );
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  scrollView: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.lighter,
  },
  body: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.white,
  },
  sectionContainer: {
    marginTop: 32,
    paddingHorizontal: 24,
  },
  sectionTitle: {
    fontSize: 24,
    fontWeight: '600',
    color: Colors.black,
  },
  sectionDescription: {
    marginTop: 8,
    fontSize: 18,
    fontWeight: '400',
    color: Colors.dark,
  },
});

export default App;

Executing Custom Tasks

In addition to the default background-fetch task defined by BackgroundFetch.configure, you may also execute your own arbitrary "oneshot" or periodic tasks (iOS requires additional Setup Instructions). However, all events will be fired into the Callback provided to BackgroundFetch#configure:

⚠️ iOS:

  • scheduleTask on iOS seems only to run when the device is plugged into power.
  • scheduleTask on iOS are designed for low-priority tasks, such as purging cache files — they tend to be unreliable for mission-critical tasks. scheduleTask will never run as frequently as you want.
  • The default fetch event is much more reliable and fires far more often.
  • scheduleTask on iOS stop when the user terminates the app. There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
// Step 1:  Configure BackgroundFetch as usual.
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  // This is the fetch-event callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);

  // Use a switch statement to route task-handling.
  switch (taskId) {
    case 'com.foo.customtask':
      print("Received custom task");
      break;
    default:
      print("Default fetch task");
  }
  // Finish, providing received taskId.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});

// Step 2:  Schedule a custom "oneshot" task "com.foo.customtask" to execute 5000ms from now.
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: "com.foo.customtask",
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  delay: 5000  // <-- milliseconds
});

API Documentation

Config

Common Options

@param {Integer} minimumFetchInterval [15]

The minimum interval in minutes to execute background fetch events. Defaults to 15 minutes. Note: Background-fetch events will never occur at a frequency higher than every 15 minutes. Apple uses a secret algorithm to adjust the frequency of fetch events, presumably based upon usage patterns of the app. Fetch events can occur less often than your configured minimumFetchInterval.

@param {Integer} delay (milliseconds)

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. The minimum number of milliseconds in future that task should execute.

@param {Boolean} periodic [false]

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. Defaults to false. Set true to execute the task repeatedly. When false, the task will execute just once.

Android Options

@config {Boolean} stopOnTerminate [true]

Set false to continue background-fetch events after user terminates the app. Default to true.

@config {Boolean} startOnBoot [false]

Set true to initiate background-fetch events when the device is rebooted. Defaults to false.

NOTE: startOnBoot requires stopOnTerminate: false.

@config {Boolean} forceAlarmManager [false]

By default, the plugin will use Android's JobScheduler when possible. The JobScheduler API prioritizes for battery-life, throttling task-execution based upon device usage and battery level.

Configuring forceAlarmManager: true will bypass JobScheduler to use Android's older AlarmManager API, resulting in more accurate task-execution at the cost of higher battery usage.

let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15,
  forceAlarmManager: true
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
.
.
.
// And with with #scheduleTask
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: 'com.foo.customtask',
  delay: 5000,       // milliseconds
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  periodic: false
});

@config {Boolean} enableHeadless [false]

Set true to enable React Native's Headless JS mechanism, for handling fetch events after app termination.

  • 📂 index.js (MUST BE IN index.js):
import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

let MyHeadlessTask = async (event) => {
  // Get task id from event {}:
  let taskId = event.taskId;
  let isTimeout = event.timeout;  // <-- true when your background-time has expired.
  if (isTimeout) {
    // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately finish(taskId)
    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] Headless TIMEOUT:', taskId);
    BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    return;
  }
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] start: ', taskId);

  // Perform an example HTTP request.
  // Important:  await asychronous tasks when using HeadlessJS.
  let response = await fetch('https://reactnative.dev/movies.json');
  let responseJson = await response.json();
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] response: ', responseJson);

  // Required:  Signal to native code that your task is complete.
  // If you don't do this, your app could be terminated and/or assigned
  // battery-blame for consuming too much time in background.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}

// Register your BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask
BackgroundFetch.registerHeadlessTask(MyHeadlessTask);

@config {integer} requiredNetworkType [BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE]

Set basic description of the kind of network your job requires.

If your job doesn't need a network connection, you don't need to use this option as the default value is BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE.

NetworkTypeDescription
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONEThis job doesn't care about network constraints, either any or none.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_ANYThis job requires network connectivity.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_CELLULARThis job requires network connectivity that is a cellular network.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_UNMETEREDThis job requires network connectivity that is unmetered. Most WiFi networks are unmetered, as in "you can upload as much as you like".
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NOT_ROAMINGThis job requires network connectivity that is not roaming (being outside the country of origin)

@config {Boolean} requiresBatteryNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's battery level must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the battery level is not low, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low battery" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresStorageNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's available storage must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the device is not in a low storage state, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low storage" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresCharging [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device must be charging (or be a non-battery-powered device connected to permanent power, such as Android TV devices). This defaults to false.

@config {Boolean} requiresDeviceIdle [false]

When set true, ensure that this job will not run if the device is in active use.

The default state is false: that is, the for the job to be runnable even when someone is interacting with the device.

This state is a loose definition provided by the system. In general, it means that the device is not currently being used interactively, and has not been in use for some time. As such, it is a good time to perform resource heavy jobs. Bear in mind that battery usage will still be attributed to your application, and shown to the user in battery stats.


Methods

Method NameArgumentsReturnsNotes
configure{FetchConfig}, callbackFn, timeoutFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Configures the plugin's callbackFn and timeoutFn. This callback will fire each time a background-fetch event occurs in addition to events from #scheduleTask. The timeoutFn will be called when the OS reports your task is nearing the end of its allowed background-time.
scheduleTask{TaskConfig}Promise<boolean>Executes a custom task. The task will be executed in the same Callback function provided to #configure.
statuscallbackFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Your callback will be executed with the current status (Integer) 0: Restricted, 1: Denied, 2: Available. These constants are defined as BackgroundFetch.STATUS_RESTRICTED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_DENIED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_AVAILABLE (NOTE: Android will always return STATUS_AVAILABLE)
finishString taskIdVoidYou MUST call this method in your callbackFn provided to #configure in order to signal to the OS that your task is complete. iOS provides only 30s of background-time for a fetch-event -- if you exceed this 30s, iOS will kill your app.
startnonePromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Start the background-fetch API. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will be executed each time a background-fetch event occurs. NOTE the #configure method automatically calls #start. You do not have to call this method after you #configure the plugin
stop[taskId:String]Promise<boolean>Stop the background-fetch API and all #scheduleTask from firing events. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will no longer be executed. If you provide an optional taskId, only that #scheduleTask will be stopped.

Debugging

iOS

🆕 BGTaskScheduler API for iOS 13+

  • ⚠️ At the time of writing, the new task simulator does not yet work in Simulator; Only real devices.
  • See Apple docs Starting and Terminating Tasks During Development
  • After running your app in XCode, Click the [||] button to initiate a Breakpoint.
  • In the console (lldb), paste the following command (Note: use cursor up/down keys to cycle through previously run commands):
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateLaunchForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]
  • Click the [ > ] button to continue. The task will execute and the Callback function provided to BackgroundFetch.configure will receive the event.

Simulating task-timeout events

  • Only the new BGTaskScheduler api supports simulated task-timeout events. To simulate a task-timeout, your fetchCallback must not call BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId):
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback.
  // This is the task callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId", taskId);
  //BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId); // <-- Disable .finish(taskId) when simulating an iOS task timeout
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  print("[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT taskId:", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
  • Now simulate an iOS task timeout as follows, in the same manner as simulating an event above:
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateExpirationForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]

Old BackgroundFetch API

  • Simulate background fetch events in XCode using Debug->Simulate Background Fetch
  • iOS can take some hours or even days to start a consistently scheduling background-fetch events since iOS schedules fetch events based upon the user's patterns of activity. If Simulate Background Fetch works, your can be sure that everything is working fine. You just need to wait.

Android

  • Observe plugin logs in $ adb logcat:
$ adb logcat *:S ReactNative:V ReactNativeJS:V TSBackgroundFetch:V
  • Simulate a background-fetch event on a device (insert <your.application.id>) (only works for sdk 21+:
$ adb shell cmd jobscheduler run -f <your.application.id> 999
  • For devices with sdk <21, simulate a "Headless JS" event with (insert <your.application.id>)
$ adb shell am broadcast -a <your.application.id>.event.BACKGROUND_FETCH

Download Details:
Author: transistorsoft
Source Code: https://github.com/transistorsoft/react-native-background-fetch
License: MIT license

#react  #reactnative  #mobileapp  #javascript 

Garry Taylor

Garry Taylor

1653464648

Python Data Visualization: Bokeh Cheat Sheet

A handy cheat sheet for interactive plotting and statistical charts with Bokeh.

Bokeh distinguishes itself from other Python visualization libraries such as Matplotlib or Seaborn in the fact that it is an interactive visualization library that is ideal for anyone who would like to quickly and easily create interactive plots, dashboards, and data applications. 

Bokeh is also known for enabling high-performance visual presentation of large data sets in modern web browsers. 

For data scientists, Bokeh is the ideal tool to build statistical charts quickly and easily; But there are also other advantages, such as the various output options and the fact that you can embed your visualizations in applications. And let's not forget that the wide variety of visualization customization options makes this Python library an indispensable tool for your data science toolbox.

Now, DataCamp has created a Bokeh cheat sheet for those who have already taken the course and that still want a handy one-page reference or for those who need an extra push to get started.

In short, you'll see that this cheat sheet not only presents you with the five steps that you can go through to make beautiful plots but will also introduce you to the basics of statistical charts. 

Python Bokeh Cheat Sheet

In no time, this Bokeh cheat sheet will make you familiar with how you can prepare your data, create a new plot, add renderers for your data with custom visualizations, output your plot and save or show it. And the creation of basic statistical charts will hold no secrets for you any longer. 

Boost your Python data visualizations now with the help of Bokeh! :)


Plotting With Bokeh

The Python interactive visualization library Bokeh enables high-performance visual presentation of large datasets in modern web browsers.

Bokeh's mid-level general-purpose bokeh. plotting interface is centered around two main components: data and glyphs.

The basic steps to creating plots with the bokeh. plotting interface are:

  1. Prepare some data (Python lists, NumPy arrays, Pandas DataFrames and other sequences of values)
  2. Create a new plot
  3. Add renderers for your data, with visual customizations
  4. Specify where to generate the output
  5. Show or save the results
>>> from bokeh.plotting import figure
>>> from bokeh.io import output_file, show
>>> x = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] #Step 1
>>> y = [6, 7, 2, 4, 5]
>>> p = figure(title="simple line example", #Step 2
x_axis_label='x',
y_axis_label='y')
>>> p.line(x, y, legend="Temp.", line_width=2) #Step 3
>>> output_file("lines.html") #Step 4
>>> show(p) #Step 5

1. Data 

Under the hood, your data is converted to Column Data Sources. You can also do this manually:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> import pandas as pd
>>> df = pd.OataFrame(np.array([[33.9,4,65, 'US'], [32.4, 4, 66, 'Asia'], [21.4, 4, 109, 'Europe']]),
                     columns= ['mpg', 'cyl',   'hp',   'origin'],
                      index=['Toyota', 'Fiat', 'Volvo'])


>>> from bokeh.models import ColumnOataSource
>>> cds_df = ColumnOataSource(df)

2. Plotting 

>>> from bokeh.plotting import figure
>>>p1= figure(plot_width=300, tools='pan,box_zoom')
>>> p2 = figure(plot_width=300, plot_height=300,
x_range=(0, 8), y_range=(0, 8))
>>> p3 = figure()

3. Renderers & Visual Customizations 

Glyphs 

Scatter Markers 
Bokeh Scatter Markers

>>> p1.circle(np.array([1,2,3]), np.array([3,2,1]), fill_color='white')
>>> p2.square(np.array([1.5,3.5,5.5]), [1,4,3],
color='blue', size=1)

Line Glyphs 

Bokeh Line Glyphs

>>> pl.line([1,2,3,4], [3,4,5,6], line_width=2)
>>> p2.multi_line(pd.DataFrame([[1,2,3],[5,6,7]]),
pd.DataFrame([[3,4,5],[3,2,1]]),
color="blue")

Customized Glyphs

Selection and Non-Selection Glyphs 

Selection Glyphs

>>> p = figure(tools='box_select')
>>> p. circle ('mpg', 'cyl', source=cds_df,
selection_color='red',
nonselection_alpha=0.1)

Hover Glyphs

Hover Glyphs

>>> from bokeh.models import HoverTool
>>>hover= HoverTool(tooltips=None, mode='vline')
>>> p3.add_tools(hover)

Color Mapping 

Bokeh Colormapping Glyphs

>>> from bokeh.models import CategoricalColorMapper
>>> color_mapper = CategoricalColorMapper(
             factors= ['US', 'Asia', 'Europe'],
             palette= ['blue', 'red', 'green'])
>>>  p3. circle ('mpg', 'cyl', source=cds_df,
            color=dict(field='origin',
                 transform=color_mapper), legend='Origin')

4. Output & Export 

Notebook

>>> from bokeh.io import output_notebook, show
>>> output_notebook()

HTML 

Standalone HTML 

>>> from bokeh.embed import file_html
>>> from bokeh.resources import CON
>>> html = file_html(p, CON, "my_plot")

>>> from  bokeh.io  import  output_file,  show
>>> output_file('my_bar_chart.html',  mode='cdn')

Components

>>> from bokeh.embed import components
>>> script, div= components(p)

PNG

>>> from bokeh.io import export_png
>>> export_png(p, filename="plot.png")

SVG 

>>> from bokeh.io import export_svgs
>>> p. output_backend = "svg"
>>> export_svgs(p,filename="plot.svg")

Legend Location 

Inside Plot Area 

>>> p.legend.location = 'bottom left'

Outside Plot Area 

>>> from bokeh.models import Legend
>>> r1 = p2.asterisk(np.array([1,2,3]), np.array([3,2,1])
>>> r2 = p2.line([1,2,3,4], [3,4,5,6])
>>> legend = Legend(items=[("One" ,[p1, r1]),("Two",[r2])], location=(0, -30))
>>> p.add_layout(legend, 'right')

Legend Background & Border 

>>> p.legend. border_line_color = "navy"
>>> p.legend.background_fill_color = "white"

Legend Orientation 

>>> p.legend.orientation = "horizontal"
>>> p.legend.orientation = "vertical"

Rows & Columns Layout

Rows

>>> from bokeh.layouts import row
>>>layout= row(p1,p2,p3)

Columns

>>> from bokeh.layouts import columns
>>>layout= column(p1,p2,p3)

Nesting Rows & Columns 

>>>layout= row(column(p1,p2), p3)

Grid Layout 

>>> from bokeh.layouts import gridplot
>>> rowl = [p1,p2]
>>> row2 = [p3]
>>> layout = gridplot([[p1, p2],[p3]])

Tabbed Layout 

>>> from bokeh.models.widgets import Panel, Tabs
>>> tab1 = Panel(child=p1, title="tab1")
>>> tab2 = Panel(child=p2, title="tab2")
>>> layout = Tabs(tabs=[tab1, tab2])

Linked Plots

Linked Axes 

Linked Axes
>>> p2.x_range = p1.x_range
>>> p2.y_range = p1.y_range

Linked Brushing 

>>> p4 = figure(plot_width = 100, tools='box_select,lasso_select')
>>> p4.circle('mpg', 'cyl' , source=cds_df)
>>> p5 = figure(plot_width = 200, tools='box_select,lasso_select')
>>> p5.circle('mpg', 'hp', source=cds df)
>>>layout= row(p4,p5)

5. Show or Save Your Plots  

>>> show(p1)
>>> show(layout)
>>> save(p1)

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#python #datavisualization #bokeh #cheatsheet

Step by step guide to setup your business

Step by step guide to setup your Business

You can talk to any entrepreneur or small business owner and you’ll instantly learn that starting a business requires a lot of work. An idea doesn’t become a business without effort. Some quality entrepreneurs understand the effort necessary to develop a business, but they might not be familiar with the many steps required to launch a business venture.

If you’re wishing to put in the effort to build a business, you’re going to want to know the steps needed to reach your goals. Simple tasks like naming the business and creating a logo are obvious, but what about the less-heralded, equally important steps?

Whether it’s determining your business structure or crafting a detailed marketing strategy, the workload can quickly pile up. It is better rather than spinning your wheels and guessing at where to start, follow this 10-step checklist to transform your business from a light bulb above your head to a real entity.

10-step checklist:

  • Refine your idea.
  • Write a business plan.
  • Assess your finances.
  • Determine your legal business structure.
  • Register with the government and IRS.
  • Purchase an insurance policy.
  • Build your team.
  • Choose your vendors.
  • Brand yourself and advertise.
  • Grow your business.
  • Refine your idea

If you’re thinking about starting a business, you likely already have an idea of what you want to sell, or at least the market you want to enter. Do a quick search for existing companies in your chosen industry.

Write a business plan

Once you have your idea in place, you need to ask yourself a few important questions: What is the main purpose of your business? What are your end goals? How will you finance your startup costs? These key questions can be answered in a well-written business plan.

Conduct market research

It is learnt that conducting thorough market research on your field and demographics of potential clientele is crucial part of crafting a business plan. This involves conducting surveys, holding focus groups, and researching SEO and public data.

Assess your finances

Many startups fail since they run out of money before turning a profit. It’s never a bad idea to overestimate the amount of startup capital you need, as it can be a while before the business begins to bring in sustainable revenue.

Brand yourself and advertise

Primarily before you start selling your product or service, you need to build up your brand and get a following of people ready to jump when you open your literal or figurative doors for business.

**Final Thoughts **

In order to get perfect step by step guide to setup your business the popular Smart innovations will completely help in all aspects right from getting business consultation, getting a suitable idea, getting your business registered, getting technical/software assistance, getting marketing support and finally getting massive success in your Business.

#step by step guide to setup your business #best business services in india #small business services