Rupert  Beatty

Rupert Beatty

1622610603

8 underrated Git commands every programmer should know (not the usual pull, push, commit)

I will be adding more useful Git tips, if you find this helpful I suggest bookmarking this page. 🔖

1. Rename a local branch

2. Change the upstream branch

3. Makes local branch same as remote

4. Delete the most recent commit, keeping the work you’ve done

5. Delete the most recent commit, destroying the work you’ve done

6. Stash your work

7. Recover stash by going into that branch and

8. Go back to a previous commit, undo a rebase

#git #github #programming-tips #github-actions

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8 underrated Git commands every programmer should know (not the usual pull, push, commit)
Rupert  Beatty

Rupert Beatty

1622610603

8 underrated Git commands every programmer should know (not the usual pull, push, commit)

I will be adding more useful Git tips, if you find this helpful I suggest bookmarking this page. 🔖

1. Rename a local branch

2. Change the upstream branch

3. Makes local branch same as remote

4. Delete the most recent commit, keeping the work you’ve done

5. Delete the most recent commit, destroying the work you’ve done

6. Stash your work

7. Recover stash by going into that branch and

8. Go back to a previous commit, undo a rebase

#git #github #programming-tips #github-actions

Madyson  Reilly

Madyson Reilly

1604109000

Best Practices for Using Git

Git has become ubiquitous as the preferred version control system (VCS) used by developers. Using Git adds immense value especially for engineering teams where several developers work together since it becomes critical to have a system of integrating everyone’s code reliably.

But with every powerful tool, especially one that involves collaboration with others, it is better to establish conventions to follow lest we shoot ourselves in the foot.

At DeepSource, we’ve put together some guiding principles for our own team that make working with a VCS like Git easier. Here are 5 simple rules you can follow:

1. Make Clean, Single-Purpose Commits

Oftentimes programmers working on something get sidetracked into doing too many things when working on one particular thing — like when you are trying to fix one particular bug and you spot another one, and you can’t resist the urge to fix that as well. And another one. Soon, it snowballs and you end up with so many changes all going together in one commit.

This is problematic, and it is better to keep commits as small and focused as possible for many reasons, including:

  • It makes it easier for other people in the team to look at your change, making code reviews more efficient.
  • If the commit has to be rolled back completely, it’s far easier to do so.
  • It’s straightforward to track these changes with your ticketing system.

Additionally, it helps you mentally parse changes you’ve made using git log.

#open source #git #git basics #git tools #git best practices #git tutorials #git commit

Kaia  Schmitt

Kaia Schmitt

1627035540

How to Use Push and Pull Command in Flutter Project | Push & Pull | GitHub

Push and Pull Command - GitHub | Flutter

Github - https://github.com/theindianinnovation/Air-Quality-App-Flutter

#github #pull #push #push & pull #flutter

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1620615985

Top 35 Git Commands With Examples

Git commands are essential, and they help to manage your source code effectively. In this guide, you will learn Git commands from Beginners to Advanced level.

If you are a new or experienced developer, you have to use source control. And good chances are you are using Git to manage your source code.

And to use Git to its full potential, you need to know Git commands. Here you will learn the most helpful Git commands that will take you from one level to another.

To make this Git commands guide more helpful, I have divided the guide into three different sections: Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Git commands.

This is an epic guide. And to make it more useful, I have added a Bonus section where you can download  51+ Git commands and a few more downloads to boost your productivity in Git.

Basic Git Commands

In this section, you will learn the essential Git commands. These basic Git commands are the foundation to learn more advanced commands.

Here are the nine useful Git commands.

1. git config

2. git version

3. git init

4. git clone

5. git add

6. git commit

7. git status

8. git branch

9. git checkout

10. git remote

11. git push

13. git fetch

14. git pull

15. git stash

16. git log

17. git shortlog

18. git show

19. git rm

20. git merge

21. git rebase

22. git bisect

23. git cherry-pick

24. git archive

26. git blame

27. git tag

28. git verify-commit

29. git verify-tag

30. git diff

31. git citool

32. git mv

33. git clean

34. git help

35. git whatchanged

#git #git commands #git commits #git tutorial

GitHub for Data Scientists: Part1

This is the first part of a follow-along series on GitHub collaboration. With this article, I aim to explain how two or more people can collaborate, version control and proofread their codes on GitHub for Data Science projects.

We will be covering specific topics like:

  1. Getting started on GitHub: Collaborate on GitHub like Pro: Part1
  2. **Branching: **Collaborate on GitHub like Pro: Part2
  3. **Commit: **Collaborate on GitHub like Pro: Commit

In these articles, we will have two people collaborating on GitHub. Let’s give them two pseudonyms, Sofi and Alec.

Tasks Planned

Since this is not an article on data cleaning, we will just focus on writing a few functions to see how collaboration and version controlling works. We will be working with a used cars dataset. You can download the dataset from here.

Sofi and Alec: are working on a data cleaning project named “autos“. Sofi takes the initiative of gathering data, creating required .py, .ipynb  files for the project.

Exploratory data analysis (EDA) was carried out on the dataset. Please refer to this article for the EDA. Based on EDA report tasks are planned for the project. We will only look at 3 tasks in this article.

Sofi creates a project folder (…/autos) with two files, auto.csv and autos_analysis.ipynb.

Version Control Systems (VCS)

In software engineeringversion control (also known as revision controlsource control, or source code management) is a class of systems responsible for managing changes to computer programs, documents, large web sites, or other collections of information. Version control is a component of software configuration management.

There are many version control systems out there. Often they are divided into two groups: “centralized” and “distributed”.

Centralized version control systems (CVCS)

CVCS are based on the idea that there is a single “central” copy of your project somewhere (probably on a server), and programmers will “commit” their changes to this central copy. The most popular CVCS is Subversion.

#git-pull #git-clone #git-commands #git-push #git-branch