Microsoft Teams Advanced - Full Tutorial

Teams Advanced Tutorial

Start 0:00
Introduction 0:03
Private Channels 1:15
Channel Notifications 7:26
Pinning Channels 10:35
Posting to Multiple Channels 12:39
Tags 17:25
Share to Outlook 20:56
Pop Out Chat Window 23:25
Scheduling Meetings & Adjusting Settings 27:20
Meeting Chat & Whiteboard 31:55
Background Effects 35:04
Sharing Whiteboards During Meetings 36:38
Ending the Meeting for All and Downloading Attendance List 38:31
3x3 Video Grid 40:18
Settings 40:55
Conclusion 42:28

#Teams #microsoftteams #microsoft 

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Microsoft Teams Advanced - Full Tutorial
Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1595429220

How to Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

Microsoft Teams is a communication platform used for Chat, Calling, Meetings, and Collaboration. Generally, it is used by companies and individuals working on projects. However, Microsoft Teams is available for macOS, Windows, and Linux operating systems available now.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04 machine. By default, Microsoft Teams package is not available in the Ubuntu default repository. However we will show you 2 methods to install Teams by downloading the Debian package from their official website, or by adding the Microsoft repository.

Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

1./ Install Microsoft Teams using Debian installer file

01- First, navigate to teams app downloads page and grab the Debian binary installer. You can simply obtain the URL and pull the binary using wget;

$ VERSION=1.3.00.5153
$ wget https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/ms-teams/pool/main/t/teams/teams_${VERSION}_amd64.deb

#linux #ubuntu #install microsoft teams on ubuntu #install teams ubuntu #microsoft teams #teams #teams download ubuntu #teams install ubuntu #ubuntu install microsoft teams #uninstall teams ubuntu

Microsoft Teams Advanced - Full Tutorial

Teams Advanced Tutorial

Start 0:00
Introduction 0:03
Private Channels 1:15
Channel Notifications 7:26
Pinning Channels 10:35
Posting to Multiple Channels 12:39
Tags 17:25
Share to Outlook 20:56
Pop Out Chat Window 23:25
Scheduling Meetings & Adjusting Settings 27:20
Meeting Chat & Whiteboard 31:55
Background Effects 35:04
Sharing Whiteboards During Meetings 36:38
Ending the Meeting for All and Downloading Attendance List 38:31
3x3 Video Grid 40:18
Settings 40:55
Conclusion 42:28

#Teams #microsoftteams #microsoft 

How to create and configure your bot to work in Microsoft Teams

This article is a step-by-step guide on how to create a Bot from scratch using Microsoft Bot Framework and how to configure it to work with Microsoft Teams.

Prerequisites

  1. Office 365 Tenant
  2. Azure Subscription with Azure Bot Service, App Service
  3. Visual Studio

Prepare the Azure resources

Navigate and log in to Azure Portal. Create a new resource group then add a new Web App Bot (You can type “bot” in the search bar to filter your results).

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After you click on the Create button, you will be redirected to the configuration page of your resource.

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Since you added the resource directly from the resource group, some properties will be automatically set to the resource group values (like Resource group, Location, and Subscription).

Let’s fill up the remaining properties as follow:

  • Bot handle: Unique identifier for your bot.
  • Pricing tier: F0 (Fee up to 10k messages without premium channels) or S1 ($0.50 per 1,000 messages and the possibility to create premium channels)
  • App name: This will form the bot’s Endpoint Url.
  • Bot template: Currently it is possible to use the SDK for C## and Node.JS to implement two different templates: Echo Bots (a simple bot that echoes back the user’s message) and Basic Bot (bot template that contains Language Understanding and Bot Analytics services).

To complete the configuration and create the resource click Create and wait a few seconds to allow Azure to complete the task in the background. From the Channels tab under Bot Management, click on the Microsoft Teams icon to add the MS Teams channel to the bot.

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Create an empty bot

Open Visual Studio and create a new empty .NET Core web application project. It’s possible to start from a Skill Template but it comes with many pre-added features (like CosmosDb, Monitoring, Multilanguage, and many more) which might confuse you and for the purpose of this demo I prefer to start with a barebone bot.

Add dependencies

Open the Package Manager Console and execute the following instruction to add the required dependencies:

Install-Package Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.NewtonsoftJson
Install-Package Microsoft.Bot.Builder
Install-Package Microsoft.Bot.Builder.Integration.AspNet.Core

Configure the application

Now it’s time to add services to our collection and make them available in our application through dependency injection and configure the middleware pipeline:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Builder;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting;
using Microsoft.Bot.Builder;
using Microsoft.Bot.Builder.Integration.AspNet.Core;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting;
using Pegasus.Bots;
namespace Pegasus
{
    public class Startup
    {
        public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }
        public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
        {
            Configuration = configuration;
        }
        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddControllers().AddNewtonsoftJson();
            services.AddSingleton<IBotFrameworkHttpAdapter, AdapterWithErrorHandler>();
            services.AddTransient<IBot, PegasusBot>();
        }
        public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IWebHostEnvironment env)
        {
            if (env.IsDevelopment())
            {
                app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
            }
            app.UseDefaultFiles()
                .UseStaticFiles()
                .UseWebSockets()
                .UseRouting()
                .UseAuthorization()
                .UseEndpoints(endpoints =>
                {
                    endpoints.MapControllers();
                });
        }
    }
}

#microsoft-teams #bots #microsoft #coding #tutorial

Willie  Beier

Willie Beier

1596728880

Tutorial: Getting Started with R and RStudio

In this tutorial we’ll learn how to begin programming with R using RStudio. We’ll install R, and RStudio RStudio, an extremely popular development environment for R. We’ll learn the key RStudio features in order to start programming in R on our own.

If you already know how to use RStudio and want to learn some tips, tricks, and shortcuts, check out this Dataquest blog post.

Table of Contents

#data science tutorials #beginner #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tutorial #tutorials

Jeromy  Lowe

Jeromy Lowe

1599097440

Data Visualization in R with ggplot2: A Beginner Tutorial

A famous general is thought to have said, “A good sketch is better than a long speech.” That advice may have come from the battlefield, but it’s applicable in lots of other areas — including data science. “Sketching” out our data by visualizing it using ggplot2 in R is more impactful than simply describing the trends we find.

This is why we visualize data. We visualize data because it’s easier to learn from something that we can see rather than read. And thankfully for data analysts and data scientists who use R, there’s a tidyverse package called ggplot2 that makes data visualization a snap!

In this blog post, we’ll learn how to take some data and produce a visualization using R. To work through it, it’s best if you already have an understanding of R programming syntax, but you don’t need to be an expert or have any prior experience working with ggplot2

#data science tutorials #beginner #ggplot2 #r #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tutorial #tutorials