Idris Brhane

Idris Brhane

1610086020

A Port of Puppeteer Running on Deno

deno-puppeteer

API

A fork of Puppeteer running on Deno.

Puppeteer is a library which provides a high-level API to control Chrome, Chromium, or Firefox Nightly over the DevTools Protocol. Puppeteer runs headless by default, but can be configured to run full (non-headless) Chrome or Chromium.

Most things that you can do manually in the browser can be done using Puppeteer! Here are a few examples to get you started:

  • Generate screenshots and PDFs of pages.
  • Crawl a SPA (Single-Page Application) and generate pre-rendered content (i.e. “SSR” (Server-Side Rendering)).
  • Automate form submission, UI testing, keyboard input, etc.
  • Create an up-to-date, automated testing environment. Run your tests directly in the latest version of Chrome using the latest JavaScript and browser features.
  • Capture a timeline trace of your site to help diagnose performance issues.
  • Test Chrome Extensions.

Getting Started

Installation

To use Puppeteer, import it like so:

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

Puppeteer can use any recent version of Chromium or Firefox Nightly, but this version of Puppeteer is only validated against a specific version. To cache these versions in the Puppeteer cache, run the commands below.

PUPPETEER_PRODUCT=chrome deno run -A --unstable https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/install.ts
PUPPETEER_PRODUCT=firefox deno run -A --unstable https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/install.ts

You can find all of the supported environment variables to customize installation in the Puppeteer docs.

Usage

Puppeteer will be familiar to people using other browser testing frameworks. You create an instance of Browser, open pages, and then manipulate them with Puppeteer’s API.

Example - navigating to https://example.com and saving a screenshot as example.png:

Save file as example.js

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto("https://example.com");
await page.screenshot({ path: "example.png" });

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A --unstable example.js

Puppeteer sets an initial page size to 800×600px, which defines the screenshot size. The page size can be customized with Page.setViewport().

Example - create a PDF.

Save file as hn.js

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto("https://news.ycombinator.com", {
  waitUntil: "networkidle2",
});
await page.pdf({ path: "hn.pdf", format: "A4" });

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A --unstable hn.js

See Page.pdf() for more information about creating pdfs.

Example - evaluate script in the context of the page

Save file as get-dimensions.js

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto("https://example.com");

// Get the "viewport" of the page, as reported by the page.
const dimensions = await page.evaluate(() => {
  return {
    width: document.documentElement.clientWidth,
    height: document.documentElement.clientHeight,
    deviceScaleFactor: window.devicePixelRatio,
  };
});

console.log("Dimensions:", dimensions);

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A --unstable get-dimensions.js

FAQ

How does deno-puppeteer compare to the Node version?

deno-puppeteer effectively runs a regular version of Puppeteer, except for some minor changes to make it compatible with Deno.

The most noticable difference is likely that instead of some methods taking / returning Node Buffer, they take / return Uint8Array.

Other than this, the documentation on https://pptr.dev generally applies.

Download Details:

Author: lucacasonato

Demo: https://deno.land/x/puppeteer

Source Code: https://github.com/lucacasonato/deno-puppeteer

#deno #nodejs #node #javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

A Port of Puppeteer Running on Deno

Android App to iOS App Porting Services in Virginia, USA | SISGAIN

Want to port your android app to IOS ? The Android to iOS portion can be easy with SISGAIN. Our android to ios porting services make it easier to port android apps to iOS in Virginia, USA. With our remote team you can port your app today. Our dedicated android to iOS Porting developers will help you to run your business smoothly without any hassle. For more information call us at +18444455767 or email us at hello@sisgain.com

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Idris Brhane

Idris Brhane

1610086020

A Port of Puppeteer Running on Deno

deno-puppeteer

API

A fork of Puppeteer running on Deno.

Puppeteer is a library which provides a high-level API to control Chrome, Chromium, or Firefox Nightly over the DevTools Protocol. Puppeteer runs headless by default, but can be configured to run full (non-headless) Chrome or Chromium.

Most things that you can do manually in the browser can be done using Puppeteer! Here are a few examples to get you started:

  • Generate screenshots and PDFs of pages.
  • Crawl a SPA (Single-Page Application) and generate pre-rendered content (i.e. “SSR” (Server-Side Rendering)).
  • Automate form submission, UI testing, keyboard input, etc.
  • Create an up-to-date, automated testing environment. Run your tests directly in the latest version of Chrome using the latest JavaScript and browser features.
  • Capture a timeline trace of your site to help diagnose performance issues.
  • Test Chrome Extensions.

Getting Started

Installation

To use Puppeteer, import it like so:

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

Puppeteer can use any recent version of Chromium or Firefox Nightly, but this version of Puppeteer is only validated against a specific version. To cache these versions in the Puppeteer cache, run the commands below.

PUPPETEER_PRODUCT=chrome deno run -A --unstable https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/install.ts
PUPPETEER_PRODUCT=firefox deno run -A --unstable https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/install.ts

You can find all of the supported environment variables to customize installation in the Puppeteer docs.

Usage

Puppeteer will be familiar to people using other browser testing frameworks. You create an instance of Browser, open pages, and then manipulate them with Puppeteer’s API.

Example - navigating to https://example.com and saving a screenshot as example.png:

Save file as example.js

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto("https://example.com");
await page.screenshot({ path: "example.png" });

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A --unstable example.js

Puppeteer sets an initial page size to 800×600px, which defines the screenshot size. The page size can be customized with Page.setViewport().

Example - create a PDF.

Save file as hn.js

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto("https://news.ycombinator.com", {
  waitUntil: "networkidle2",
});
await page.pdf({ path: "hn.pdf", format: "A4" });

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A --unstable hn.js

See Page.pdf() for more information about creating pdfs.

Example - evaluate script in the context of the page

Save file as get-dimensions.js

import puppeteer from "https://deno.land/x/puppeteer@5.5.1/mod.ts";

const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto("https://example.com");

// Get the "viewport" of the page, as reported by the page.
const dimensions = await page.evaluate(() => {
  return {
    width: document.documentElement.clientWidth,
    height: document.documentElement.clientHeight,
    deviceScaleFactor: window.devicePixelRatio,
  };
});

console.log("Dimensions:", dimensions);

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A --unstable get-dimensions.js

FAQ

How does deno-puppeteer compare to the Node version?

deno-puppeteer effectively runs a regular version of Puppeteer, except for some minor changes to make it compatible with Deno.

The most noticable difference is likely that instead of some methods taking / returning Node Buffer, they take / return Uint8Array.

Other than this, the documentation on https://pptr.dev generally applies.

Download Details:

Author: lucacasonato

Demo: https://deno.land/x/puppeteer

Source Code: https://github.com/lucacasonato/deno-puppeteer

#deno #nodejs #node #javascript

Welde Tekle

Welde Tekle

1610082420

Full featured Puppeteer for Deno

Puppeteer Deno

Full featured Puppeteer for Deno

Puppeteer Deno is a Deno library which provides a high-level API to control Chrome or Chromium over the DevTools Protocol. Puppeteer runs headless by default, but can be configured to run full (non-headless) Chrome or Chromium.

What can I do?

Most things that you can do manually in the browser can be done using Puppeteer! Here are a few examples to get you started:

  • Generate screenshots and PDFs of pages.
  • Crawl a SPA (Single-Page Application) and generate pre-rendered content (i.e. “SSR” (Server-Side Rendering)).
  • Automate form submission, UI testing, keyboard input, etc.
  • Create an up-to-date, automated testing environment. Run your tests directly in the latest version of Chrome using the latest JavaScript and browser features.
  • Capture a timeline trace of your site to help diagnose performance issues.
  • Test Chrome Extensions.

Getting Started

Installation

NO INSTALLATION! Just import puppeteer from ‘https://deno.land/x/pptr/mod.ts’.

This veersion is puppeteer-core

puppeteer-core is intended to be a lightweight version of Puppeteer for launching an existing browser installation or for connecting to a remote one. Be sure that the version of puppeteer-core you install is compatible with the browser you intend to connect to.

See puppeteer vs puppeteer-core.

Usage

Puppeteer Deno requires latest Deno (1.6.x). Puppeteer Deno’s API will same with latest puppeteer-core. Puppeteer will be familiar to people using other browser testing frameworks. You create an instance of Browser, open pages, and then manipulate them with Puppeteer’s API.

Example - navigating to https://example.com and saving a screenshot as example.png:

Save file as example.ts

import puppeteer from 'https://deno.land/x/pptr/mod.ts';

const browser = await puppeteer.launch({
  executablePath: '/usr/bin/google-chrome',
});

const page = await browser.newPage();

await page.goto('https://google.com');
await page.screenshot({ path: 'example.png' });

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

deno run -A example.ts

Puppeteer sets an initial page size to 800×600px, which defines the screenshot size. The page size can be customized with Page.setViewport().

Example - create a PDF.

Save file as hn.js

import puppeteer from 'https://deno.land/x/pptr/mod.ts';

const browser = await puppeteer.launch({
  executablePath: '/usr/bin/google-chrome',
});
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto('https://news.ycombinator.com', {
  waitUntil: 'networkidle2',
});
await page.pdf({ path: 'hn.pdf', format: 'A4' });

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

node hn.js

See Page.pdf() for more information about creating pdfs.

Example - evaluate script in the context of the page

Save file as get-dimensions.js

import puppeteer from 'https://deno.land/x/pptr/mod.ts';

const browser = await puppeteer.launch({
  executablePath: '/usr/bin/google-chrome',
});
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto('https://example.com');

// Get the "viewport" of the page, as reported by the page.
const dimensions = await page.evaluate(() => {
  return {
    width: document.documentElement.clientWidth,
    height: document.documentElement.clientHeight,
    deviceScaleFactor: window.devicePixelRatio,
  };
});

console.log('Dimensions:', dimensions);

await browser.close();

Execute script on the command line

node get-dimensions.js

See Page.evaluate() for more information on evaluate and related methods like evaluateOnNewDocument and exposeFunction.

Default runtime settings

1. Uses Headless mode

Puppeteer launches Chromium in headless mode. To launch a full version of Chromium, set the headless option when launching a browser:

const browser = await puppeteer.launch({ headless: false }); // default is true

2. Runs a bundled version of Chromium

WORK IN PROGRESS

const browser = await puppeteer.launch({ executablePath: '/path/to/Chrome' });

3. Creates a fresh user profile

Puppeteer creates its own browser user profile which it cleans up on every run.

Resources

Debugging tips

  1. Turn off headless mode - sometimes it’s useful to see what the browser is displaying. Instead of launching in headless mode, launch a full version of the browser using headless: false:

    const browser = await puppeteer.launch({ headless: false });
    
  2. Slow it down - the slowMo option slows down Puppeteer operations by the specified amount of milliseconds. It’s another way to help see what’s going on.

    const browser = await puppeteer.launch({
      headless: false,
      slowMo: 250, // slow down by 250ms
    });
    
  3. Capture console output - You can listen for the console event. This is also handy when debugging code in page.evaluate():

    page.on('console', (msg) => console.log('PAGE LOG:', msg.text()));
    
    await page.evaluate(() => console.log(`url is ${location.href}`));
    
  4. Use debugger in application code browser

    There are two execution context: node.js that is running test code, and the browser running application code being tested. This lets you debug code in the application code browser; ie code inside evaluate().

    • Use {devtools: true} when launching Puppeteer:

      const browser = await puppeteer.launch({ devtools: true });
      
    • Change default test timeout:

      jest: jest.setTimeout(100000);

      jasmine: jasmine.DEFAULT_TIMEOUT_INTERVAL = 100000;

      mocha: this.timeout(100000); (don’t forget to change test to use function and not ‘=>’)

    • Add an evaluate statement with debugger inside / add debugger to an existing evaluate statement:

      await page.evaluate(() => {
        debugger;
      });
      

      The test will now stop executing in the above evaluate statement, and chromium will stop in debug mode.

FAQ

Q: Who maintains Puppeteer?

The Chrome DevTools team maintains the library, but we’d love your help and expertise on the project! See Contributing.

Q: What is the status of cross-browser support?

I have never tested it on Firefox. But Chrome and Chromium is working well

Q: What are Puppeteer Deno’s goals and principles?

The goals of the project are:

  • Provide a Full, Complete, Strict Typed version of Puppeteer on Deno platform.
  • Same API with original Puppeteer.
Q: Where is Buffer

Deno has no Buffer, so it is replaced with Uint8Array

Q: What’s considered a “Navigation”?

From Puppeteer’s standpoint, “navigation” is anything that changes a page’s URL. Aside from regular navigation where the browser hits the network to fetch a new document from the web server, this includes anchor navigations and History API usage.

With this definition of “navigation,” Puppeteer works seamlessly with single-page applications.

Q: What’s the difference between a “trusted" and “untrusted” input event?

In browsers, input events could be divided into two big groups: trusted vs. untrusted.

  • Trusted events: events generated by users interacting with the page, e.g. using a mouse or keyboard.
  • Untrusted event: events generated by Web APIs, e.g. document.createEvent or element.click() methods.

Websites can distinguish between these two groups:

  • using an Event.isTrusted event flag
  • sniffing for accompanying events. For example, every trusted 'click' event is preceded by 'mousedown' and 'mouseup' events.

For automation purposes it’s important to generate trusted events. All input events generated with Puppeteer are trusted and fire proper accompanying events. If, for some reason, one needs an untrusted event, it’s always possible to hop into a page context with page.evaluate and generate a fake event:

await page.evaluate(() => {
  document.querySelector('button[type=submit]').click();
});
Q: What features does Puppeteer not support?

You may find that Puppeteer does not behave as expected when controlling pages that incorporate audio and video. (For example, video playback/screenshots is likely to fail.) There are two reasons for this:

  • Puppeteer is bundled with Chromium — not Chrome — and so by default, it inherits all of Chromium’s media-related limitations. This means that Puppeteer does not support licensed formats such as AAC or H.264. (However, it is possible to force Puppeteer to use a separately-installed version Chrome instead of Chromium via the executablePath option to puppeteer.launch. You should only use this configuration if you need an official release of Chrome that supports these media formats.)
  • Since Puppeteer (in all configurations) controls a desktop version of Chromium/Chrome, features that are only supported by the mobile version of Chrome are not supported. This means that Puppeteer does not support HTTP Live Streaming (HLS).

Download Details:

Author: yj01jung

Source Code: https://github.com/yj01jung/puppeteer_deno

#deno #node #nodejs #javascript #puppeteer

Louis Jones

Louis Jones

1628407782

Web Scraping in Deno using Puppeteer/Cheerio

Deno is v8 runtime for typescript and puppeteer is an awesome library for scraping dynamic data from websites. Puppeteer runs headless by default, but can be configured to run full (non-headless) Chrome or Chromium.

#puppeteer #deno #node 

 

mark williams

1620400429

QBDBMgrN Not Running on This Computer | QuickBooks Database Server Manager

Nowadays, many users face QuickBooks Database Server Manager has stopped working issue while switching to multi-user mode in QuickBooks Desktop. If you don’t know what QB Database Server Manager is, then let us inform you that it is a component of QuickBooks that allows users to switch to multi-user mode so that they can access or share their company files with other computers on the network. Resolving such a multi-user issue can be quite daunting, but all it requires the right troubleshooting guide that we will provide you with through this post.

Looking for instant troubleshooting assistance resolving QuickBooks Database Server Manager has stopped working issue? If yes, feel free to get in touch with our QuickBooks support team by dialing (844-888-4666).

What causes QuickBooks Server Manager Status Stopped?

The followings are all the possible reasons that can cause QuickBooks Server Manager Status Stopped:

  • The Windows Firewall is blocking QuickBooks executable files from accessing the network.
  • There is some damage done to QuickBooks Database Server Manager program files.

What should you do to resolve QuickBooks Database Server Manager has stopped working issue?

Solution 1) Create exceptions for QuickBooks executable files in the Windows Firewall settings

  • Select the Windows Start menu, type “Windows Firewall” into the search space, and open Windows Firewall.
  • From the left panel, choose the Advanced Settings option.
  • Right-click Inbound Rules and then click on the New Rule option.
  • Choose the Program option and then hit the Next button.
  • Select the This Program Path option and then hit the Browse button.
  • Navigate to the following path:** C:\Program Files\Intuit\QUICKBOOKS YEAR**
  • In the folder, look for the file named QBDBMgrN.exe and select it.
  • Hit the Next button.
  • Click on the Allow the Connection option and then hit the Next button.
  • Create a new rule and give it a name in the following order: “QBFirewallException(name.exe).”

After creating inbound rules, create outbound rules by following the aforementioned steps in the same order, except you need to choose Outbound Rules instead of Inbound Rules.

Solution 2) Reinstall QuickBooks Database Server Manager on the computer

Step 1) Delete the QuickBooks Database Server Manager from the computer

  • On the keyboard, press Windows + R keys to open the Run command window.
  • In the Run dialog box, type “appwiz.cpl” and then press the Enter key.
  • From the list of installed programs, choose the QuickBooks Database Server Manager program and then click on the Uninstall option.
  • Hit the Next button.

Step 2) Rename the folder that contains installation files of the Database Server Manager

  • On the keyboard, press Windows + E keys simultaneously to open the File Explorer.
  • Navigate to the following path: C:\Program Files\Common Files
  • In the Common Files folder, look for the folder named Intuit and right-click it.
  • Select the Rename option.
  • Add the word “.OLD” at the end of the folder’s name.

Step 3) Reinstall the QuickBooks Database Server Manager

  • From Intuit’s official website, download the QuickBooks Database Server Manager on the computer.
  • Click on the downloaded setup_QuickBooks.exe file and then follow the on-screen instructions to install it.

Conclusion:

Even after following all the troubleshooting solutions mentioned above, if you still get QuickBooks Database Server Manager has stopped working issue, then there is a great possibility that any third-party security application is blocking QuickBooks from executing actions. We suggest you configure third-party security application settings for QuickBooks Desktop and see whether this resolves the issue or not. You can also contact our QuickBooks professionals at (844-888-4666) and get the issue resolved immediately.

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