Lindsey  Koepp

Lindsey Koepp

1626854592

HTML Tags | How to Use the <u> Tag in HTML5 with Example

In this article, we are going to learn about the <u> tag and when it is appropriate to use it in HTML 5.

In older versions of HTML, you'd use this tag as a way to underline text. We are going to learn about the new HTML 5 definition and ways to underline text using CSS.

What is the <u> tag?

The <u> tag stands for Unarticulated Annotation element. This element is a length of inline text that stylistically looks different from its surrounding text but has non-textual annotation.

The default style for this element is a single underline.

Let's take a look at some examples of when to use the <u> tag.

How to use the <u> tag for misspelled words

A common use for this tag is to point out misspelled words.

<p>I was sitting in <u>orcestra</u> practice and the conductor was mad because we <u>didt</u> practice our parts.</p>

Screen-Shot-2021-07-20-at-2.45.43-PM

You can also use the <u> tag if you want to label Chinese text as a proper name mark. According to Wikipedia,

a proper name mark (Simplified Chinese: 专名号, zhuānmínghào; Traditional Chinese: 專名號) is an underline used to mark proper names, such as the names of people, places, dynasties, organizations.

<p> This is an example of a proper name mark:<u>书名号</u></p>

Screen-Shot-2021-07-20-at-1.28.22-AM

How to use CSS to change the style of the <u> tag

If you want to point out misspelled text, you can style the <u> tag with a red wavy line underneath it.

<p>This sentence has so <u class="spelling">mannny</u> spelling <u class="spelling">errrrors</u>.</p>
body {
  font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;
}
u.spelling {
  text-decoration: red wavy underline;
}

Screen-Shot-2021-07-20-at-1.36.15-AM

Avoid using the <u> tag for styling purposes

In earlier versions of HTML, it was appropriate to use the <u> tag strictly for styling text with an underline. But in HTML 5, the <u> tag holds semantic meaning and you should use CSS to style your text with an underline.

<span class="underline">This text was styled with CSS.</span>
.underline {
  text-decoration: underline;
}

Screen-Shot-2021-07-20-at-1.50.19-AM

Do not use the <u> tag for titles of books

If you are referring to a book title, you should use the <cite> tag. The default styling is in italics but you can override those styles using CSS.  

<p>I enjoyed reading <cite>The Great Gatsby</cite> in high school.</p>
cite {
  font-style: normal;
  text-decoration: underline;
}

Screen-Shot-2021-07-20-at-2.11.30-AM

Conclusion

The <u> tag is a semantic element that should only be used in very specific cases. If you want to point out spelling errors within the text, then you can use the <u> tag.  

A less common example would be to use the tag in Chinese proper name marks.

You should never use the <u> tag for styling purposes. Instead you should use text-decoration:underline; in your CSS.

Whenever you are working on a project, it is important to learn the correct usage for HTML 5 elements so you can use them in the proper way.

Original article source at https://www.freecodecamp.org

#html #css #programming 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

HTML Tags | How to Use the <u> Tag in HTML5 with Example
Angela  Dickens

Angela Dickens

1596090180

Commonly Used HTML Tags with Examples

HTML tags are keywords used in HTML to display web-pages with certain properties. They are further used for defining HTML elements. An HTML element consists of a starting tag, some content, and an ending tag. The web browser reads the HTML document from top to bottom, left to right. Each HTML tag defines a new property that helps in rendering the website.

HTML Tags

HTML Tags

The ‘<>’ brackets contain an HTML tag. There are two types of HTML tags- empty tags or singleton tags and container tags. Singleton tags or empty tags do not contain any content such as an image or a paragraph and hence do not need to be closed, whereas container tags should be closed.

Syntax

  1. Some Content

Examples of:

Empty tag: 
,


,etc.

Container tags: 

Paragraph

Link

  1. <!DOCTYPE>
  2. Paragraph

  3. Heading

  4. Bold
  5. Italic
  6. Underline

Output-

HTML Tags example

Head tags:

,<style>,<script>,<link>,<meta> and <base>. <p>Text-formatting tags:</p> <p><h>,<b>,<strong>,<small>,<pre>,<i>,<em>,<sub>,<sup>,<ins>,<dfn>,<del>,<div> and <span>.</p> <p>Link tags:</p> <p><a>, <base>.</p> <p>List tags:</p> <ul>, <ol>, <li>, <dl>, <dd> <p>Table tags:</p> <table> ,<tr> , <td>, <th>, <thead>, <tbody>, <tfoot>. <p>Form tags:</p> <form>, <input>, <select>, <option>, <button>, <label>, <fieldset>, <textarea>. <p>Scripting tags:</p> <script>, <noscript> Image and Object tags: <img>, <figure>, <figcaption>, <area>, <map>, <object>. Here is an alphabetical list of tags used in HTML.

#html tutorials #html image tags #html link tags #html list tags #html tags #html

Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

smm captain

1650364405

Best Instagram Hashtags for Reels, Giveaways, Travel, Fashion

Pick the right hash tags and enjoy likes and comments on the post.

Making engaging reels about the travels, fashion, fitness, contest, and more, the results are not satisfactory. All you get is a few likes, comments and nothing else. You need the engagement on your post to bring more business to you. How can you bring interaction to the content? Indeed you can buy real instagram likes uk to get high rates. But how can you make the Instagram world hit the likes button under the post? You need to boost the reach. You must present your content to the right audiences to get higher interaction rates. 

Your Instagram #tags are the power tool that works like magic for influencers and businesses. The blue text with # is the magical option that increases the viability of the posts. The Instagram algorithm keeps on changing, and now the engagement on the post is a must to place the content at a higher place in followers’ feed. For this, you require more likes and comments under the post. For this, you must lift the reach by using perfect tags.

Why are hashtags popular on Instagram?

Let me clear it for you. Do you know how many active users this digital handle has? It is about 2B and more, and the count is changing every day. Each of the followers must be posting something on the handles. Thousands of profit must be of a similar niche as yours. If you are the business and running the clothing brands, then many other companies deal with clothes. So, customers or followers have many choices to choose from. Why would they follow you or purchase from your companies?

Your reply must be that you offer quality material at the best rates. But how does anyone finds out about you? Indeed you can buy active instagram followers uk to bring more fans, but how can you boost the reach of your voices. All businesses must represent their product to the right audiences, but how?

Of course, hashtags.

Table of Contents

Not all Hashtags are for you

There are some basic tags that you can use, but if you are more specific about your approach, choose the relevant tags for your business. Your #tags game must be industry oriented. So in this part, you will learn about the famous tags as per various niches. 

Tags for Travel Niche

Indeed this niche is famous on Instagram, and influencers earn handsome amounts. These #tags are best for you if you possess a similar place. Use them smartly and rightly!

#TravelPhotography

#PicOfTheDay

#NaturePhotography

#TravelBlogger

#beautiful

#landscape

#adventure

#explore

#instatravel

#photo

#trip

#summer

#travelgram

#photography

#art

#travel

#wanderlust

#nature

#instagood

#PhotoOfTheDay

Tags for Fashion Industry

After thee travel next most famous niche is fashion. You can earn handsome amount form it. But for this you need to pick the right tags form the following:

  1. #bhfyp
  2. #smile
  3. #OutfitOfTheDay
  4. #FashionPhotography
  5. #FollowBack
  6. #ootd
  7. #FashionBlogger
  8. #WhatIWore
  9. #follow
  10. #fashionista
  11. #PhotoOfTheDay
  12. #StyleInspo
  13. #instastyle
  14. #love
  15. #CurrentlyWearing
  16. #FashionBlog
  17. #ShoppingAddict
  18. #LookGoodFeelGood
  19. #FashionAddict
  20. #FashionStyle
  21. #BeautyDoesntHaveToBePain
  22. #style
  23. #fashion
  24. #FollowForFollowBack
  25. #fashionable
  26. #l
  27. #PicOfTheDay
  28. #fashiongram

Tags for fitness Influencers

So, what to boost your fitness business then uses these tags and enjoys likes:

  1. #exercise
  2. #bodybuilding
  3. #life
  4. #gymlife
  5. #motivation
  6. #healthy
  7. #lifestyle
  8. #health
  9. #gym
  10. #sport
  11. #training
  12. #workout
  13. #HealthyLifestyle
  14. #muscle
  15. #fit
  16. #CrossFit
  17. #fitness
  18. #FitFam
  19. #goals
  20. #PersonalTrainer
  21. #FitnessMotivation

Best Tags for Giveaway

So, are you arranging the giveaway and want a maximum number of people to participate? If so, then it is time to boost the reach vis using these tags

  1. #giveaway
  2. #sweepstakes
  3. #WinItWednesday
  4. #freebie
  5. #ContestAlert
  6. #ContestEntry
  7. #instacontest
  8. #instagiveaway
  9. #WinIt
  10. #contest
  11. #GiveawayAlert
  12. #giveaway

The popular #tags for Reels

Are you the reels queen, or do you want to become the one? Then these below mentioned tags are for you. But don’t go for all of them because you can use only thirty of them. Pick it smartly!

  1. #ReelsInstagram
  2. #VideoOfTheDay
  3. #ReelsIndia
  4. #ReelSteady
  5. #disney
  6. #ForYouPage
  7. #InstagramReels
  8. #bhfyp
  9. #instareels
  10. #reelsinsta
  11. #fyp
  12. #ReelsOfInstagram
  13. #TikTokIndia
  14. #HolaReels
  15. #reels
  16. #ReelsBrasil
  17. #k
  18. #ReelsVideo
  19. #instareel
  20. #music

#tags for foodie

Do you love to eat and what to share your experience with another foodie on Instagram? If you are visiting any cafe, then before uploading, always add one of the following tags!

  1. #instafood
  2. #FoodBlogger
  3. #lunch
  4. #PicOfTheDay
  5. #instadaily
  6. #FoodPhotography
  7. #PhotoOfTheDay
  8. #food
  9. #healthy
  10. #foodie
  11. #FoodLover
  12. #bhfyp
  13. #instagood
  14. #tasty
  15. #delicious
  16. #foodstagram
  17. #homemade
  18. #cooking
  19. #FoodPorn
  20. #love
  21. #foodgasm
  22. #foodies
  23. #HealthyFood
  24. #dinner
  25. #yummy
  26. #restaurant

How to Pick the proper tags or find the best one for you?

There is a long list of each niche, and you can use all of them. If you are confused about what to pick and whatnot, here is the guide to choosing the perfect tag.

  1. Use the search function. Just mentions a keyword applicable to your content and choose the Tags tab. This handle will then provide you with a hashtags list. Search for relevant #tags with fair usage ( 50K)
  2. Use the tags that others use in your sector.

Study your competition. Review their post and study the tags they are using.

Noah  Rowe

Noah Rowe

1597574580

HTML Tags — Tags used in Html — Webify Techno

When you are creating a web page,you would like to emphasize or

otherwise set apart a word or a phrase from the rest of the text.

.For creating these effects, HTML offers a set of tags called an “logical character effects”.

Use of Heading styles

.HTML enables users to identify headings and subheadings in a document through the tag, where n is a number from 1 to 6.

.There are 6 levels in Heading Tag.

.All The text size will be changed with these levels.

.We can give different heading level to different topics.

.Such as — —

.Whereas, n=1,2,3,4,5,6

#html #fonts #html-tags #web-design #heading-tags

html html

html html

1596504390

10 HTML Tags You Need to be Using Not all HTML tags are created equal.

As a front-end developer, you no doubt use HTML constantly and probably feel it doesn’t have any more unknowns. Nevertheless, the way it has evolved (in particular with the advent of HTML5) may surprise you at times.

I’ll show you 10 HTML tags you may not be using or maybe even aren’t yet aware of that help to increase the semantics and maintainability of your web pages.

The basic semantic HTML tags such as <header><footer>and <nav>are almost self-explanatory. But, there are a host of newer HTML tags that we need to be using as well.

1- Time

This tag allows you to represent a machine-readable date and/or time on your web pages.

Because you can simply place dates and times on a page, you might wonder why you would ever want to use a time tag. The simple answer is that while you can display dates and times on your page in a variety of ways, there are times when you might want the browser to clearly understand what the date and/or time is. By using the datetime attribute of the <time> tag, you can make sure that it is clear that date and/or time are being represented. More importantly, using scripting or another coding, you can access this machine-readable format and use it to do calculations and more.

The <time> tag and its datetime attribute are supported by all the major browsers including Google Chrome 6.0+, Internet Explorer/Edge 9.0+, Safari 5.0+ Firefox 4.0+, and Opera 11.1+.

<p>Our party is going to be <time datetime="2018-08-11 17:00">the eleventh of August at 5:00pm</time></p>

Preview
Our party is going to be the eleventh of August at 5:00pm

2- DataList

The <datalist>tag provides an autocomplete interface for <input>elements. Each list contains a set of <option>elements that have an associated value. When linked to an <input>using the “list” attribute, it can provide a drop-down list or even display suggestions as the user types.

<label for="tutorial_choice">Tutorials: </label>
  <input list="tutorial_types" name="tutorial_choice" id="tutorial_choice">

  <datalist id="tutorial_types">
    <option value="HTML">
    <option value="CSS">
    <option value="SQL">
  </datalist>

Preview

Preview of the  html tag

#programming #tag #html #html5