Exciting Things To Know About UX Research Method And Tools

User research or UX research is important for every UX designer to know. For UX designers, it's important to understand as much as possible about customers to enhance your product and service. It helps us identify their needs, behaviours, goals and mindsets. Using UX research methods and tools improves our understanding and makes our work better.

In this article, we’ll cover interesting UX research methods and UX research tools to ensure that your product is user-friendly and fully functional. Try these techniques and tools in your UX project.

What is UX research?

UX research in simple words is research about user interactions. In other words, it is the process of studying your target user to add context and insights to your design. The main thing in doing research is to build the plan from the perspective of the ideal user. 

UX research is divided into two parts: collecting and combining that data to advance usability. At the beginning of the UX project, design research is to understand the business requirements and learn about the user's necessities and goals. After market research, they focus on usability tests or A/B tests that will improve your UX.

The importance of UX research

UX research is the pillar of UX design. The end goal is to create products and services that customers want to use. This process looks optional, but in reality, it’s very important from both a design and a business viewpoint. Which brings your business to the next level.

UX research saves your time & money by uncovering usability bugs and design flaws. Conducting the research, you can design based on accurate statistics to overcome the bugs.

Best UX research methods

Interviews

Taking interviews is the best UX research method to collect valuable insights. It is a quick and easy way to uncover those data that survey and usability testing cannot do. Especially helpful for UX researchers for understanding the user's emotions and experiences with the help of feedback questions. With the help of accurate information, you can create a product structure and user persona. 

Surveys

Email surveys and on-site surveys are perfect UX research methods for collecting lots of information without spending a single penny. It is much easier than taking long interviews and no need to coordinate with time and place. Surveys help collect open & close minded questions. Adding too many questions to the survey is getting fewer responses so try to add focused questions.

Card sorting

The card sorting UX research method helps determine the information architecture of a product or service. Card sorting is done by using cards. The UX researchers, write topics on each card, mix the cards into a random order and then ask users to select them. This will help in creating a site and app structure that matches the user's thinking.

A/B testing

Another best UX research method, A/B testing name suggests, a group of users is divided into two for comparing two different versions of the product and service. To finalize which one performs better. For example, show different versions of UX to a different group to choose the winner. In a better way to test colour, banner, font, menu and button placement in your UI design. 

Tree Testing

Tree testing is typically used to consider the information architecture of your website. This is UX research method is another step of card sorting. Tree testing is to test the advance of designing page structures or navigation menus of the website. 

Best UX research tools

Lookback

Lookback is a powerful UX research tool for taking live user interviews, including features of collaborative & testing analysis and recording of user interviews. Its pricing starts from $17/month and has a 60-day free trial.

Google Forms

Google Forms is a free and easy-to-use UX research tool to collect information from users. This is a favourite tool for many UX researchers and integrates with other apps like zapier.

Optimal Workshop

Optimal Workshop is a popular UX research tool for Card sorting. This tool is best for planning information structures, analysis and recruitment. It also has a free plan, for advanced features pricing starts at $99/month.

Maze

Maze is a leading testing platform that collects actionable insights from real users in minutes. This UX research tool includes multiple analysis, heatmaps, A/B & guerrilla testing and many more. It's free for one project, then the price starts at $25/month.

Userlytics

Userlytics is a user-testing platform for collecting both qualitative and quantitative data. With this UX research tool, you can do card sorting, usability tests, and tree testing using a variety of features. Its price is $49/month.

Wrapping up

This article gives us a brief summary of several best user research methods and the best UX research tools that UX designers use.

By choosing the correct UX research methods and using them properly, designers develop superior products and services that help customers and businesses more effectively.

UX research tools are free and paid but choose the best tool that works best for your project. Each project requires different tools and methods to find what works best.

What is GEEK

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Exciting Things To Know About UX Research Method And Tools
Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1594342212

UX Design 101: User research — Everything you need to know to get started

What is this?

This session is part of a learning curriculum that I designed to incrementally skill up and empower a team of Designers and Researchers whose skillset and ways of working needed to evolve to keep up with changes in the way we think about and execute design.

Each session in the curriculum aims to simplify the complexities of human-centered interaction design using real-life examples from my own professional experience alongside established theory from industry experts.

The sessions are intentionally structured as short, achievable hands-on learning workshops that balance technique (hands-on, doing) with theory (readout, presentation).

**For more info about this curriculum, please read: **👇👇🏼👇🏾

_Why am I sharing this? _I have open-sourced this content to help others understand the fundamentals of human-centered interaction design and the multi-dimensional skillset needed to be successful in complex, collaborative environments.

What is the focus of this session?

Context — An understanding of how to approach the work

_Craft _— An understanding of how to do the work

_Communication _— An understanding of how to interact and collaborate

What are the goals of this session?

This session provides participants with an introduction to User Research and what it takes to get started — including an understanding of what user research is (and isn’t), where it fits into the product development process, when it should (and shouldn’t) be used, and an overview of common methodologies and tools.

Additionally, it provides a step-by-step framework and techniques for planning and executing effective user research activities, individually, or within an organization.

The participatory exercises in this session help attendees apply the concepts presented to a project they are working on (or have worked on in the past). Each exercise is incremental, building upon the previous one, to help participants understand how the principles of user research can be applied to the design challenges they face in their day-to-day.

Why is this topic important?

User insights are a fundamental element of human-centered design and help to facilitate impactful product design and development.

If a product or design solution is not rooted in an understanding of user needs and behavior, it does not account for how real people will interact with it, and its chance of delivering value and impact are relegated to luck.

User insights are fundamental to the product design and development process — they help us understand a problem, before we try to solve it.

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#user-experience-research #interaction-design #ux-research #ux #user-research #design

Hertha  Mayer

Hertha Mayer

1598149205

13 Helpful UX Research Tools

The landscape of UX research tools has been growing to cover everything from recruiting participants, logistics, capturing remote or in person sessions, usability tests, generating reports and more.

While not inclusive of all the tools that are out there, here are some helpful tools you can check out whether you’re a seasoned pro or a beginner:

Airtable

A spreadsheet/database like tool that has UX research templates to help you search and categorize participants and session insights.

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Calendly

A free tool to help you schedule meetings.

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Dscout

Recruit, plan and analyze diary studies.

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Evolt

A flexible canvas creation for collaboration, with templates for storyboards, user journeys and more

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Lookback

A real time or remote user research sessions with the ability to record, and take notes during session in a collaborative dashboard. Use the “Live” feature to broadcast your research to your team.

#tools #ux #ux-research #design

Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1594345380

How the Findings of Your UX Research Remain Valuable.

You might recognize this problem: you have invested time, money and energy in user research but throughout the course of the of the project, you discover that nobody remembers the valuable findings. Well, here are some suggestions on how to make your UX research results more memorable and sustainable for you and your team.

By Sydney Luca-Lion, UX research intern

illustration of heads and question marks
If you’re in the business of making things for people, you may have already come across the terms “human-centered design” or “user-centered design”. This essentially means keeping the end user in mind at every step of the design and development process. To achieve this, you need to know your users, understand their goals, know how they think and act. Research helps you make better decisions, and better decisions lead to more successful products. If you are not convinced or don’t know where to start, this article(in German) might interest you.

If you have already conducted UX research and collected results, an important step in the user-centered project process has already been taken. But this does not mean that the research phase is over — it is now important to get the most out of your findings and to make them more useful for everyone on the team who’s involved in the project. Here are three things you should keep in mind:

1. See the wood for the trees

In UX research you are often confronted with a lot of data in many different forms, and some of the information is really useful and informative, and some less so. As you prepare to share your results with the team, you as an observer/researcher need to think carefully about how you can interpret and summarize the information — so that you end up presenting only what is worth sharing.

Valuable research results are those that are truly relevant to the project, and are accessible for the whole team. You and your team want to “see the wood for the trees”, which means not getting caught up in too many details and losing sight of the big picture. Try to stay focused on the scope of the project and don’t get caught up in insights that are not really relevant to the project. If you want memorable and valuable research results, you have to clarify to find the most meaningful points. Make an effort to be clear, comprehensive and straightforward so that the results of your research are understood and remembered by everyone involved in the project.

#ux #user-research #ux-design #ux-research

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1594346040

UX Design 101: Value vs. effort — Choosing a user research methodology

What is this?

This session is part of a learning curriculum that I designed to incrementally skill up and empower a team of Designers and Researchers whose skillset and ways of working needed to evolve to keep up with changes in the way we think about and execute design.

Each session in the curriculum aims to simplify the complexities of human-centered interaction design using real-life examples from my own professional experience alongside established theory from industry experts.

The sessions are intentionally structured as short, achievable hands-on learning workshops that balance technique (hands-on, doing) with theory (readout, presentation).

**For more info about this curriculum, please read: **👇👇🏼👇🏾

_Why am I sharing this? _I have open-sourced this content to help others understand the fundamentals of human-centered interaction design and the multi-dimensional skillset needed to be successful in complex, collaborative environments.

What is the focus of this session?

Context — An understanding of how to approach the work

What are the goals of this session?

This session provides participants with techniques for establishing _context_around their research by assessing the value and efficiency of answering a question via UX Research at the onset of a project, before they get started.

Additionally, the step-by-step framework and hands-on exercises in the session internalizethe value of _Context _by challenging each participant to answer a series of up-front questions that establish the _Who, What, Where, When, and Why _around a question they (or their team) feel could be best answered via UX Research.

#ux #user-research #user-experience-research #ux-research #interaction-design

Hertha  Mayer

Hertha Mayer

1598145525

6 Things I Learned in Academia That Make Me a Better UX Researcher

I started my career doing academic research in a child development research lab and was convinced that I would be pursuing academia. However, since then I’ve transitioned and applied my research skills from my academic training to more applied fields like museum evaluation and UX Research.

Though I definitely did not start off my career intending to become a UX Researcher, I’ve learned that my academic training offered a unique perspective to research in general — something self-taught UXers may not have developed.

1. Literature reviews taught me the importance of building on previous knowledge and never starting from scratch

One of the first tasks I had as an undergraduate and graduate research assistant in a university lab was to create or add to a literature review. When starting out, I always thought that these tasks were very menial and took way too long.

Though I don’t usually scour the internet or library archives these days with specific search terms, quotes, _AND_s, or _OR_s anymore, I learned the value in understanding what previous research has been done, what methods have been used to answer a research question, and using those pieces to build on knowledge and offer something unique to the field.

Now, whenever I start off a UX research project, my first questions are, “What do we already know about this topic?” and “Who has done something related internally or externally?” This appreciation for previous work allows me to ask deeper questions or to seek validation of something previous.

It really offers you the opportunity to ask the right question!

2. A semester/academic year of constructing a research question taught me good research questions are open-ended, specific, and answer a “So what?”

Speaking of the right question, I’ve learned that it is a real skill and art to develop good research questions. I remember taking methods courses in academia and spending almost a whole year developing the right research question for my thesis. Every time I felt like I had a research question nailed down, my professor would ask me, “What are you really trying to learn?” and the dreaded, “So what?”

Obviously, nowadays, I don’t that much time to develop research questions in a UX and tech setting. However, that practice of critically thinking about the content of a research question, how it’s asked, and the potential impact of finding that answer deeply resonate with my everyday work.

#ux-design #career-change #academia #ux-research #ux