What is the proper way to get data from database in react?

I have some simple react app with authorisation, which is done with - jwh tokens and Redux magic code, that I cannot understand to the point (and hope not to touch that technology if that is ever possible - really dislike it, too obfuscated and complex-to-write style for novice). But that's lyrics away.

I have some simple react app with authorisation, which is done with - jwh tokens and Redux magic code, that I cannot understand to the point (and hope not to touch that technology if that is ever possible - really dislike it, too obfuscated and complex-to-write style for novice). But that's lyrics away.

So after login some token is saved somewhere, some magic happened, and this have two consequences: now I have my user.id in props.user, and may call api endpoints with axios, (normally unavailble without auth).

Now I have user login history table, and I want to display a data table associated with user on a page. Where should I fetch the database? Simpliest way I found up to date is to poll backend api (to poll mongoDb) in componentWillMount() method. Then I could have access to the data in render(), to display user table. Is that correct? Or am I forced to somehow "sync state" with a Redux? Or what? I am lost in paradigms..


PS. Polling that works, but if data is updated dynamically by another user I cannot see updates about that he was logged in (without refreshing page).

Fullstack Vue App with MongoDB, Express.js and Node.js

Fullstack Vue App with MongoDB, Express.js and Node.js

In this article, you'll learn building a fullstack Vue note-taking application and showing you how to perform the aforementioned processes, using Node.js running the Express.js framework for the back end, and MongoDB to store our data.

In this article, you'll learn building a fullstack Vue note-taking application and showing you how to perform the aforementioned processes, using Node.js running the Express.js framework for the back end, and MongoDB to store our data.

We learn how to create full fledge application using this increasingly popular tech stack that takes advantage of the upstart Vue.js.

Much of application development, including web applications, has to do with CRUDcreating, reading, updating, and deleting data.

Below is a preview of the application we will be building:

Configuring the Development Environment

For this tutorial, I will be using the Eclipse IDE with the CodeMix plugin installed.

Getting Started

Now we can create our project using the Eclipse IDE, by navigating to File > New > Project. Select the **Vue **option under the CodeMix list of projects, name the application, and click Next to proceed (make sure to be connected to the Internet to enable CodeMix, to get the newest Vue.js template and folder structure for the application), as shown below:

Open the integrated Terminal+ in CodeMix 2.0. Alternatively, it can be opened using the command Ctrl + Shift + P, as shown below:

After that has been completed, we make some changes in the folder structure. First, we add an API folder in the root folder of our project. This folder would contain the Express backend (which includes the server.js file). In the terminal, we run the following commands to install the required modules for the application:

npm install 
npm install --save axios body-parser cors express mongoose moment

  • Axios – a promise-based HTTP client that we will use to communicate with the Node server.
  • Body-parser – a Node.js middleware for parsing request inputs.
  • CORS – middleware that is used to enable Cross-Origin Resource Sharing.
  • Mongoose – an Object Data Modeling (ODM) library for MongoDB.
  • Moment – a library used to parse and format dates.

Next, we add the following line in the scripts object in the package.json file:

...
  "scripts": {
    "serve": "vue-cli-service serve",
    "build": "vue-cli-service build",
    "lint": "vue-cli-service lint",
    "api": "node api/server.js"
  }
...

Running Our Backend and Front-End

Wait, already? Isn’t it too early to run these applications before writing any code? Actually, it isn’t – with the following scripts running, your code will be watched for changes, and the running backend and front-end applications will be automatically updated when necessary.

We can start the Vue.js application using this command in the terminal:

npm run serve

Your browser will automatically open to http://localhost:3000, where you can see the Vue app slowly take shape as we add more code.

And let’s start the back end by using the command below in a different terminal (simply use the +button in the Terminal+ view to open a new terminal tab for the same project):

npm run api

Building the Backend With Node.js and Express.js

Creating the Note Model

Before setting up the actual server, let’s create the Note model, which is the only model for this application. A model is an object representation of the data in a database. Here, using Mongoose we can specify a schema of data as well; this helps with the validation of the data. In the folder, we create a new Note.js file that will contain the code below:

const mongoose = require('mongoose');
const Schema = mongoose.Schema;
const NoteSchema = Schema(
    {
        title: {type: String, required: true},
        body: {type: String, required: true},
    }, 
    { timestamps: true }
);
const Note = mongoose.model("Note", NoteSchema);
module.exports = Note;

The first parameter object describes the fields, their types, and constraints. The second parameter object of the schema constructor helps create a timestamp, i.e. two auto fields: createdAt which is set at data creation, and updatedAt which is set every time the data is modified.

Creating the Node.js Server

Next up, we create a server.js file in the API folder. This file will contain the Node.js configurations, as well as the routes we will be using in the application. The file will contain the code below:

'use strict';
const express = require('express');
const app = express();
const mongoose = require('mongoose');
const cors = require('cors');
const bodyParser = require('body-parser');
const bcrypt = require('bcrypt');
//models
const Note = require('./Note');
//connect server to mongoDB 
+mongoose.connect(
  'mongodb://localhost:27017/simple_blog', 
  { useNewUrlParser: true, useCreateIndex: true, }
);
mongoose.connection.on('error', console.error.bind(console, 'connection error:'));
app.use(bodyParser.json());
app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({ extended: true }));
app.use(cors());
// retrieves all the notes
app.get('/api/note/list', (req, res) => {
  Note.find({}).sort({updatedAt: 'descending'}).exec((err, notes) => {
    if (err) return res.status(404).send('Error while getting notes!');
    return res.send({notes});
  });
});
// create a new note
app.post('/api/note/create', (req, res) => {
  const note = new Note({body: req.body.body, title: req.body.title});
  note.save( (err) => {
    if (err) return res.status(404).send({message: err.message});      
    return res.send({ note });
  });
});
// update an existing note with the given object id
app.post('/api/note/update/:id', (req, res) => {
let options = { new: true };
  Note.findByIdAndUpdate(req.params.id, req.body.data , options, (err, note) => {
    if (err) return res.status(404).send({message: err.message});
    return res.send({ message: 'note updated!', note });
  });
});
// delete an existing note with the given object id
app.post('/api/note/delete/:id', (req,res) => {
  Note.findByIdAndRemove(req.params.id, (err) => {
    if (err) return res.status(404).send({message: err.message});
    return res.send({ message: 'note deleted!' });
  });
});
const PORT = 5000;
app.listen(PORT);
console.log('api runnging on port ' + PORT + ': ');

The server.js module helps set up a simple connection to MongoDB using a Mongoose method, while also listening for an error event on connecting to the database (which can be caused by improper installation or unavailability of *MongoDB *on the computer). The server.js also applies the necessary middlewares to the *Express server *and provides four routes. The first route fetches all the notes in the *database *using the note model. The second route will allow the creation of a new note. The third route updates a note of a given ID which is passed as the route parameter; it also returns the updated note which, as a result of the options object, is passed to the findByIdAndUpdate method. The last route deletes a note with the ID passed in the parameter of the route.

Building the Front-End With Vue.js

Web Service Calls With Axios

After we have completed the server part of the application, we can proceed to create the repository.js file in the src folder. This file will contain all the server calls we would be making from the Vue.js application using the Axios module. The file code is below:

import axios from 'axios';
const BASE_URL = 'http://localhost:5000';
export function getNotes() {
        return axios.get(`${BASE_URL}/api/note/list`)
                .then(response => response.data);
}
export function deleteNote(id){
        return axios.post(`${BASE_URL}/api/note/delete/${id}`)
                .then(response => response.data)
                .catch(err => Promise.reject(err.message));
}
export function createNote(data) {
        return axios.post(`${BASE_URL}/api/note/create`, 
        { title: data.title, body: data.body }
        )      .then(response => {
                        return response.data
                })
                .catch(err => Promise.reject(err.message));
}
export function updateNote(data, id) {
        return axios.post(`${BASE_URL}/api/note/update/${id}`, { data })
                .then(response => {
                        return response.data
                })
                .catch(err => Promise.reject(err.message));
}

The application is styled using the Bulma CSS framework that is added to the public/index.html file in the head tag, as written below:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/bulma/0.7.2/css/bulma.css">

Creating the Root Component

Next, we proceed to edit the App component, which is the entry component for the Vue.js application. In this file, we add the application header and render a couple of components that we will be building later in this article. The src/App.vue component also provides some methods which manage the application data. This component also loads the list of available notes in the database when the component has been mounted (loaded); it does this using the getNotes function provided in the repository.js module.

If you use CodeMix, you can see below how you will be able to edit the .vue files – these files allow you to keep the HTML, JavaScript, and styles of a component in a single place, and the editor provides content assist and validation corresponding to the section you are in. Have a look at these quick GIFs to see the .vue editor in action.

This App.vue file contains the code below:

<template>
  <div id="app">
    <nav class="navbar is-light" role="navigation" aria-label="main navigation">
      <div class="container">
        <div class="navbar-brand">
          <a class="navbar-item" href="#">
            <span class="title is-size-1">NoteTaker</span>
          </a>
        </div>
      </div>
    </nav>
    <br><br>
    <div  class="container">
      <div v-if="notes">
        <CreateNoteModal @createNote="createNote"/>
        <br>
        <div>
          <noteItem v-for="(note, index) in notes" :note="note" :key="index" @deleteNote="deleteNote" @updateNote="updateNote"/>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</template>
<script>
import NoteItem  from './components/NoteItem.vue'
import CreateNoteModal  from './components/CreateNoteModal.vue'
import { getNotes }  from './repository'
export default {
  name: 'app',
  components: { NoteItem, CreateNoteModal  },
  data(){
    return {
      notes: []
    }
  },
  methods: {
    deleteNote(id){
      let notes = this.notes.filter(note => note._id != id)
      this.notes = notes;
    },
    updateNote(note){
      this.deleteNote(note._id);
      this.createNote(note);
    },
    createNote(note){
        this.notes = [note, ...this.notes];
    },
  },
  mounted(){
    getNotes()
      .then(data => this.notes = data.notes)
      .catch((err =>alert(err)));
  }
}
</script>

Creating Components

Next, we create the CreateNoteModal component in the src/components/CreateNoteModal.vue, which contains the code below:

<template>
  <div>
    <div class="modal" :class="{ 'is-active': isActive }">
      <div class="modal-background"></div>
      <div class="modal-card">
        <header class="modal-card-head">
          Add Note
        </header>
        <section class="modal-card-body">
          <div class="field">
            <div class="control">
              <input v-model="title" class="input" type="text" placeholder="title">
            </div>
          </div>
          <div class="field">
            <div class="control">
              <textarea v-model="body" class="textarea"  placeholder="enter content">
                </textarea>
            </div>
          </div>
          <button @click="create" class="button is-primary is-pulled-right">Post</button>
        </section>
      </div>
      <button @click="toggle" class="modal-close is-large" aria-label="close"></button>
    </div>
    <button @click="toggle" class="button is-primary is-pulled-right">Create Note</button>
    <br>
  </div>
</template>
<script>
import { createNote }  from '../repository'
export default {
  name: 'CreateNoteModal',
  data(){
    return {
      title: '',
      body: '',
      isActive: false
    }
  },
  methods: {
    create(){
      let data = { title: this.title, body: this.body }
      createNote(data)
        .then(data => {
          this.$emit('createNote', data.note);
          this.title = this.body = '';
          this.toggle();
        })
        .catch(err => alert(err.message));
    },
    toggle(){
      this.isActive = !this.isActive;
    },
  },
}
</script>

This component is a form in a modal with both input in the form, title, and body, bound to the component’s data with corresponding names. The submit button calls the create method which makes the server call, passing the data to the createNote function from the repository.js module. Upon a successful server request, this method emits a custom event that is handled by the parent component (which in this case is the App.vue component). It also clears the form and closes the modal.

Next up, we create the NoteItem component in the src/components/NoteItem.vue, which contains the code below:

<template>
  <article class="message">
    <div class="message-header">
      <p>{{ note.title }}</p>
      <button @click="deleteNote" class="delete" aria-label="delete"></button>
    </div>
    <div class="message-body">
      {{ note.body }}
      <br>
      <br>
      <span class="has-text-grey-light">Created at: {{ note.createdAt | moment }}</span>
      <br>
      <span class="has-text-grey-light">last updated: {{ note.updatedAt | moment }}</span><br>
      <UpdateNoteModal :note="note" @updateNote="updateNote" :key="note._id"/>
    </div>
  </article>
</template>
<script>
  import { deleteNote } from '../repository'
  import UpdateNoteModal from './UpdateNoteModal'
  import Moment from 'moment'
  export default {
    name: 'NoteItem',
    props: [ 'note' ],
    components: { UpdateNoteModal },
    methods: {
      deleteNote(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        deleteNote(this.note._id)
          .then(() => this.$emit('deleteNote', this.note._id))
          .catch(err => alert(err))
      },
      updateNote(note){
        this.$emit('updateNote', note)
      }
    },
    filters: {
      moment(date) {
        return Moment(date).format('MMMM Do YYYY, h:mm:ss a');
      }
    }
  }
</script>

This module renders each note, which is passed to it by its parent component (App.vue). It also provides two methods, the first of which is the deleteNote, which deletes the given note using the deleteNote function from the repository.js by passing the note ID to it. Upon success, it emits a custom deleteNote event to the parent component, which deletes the note from the array of notes.

The second method, updateNode, emits an updateNode event in response to the same event name, emitted by its child component, UpdateNoteModal, which we will create next. It also provides a moment date-time filter using the Moment module to format the date for the component.

Finally, we create the UpdateNoteModal component in the src/components/UpdateNoteModal.vue, which contains the code below:

<template>
  <div>
    <div class="modal" :class="{ 'is-active': isActive }">
      <div class="modal-background"></div>
      <div class="modal-card">
        <header class="modal-card-head">
          Update Note
        </header>
        <section class="modal-card-body">
          <div class="field">
            <div class="control">
              <input v-model="title" class="input" type="text" placeholder="title">
            </div>
          </div>
          <div class="field">
            <div class="control">
              <textarea v-model="body" class="textarea"  placeholder="enter content"></textarea>
            </div>
          </div>
          <button @click="update" class="button is-primary is-pulled-right">Post</button>
        </section>
      </div>
      <button @click="toggle" class="modal-close is-large" aria-label="close"></button>
    </div>
    <button @click="toggle" class="button is-small is-pulled-right">Update</button>
  </div>
</template>
<script>
import { updateNote }  from '../repository'
export default {
  name: 'UpdateNoteModal',
  data(){
    return {
      title: this.note.title,
      body: this.note.body,
      isActive: false
    }
  },
  props: ['note'],
  methods: {
    update(){
      let data = { title: this.title, body: this.body }
      updateNote(data, this.note._id)
        .then(data => {
          this.$emit('updateNote', data.note);
          this.toggle();
        })
        .catch(err => alert(err.message));
    },
    toggle(){
      this.isActive = !this.isActive;
    },
  },
}
</script>

This, much like the CreateNoteModal, is a Bulma styled modal, which has two inputs whose values are bound to the component data, which is initialized using the note passed through to the component as a property. It also provides an update method, which is called when the post button is clicked. This method uses the updateNote function from the repository.js module to update the note. Upon a successful request, it emits an event – the updateNote event, which is handled by the parent component (i.e. the NoteItem component, which further passes it to the App component).

We did it, our note taking app is complete! Remember, if you haven’t already run your backend and front-end applications, please scroll back to the Running our Backend and Front-End sections for instructions.

Next Steps

To keep focused on the concepts being demonstrated, we’ve developed a simplified application. Here are some additional steps that would take our application to the next level:

  • Add authentication – Although the application performs the basic functions of a note-taking application and the four fundamental **CRUD **operations, it does not perform any form of authentication.
  • Folder structure – The folder structure is not suitable for larger applications, for example, the routes are usually in a separate file from the server configuration, and the models are usually grouped in a folder.
  • Vuex – Better stage management is possible by using a framework like Vuex.

The code for this application can be downloaded here.

Node, Express, React.js, Graphql and MongoDB CRUD Web Application

Node, Express, React.js, Graphql and MongoDB CRUD Web Application

In this tutorial, we just change the client side by using React.js and the backend still the same. Don’t worry, we will show the full tutorial from the server and the client side. We are using React Apollo library for fetch GraphQL data.

A comprehensive step by step tutorial on building CRUD (create, read, update, delete) web application using React.js and GraphQL using React-Apollo. Previously, we have to build CRUD web application using Node, Express, Angular 7 and GraphQL.

Table of Contents:
  • Create Express.js App
  • Install and Configure Mongoose.js Modules for Accessing MongoDB
  • Create Mongoose.js Model for the Book Document
  • Install GraphQL Modules and Dependencies
  • Create GraphQL Schemas for the Book
  • Add Mutation for CRUD Operation to the Schema
  • Test GraphQL using GraphiQL
  • Create React.js Application
  • Install and Configure Required Modules and Dependencies
  • Create React.js Router DOM]
  • Create a Component to Display List of Books
  • Create a Component to Show and Delete Books
  • Create a Component to Add a New Book
  • Create a Component to Edit a Book
  • Run and Test GraphQL CRUD from the React.js Application

The following tools, frameworks, and modules are required for this tutorial:

  • Node.js (choose recommended version)
  • React.js
  • Express.js
  • GraphQL
  • Express-GraphQL
  • React Apollo
  • Terminal (Mac/Linux) or Node Command Line (Windows)
  • IDE or Text Editor (We are using Visual Studio Code)

We assume that you have already Installed Node.js. Make sure Node.js command line is working (on Windows) or runnable in Linux/OS X terminal.

1. Create Express.js App

If Express.js Generator hasn’t installed, type this command from the terminal or Node.js command prompt.

sudo npm install express-generator -g

The sudo keyword is using in OSX or Linux Terminal otherwise you can use that command without sudo. Before we create an Express.js app, we have to create a root project folder inside your projects folder. From the terminal or Node.js command prompt, type this command at your projects folder.

mkdir node-react-graphql

Go to the newly created directory.

cd ./node-react-graphql

From there, type this command to generate Express.js application.

express server

Go to the newly created Express.js app folder.

cd ./server

Type this command to install all required NPM modules that describe in package.json dependencies.

npm install

To check the Express.js app running smoothly, type this command.

nodemon

or

npm start

If you see this information in the terminal or command prompt that means your Express.js app is ready to use.

[nodemon] 1.18.6
[nodemon] to restart at any time, enter `rs`
[nodemon] watching: *.*
[nodemon] starting `node ./bin/www`

2. Install and Configure Mongoose.js Modules for Accessing MongoDB

To install Mongoose.js and it’s required dependencies, type this command.

npm install mongoose bluebird --save

Next, open and edit app.js then declare the Mongoose module.

var mongoose = require('mongoose');

Create a connection to the MongoDB server using this lines of codes.

mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost/node-graphql', { promiseLibrary: require('bluebird'), useNewUrlParser: true })
  .then(() =>  console.log('connection successful'))
  .catch((err) => console.error(err));

Now, if you re-run again Express.js server after running MongoDB server or daemon, you will see this information in the console.

[nodemon] 1.18.6
[nodemon] to restart at any time, enter `rs`
[nodemon] watching: *.*
[nodemon] starting `node ./bin/www`
connection successful

That’s mean, the connection to the MongoDB is successful.

3. Create Mongoose.js Model for the Book Document

Before creating a Mongoose.js model that represents Book Document, we have to create a folder at the server folder for hold Models. After that, we can create a Mongoose.js model file.

mkdir models
touch models/Book.js

Open and edit server/models/Book.js then add these lines of codes.

var mongoose = require('mongoose');

var BookSchema = new mongoose.Schema({
  id: String,
  isbn: String,
  title: String,
  author: String,
  description: String,
  published_year: { type: Number, min: 1945, max: 2019 },
  publisher: String,
  updated_date: { type: Date, default: Date.now },
});

module.exports = mongoose.model('Book', BookSchema);

4. Install GraphQL Modules and Dependencies

Now, the GraphQL time. Type this command to install GraphQL modules and it’s dependencies.

npm install express express-graphql graphql graphql-date cors --save

Next, open and edit server/app.js then declare all of those modules and dependencies.

var graphqlHTTP = require('express-graphql');
var schema = require('./graphql/bookSchemas');
var cors = require("cors");

The schema is not created yet, we will create it in the next steps. Next, add these lines of codes for configuring GraphQL that can use over HTTP.

app.use('*', cors());
app.use('/graphql', cors(), graphqlHTTP({
  schema: schema,
  rootValue: global,
  graphiql: true,
}));

That’s configuration are enabled CORS and the GraphiQL. GraphiQL is the user interface for testing GraphQL query.

5. Create GraphQL Schemas for the Book

Create a folder at the server folder for hold GraphQL Schema files then create a Javascript file for the schema.

mkdir graphql
touch graphql/bookSchemas.js

Next, open and edit server/graphql/bookSchemas.js then declares all required modules and models.

var GraphQLSchema = require('graphql').GraphQLSchema;
var GraphQLObjectType = require('graphql').GraphQLObjectType;
var GraphQLList = require('graphql').GraphQLList;
var GraphQLObjectType = require('graphql').GraphQLObjectType;
var GraphQLNonNull = require('graphql').GraphQLNonNull;
var GraphQLID = require('graphql').GraphQLID;
var GraphQLString = require('graphql').GraphQLString;
var GraphQLInt = require('graphql').GraphQLInt;
var GraphQLDate = require('graphql-date');
var BookModel = require('../models/Book');

Create a GraphQL Object Type for Book models.

var bookType = new GraphQLObjectType({
  name: 'book',
  fields: function () {
    return {
      _id: {
        type: GraphQLString
      },
      isbn: {
        type: GraphQLString
      },
      title: {
        type: GraphQLString
      },
      author: {
        type: GraphQLString
      },
      description: {
        type: GraphQLString
      },
      published_year: {
        type: GraphQLInt
      },
      publisher: {
        type: GraphQLString
      },
      updated_date: {
        type: GraphQLDate
      }
    }
  }
});

Next, create a GraphQL query type that calls a list of book and single book by ID.

var queryType = new GraphQLObjectType({
  name: 'Query',
  fields: function () {
    return {
      books: {
        type: new GraphQLList(bookType),
        resolve: function () {
          const books = BookModel.find().exec()
          if (!books) {
            throw new Error('Error')
          }
          return books
        }
      },
      book: {
        type: bookType,
        args: {
          id: {
            name: '_id',
            type: GraphQLString
          }
        },
        resolve: function (root, params) {
          const bookDetails = BookModel.findById(params.id).exec()
          if (!bookDetails) {
            throw new Error('Error')
          }
          return bookDetails
        }
      }
    }
  }
});

Finally, exports this file as GraphQL schema by adding this line at the end of the file.

module.exports = new GraphQLSchema({query: queryType});

6. Add Mutation for CRUD Operation to the Schema

For completing CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) operation of the GraphQL, we need to add a mutation that contains create, update and delete operations. Open and edit server/graphql/bookSchemas.js then add this mutation as GraphQL Object Type.

var mutation = new GraphQLObjectType({
  name: 'Mutation',
  fields: function () {
    return {
      addBook: {
        type: bookType,
        args: {
          isbn: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          title: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          author: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          description: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          published_year: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLInt)
          },
          publisher: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          }
        },
        resolve: function (root, params) {
          const bookModel = new BookModel(params);
          const newBook = bookModel.save();
          if (!newBook) {
            throw new Error('Error');
          }
          return newBook
        }
      },
      updateBook: {
        type: bookType,
        args: {
          id: {
            name: 'id',
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          isbn: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          title: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          author: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          description: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          },
          published_year: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLInt)
          },
          publisher: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          }
        },
        resolve(root, params) {
          return BookModel.findByIdAndUpdate(params.id, { isbn: params.isbn, title: params.title, author: params.author, description: params.description, published_year: params.published_year, publisher: params.publisher, updated_date: new Date() }, function (err) {
            if (err) return next(err);
          });
        }
      },
      removeBook: {
        type: bookType,
        args: {
          id: {
            type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
          }
        },
        resolve(root, params) {
          const remBook = BookModel.findByIdAndRemove(params.id).exec();
          if (!remBook) {
            throw new Error('Error')
          }
          return remBook;
        }
      }
    }
  }
});

Finally, add this mutation to the GraphQL Schema exports like below.

module.exports = new GraphQLSchema({query: queryType, mutation: mutation});

7. Test GraphQL using GraphiQL

To test the queries and mutations of CRUD operations, re-run again the Express.js app then open the browser. Go to this address <a href="http://localhost:3000/graphql" target="_blank">http://localhost:3000/graphql</a> to open the GraphiQL User Interface.

To get the list of books, replace all of the text on the left pane with this GraphQL query then click the Play button.

To get a single book by ID, use this GraphQL query.

{
  book(id: "5c738dd4cb720f79497de85c") {
    _id
    isbn
    title
    author
    description
    published_year
    publisher
    updated_date
  }
}

To add a book, use this GraphQL mutation.

mutation {
  addBook(
    isbn: "12345678",
    title: "Whatever this Book Title",
    author: "Mr. Bean",
    description: "The short explanation of this Book",
    publisher: "Djamware Press",
    published_year: 2019
  ) {
    updated_date
  }
}

You will the response at the right pane like this.

{
  "data": {
    "addBook": {
      "updated_date": "2019-02-26T13:55:39.160Z"
    }
  }
}

To update a book, use this GraphQL mutation.

mutation {
  updateBook(
    id: "5c75455b146dbc2504b94012",
    isbn: "12345678221",
    title: "The Learning Curve of GraphQL",
    author: "Didin J.",
    description: "The short explanation of this Book",
    publisher: "Djamware Press",
    published_year: 2019
  ) {
    _id,
    updated_date
  }
}

You will see the response in the right pane like this.

{
  "data": {
    "updateBook": {
      "_id": "5c75455b146dbc2504b94012",
      "updated_date": "2019-02-26T13:58:35.811Z"
    }
  }
}

To delete a book by ID, use this GraphQL mutation.

mutation {
  removeBook(id: "5c75455b146dbc2504b94012") {
    _id
  }
}

You will see the response in the right pane like this.

{
  "data": {
    "removeBook": {
      "_id": "5c75455b146dbc2504b94012"
    }
  }
}

8. Install and Create React.js Application

Open the terminal or Node.js command line then go to your React.js projects folder. We will install React.js app creator for creating a React.js app easily. For that, type this command.

sudo npm install -g create-react-app

Now, create a React app by type this command after back to the root of the project folder.

cd ..
create-react-app client

This command will create a new React app with the name client and this process can take minutes because all dependencies and modules also installing automatically. Next, go to the newly created app folder.

cd ./client

Now, run the React app for the first time using this command.

npm start

It will automatically open the default browser the point to <a href="http://localhost:3000" target="_blank">http://localhost:3000</a>, so the landing page should be like this.

9. Install and Configure Required Modules and Dependencies

Now, we have to install and configure all of the required modules and dependencies. Type this command to install the modules.

npm install apollo-boost react-apollo graphql-tag graphql --save

Next, open and edit client/src/index.js then add these imports.

import ApolloClient from 'apollo-boost';
import { ApolloProvider } from 'react-apollo';

Instantiate ApolloClient module as a variable before the React.js class name.

const client = new ApolloClient();

Add the ApolloProvider to the root of React.js component.

ReactDOM.render(
    <ApolloProvider client={client}>
        <App />
    </ApolloProvider>, 
    document.getElementById('root')
);

10. Create React.js Router DOM

Before creating React Router DOM, first, we have to install the required NPM modules by typing these commands.

npm install --save react-router-dom
npm install --save-dev bootstrap

The React.js CRUD web application required pages to creating, show details and edit Book data. For that, type this commands to create those components.

mkdir src/components
touch src/components/Create.js
touch src/components/Show.js
touch src/components/Edit.js

Next, we will create routes for those components. Open and edit src/index.js then add these imports.

import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route } from 'react-router-dom';
import '../node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css';
import Edit from './components/Edit';
import Create from './components/Create';
import Show from './components/Show';

Add React Router to the ReactDOM render.

ReactDOM.render(
    <ApolloProvider client={client}>
        <App />
    </ApolloProvider>, 
    <Router>
        <div>
            <Route exact path='/' component={App} />
            <Route path='/edit/:id' component={Edit} />
            <Route path='/create' component={Create} />
            <Route path='/show/:id' component={Show} />
        </div>
    </Router>,
    document.getElementById('root')
);

As you see that Edit, Create and Show added as the separate component. Bootstrap also included in the import to make the views better.

11. Create a Component to Display List of Books

We need to add graphql-tag to use GraphQL query with React.js. Type this command to install it.

npm install graphql-tag --save

Next, open and edit client/App.js then replace all imports with these.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Link } from 'react-router-dom';
import './App.css';
import gql from 'graphql-tag';
import { Query } from 'react-apollo';

Declare a constant before the class name for the query.

const GET_BOOKS = gql`
  {
    books {
      _id
      title
      author
    }
  }
`;

Replace all render function contents with these.

render() {
    return (
      <Query pollInterval={500} query={GET_BOOKS}>
        {({ loading, error, data }) => {
          if (loading) return 'Loading...';
          if (error) return `Error! ${error.message}`;

          return (
            <div className="container">
              <div className="panel panel-default">
                <div className="panel-heading">
                  <h3 className="panel-title">
                    LIST OF BOOKS
                  </h3>
                  <h4><Link to="/create">Add Book</Link></h4>
                </div>
                <div className="panel-body">
                  <table className="table table-stripe">
                    <thead>
                      <tr>
                        <th>Title</th>
                        <th>Author</th>
                      </tr>
                    </thead>
                    <tbody>
                      {data.books.map((book, index) => (
                        <tr key={index}>
                          <td><Link to={`/show/${book._id}`}>{book.title}</Link></td>
                          <td>{book.title}</td>
                        </tr>
                      ))}
                    </tbody>
                  </table>
                </div>
              </div>
            </div>
          );
        }}
      </Query>
    );
}

12. Create a Component to Show and Delete Books

As you see in previous steps, it’s a link to show the details of the Book. For that, open and edit client/components/Show.js then add these imports.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Link } from 'react-router-dom';
import '../App.css';
import gql from 'graphql-tag';
import { Query, Mutation } from 'react-apollo';

Add the constants variables of query and mutation before the class name.

const GET_BOOK = gql`
    query book($bookId: String) {
        book(id: $bookId) {
            _id
            isbn
            title
            author
            description
            published_year
            publisher
            updated_date
        }
    }
`;

const DELETE_BOOK = gql`
  mutation removeBook($id: String!) {
    removeBook(id:$id) {
      _id
    }
  }
`;

Add class with the name Show as below.

class Show extends Component {

  render() {
    return (
        <Query pollInterval={500} query={GET_BOOK} variables={{ bookId: this.props.match.params.id }}>
            {({ loading, error, data }) => {
                if (loading) return 'Loading...';
                if (error) return `Error! ${error.message}`;

                return (
                    <div className="container">
                        <div className="panel panel-default">
                            <div className="panel-heading">
                            <h4><Link to="/">Book List</Link></h4>
                                <h3 className="panel-title">
                                {data.book.title}
                                </h3>
                            </div>
                            <div className="panel-body">
                                <dl>
                                    <dt>ISBN:</dt>
                                    <dd>{data.book.isbn}</dd>
                                    <dt>Author:</dt>
                                    <dd>{data.book.author}</dd>
                                    <dt>Description:</dt>
                                    <dd>{data.book.description}</dd>
                                    <dt>Published Year:</dt>
                                    <dd>{data.book.published_year}</dd>
                                    <dt>Publisher:</dt>
                                    <dd>{data.book.publisher}</dd>
                                    <dt>Updated:</dt>
                                    <dd>{data.book.updated_date}</dd>
                                </dl>
                                <Mutation mutation={DELETE_BOOK} key={data.book._id} onCompleted={() => this.props.history.push('/')}>
                                    {(removeBook, { loading, error }) => (
                                        <div>
                                            <form
                                                onSubmit={e => {
                                                    e.preventDefault();
                                                    removeBook({ variables: { id: data.book._id } });
                                                }}>
                                                <Link to={`/edit/${data.book._id}`} className="btn btn-success">Edit</Link>&nbsp;
                                                <button type="submit" className="btn btn-danger">Delete</button>
                                            </form>
                                        {loading && <p>Loading...</p>}
                                        {error && <p>Error :( Please try again</p>}
                                        </div>
                                    )}
                                </Mutation>
                            </div>
                        </div>
                    </div>
                );
            }}
        </Query>
    );
  }
}

Finally, export this class name.

export default Show;

13. Create a Component to Add a New Book

To add a new Book, open and edit client/components/Create.js then add these imports.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import gql from "graphql-tag";
import { Mutation } from "react-apollo";
import { Link } from 'react-router-dom';

Create a constant variable for the mutation.

const ADD_BOOK = gql`
    mutation AddBook(
        $isbn: String!,
        $title: String!,
        $author: String!,
        $description: String!,
        $publisher: String!,
        $published_year: Int!) {
        addBook(
            isbn: $isbn,
            title: $title,
            author: $author,
            description: $description,
            publisher: $publisher,
            published_year: $published_year) {
            _id
        }
    }
`;

Add a class with its contents like below.

class Create extends Component {

    render() {
      let isbn, title, author, description, published_year, publisher;
      return (
        <Mutation mutation={ADD_BOOK} onCompleted={() => this.props.history.push('/')}>
            {(addBook, { loading, error }) => (
                <div className="container">
                    <div className="panel panel-default">
                        <div className="panel-heading">
                            <h3 className="panel-title">
                                ADD BOOK
                            </h3>
                        </div>
                        <div className="panel-body">
                            <h4><Link to="/" className="btn btn-primary">Book List</Link></h4>
                            <form onSubmit={e => {
                                e.preventDefault();
                                addBook({ variables: { isbn: isbn.value, title: title.value, author: author.value, description: description.value, publisher: publisher.value, published_year: parseInt(published_year.value) } });
                                isbn.value = "";
                                title.value = "";
                                author.value = "";
                                description.value = "";
                                publisher.value = null;
                                published_year.value = "";
                            }}>
                                <div className="form-group">
                                    <label htmlFor="isbn">ISBN:</label>
                                    <input type="text" className="form-control" name="isbn" ref={node => {
                                        isbn = node;
                                    }} placeholder="ISBN" />
                                </div>
                                <div className="form-group">
                                    <label htmlFor="title">Title:</label>
                                    <input type="text" className="form-control" name="title" ref={node => {
                                        title = node;
                                    }} placeholder="Title" />
                                </div>
                                <div className="form-group">
                                    <label htmlFor="author">Author:</label>
                                    <input type="text" className="form-control" name="author" ref={node => {
                                        author = node;
                                    }} placeholder="Author" />
                                </div>
                                <div className="form-group">
                                    <label htmlFor="description">Description:</label>
                                    <textarea className="form-control" name="description" ref={node => {
                                        description = node;
                                    }} placeholder="Description" cols="80" rows="3" />
                                </div>
                                <div className="form-group">
                                    <label htmlFor="author">Publisher:</label>
                                    <input type="text" className="form-control" name="publisher" ref={node => {
                                        publisher = node;
                                    }} placeholder="Publisher" />
                                </div>
                                <div className="form-group">
                                    <label htmlFor="author">Published Year:</label>
                                    <input type="number" className="form-control" name="published_year" ref={node => {
                                        published_year = node;
                                    }} placeholder="Published Year" />
                                </div>
                                <button type="submit" className="btn btn-success">Submit</button>
                            </form>
                            {loading && <p>Loading...</p>}
                            {error && <p>Error :( Please try again</p>}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </div>
            )}
        </Mutation>
      );
    }
}

Finally, export this class name.

export default Create;

14. Create a Component to Edit a Book

In the Show component, it’s a button that edit the Book. Now, we will create a component for edit a book. Open and edit client/components/Edit.js then add these imports.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Link } from 'react-router-dom';
import gql from "graphql-tag";
import { Query, Mutation } from "react-apollo";

Add a constant as a query to get the book data.

const GET_BOOK = gql`
    query book($bookId: String) {
        book(id: $bookId) {
            _id
            isbn
            title
            author
            description
            published_year
            publisher
            updated_date
        }
    }
`;

Add a constant as a mutation to update a book.

const UPDATE_BOOK = gql`
    mutation updateBook(
        $id: String!,
        $isbn: String!,
        $title: String!,
        $author: String!,
        $description: String!,
        $publisher: String!,
        $published_year: Int!) {
        updateBook(
        id: $id,
        isbn: $isbn,
        title: $title,
        author: $author,
        description: $description,
        publisher: $publisher,
        published_year: $published_year) {
            updated_date
        }
    }
`;

Add the class with the name Edit and it’s contents.

class Edit extends Component {

  render() {
    let isbn, title, author, description, published_year, publisher;
    return (
        <Query query={GET_BOOK} variables={{ bookId: this.props.match.params.id }}>
            {({ loading, error, data }) => {
                if (loading) return 'Loading...';
                if (error) return `Error! ${error.message}`;

                return (
                    <Mutation mutation={UPDATE_BOOK} key={data.book._id} onCompleted={() => this.props.history.push(`/`)}>
                        {(updateBook, { loading, error }) => (
                            <div className="container">
                                <div className="panel panel-default">
                                    <div className="panel-heading">
                                        <h3 className="panel-title">
                                            EDIT BOOK
                                        </h3>
                                    </div>
                                    <div className="panel-body">
                                        <h4><Link to="/" className="btn btn-primary">Book List</Link></h4>
                                        <form onSubmit={e => {
                                            e.preventDefault();
                                            updateBook({ variables: { id: data.book._id, isbn: isbn.value, title: title.value, author: author.value, description: description.value, publisher: publisher.value, published_year: parseInt(published_year.value) } });
                                            isbn.value = "";
                                            title.value = "";
                                            author.value = "";
                                            description.value = "";
                                            publisher.value = null;
                                            published_year.value = "";
                                        }}>
                                            <div className="form-group">
                                                <label htmlFor="isbn">ISBN:</label>
                                                <input type="text" className="form-control" name="isbn" ref={node => {
                                                    isbn = node;
                                                }} placeholder="ISBN" defaultValue={data.book.isbn} />
                                            </div>
                                            <div className="form-group">
                                                <label htmlFor="title">Title:</label>
                                                <input type="text" className="form-control" name="title" ref={node => {
                                                    title = node;
                                                }} placeholder="Title" defaultValue={data.book.title} />
                                            </div>
                                            <div className="form-group">
                                                <label htmlFor="author">Author:</label>
                                                <input type="text" className="form-control" name="author" ref={node => {
                                                    author = node;
                                                }} placeholder="Author" defaultValue={data.book.author} />
                                            </div>
                                            <div className="form-group">
                                                <label htmlFor="description">Description:</label>
                                                <textarea className="form-control" name="description" ref={node => {
                                                    description = node;
                                                }} placeholder="Description" cols="80" rows="3" defaultValue={data.book.description} />
                                            </div>
                                            <div className="form-group">
                                                <label htmlFor="author">Publisher:</label>
                                                <input type="text" className="form-control" name="publisher" ref={node => {
                                                    publisher = node;
                                                }} placeholder="Publisher" defaultValue={data.book.publisher} />
                                            </div>
                                            <div className="form-group">
                                                <label htmlFor="author">Published Year:</label>
                                                <input type="number" className="form-control" name="published_year" ref={node => {
                                                    published_year = node;
                                                }} placeholder="Published Year" defaultValue={data.book.published_year} />
                                            </div>
                                            <button type="submit" className="btn btn-success">Submit</button>
                                        </form>
                                        {loading && <p>Loading...</p>}
                                        {error && <p>Error :( Please try again</p>}
                                    </div>
                                </div>
                            </div>
                        )}
                    </Mutation>
                );
            }}
        </Query>
    );
  }
}

Finally, export the class name.

export default Edit;

15. Run and Test GraphQL CRUD from the React.js Application

Before running the whole application, make sure you have run the MongoDB server. To run the MongoDB server manually, type this command in the new Terminal tab.

mongod

Open the new terminal tab then type this command inside the project folder.

cd server
nodemon

Open the new terminal tab then type this command inside the project folder.

cd client
npm start

If asking to use a different port, just type Y. Now, the browser will automatically open then show the React.js and GraphQL application like these.

That it's, the Node, Express, React.js, Graphql, and MongoDB CRUD Web Application. You can find the full source code in our GitHub.

Thanks for reading ❤

Node.js, ExpressJs, MongoDB and Vue.js (MEVN Stack) Application Tutorial

Node.js, ExpressJs, MongoDB and Vue.js (MEVN Stack) Application Tutorial

In this tutorial, you'll learn how to integrate Vue.js with Node.js backend (using Express framework) and MongoDB and how to build application with Node.js, ExpressJs, MongoDB and Vue.js

In this tutorial, you'll learn how to integrate Vue.js with Node.js backend (using Express framework) and MongoDB and how to build application with Node.js, ExpressJs, MongoDB and Vue.js

Vue.js is a JavaScript framework with growing number of users. Released 4 years ago, it’s now one of the most populare front-end frameworks. There are some reasons why people like Vue.js. Using Vue.js is very simple if you are already familiar with HTML and JavaScript. They also provide clear documentation and examples, makes it easy for starters to learn the framework. Vue.js can be used for both simple and complex applications. If your application is quite complex, you can use Vuex for state management, which is officially supported. In addition, it’s also very flexible that yu can write template in HTML, JavaScript or JSX.

This tutorial shows you how to integrate Vue.js with Node.js backend (using Express framework) and MongoDB. As for example, we’re going to create a simple application for managing posts which includes list posts, create post, update post and delete post (basic CRUD functionality). I divide this tutorial into two parts. The first part is setting up the Node.js back-end and database. The other part is writing Vue.js code including how to build .vue code using Webpack.

Dependencies

There are some dependencies required for this project. Add the dependencies below to your package.json. Then run npm install to install these dependencies.

  "dependencies": {
    "body-parser": "~1.17.2",
    "dotenv": "~4.0.0",
    "express": "~4.16.3",
    "lodash": "~4.17.10",
    "mongoose": "~5.2.9",
    "morgan": "~1.9.0"
  },
  "devDependencies": {
    "axios": "~0.18.0",
    "babel-core": "~6.26.3",
    "babel-loader": "~7.1.5",
    "babel-preset-env": "~1.7.0",
    "babel-preset-stage-3": "~6.24.1",
    "bootstrap-vue": "~2.0.0-rc.11",
    "cross-env": "~5.2.0",
    "css-loader": "~1.0.0",
    "vue": "~2.5.17",
    "vue-loader": "~15.3.0",
    "vue-router": "~3.0.1",
    "vue-style-loader": "~4.1.2",
    "vue-template-compiler": "~2.5.17",
    "webpack": "~4.16.5",
    "webpack-cli": "^3.1.0"
  },

Project Structure

Below is the overview of directory structure for this project.

  app
    config
    controllers
    models
    queries
    routes
    views
  public
    dist
    src

The app directory contains all files related to server-side. The public directory contains two sub-directories: dist and src. dist is used for the output of build result, while src is for front-end code files.

Model

First, we define a model for Post using Mongoose. To make it simple, it only has two properties: title and content.

app/models/Post.js

  const mongoose = require('mongoose');

  const { Schema } = mongoose;

  const PostSchema = new Schema(
    {
      title: { type: String, trim: true, index: true, default: '' },
      content: { type: String },
    },
    {
      collection: 'posts',
      timestamps: true,
    },
  );

  module.exports = mongoose.model('Post', PostSchema);

Queries

After defining the model, we write some queries that will be needed in the controllers.

app/queries/posts.js

  const Post = require('../models/Post');

  /**
   * Save a post.
   *
   * @param {Object} post - Javascript object or Mongoose object
   * @returns {Promise.}
   */
  exports.save = (post) => {
    if (!(post instanceof Post)) {
      post = new Post(post);
    }

    return post.save();
  };

  /**
   * Get post list.
   * @param {object} [criteria] - Filter options
   * @returns {Promise.<Array.>}
   */
  exports.getPostList = (criteria = {}) => Post.find(criteria);

  /**
   * Get post by ID.
   * @param {string} id - Post ID
   * @returns {Promise.}
   */
  exports.getPostById = id => Post.findOne({ _id: id });

  /**
   * Delete a post.
   * @param {string} id - Post ID
   * @returns {Promise}
   */
  exports.deletePost = id => Post.findByIdAndRemove(id);

Controllers

We need API controllers for handling create post, get post listing, get detail of a post, update a post and delete a post.

app/controllers/api/posts/create.js

  const postQueries = require('../../../queries/posts');

  module.exports = (req, res) => postQueries.save(req.body)
    .then((post) => {
      if (!post) {
        return Promise.reject(new Error('Post not created'));
      }

      return res.status(200).send(post);
    })
    .catch((err) => {
      console.error(err);

      return res.status(500).send('Unable to create post');
    });

app/controllers/api/posts/delete.js

  const postQueries = require('../../../queries/posts');

  module.exports = (req, res) => postQueries.deletePost(req.params.id)
    .then(() => res.status(200).send())
    .catch((err) => {
      console.error(err);

      return res.status(500).send('Unable to delete post');
    });

app/controllers/api/posts/details.js

  const postQueries = require('../../../queries/posts');

  module.exports = (req, res) => postQueries.getPostById(req.params.id)
    .then((post) => {
      if (!post) {
        return Promise.reject(new Error('Post not found'));
      }

      return res.status(200).send(post);
    })
    .catch((err) => {
      console.error(err);

      return res.status(500).send('Unable to get post');
    });

app/controllers/api/posts/list.js

  const postQueries = require('../../../queries/posts');

  module.exports = (req, res) => postQueries.getPostList(req.params.id)
    .then(posts => res.status(200).send(posts))
    .catch((err) => {
      console.error(err);

      return res.status(500).send('Unable to get post list');
    });

app/controllers/api/posts/update.js

  const _ = require('lodash');

  const postQueries = require('../../../queries/posts');

  module.exports = (req, res) => postQueries.getPostById(req.params.id)
    .then(async (post) => {
      if (!post) {
        return Promise.reject(new Error('Post not found'));
      }

      const { title, content } = req.body;

      _.assign(post, {
        title, content
      });

      await postQueries.save(post);

      return res.status(200).send({
        success: true,
        data: post,
      })
    })
    .catch((err) => {
      console.error(err);

      return res.status(500).send('Unable to update post');
    });

Routes

We need to have some pages for user interaction and some API endpoints for processing HTTP requests. To make the app scalable, it’s better to separate the routes for pages and APIs.

app/routes/index.js

  const express = require('express');

  const routes = express.Router();

  routes.use('/api', require('./api'));
  routes.use('/', require('./pages'));

  module.exports = routes;


Below is the API routes.

app/routes/api/index.js

  const express = require('express');

  const router = express.Router();

  router.get('/posts/', require('../../controllers/api/posts/list'));
  router.get('/posts/:id', require('../../controllers/api/posts/details'));
  router.post('/posts/', require('../../controllers/api/posts/create'));
  router.patch('/posts/:id', require('../../controllers/api/posts/update'));
  router.delete('/posts/:id', require('../../controllers/api/posts/delete'));

  module.exports = router;


For the pages, in this tutorial, we use plain HTML file. You can easily replace it with any HTML template engine if you want. The HTML file contains a div whose id is app. Later, in Vue.js application, it will use the element with id app for rendering the content. What will be rendered on each pages is configured on Vue.js route on part 2 of this tutorial.

app/routes/pages/index.js

  const express = require('express');

  const router = express.Router();

  router.get('/posts/', (req, res) => {
    res.sendFile(`${__basedir}/views/index.html`);
  });

  router.get('/posts/create', (req, res) => {
    res.sendFile(`${__basedir}/views/index.html`);
  });

  router.get('/posts/:id', (req, res) => {
    res.sendFile(`${__basedir}/views/index.html`);
  });

  module.exports = router;

Below is the HTML file

app/views/index.html

  <!DOCTYPE html>
  <html>
    <head>
      <meta charset="utf-8">
      <title>VueJS Tutorial by Woolha.com</title>
      <link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/font-awesome/4.4.0/css/font-awesome.min.css" type="text/css" media="all" />
      <link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/4.0.0/css/bootstrap.min.css" integrity="sha384-Gn5384xqQ1aoWXA+058RXPxPg6fy4IWvTNh0E263XmFcJlSAwiGgFAW/dAiS6JXm" crossorigin="anonymous">
      <script src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-3.2.1.slim.min.js" integrity="sha384-KJ3o2DKtIkvYIK3UENzmM7KCkRr/rE9/Qpg6aAZGJwFDMVNA/GpGFF93hXpG5KkN" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
      <div id="app"></div>
      <script src="/dist/js/main.js"></script>
    </body>
  </html>

Below is the main script of the application, you need to run this for starting the server-side application.

app/index.js

  require('dotenv').config();

  const bodyParser = require('body-parser');
  const express = require('express');
  const http = require('http');
  const mongoose = require('mongoose');
  const morgan = require('morgan');
  const path = require('path');

  const dbConfig = require('./config/database');
  const routes = require('./routes');

  const app = express();
  const port = process.env.PORT || 4000;

  global.__basedir = __dirname;

  mongoose.Promise = global.Promise;

  mongoose.connect(dbConfig.url, dbConfig.options, (err) => {
    if (err) {
      console.error(err.stack || err);
    }
  });

  /* General setup */
  app.use(morgan('dev'));
  app.use(bodyParser.json());
  app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({ extended: true }));
  app.use(morgan('dev'));

  app.use('/', routes);

  const MAX_AGE = 86400000;

  // Select which directories or files under public can be served to users
  app.use('/', express.static(path.join(__dirname, '../public'), { maxAge: MAX_AGE }));

  // Error handler
  app.use((err, req, res, next) => { // eslint-disable-line no-unused-vars
    res.status(err.status || 500);

    if (err.status === 404) {
      res.locals.page = {
        title: 'Not Found',
        noIndex: true,
      };

      console.error(`Not found: ${req.url}`);

      return res.status(404).send();
    }

    console.error(err.stack || err);

    return res.status(500).send();
  });

  http
    .createServer(app)
    .listen(port, () => {
      console.info(`HTTP server started on port ${port}`);
    })
    .on('error', (err) => {
      console.error(err.stack || err);
    });

  process.on('uncaughtException', (err) => {
    if (err.name === 'MongoError') {
      mongoose.connection.emit('error', err);
    } else {
      console.error(err.stack || err);
    }
  });

  module.exports = app;

That’s all for the server side preparation. On the next part, we’re going to set up the Vue.js client-side application and build the code into a single JavaScript file ready to be loaded from HTML.

Then, we build the code using Webpack, so that it can be loaded from HTML. In this tutorial, we’re building a simple application with basic CRUD functionality for managing posts.

Create Vue.js Components

For managing posts, there are three components we’re going to create. The first one is for creating a new post. The second is for editing a post. The other is for managing posts (displaying list of posts and allow post deletion)

First, this is the component for creating a new post. It has one method createPost which validate data and send HTTP request to the server. We use axios for sending HTTP request.

public/src/components/Posts/Create.vue

  <template>
    <b-container>
      <h1 class="d-flex justify-content-center">Create a Post</h1>
      <p v-if="errors.length">
        <b>Please correct the following error(s):</b>
        <ul>
          <li v-for="error in errors">{{ error }}</li>
        </ul>
      </p>
      <b-form @submit.prevent>
        <b-form-group>
          <b-form-input type="text" class="form-control" placeholder="Title of the post" v-model="post.title"></b-form-input>
        </b-form-group>
        <b-form-group>
          <b-form-textarea class="form-control" placeholder="Write the content here" v-model="post.content"></b-form-textarea>
        </b-form-group>
        <b-button variant="primary" v-on:click="createPost">Create Post</b-button>
      </b-form>
    </b-container>
  </template>

  <script>
    import axios from 'axios';

    export default {
      data: () => ({
        errors: [],
        post: {
          title: '',
          content: '',
        },
      }),
      methods: {
        createPost(event) {
          if (event) {
            event.preventDefault();
          }

          if (!this.post.title) {
            this.errors = [];

            if (!this.post.title) {
              this.errors.push('Title required.');
            }

            return;
          }

          const url = 'http://localhost:4000/api/posts';
          const param = this.post;

          axios
            .post(url, param)
            .then((response) => {
              console.log(response);
              window.location.href = 'http://localhost:4000/posts';
            }).catch((error) => {
              console.log(error);
            });
        },
      }
    }
  </script>


Below is the component for editing a post. Of course, we need the current data of the post before editing it. Therefore, there’s fetchPost method called when the component is created. There’s also updatePost method which validate data and call the API for updating post.

public/src/components/Posts/Edit.vue

  <template>
    <b-container>
      <h1 class="d-flex justify-content-center">Edit a Post</h1>
      <p v-if="errors.length">
        <b>Please correct the following error(s):</b>
        <ul>
          <li v-for="error in errors">{{ error }}</li>
        </ul>
      </p>
      <b-form @submit.prevent>
        <b-form-group>
          <b-form-input type="text" class="form-control" placeholder="Title of the post" v-model="post.title"></b-form-input>
        </b-form-group>
        <b-form-group>
          <b-form-textarea class="form-control" placeholder="Write the content here" v-model="post.content"></b-form-textarea>
        </b-form-group>
        <b-button variant="primary" v-on:click="updatePost">Update Post</b-button>
      </b-form>
    </b-container>
  </template>

  <script>
    import axios from 'axios';

    export default {
      data: () => ({
        errors: [],
        post: {
          _id: '',
          title: '',
          content: '',
        },
      }),
      created: function() {
        this.fetchPost();
      },
      methods: {
        fetchPost() {
          const postId = this.$route.params.id;
          const url = `http://localhost:4000/api/posts/${postId}`;

          axios
            .get(url)
            .then((response) => {
              this.post = response.data;
              console.log('this.post;');
              console.log(this.post);
          });
        },
        updatePost(event) {
          if (event) {
            event.preventDefault();
          }

          if (!this.post.title) {
            this.errors = [];

            if (!this.post.title) {
              this.errors.push('Title required.');
            }

            return;
          }

          const url = `http://localhost:4000/api/posts/${this.post._id}`;
          const param = this.post;

          axios
            .patch(url, param)
            .then((response) => {
                console.log(response);
              window.alert('Post successfully saved');
            }).catch((error) => {
              console.log(error);
            });
        },
      }
    }
  </script>


For managing posts, we need to fetch the list of post first. Similar to the edit component, in this component, we have fetchPosts method called when the component is created. For deleting a post, there’s also a method deletePost. If post successfully deleted, the fetchPosts method is called again to refresh the post list.

public/src/components/Posts/List.vue

  <template>
    <b-container>
      <h1 class="d-flex justify-content-center">Post List</h1>
      <b-button variant="primary" style="color: #ffffff; margin: 20px;"><a href="/posts/create" style="color: #ffffff;">Create New Post</a></b-button>
      <b-container-fluid v-if="posts.length">
        <table class="table">
          <thead>
            <tr class="d-flex">
              <td class="col-8">Titleqqqqqqqqq</td>
              <td class="col-4">Actions</td>
            </tr>
          </thead>
          <tbody>
            <tr v-for="post in posts" class="d-flex">
              <td class="col-8">{{ post.title }}</td>
              <td class="col-2"><a v-bind:href="'http://localhost:4000/posts/' + post._id"><button type="button" class="btn btn-primary"><i class="fa fa-edit" aria-hidden="true"></i></button></a></td>
              <td class="col-2"><button type="button" class="btn btn-danger" v-on:click="deletePost(post._id)"><i class="fa fa-remove" aria-hidden="true"></i></button></td>
            </tr>
          </tbody>
        </table>
      </b-container-fluid>
    </b-container>
  </template>

  <script>
    import axios from 'axios';

    export default {
      data: () => ({
        posts: [],
      }),
      created: () => {
        this.fetchPosts();
      },
      methods: {
        fetchPosts() {
          const url = 'http://localhost:4000/api/posts/';

          axios
            .get(url)
            .then((response) => {
              console.log(response.data);
              this.posts = response.data;
          });
        },
        deletePost(id) {
          if (event) {
            event.preventDefault();
          }

          const url = `http://localhost:4000/api/posts/${id}`;
          const param = this.post;

          axios
            .delete(url, param)
            .then((response) => {
              console.log(response);
              console.log('Post successfully deleted');

              this.fetchPosts();
            }).catch((error) => {
              console.log(error);
            });
        },
      }
    }
  </script>


All of the components above are wrapped into a root component which roles as the basic template. The root component renders the navbar which is same across all components. The component for each routes will be rendered on router-view.

public/src/App.vue

  <template>
    <div>
      <b-navbar toggleable="md" type="dark" variant="dark">
        <b-navbar-toggle target="nav_collapse"></b-navbar-toggle>
        <b-navbar-brand to="/">My Vue App</b-navbar-brand>
        <b-collapse is-nav id="nav_collapse">
          <b-navbar-nav>
            <b-nav-item to="/">Home</b-nav-item>
            <b-nav-item to="/posts">Manage Posts</b-nav-item>
          </b-navbar-nav>
        </b-collapse>
      </b-navbar>
      <!-- routes will be rendered here -->
      <router-view />
    </div>
  </template>

  <script>

  export default {
    name: 'app',
    data () {},
    methods: {}
  }
  </script>


For determining which component should be rendered, we use Vue.js’ router. For each routes, we need to define the path, component name and the component itself. A component will be rendered if the current URL matches the path.

public/src/router/index.js

  import Vue from 'vue'
  import Router from 'vue-router'

  import CreatePost from '../components/Posts/Create.vue';
  import EditPost from '../components/Posts/Edit.vue';
  import ListPost from '../components/Posts/List.vue';

  Vue.use(Router);

  let router = new Router({
    mode: 'history',
    routes: [
      {
        path: '/posts',
        name: 'ListPost',
        component: ListPost,
      },
      {
        path: '/posts/create',
        name: 'CreatePost',
        component: CreatePost,
      },
      {
        path: '/posts/:id',
        name: 'EditPost',
        component: EditPost,
      },
    ]
  });

  export default router;


Lastly, we need a main script as the entry point which imports the main App component and the router. Inside, it creates a new Vue instance

webpack.config.js

  import BootstrapVue from 'bootstrap-vue';
  import Vue from 'vue';

  import App from './App.vue';
  import router from './router';

  Vue.use(BootstrapVue);
  Vue.config.productionTip = false;
  new Vue({
    el: '#app',
    router,
    render: h => h(App),
  });

Configure Webpack

For building the code into a single JavaSript file. Below is the basic configuration for Webpack 4.

webpack.config.js

  const { VueLoaderPlugin } = require('vue-loader');

  module.exports = {
    entry: './public/src/main.js',
    output: {
      path: `${__dirname}/public/dist/js/`,
      filename: '[name].js',
    },
    resolve: {
      modules: [
        'node_modules',
      ],
      alias: {
        // vue: './vue.js'
      }
    },
    module: {
      rules: [
        {
          test: /\.css$/,
          use: [
            'vue-style-loader',
            'css-loader'
          ]
        },
        {
          test: /\.vue$/,
          loader: 'vue-loader',
          options: {
            loaders: {
            }
            // other vue-loader options go here
          }
        },
        {
          test: /\.js$/,
          loader: 'babel-loader',
          exclude: /node_modules/
        },
      ]
    },
    plugins: [
      new VueLoaderPlugin(),
    ]

After that, run ./node_modules/webpack/bin/webpack.js. You can add the command to the scripts section of package.json, so you can run Webpack with a shorter command npm run build, as examplified below.

  "dependencies": {
    ...
  },
  "devDependencies": {
    ...
  },
  "scripts": {
    "build": "./node_modules/webpack/bin/webpack.js",
    "start": "node app/index.js"
  },

Finally, you can start to try the application. This code is also available on Woolha.com’s Github.