Haylie  Conn

Haylie Conn

1625040571

Absolute beginner’s guide to Docker: What is a container?

Docker is an open-source software platform that helps you simplify the process of creating, managing, running, and distributing your applications. With Docker, you can package your application along with all its dependencies into a container. Containers allow your applications to be deployed easily and uniformly.

Today, we’ll dive deeper into Docker and discuss containers, modules, key terms, and more.

We’ll cover:

  • What is Docker?
  • Docker vs Kubernetes
  • Docker vocabulary guide
  • Installing Docker
  • What to learn next

What is Docker?

Docker is an open-source software that runs on Linux and Windows. With Docker, you can package your application and its dependencies together into containers. Docker allows you to separate your applications from your infrastructure.

The company started as a platform as a service that was built on Linux containers. To help make and manage the containers, they built an in-house tool that they nicknamed “Docker,” which is how the technology was born. The first version was released in 2013.

Today, Docker dominates the market. Many companies use Docker to simplify the process of building, running, and managing applications. It has changed the way companies do their application development. Docker virtualizes the operating system of the computer on which it’s installed, which gives it the functionality of being extremely portable.

#docker #kubernetes #docker-container

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Absolute beginner’s guide to Docker: What is a container?
Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Haylie  Conn

Haylie Conn

1625040571

Absolute beginner’s guide to Docker: What is a container?

Docker is an open-source software platform that helps you simplify the process of creating, managing, running, and distributing your applications. With Docker, you can package your application along with all its dependencies into a container. Containers allow your applications to be deployed easily and uniformly.

Today, we’ll dive deeper into Docker and discuss containers, modules, key terms, and more.

We’ll cover:

  • What is Docker?
  • Docker vs Kubernetes
  • Docker vocabulary guide
  • Installing Docker
  • What to learn next

What is Docker?

Docker is an open-source software that runs on Linux and Windows. With Docker, you can package your application and its dependencies together into containers. Docker allows you to separate your applications from your infrastructure.

The company started as a platform as a service that was built on Linux containers. To help make and manage the containers, they built an in-house tool that they nicknamed “Docker,” which is how the technology was born. The first version was released in 2013.

Today, Docker dominates the market. Many companies use Docker to simplify the process of building, running, and managing applications. It has changed the way companies do their application development. Docker virtualizes the operating system of the computer on which it’s installed, which gives it the functionality of being extremely portable.

#docker #kubernetes #docker-container

Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1597368540

Docker Tutorial for Beginners 8 - Build and Run C++ Applications in a Docker Container

Docker is an open platform that allows use package, develop, run, and ship software applications in different environments using containers.
In this course We will learn How to Write Dockerfiles, Working with the Docker Toolbox, How to Work with the Docker Machine, How to Use Docker Compose to fire up multiple containers, How to Work with Docker Kinematic, Push images to Docker Hub, Pull images from a Docker Registery, Push stacks of servers to Docker Hub.
How to install Docker on Mac.

#docker tutorial #c++ #docker container #docker #docker hub #devopstools

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1602317778

Ever Wondered Why We Use Containers In DevOps?

At some point we’ve all said the words, “But it works on my machine.” It usually happens during testing or when you’re trying to get a new project set up. Sometimes it happens when you pull down changes from an updated branch.

Every machine has different underlying states depending on the operating system, other installed programs, and permissions. Getting a project to run locally could take hours or even days because of weird system issues.

The worst part is that this can also happen in production. If the server is configured differently than what you’re running locally, your changes might not work as you expect and cause problems for users. There’s a way around all of these common issues using containers.

What is a container

A container is a piece of software that packages code and its dependencies so that the application can run in any computing environment. They basically create a little unit that you can put on any operating system and reliably and consistently run the application. You don’t have to worry about any of those underlying system issues creeping in later.

Although containers were already used in Linux for years, they became more popular in recent years. Most of the time when people are talking about containers, they’re referring to Docker containers. These containers are built from images that include all of the dependencies needed to run an application.

When you think of containers, virtual machines might also come to mind. They are very similar, but the big difference is that containers virtualize the operating system instead of the hardware. That’s what makes them so easy to run on all of the operating systems consistently.

What containers have to do with DevOps

Since we know how odd happenings occur when you move code from one computing environment to another, this is also a common issue with moving code to the different environments in our DevOps process. You don’t want to have to deal with system differences between staging and production. That would require more work than it should.

Once you have an artifact built, you should be able to use it in any environment from local to production. That’s the reason we use containers in DevOps. It’s also invaluable when you’re working with microservices. Docker containers used with something like Kubernetes will make it easier for you to handle larger systems with more moving pieces.

#devops #containers #containers-devops #devops-containers #devops-tools #devops-docker #docker #docker-image

Docker Architecture Overview & Docker Components [For Beginners]

If you have recently come across the world of containers, it’s probably not a bad idea to understand the underlying elements that work together to offer containerisation benefits. But before that, there’s a question that you may ask. What problem do containers solve?

After building an application in a typical development lifecycle, the developer sends it to the tester for testing purposes. However, since the development and testing environments are different, the code fails to work.

Now, predominantly, there are two solutions to this – either you use a Virtual Machine or a containerised environment such as Docker. In the good old times, organisations used to deploy VMs for running multiple applications.

So, why did they started adopting containerisation over VMs? In this article, we will provide detailed explanations of all such questions.

#docker containers #docker engine #docker #docker architecture