Build a Progressive Web App In VueJs

Build a Progressive Web App In VueJs

Learn to build a Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) in VueJS and combine discoverability& accessibility of a website.In this tutorial, we will implement and discuss the Service Worker, one of the core technologies that adds the astonishing offline-first experience of a native app to a regular web app.

Learn to build a Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) in VueJS and combine discoverability& accessibility of a website.In this tutorial, we will implement and discuss the Service Worker, one of the core technologies that adds the astonishing offline-first experience of a native app to a regular web app.

The concept of Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) is a framework agnostic approach which seeks to combine discoverability and accessibility of a website with the functionality of a native app.

Since couple of years I see an increasing interest technologies which bridge the gap between web- and native-apps.

The reason is obvious, plenty of these companies report very promising numbers, mostly as astonishing as the 97 percent of increase in conversions Trivago has seen.

Why should we start developing PWAs now?
In fact, in 2018 also the majority of browser vendors started backing the technology behind PWAs. Microsoft committed to bring PWAs to “more than half a billion devices running Windows 10”. Google even went as far as calling it the future of app development — no surprise that Lighthouse, Google’s tool for improving the quality of web pages, audits ‘PWA’, next to ‘SEO and ‘Accessibility’ of webapps. And even Apple has finally started to support PWAs in 2018, even though, PWAs are a clear threat to Apple’s app store business.

The Tax Calculator App

In this tutorial we will build an income tax calculator. Why?

Because calculating income tax (at least in Germany) is complicated and people would love an app that solves that problem for them. Besides that, it’s also a opportunity to explore the impact of the PWA features mentioned above.

We will use VueJS for this tutorial, as it comes with a great template which makes it easy to kick off a PWA project. Another reason is, that VueJS is really easy to learn. No prior experience in any other frontend framework required!

Enough theory for now, it’s time to get our hands dirty!

Let’s create the App’s Skeleton

We start-off with creating the basic setup and the file structure of our app. To speed things up, we will bootstrap the app with vue-cli. First, we need to install the vue CLI tool globally.

yarn global add @vue/cli

Now we can instantiate the template by

vue init pwa vue-calculator-pwa

We will be prompted to pick a preset — I recommend the following configuration:

? Project name vue-calculator-pwa
? Project short name: fewer than 12 characters to not be truncated on homescreens (default: same as name) vue-calculator-pwa
? Project description A simple tax calculator 
? Author Fabian Hinsenkamp <[email protected]>
? Vue build runtime
? Install vue-router? No
? Use ESLint to lint your code? Yes
? Pick an ESLint preset Standard
? Setup unit tests with Karma + Mocha? No
? Setup e2e tests with Nightwatch? No

For the Vue build configuration we can choose the smaller runtime option as we don’t need the compiler as the html we write inside our *.vue files is pre-compiled into JavaScript at build time.

We don’t add tests here for brevity reasons. If we would set up a project for for production definitely add them.

Next, run yarn to install all dependencies. To start the development mode just run yarn start.

Why should we start developing PWAs now?
In the project we will find files with the .vue extension. It indicates that this file is a single-file vue component. It is one of the Vue’s features. Each file consists of three types of blocks: <template>, <script> <style>. That way, we can easily divide the project into loosely-coupled components.

Let’s start creating all the *.vue files our app consists off.

App.vue

Create the file src/App.vue. It is our main view and it will contain our different components which make up our calculator.

<template>
  <div id="app">
    <main>
    </main>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
import Panel from "./components/Panel.vue";
import InputForm from "./components/InputForm";
import Result from "./components/Result";
import { calcTaxes } from "./calc.js";
export default {
  name: "app",
  components: {
    Panel,
    InputForm,
    Result
  }
};
</script>

<style lang="scss" src="./assets/styles/App.scss"/>

InputForm.vue

Next let’s create the inputForm file src/components/InputForm.vue. It will handle all user inputs required to calculate the income taxes.

<template>

</template>

<script>
export default {
  name: "InputForm"
};
</script>

<style lang="scss" src="../assets/styles/InputForm.scss"/>

Moreover, we create .vue skeleton files for the following Result, Panel ,Input components including a style sheet named identically to the component it belongs to. All of them belong into the src/components folder.

Result.vue

It will display the results of our calculations.

Panel.vue & Input.vue

The panel is a simple component that wraps the input and result components.

Finally, we should remove the Hello.vue file, that comes with the vue template.

Add Styles & Calculation Logic

Next, we add the following libraries to support sass/scss files.

yarn add node-sass sass-loader -D

For now, the scss files we added are all empty.

Why should we start developing PWAs now?
Hence, you have two options, create your own styles or checkout the following branch of the github project.

git checkout 01_skeletonApp

We also need logic to calculate our income tax. I use the real German income tax formular. To spare the details, I also added it to the branch.

It also contains some css animations for the input validation message. In case you don’t want to use the branch above, you can also add them manually:

yarn add animation.css

Let’s create the Panel Component!

Now we can start coding! To warm you up, we start with building the panel component. It’s good practice to keep such components generic so it can be reused holding any kind of content. That’s why we aim to pass the headline as well as the html for the body to the component.

Let’s add the following code to the template section of the panel.vue file.

<template>
  <div class="panel">
    <div class="header">
      <h2 class="headline">{{ headline }}</h2>
    </div>
    <div class="body">
      <slot />
    </div>
  </div>
</template>

For one-way data binding in VueJS, we can use textinterpolation. That’s exactly what we do to render the headline. Therefore, we simply need to wrap our headline data object in double curly braces. Attention, this “Mustache” syntax interprets data always as plain text, not HTML.

That’s why we also use vue’s slot element, which allows us to render child elements of our panel component within the body element. Now we are done with the html for the panel component, next we define our script logic.

<script>
export default {
  name: "Panel",
  props: {
    headline: String,
  }
};
</script>

First, it’s important to add a name to the component so we can actually register the component and import it later on. As we want to pass the headline to the panel, we should specify it as properties. Properties are custom attributes we can register on a component.

<template>
      <Panel class="calculator-panel" headline="Income Tax Calculator">
        <template>
        <span>content goes here.<span/>
        </template>
      </Panel>
</template>

To see the panel in our app, just add the code above to our app.vue component.

In the script block we already import the component so adding the html is all we need to add our first component to the app!

We should see the panel when we run yarn start.

If we have any problems implementing the panel or want to skip this section check the following branch.

git checkout 02_panel

Let’s create the Input Component!

Next we build our input form with some neat custom input validation.

We have three types of inputs: regular, select and radio.

Except the radio buttons these inputs need input validation and corresponding user feedback. To avoid repeating ourselves, we should build a reusable input component. To build a component which is actually reusable, I advice to build it in a way, that allows to easily extend it without changing the whole architecture.

Defining a clean and thought through component api is a great starting point.

In our case, we always want to control four properties from outside of the component:

  • label
  • input type
  • validation rule
  • data-binding

Let’s translate these requirements into code! The input.vue component looks like the following:

<template>
  <div class="input-wrapper">
    <label>{{label}}</label>
    <input
      class="input"
      v-if="type==='input'"
      @input="customInput($event.target.value)"
      autocomplete="off"
      type="text"
    >
</template>
<script>
export default {
  name: "Input",
  props: {
    type: String,
    label: String,
    validation: String,
  }
}
</script>

We add some custom vue-attributes to the native input component. First we add v-if, which allows us to render the input only if we pass the correct type to our component. This is important to add different types of inputs. Next, we bind to the component’s input event with the @-prefix to a method called customInput.

Thats where our custom input validation comes to play. We add a validation library to the project by running

yarn add vee-validate and register the plugin in our main.js file.

import VeeValidate from "vee-validate";

Vue.use(VeeValidate);

Our validation consists in intercepting the native input event and then check if the entered values meet our validation rule. In case it doesn’t we set an error message. Therefore, we add two methods to the input.vue file. The customInput method is triggered when the user enters any input.

<script>
import { Validator } from "vee-validate";
const validator = new Validator();
... 
data() {
    return {
      validationError: ""
    };
  },
  methods: {
    validate(value) {
      return validator.verify(value, this.validation, {
        name: this.label
      });
    },
    async customInput(value) {
      const { valid, errors } = await this.validate(value);
      if (valid) {
        this.validationError = "";
        this.$emit("input", value);
      } else {
        this.validationError = errors[0];
        this.$emit("input", "");
      }
    }
  }
  </script>

The validation error message is returned from the v-validate plugin. We only have to add some html to show it to the user:

<template>
...
 <transition name="alert-in"
  enter-active-class="animated flipInX"
  leave-active-class="animated flipOutX">
   <p v-if="validationError" class="alert" >
    {{ validationError }}
   </p>
 </transition>
</template>

I add a transition to the error message. VueJS comes with a transition wrapper, combined with the flip-animation from animate.css and some styles, we can get a nice error message without any hassle.

<template>
  <form>
    <Input
      type="input"
      label="Net Income"
      validation="required|numeric"
      v-model="inputs.incomeValue"
      @input="input"
    />
  </form>
</template>

<script>
import Input from "./Input";
export default {
  name: "InputForm",
  components: {
    Input
  },
  data() {
    return {
      inputs: {
        incomeValue: ""
      }
    };
  }
};
</script>

To add the new input to the app, register the completed Input component to the InputForm.vue. Here we apply two-way-binding through v-model — It automatically picks the correct way to update the element based on the input type. Now, we need to open App.vue , import InputForm as we did with Panel and replace <span> content goes here. </span> with <InputForm/>.

The result should look like what you see here on the left side.

Check the branch for more details!

git checkout 03_basicInput

Add more input types!

Now that we have a basic input with validation in place, it’s easy to extend our input component with the remaining two input types — the select and radio input.

For the select element we use an out-off-the-box component. We simply add it by running:

yarn add vue-select

Before we can use it, it needs to be registered in the main.js file similar to the v-validate plugin before. However, this time we use the Vue.componentmethod.

import vSelect from 'vue-select'
..
Vue.component('v-select', vSelect)

Now simply add the component to our Input.vue file. The options we want to show in the dropdown will be passed to the component as props.

template>
...
 <v-select
      v-if="type ==='dropdown'"
      class="input-dropdown"
      @input="customInput"
      :options="options"
    />
</template>
<script>
...
export default {
...
props {
     ...
     options: Array
}

Now there are only the radio buttons left to add.

// image

We start off with the native html element. Even though we just need two radio buttons atm, I advice to build the component in a way that allows to pass an arbitrary number of inputs. Therefore, we simply use vue’sv-for attribute to loop over the options property and create a radio button for each element of the option array.

<template>
 <div
  v-if="type ==='radio'"
  v-for='option in options'
  :key='option.label'
 >
 <input
  type="radio"
  class="radio"
  :id="option.label"
  :value="option.value"
  :checked="value === option.value"
  @input="customInput($event.target.value)"
  >
   <label :for="option.label">{{option.label}}</label>
  </div>
...
</template>

<script>
...
  props: {
    ...
    value: [String, Object, Boolean]
  }
...
 </script>

Additionally, we need to pass the currently selected value in order to manage the ‘checked’ state of the radio button inputs. In the script block we add an array holding all possible value types.

To test our new input types, we need to actually add them to the submit form and pass options to the select and radio input.

Check out the inputForm.vue file in the following branch to see how the options are passed to the new inputs.

It follows the same pattern we have investigated for the regular input in detail.

Most importantly, keep in mind to always pass an object containing a value and a label.

That’s it! We managed to create a component that allows us to add all the input types we need and validate them without repeating ourselves!

Let’s finalise our input form!

Now we can finalise the input form. The only thing missing is the button to submit the form.

<template>
 <form @submit.prevent="handleSubmit">
  ...
  <button
   class='submit-btn'
   :disabled="!isEnabled"
   type="submit"
  >
   Calculate!      
  </button>
 </form>  
</template>
<script>
...
  computed: {
      isEnabled: function() {
        return !!Object.values(this.inputs).every(Boolean);
      }
    },
    methods: {
      input: function(input) {
        if (input.type === "input") {
         this.incomeValue = input.value;
        }
      },
      handleSubmit: function() {
        const { isInChurch, stateOfResidence } = this.inputs;
        const inputValues = {
          ...this.inputs,
          yearValue: yearValue.value,
          isInChurch: isInChurch.value,
          stateOfResidence: stateOfResidence.value
        };
        this.$emit("submitted", inputValues);
      }
    }
</script>

We start with preventing the default html form event, and call our custom method handleSubmit instead.

There we clean our input results — Although our dropdown and radio buttons require return objects with label and value, we are only interested in the value to calculate the results.

Finally, we create a custom event which emits only the values of our input options.

We also create a computed property which enables our “calculate” button only after all required data is entered by the user.

You find the completed input form on the branch I mentioned already above.

git checkout 04_completeInputs

Let’s calculate our taxes!

Now we are already able to get the inputs from the user, next we need to actually calculate the resulting income taxes. As I mentioned in the very beginning, I want to spare you the details about how the different types of deductions are calculated. In case you are interested anyhow check out the calc.js file.

<template>
...
  <InputForm @submitted="submitted" />
...
</template>
<script>
...
import { calcTaxes } from "./calc.js";
export default {
...
  data() {
    return {
      calculations: {}
    };
  },
  methods: {
    submitted: function(input) {
      const calcValues = calcTaxes(input);
      this.calculations = {
        grossIncome: { label: "Gross Salary", value: calcValues.incomeValue },
        tax: { label: "Income Tax", value: -calcValues.incomeTax },
        churchTax: { label: "Church Tax", value: -calcValues.churchTax },
        soli: { label: "Solidarity Charge", value: -calcValues.soli },
        netIncome: { label: "Net Salary", value: calcValues.netIncome }
      };
    },
  }
};
</script>

Most importantly, we understand that we use the custom submitted event to pass the inputs back to our app.vue component. Here we also calculate the actual taxes and store the resulting values with labels, and add negative signs to the values we deduced from the gross income.

— Why? It makes displaying the results very simple as we will see in the next section.

Let’s display our Results!

Now we have everything we need to finally show the results of our tax calculations.

Therefore, we use a native html table to show the label and the corresponding value in a structured manner.

The implementation is quite simple, as we can stick to what we have learned about VueJS already. In fact, we repeat what we have done for the radio input already.

We just pass our calculations as props to the results component and loop over our results object.

<template>
  <div>
    <table>
      <tr class="table-head">
        <th class="name">Name</th>
        <th class="value">Value</th>
      </tr>
      <tr
        v-for='result in results'
        :key="result.label"
      >
        <td>{{result.label}}</td>
        <td class="value">
          {{result.value}}
        </td>
      </tr>
    </table>

    <button
      v-on:click="handleBackClick"
      class="btn-back"
    >
      Back
    </button>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  name: "Result",
  props: {
    results: Object
  },
  methods: {
    handleBackClick: function() {
      this.$emit("clearCalculations");
    }
  }
};
</script>

As users probably want to perform multiple calculations without refreshing the page, we add another button, that leads users back to the input form.

Therefore, we simply emit a custom event called clearCalculations to clear our calculations property in the parent component. Finally, we are also tying all our components together and complete our income tax calculator.

As always, checkout the branch I you want to have a more detailed look at the code.

git checkout 05_result

Let’s finalise our App!

In this last section there is only, two things left to do — complete the data-flow and manage the lifecycle of the input and result component accordingly.

<template>
  <div id="app">
    <main>
      <Panel
        class="calculator-panel"
        headline="Income Tax Calculator"
      >
        <template>
          <transition
            name="alert-in"
            mode="out-in"
            enter-active-class="animated fadeIn"
            leave-active-class="animated fadeOut"
          >
            <InputForm
              v-if="!resultsCalculated"
              @submitted="submitted"
            />
            <Result
              v-if="resultsCalculated"
              @clearCalculations='clearCalculations'
              :results="calculations"
            />
          </transition>
        </template>
      </Panel>
    </main>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
...
export default {
  ...
  data() {
    return {
      calculations: {}
    };
  },
  computed: {
    resultsCalculated: function() {
      return Object.keys(this.calculations).length !== 0;
    }
  },
  methods: {
   ...
   clearCalculations: function() {
    this.calculations = {};
   }
  }
};
</script>

in the Result.vue component we just added a button which emits the clearCalculation event. On the left, we see our main component App.vue. Here we subscribe to the event and reset the calculations object to be empty.

Now, we want to only render the input or the result component.

Therefore, we add another computed boolean property, which checks if we have calculation results or not.

Now, we add v-if attributes to our components based on our resultsCalculated prop.

Try it out! Now we should see the table with the results only after we have successfully entered our inputs.

To make the switch between input and results less harsh we add a transition. As we are replacing the one with the other component here, we use the mode attribute out-in so that, the current element transitions out first, then when complete, the new element transitions in.

We completed the tutorial! Well done! The branch with the finale application code is the following

git checkout 06_complete

In this tutorial, we will implement and discuss the Service Worker, one of the core technologies that adds the astonishing offline-first experience of a native app to a regular web app.

Offline-first Paradigm

On the web of today the majority of websites and web apps simply fail when there is no network connection. This is so common, that users of today don’t even complain about this poor experience.

For Progressive Web Apps it’s different, as these bridge the gap between native and web applications. In contrast to the web, native app users do not simply accept complete crashes due to poor network connectivity.

Thats why building PWAs does not only require new technologies but also a new paradigm to meet these user expectations. This very paradigm is called offline-first! Boiled down to one single sentence:

Why should we start developing PWAs now?
We jump right into learning what offline-first means for app development by checking out the tax calculator app as our starting point.

The Tax Calculator App

That’s the VueJS app we have build in Part I of this tutorial. It helps users to calculate German income tax (it’s really tricky) based on some personal details.

To get started with the already completed app check out the 07_complete branch of this repo.

Let’s make the app work offline!

Let’s start with making our income tax calculator available offline. Typically, all static files (HTML, JS, CSS, images, etc.) are requested again and again with each page refresh. As the tax calculator app does its calculations in the frontend, a server connection is not really required, but for fetching these static files. That means, to make our app available offline we simply need can simply cache them by using a Service Worker!

Sounds not as easy to do, right?

In fact, most of the job is already done. Our app is based on VueJS PWA template that supports pre-caching of static assets out of the box. However, it’s not easy to understand whats going on if you are not familiar with the the concept of Service Workers and the CacheStorage API yet.

That’s why we start with exploring both topics in this section!

What is a Service Worker?

A service worker is a script that your browser runs in the background, separate from a web page. It can neither directly interact with the webpage nor directly access the DOM because he service worker runs on a different thread. This nature of service workers opens the door to features that don’t need a web page or user interaction, e.g the interception and management of network requests and including data caching.

Check it our yourself! Go to webpack.prod.conf file, thats where we configure sw-precache to build a service worker. Look for the SWPrecacheWebpackPlugin constructor and change the minified option to false.

Then, run yarn build. When we now check our /build folder, we find the service-worker.js file there. Service Workers are a production only feature. Imaging, your app would cache all static files in development mode…not a very pleasant dev experience. That’s why we need to serve our production build in order to ensure it is all working correctly.

yarn global add serve

Then run the following command and browse http://localhost:3000

serve dist/

You should see the tax calculator as you know it. Now go to the dev tools, network tab. set the offline tick and refresh the page. The app is still there and fully functional!

Great, now we know what a service worker is and how [sw-precache]([https://github.com/GoogleChromeLabs/sw-precache)](https://github.com/GoogleChromeLabs/sw-precache) "https://github.com/GoogleChromeLabs/sw-precache)") lets us set it up very conveniently. However, we haven’t explored how the service worker actually caches the static files.

CacheStorage API

First of all, important to understand how caching in general works. Therefore we have a look at the CacheStorage browser API. It’s a fairly new type of caching layer which allows us to explicitly manage the caching of assets. CacheStorage is nothing like AppCache, you might remember. CacheStorage is less opinionated and much more advanced, which gives us a lot more freedom.

CacheStorage is great for our purpose, as it allows us to manage our caching needs on a very granular level. Basically, we can decide individually for each single single how and when to serve it from cache or network. Even though, we can basically come up with very individual cache strategy, there are a few common once, worth knowing.

The most common are cache only, cache falling back to network, network only, network, falling back to cache and generic fallback.

The Cache-first Strategy

Our sw-precache library comes with a cache-first strategy.

That means, when the app starts to load its static files(1), the service worker intercepts the requests. Next, the service worker tries to serve the static files from the local cache storage(2). Only if not files are available there, it connects to the network to fetch them(3) and completes the app’s request(4).

Generally speaking, cache-first is a good strategy for basic offline-first implementations. However, this strategy comes with some downsides. For example, it prevents that users always see the newest version of the app, as the service worker serves preferably a cached, probably outdated, app version. In the documentation of sw-precache they recommend compensation this by

Why should we start developing PWAs now?
In the case of our tax calculator this isn’t a big problem, otherwise one of the other caching strategies could be a better choice.

The Service Worker LifeCycle

To successfully implement any of the mentioned caching strategy it’s important to be familiar with the life cycle of a service worker. So let’s look at a simplified version of the actual lifecycle for now. We look at the following stages: i_nstalling, activating_ and activated. Each of these stagesmust be completed during the life time of a worker.

When the worker enters one of the stages it emits an event, we can listen to. Now we can checkout how our service worker is actually caching our static files. Don’t let the helper functions confuse you, I highlight for you whats most important.

self.addEventListener("install", function(event) {
  event.waitUntil(
    caches
      .open(cacheName)
      .then(function(cache) {
        return setOfCachedUrls(cache).then(function(cachedUrls) {
          return Promise.all(
            Array.from(urlsToCacheKeys.values()).map(function(cacheKey) {
              ...
              return fetch(request).then(function(response) {
                 ...
                return cleanResponse(response).then(function(responseToCache) {
                  return cache.put(cacheKey, responseToCache);
                });
              });
            })
          );
        });
      })
      .then(function() {
        // Force the SW to transition from installing -> active state
        return self.skipWaiting();
      })
  );
});

Install Event, typically used to cache files which are required to be available, before the service worker is active. For example, requests the service worker relies on to function correctly. If anything goes wrong we simply cancel the installation. Next time the user visits the page, the service worker will try to install again.

If there is new static assets, they are added to the cache by cache.put(cacheKey, resonseToCache) , else the worker transitions to the next stage.event.waitUntil() is heavily used in service workers to extend the current state till the passed chain of callbacks is resolved.

self.addEventListener("activate", function(event) {
  var setOfExpectedUrls = new Set(urlsToCacheKeys.values());

  event.waitUntil(
    caches
      .open(cacheName)
      .then(function(cache) {
        return cache.keys().then(function(existingRequests) {
          return Promise.all(
            existingRequests.map(function(existingRequest) {
              if (!setOfExpectedUrls.has(existingRequest.url)) {
                return cache.delete(existingRequest);
              }
            })
          );
        });
      })
      .then(function() {
        return self.clients.claim();
      })
  );
});

Activate Event, when a service worker is activated, it takes control of our app. A worker needs to be activated before it can intercept fetch requests. When a worker is initially registered, pages won’t use it until they next load. The claim() method forces the service workers to immediately take control of a page. We also can do some more cache management here and delete request from the cache which are not part of our expected URLs anymore.

Fetch Event, The fetch event is the only thing which we haven’t seen is how the service worker actually fetches the cached static files. That happens by listening to fetch events.

self.addEventListener("fetch", function(event) {
  if (event.request.method === "GET") {
    var shouldRespond;
    ...
    if (shouldRespond) {
      event.respondWith(
        caches
          .open(cacheName)
          .then(function(cache) {
            return cache
              .match(urlsToCacheKeys.get(url))
              .then(function(response) {
                  return response;
                  ...
              });
          })
          .catch(function(e) {
            console.warn(
              'Couldn\'t serve response for "%s" from cache: %O',
              event.request.url,
              e
            );
            return fetch(event.request);
          })
      );
    }
  }
});

I skipped how shouldRespond is calculated, it’s more important to understand how we return content from cache to all GET requests. In case we can’t serve from cache, as we might haven’t cached a requested resource, we simply let the request through, fetching the content from the network.

Don’t forget to go back to your webpack.prod.conf file to reset the minified option to true.

Are Service Workers well supported?

You might already wondered about browser and platform support for Service Workers. Long Story short, all major browser vendors and platforms are clearly committed to extend their PWA support.

However, Apple is far behind and it will probably take a long time till they catch up. Just with last year’s iOS 11.3 update Apple started to support the basic features of service workers.

That’s all we need to know about Service Workers and Caching for now. We have covered the essential bits and pieces to make our app a true offline-first experience!

Thanks for reading!

*Originally published by Fabian Hinsenkamp at *https://hackernoon.com

Learn More

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Nuxt.js - Vue.js on Steroids

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Introduction New Features in TypeScript 3.7 and How to Use Them

Introduction New Features in TypeScript 3.7 and How to Use Them

The TypeScript 3.7 release is coming soon, and it's going to be a big one.

The target release date is November 5th, and there are some seriously exciting headline features included:

  • Assert signatures.
  • Recursive type aliases.
  • Top-level await.
  • Null coalescing.
  • Optional chaining.

Personally, I'm super excited about this, they're going to whisk away all sorts of annoyances that I've been fighting in TypeScript while building HTTP Toolkit.

If you haven't been paying close attention to the TypeScript development process though, it's probably not clear what half of these mean, or why you should care. Let's talk through all of them.

Assert Signatures

This is a brand-new and little-known TypeScript feature, which allows you to write functions that act like type guards as a side-effect, rather than explicitly returning their boolean result.

It's easiest to demonstrate this with a JavaScript example:

function assertString(input) { 
  if (typeof input === 'string') 
    return; 
  else 
    throw new Error('Input must be a string!'); 
} 
function doSomething(input) { 
  assertString(input); 
  // ... Use input, confident that it's a string 
} 
doSomething('abc'); 
// All good doSomething(123); // Throws an error

This pattern is neat and useful, and you can't use it in TypeScript today.

TypeScript can't know that you've guaranteed the type of input after it's run assertString. Typically, people just make the argument input: string to avoid this, and that's good. But, it also just pushes the type checking problem somewhere else, and in cases where you just want to fail hard, it's useful to have this option available.

Fortunately, soon we will:

// With TS 3.7 
function assertString(input: any): 
	asserts input is string { 
      // <-- the magic 
      if (typeof input === 'string') 
        return; 
      else 
        throw new Error('Input must be a string!'); 
    } 
function doSomething(input: string | number) { 
  assertString(input); 
  // input's type is just 'string' here }

Here assert input is string means that if this function ever returns, TypeScript can narrow the type of input to string, just as if it was inside an if block with a type guard.

To make this safe, that means if the assert statement isn't true then your assert function must either throw an error or not return at all (kill the process, infinite loop, you name it).

That's the basics, but this actually lets you pull some really neat tricks:

// With TS 3.7 
// Asserts that input is truthy, throwing immediately if not: 
function assert(input: any): 
	asserts input { // <-- not a typo 
      if (!input) 
        throw new Error('Not a truthy value'); 
    } 
declare const x: number | string | undefined; 
assert(x); // Narrows x to number | string 
// Also usable with type guarding expressions! 
assert(typeof x === 'string'); 
// Narrows x to string // -- Or use assert in your tests: -- 
const a: Result | Error = doSomethingTestable(); 
expect(a).is.instanceOf(result); 
// 'instanceOf' could 'asserts a is Result' 
expect(a.resultValue).to.equal(123); 
// a.resultValue is now legal // -- Use as a safer ! that throws immediately if 
// you're wrong -- 
function assertDefined<T>(obj: T): 
	asserts obj is NonNullable<T> { 
      if (obj === undefined || obj === null) { 
        throw new Error('Must not be a nullable value'); 
      } 
    } 
declare const x: string | undefined; 
// Gives y just 'string' as a type, could throw elsewhere later: 
const y = x!; 
// Gives y 'string' as a type, or throws immediately if you're wrong: 
assertDefined(x); const z = x; 
// -- Or even update types to track a function's side-effects -- 
type X<T extends string | {}> = { value: T }; 
// Use asserts to narrow types according to side effects: 
function setX<T extends string | {}>(x: X<any>, v: T): 
	asserts x is X<T> { 
      x.value = v; 
    } 
	declare let x: X<any>; 
// x is now { value: any }; 
setX(x, 123); 
// x is now { value: number };

This is still in flux, so don't take it as the definite result, and keep an eye on the pull request if you want the final details.

There's even a discussion there about allowing functions to assert something and return a type, which would let you extend the final example above to track a much wider variety of side effects, but we'll have to wait and see how that plays out.

Top-Level Await

Async/await is amazing and makes promises dramatically cleaner to use.

Unfortunately, though, you can't use them at the top level. This might not be something you care about much in a TS library or application, but if you're writing a runnable script or using TypeScript in a REPL, then this gets super annoying.

It's even worse if you're used to frontend development, since top-level await has been working nicely in the Chrome and Firefox console for a couple of years now.

Fortunately though, a fix is coming. This is actually a general stage-3 JS proposal, so it'll be everywhere else eventually too, but for TS devs 3.7 is where the magic happens.

This one's simple, but let's have another quick demo anyway:


// Your only solution right now for a script that does something async: 
async function doEverything() { 
  ... 
  const response = await fetch('http://example.com'); 
  ... 
} 
  
doEverything(); // <- eugh (could use an IIFE instead, but even more eugh)

With top-level await:

// With TS 3.7: 
// Your script: ... 
const response = await fetch('http://example.com'); 
// ...

There's a notable gotcha here: if you're not writing a script, or using a REPL, don't write this at the top level, unless you really know what you're doing!

It's totally possible to use this to write modules that do blocking async steps when imported. That can be useful for some niche cases, but people tend to assume that their import statement is a synchronous, reliable, and fairly quick operation, and you could easily hose your codebase's startup time if you start blocking imports for complex async processes (even worse, processes that can fail).

This is somewhat mitigated by the semantics of imports of async modules: they're imported and run in parallel, so the importing module effectively waits for Promise.all(importedModules) before being executed.

Rich Harris wrote an excellent piece on a previous version of this spec before that change when imports ran sequentially and this problem was much worse), which makes for good background reading on the risks here if you're interested.

It's also worth noting that this is only useful for module systems that support asynchronous imports. There isn't yet a formal spec for how TS will handle this, but that likely means that a very recent target configuration, and, either ES Modules or Webpack v5 (whose alphas have experimental support), will be used at runtime.

Recursive Type Aliases

If you're ever tried to define a recursive type in TypeScript, you may have run into StackOverflow questions like this: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/47842266/recursive-types-in-typescript.

Right now, you can't. Interfaces can be recursive, but there are limitations to their expressiveness, and type aliases can't. That means right now, you need to combine the two: define a type alias and extract the recursive parts of the type into interfaces. It works, but it's messy, and we can do better.

As a concrete example, this is the suggested type definition for JSON data:

type JSONValue = | string | number | boolean | JSONObject | JSONArray; 
interface JSONObject { [x: string]: JSONValue; } 
interface JSONArray extends Array<JSONValue> { }

That works, but the extra interfaces are only there because they're required to get around the recursion limitation.

Fixing this requires no new syntax; it just removes that restriction, so the below compiles:

// With TS 3.7: 
type JSONValue = | string | number | boolean | { [x: string]: JSONValue } | Array<JSONValue>;

Right now, that fails to compile with Type alias 'JSONValue' circularly references itself. Soon though, soon...

Null Coalescing

Aside from being difficult to spell, this one is quite simple and easy. It's based on a JavaScript stage-3 proposal, which means it'll also be coming to your favorite vanilla JavaScript environment soon (if it hasn't already).

In JavaScript, there's a common pattern for handling default values, and falling back to the first valid result of a defined group. It looks something like this:

// Use the first of firstResult/secondResult which is truthy: 
const result = firstResult || secondResult; 
// Use configValue from provided options if truthy, or 'default' if not: 
this.configValue = options.configValue || 'default';

This is useful in a host of cases, but due to some interesting quirks in JavaScript, it can catch you out. If firstResult or options.configValue can meaningfully be set to false, an empty string or 0, then this code has a bug. If those values are set, then when considered as booleans they're falsy, so the fallback value (secondResult / 'default') is used anyway.

Null coalescing fixes this. Instead of the above, you'll be able to write:

// With TS 3.7: 
// Use the first of firstResult/secondResult which is *defined*: 
const result = firstResult ?? secondResult; 
// Use configSetting from provided options if *defined*, or 'default' if not: 
this.configValue = options.configValue ?? 'default';

?? differs from || in that it falls through to the next value only if the first argument is null or undefined, not falsy. That fixes our bug. If you pass false as firstResult, that will be used instead of secondResult because, while it's falsy, it is still defined, and that's all that's required.

It's simple but super-useful, as it takes away a whole class of bugs.

Optional Chaining

Last but not least, optional chaining is another stage-3 proposal that is making its way into TypeScript.

This is designed to solve an issue faced by developers in every language: how do you get data out of a data structure when some or all of it might not be present?

Right now, you might do something like this:

// To get data.key1.key2, if any level could be null/undefined: 
let result = data ? (data.key1 ? data.key1.key2 : undefined) : undefined; 
// Another equivalent alternative: 
let result = ((data || {}).key1 || {}).key2;

Nasty! This gets much much worse if you need to go deeper, and although the second example works at runtime, it won't even compile in TypeScript, since the first step could be {}, in which case key1 isn't a valid key at all.

This gets still more complicated if you're trying to get into an array, or there's a function call somewhere in this process.

There's a host of other approaches to this, but they're all noisy, messy & error-prone. With optional chaining, you can do this:

// With TS 3.7: 
// Returns the value is it's all defined & non-null, or undefined if not. 
let result = data?.key1?.key2; 
// The same, through an array index or property, if possible: 
array?.[0]?.['key']; 
// Call a method, but only if it's defined: 
obj.method?.(); 
// Get a property, or return 'default' if any step is not defined: 
let result = data?.key1?.key2 ?? 'default';

The last case shows how neatly some of these dovetails together: null coalescing + optional chaining is a match made in heaven.

One gotcha: this will return undefined for missing values, even if they were null, e.g. in cases like (null)?.key (returns undefined). A small point, but one to watch out for if you have a lot of null in your data structures.

That's the lot! That should outline all the essentials for these features, but there are lots of smaller improvements, fixes, and editor support improvements coming too, so take a look at the official roadmap if you want to get into the nitty-gritty.

Angular 8 Pagination Example and Tutorial

Angular 8 Pagination Example and Tutorial

Pagination is the best way to show huge number of records in series for any application. Also showing/fetching thousands of record at one go will affect the performance of the application.

Pagination is the best way to show huge number of records in series for any application. Also showing/fetching thousands of record at one go will affect the performance of the application.

For example, when you search something that returns a large number of records which cannot be shown on a single web page therefore, those records are part into number of pages that can be accessed through links via pagination structure.

So today in this demo we will discuss the simple pagination in Angular 8.

Step 1: Create a basic app with angular cli
ng new angular8-simple-pagination-example

By typing the above command we will see a basic angular app created on the current folder. So move to the created folder by typing **cd angular8-simple-pagination-example/. **You can check the newly created app by typing http://localhost:4200 on the browser.

Step 2: install ngx-pagination pagination dependency from terminal

So run the below command over terminal

npm install ngx-pagination --save

Step 3: Create dummy records for pagination

Now we will create static data to show the pagination. So lets have a look on the code under file **app.component.ts **

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import {NgxPaginationModule} from 'ngx-pagination';
@Component({
   selector: 'app-root',
   templateUrl: './app.component.html',
   styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})
export class AppComponent {
   title = 'simple pagination demo';
   collection = [];
   constructor(){
     for(let i=1;i<=100;i++){
       let Obj = {'name': `Employee Name ${i}`,'code': `EMP00 ${i}`}
       this.collection.push(Obj);
     }
   }
}

In the above file, we can see that inside constructor we have created a loop for created dummy record for 100 employees having employee name & code for showing pagination.

Step 4: Import dependency in app.module.ts

Now let's have a look on the code inside **app.module.ts **where the ngx-pagination module has been imported

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
 
import { NgxPaginationModule } from 'ngx-pagination';
import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
 
@NgModule({
declarations: [
AppComponent
],
imports: [
BrowserModule,
NgxPaginationModule
],
providers: [],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

Step 5: Update view from app.component.html

Now one last step needed to do is, add the below code anywhere inside app.component.html

*  Emp Name | Emp code
 {{item.name}} | {{item.code}} 


Now, we are done with all the needed steps for the pagination in our angular application.

Step 6: Run the app

Run the app over the terminal with npm start and check the app after typing the url http://localhost:4200/.** **A page will open like below:

Conclusion

By following these easy steps we can easily achieve the client side pagination in Angular 8 application. If you want to impliment server side pagination in angular8 Server Side Pagination in Angular Example and Tutorial . You can also find other demos of Angular Sample Application here to start working on enterprise level application. Click here to view more about the pagination package over npm.

Create Simple Login Page using Angular 8 and HTTP Authentication

Create Simple Login Page using Angular 8 and HTTP Authentication

In this article, you'll learn how to setup a simple login page using Angular 8 and Basic HTTP authentication

In this article, you'll learn how to setup a simple login page using Angular 8 and Basic HTTP authentication

Tutorial built with Angular 8.0.2 and the Angular CLI

Angular CLI was used to generate the base project structure with the ng new command, the CLI is also used to build and serve the application. For more info about the Angular CLI see https://angular.io/cli.

Styling of the example app is all done with Bootstrap 4.3, for more info about Bootstrap see https://getbootstrap.com/docs/4.3/getting-started/introduction/.

Running the Angular 8 Basic Authentication Tutorial Example Locally
  1. Install NodeJS and NPM from https://nodejs.org/en/download/.
  2. Download or clone the tutorial project source code from https://github.com/cornflourblue/angular-8-basic-authentication-example
  3. Install all required npm packages by running npm install from the command line in the project root folder (where the package.json is located).
  4. Start the application by running npm start from the
  5. command line in the project root folder, this will build the application
  6. and automatically launch it in the browser on the URL
  7. http://localhost:4200.

NOTE: You can also run the app directly using the Angular CLI command ng serve --open. To do this first install the Angular CLI globally on your system with the command npm install -g @angular/cli.

Running the Tutorial Example with a Real Backend API

The Angular 8 basic authentication example app uses a fake / mock backend by default so it can run in the browser without a real api, to switch to a real backend api you just have to remove or comment out the line below the comment // provider used to create fake backend located in the /src/app/app.module.ts file.

Angular 8 Tutorial Project Structure

The app and code structure of the tutorial mostly follows the best practice recommendations in the official Angular Style Guide, with a few of my own tweaks here and there.

Each feature has it's own folder (home & login), other shared/common code such as services, models, helpers etc are placed in folders prefixed with an underscore _ to easily differentiate them and group them together at the top of the folder structure.

The index.ts files in each folder are barrel files that group the exported modules from a folder together so they can be imported using the folder path instead of the full module path and to enable importing multiple modules in a single import (e.g. import { AuthenticationService, UserService } from '../_services').

Path aliases @app and @environments have been configured in tsconfig.json that map to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

Here are the main project files that contain the application logic, I left out some files that were generated by Angular CLI ng new command that I didn't change.

  • src
  • app
  • _helpers
  • auth.guard.ts
  • basic-auth.interceptor.ts
  • error.interceptor.ts
  • fake-backend.ts
  • index.ts
  • _models
  • user.ts
  • index.ts
  • _services
  • authentication.service.ts
  • user.service.ts
  • index.ts
  • home
  • home.component.html
  • home.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • login
  • login.component.html
  • login.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • app.component.html
  • app.component.ts
  • app.module.ts
  • app.routing.ts
  • environments
  • environment.prod.ts
  • environment.ts
  • index.html
  • main.ts
  • polyfills.ts
  • styles.less
  • package.json
  • tsconfig.json
Auth Guard

Path: /src/app/_helpers/auth.guard.ts

The auth guard is an angular route guard that's used to prevent unauthenticated users from accessing restricted routes, it does this by implementing the CanActivate interface which allows the guard to decide if a route can be activated with the canActivate() method. If the method returns true the route is activated (allowed to proceed), otherwise if the method returns false the route is blocked.

The auth guard uses the authentication service to check if the user is logged in, if they are logged in it returns true from the canActivate() method, otherwise it returns false and redirects the user to the login page.

Angular route guards are attached to routes in the router config, this auth guard is used in app.routing.ts to protect the home page route.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, CanActivate, ActivatedRouteSnapshot, RouterStateSnapshot } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthGuard implements CanActivate {
    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { }

    canActivate(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) {
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser) {
            // logged in so return true
            return true;
        }

        // not logged in so redirect to login page with the return url
        this.router.navigate(['/login'], { queryParams: { returnUrl: state.url } });
        return false;
    }
}
Basic Authentication Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/basic-auth.interceptor.ts

The Basic Authentication Interceptor intercepts http requests from the application to add basic authentication credentials to the Authorization header if the user is logged in.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to modify http requests before they get sent to the server.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the _app.module.ts_ file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class BasicAuthInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        // add authorization header with basic auth credentials if available
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser && currentUser.authdata) {
            request = request.clone({
                setHeaders: { 
                    Authorization: `Basic ${currentUser.authdata}`
                }
            });
        }

        return next.handle(request);
    }
}
Http Error Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/error.interceptor.ts

The Error Interceptor intercepts http responses from the api to check if there were any errors. If there is a 401 Unauthorized response the user is automatically logged out of the application, all other errors are re-thrown up to the calling service so an alert with the error can be displayed on the screen.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to catch all error responses from the server in a single location.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the app.module.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { catchError } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class ErrorInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        return next.handle(request).pipe(catchError(err => {
            if (err.status === 401) {
                // auto logout if 401 response returned from api
                this.authenticationService.logout();
                location.reload(true);
            }

            const error = err.error.message || err.statusText;
            return throwError(error);
        }))
    }
}
Fake Backend Provider

Path: /src/app/_helpers/fake-backend.ts

In order to run and test the Angular application without a real backend API, the example uses a fake backend that intercepts the HTTP requests from the Angular app and send back "fake" responses. This is done by a class that implements the Angular HttpInterceptor interface, for more information on Angular HTTP Interceptors see https://angular.io/api/common/http/HttpInterceptor

The fake backend contains a handleRoute function that checks if the request matches one of the faked routes in the switch statement, at the moment this includes POST requests to the /users/authenticate route for handling authentication, and GET requests to the /users route for getting all users.

Requests to the authenticate route are handled by the authenticate() function which checks the username and password against an array of hardcoded users. If the username and password are correct then an ok response is returned with the user details, otherwise an error response is returned.

Requests to the get users route are handled by the getUsers() function which checks if the user is logged in by calling the new isLoggedIn() helper function. If the user is logged in an ok() response with the whole users array is returned, otherwise a 401 Unauthorized response is returned by calling the new unauthorized() helper function.

If the request doesn't match any of the faked routes it is passed through as a real HTTP request to the backend API.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpResponse, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, of, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { delay, mergeMap, materialize, dematerialize } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';

const users: User[] = [{ id: 1, username: 'test', password: 'test', firstName: 'Test', lastName: 'User' }];

@Injectable()
export class FakeBackendInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        const { url, method, headers, body } = request;

        // wrap in delayed observable to simulate server api call
        return of(null)
            .pipe(mergeMap(handleRoute))
            .pipe(materialize()) // call materialize and dematerialize to ensure delay even if an error is thrown (https://github.com/Reactive-Extensions/RxJS/issues/648)
            .pipe(delay(500))
            .pipe(dematerialize());

        function handleRoute() {
            switch (true) {
                case url.endsWith('/users/authenticate') && method === 'POST':
                    return authenticate();
                case url.endsWith('/users') && method === 'GET':
                    return getUsers();
                default:
                    // pass through any requests not handled above
                    return next.handle(request);
            }    
        }

        // route functions

        function authenticate() {
            const { username, password } = body;
            const user = users.find(x => x.username === username && x.password === password);
            if (!user) return error('Username or password is incorrect');
            return ok({
                id: user.id,
                username: user.username,
                firstName: user.firstName,
                lastName: user.lastName
            })
        }

        function getUsers() {
            if (!isLoggedIn()) return unauthorized();
            return ok(users);
        }

        // helper functions

        function ok(body?) {
            return of(new HttpResponse({ status: 200, body }))
        }

        function error(message) {
            return throwError({ error: { message } });
        }

        function unauthorized() {
            return throwError({ status: 401, error: { message: 'Unauthorised' } });
        }

        function isLoggedIn() {
            return headers.get('Authorization') === `Basic ${window.btoa('test:test')}`;
        }
    }
}

export let fakeBackendProvider = {
    // use fake backend in place of Http service for backend-less development
    provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS,
    useClass: FakeBackendInterceptor,
    multi: true
};
User Model

Path: /src/app/_models/user.ts

The user model is a small class that defines the properties of a user.

export class User {
    id: number;
    username: string;
    password: string;
    firstName: string;
    lastName: string;
    authdata?: string;
}
Authentication Service

Path: /src/app/_services/authentication.service.ts

The authentication service is used to login & logout of the Angular app, it notifies other components when the user logs in & out, and allows access the currently logged in user.

RxJS Subjects and Observables are used to store the current user object and notify other components when the user logs in and out of the app. Angular components can subscribe() to the public currentUser: Observable property to be notified of changes, and notifications are sent when the this.currentUserSubject.next() method is called in the login() and logout() methods, passing the argument to each subscriber. The RxJS BehaviorSubject is a special type of Subject that keeps hold of the current value and emits it to any new subscribers as soon as they subscribe, while regular Subjects don't store the current value and only emit values that are published after a subscription is created.

The login() method sends the user credentials to the API via an HTTP POST request for authentication. If successful the user's basic authentication data (base64 encoded username and password) is added to the user object and stored in localStorage to keep the user logged in between page refreshes. The user object is then published to all subscribers with the call to this.currentUserSubject.next(user);.

The basic auth data is used by the basic authentication interceptor above to set the authorization header of http requests made to secure api endpoints.

The constructor() of the service initialises the currentUserSubject with the currentUser object from localStorage which enables the user to stay logged in between page refreshes or after the browser is closed. The public currentUser property is then set to this.currentUserSubject.asObservable(); which allows other components to subscribe to the currentUser Observable but doesn't allow them to publish to the currentUserSubject, this is so logging in and out of the app can only be done via the authentication service.

The currentUserValue getter allows other components an easy way to get the value of the currently logged in user without having to subscribe to the currentUser Observable.

The logout() method removes the current user object from local storage and publishes null to the currentUserSubject to notify all subscribers that the user has logged out.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';
import { BehaviorSubject, Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { map } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthenticationService {
    private currentUserSubject: BehaviorSubject;
    public currentUser: Observable;

    constructor(private http: HttpClient) {
        this.currentUserSubject = new BehaviorSubject(JSON.parse(localStorage.getItem('currentUser')));
        this.currentUser = this.currentUserSubject.asObservable();
    }

    public get currentUserValue(): User {
        return this.currentUserSubject.value;
    }

    login(username: string, password: string) {
        return this.http.post(`${environment.apiUrl}/users/authenticate`, { username, password })
            .pipe(map(user => {
                // store user details and basic auth credentials in local storage to keep user logged in between page refreshes
                user.authdata = window.btoa(username + ':' + password);
                localStorage.setItem('currentUser', JSON.stringify(user));
                this.currentUserSubject.next(user);
                return user;
            }));
    }

    logout() {
        // remove user from local storage to log user out
        localStorage.removeItem('currentUser');
        this.currentUserSubject.next(null);
    }
}
User Service

Path: /src/app/_services/user.service.ts

The user service contains a method for getting all users from the api, I included it to demonstrate accessing a secure api endpoint with the http authorization header set after logging in to the application, the auth header is automatically set with basic authentication credentials by the basic authentication interceptor. The secure endpoint in the example is a fake one implemented in the fake backend provider.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class UserService {
    constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

    getAll() {
        return this.http.get(`${environment.apiUrl}/users`);
    }
}
Home Component Template

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.html

The home component template contains html and angular 8 template syntax for displaying a simple welcome message and a list of users from a secure api endpoint.


    #### You're logged in with Angular 8 & Basic HTTP Authentication!!

    
        ###### Users from secure api end point

        

        
            {{user.firstName}} {{user.lastName}}
        
    

Home Component

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.ts

The home component defines an angular 8 component that gets all users from the user service and makes them available to the template via a users array property.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';
import { UserService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'home.component.html' })
export class HomeComponent {
    loading = false;
    users: User[];

    constructor(private userService: UserService) { }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loading = true;
        this.userService.getAll().pipe(first()).subscribe(users => {
            this.loading = false;
            this.users = users;
        });
    }
}
Login Component Template

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.html

The login component template contains a login form with username and password fields. It displays validation messages for invalid fields when the submit button is clicked. The form submit event is bound to the onSubmit() method of the login component.


    
        Username: test

        Password: test
    
    
        #### Angular 8 Basic Auth Login Example

        
            
                
                    Username
                    
                    
                        Username is required

                    
                
                
                    Password
                    
                    
                        Password is required

                    
                
                
                    
                    Login
                
                {{error}}

            
        
    

Login Component

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.ts

The login component uses the authentication service to login to the application. If the user is already logged in they are automatically redirected to the home page.

The loginForm: FormGroup object defines the form controls and validators, and is used to access data entered into the form. The FormGroup is part of the Angular Reactive Forms module and is bound to the login template above with the [formGroup]="loginForm" directive.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { FormBuilder, FormGroup, Validators } from '@angular/forms';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'login.component.html' })
export class LoginComponent implements OnInit {
    loginForm: FormGroup;
    loading = false;
    submitted = false;
    returnUrl: string;
    error = '';

    constructor(
        private formBuilder: FormBuilder,
        private route: ActivatedRoute,
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { 
        // redirect to home if already logged in
        if (this.authenticationService.currentUserValue) { 
            this.router.navigate(['/']);
        }
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loginForm = this.formBuilder.group({
            username: ['', Validators.required],
            password: ['', Validators.required]
        });

        // get return url from route parameters or default to '/'
        this.returnUrl = this.route.snapshot.queryParams['returnUrl'] || '/';
    }

    // convenience getter for easy access to form fields
    get f() { return this.loginForm.controls; }

    onSubmit() {
        this.submitted = true;

        // stop here if form is invalid
        if (this.loginForm.invalid) {
            return;
        }

        this.loading = true;
        this.authenticationService.login(this.f.username.value, this.f.password.value)
            .pipe(first())
            .subscribe(
                data => {
                    this.router.navigate([this.returnUrl]);
                },
                error => {
                    this.error = error;
                    this.loading = false;
                });
    }
}
App Component Template

Path: /src/app/app.component.html

The app component template is the root component template of the application, it contains the main nav bar which is only displayed for authenticated users, and a router-outlet directive for displaying the contents of each view based on the current route / path.



    
        Home
        Logout
    




    

App Component

Path: /src/app/app.component.ts

The app component is the root component of the application, it defines the root tag of the app as `` with the selector property of the @Component() decorator.

It subscribes to the currentUser observable in the authentication service so it can reactively show/hide the main navigation bar when the user logs in/out of the application. I didn't worry about unsubscribing from the observable here because it's the root component of the application, the only time the component will be destroyed is when the application is closed which would destroy any subscriptions as well.

The app component contains a logout() method which is called from the logout link in the main nav bar above to log the user out and redirect them to the login page.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from './_services';
import { User } from './_models';

@Component({ selector: 'app', templateUrl: 'app.component.html' })
export class AppComponent {
    currentUser: User;

    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) {
        this.authenticationService.currentUser.subscribe(x => this.currentUser = x);
    }

    logout() {
        this.authenticationService.logout();
        this.router.navigate(['/login']);
    }
}
App Module

Path: /src/app/app.module.ts

The app module defines the root module of the application along with metadata about the module. For more info about angular 8 modules check out this page on the official docs site.

This is where the fake backend provider is added to the application, to switch to a real backend simply remove the providers located below the comment // provider used to create fake backend.

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { ReactiveFormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpClientModule, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';

// used to create fake backend
import { fakeBackendProvider } from './_helpers';

import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
import { appRoutingModule } from './app.routing';

import { BasicAuthInterceptor, ErrorInterceptor } from './_helpers';
import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';

@NgModule({
    imports: [
        BrowserModule,
        ReactiveFormsModule,
        HttpClientModule,
        appRoutingModule
    ],
    declarations: [
        AppComponent,
        HomeComponent,
        LoginComponent
    ],
    providers: [
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: BasicAuthInterceptor, multi: true },
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: ErrorInterceptor, multi: true },

        // provider used to create fake backend
        fakeBackendProvider
    ],
    bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }
App Routing Module

Path: /src/app/app.routing.ts

Routing for the Angular app is configured as an array of Routes, each component is mapped to a path so the Angular Router knows which component to display based on the URL in the browser address bar. The home route is secured by passing the AuthGuard to the canActivate property of the route.

The Routes array is passed to the RouterModule.forRoot() method which creates a routing module with all of the app routes configured, and also includes all of the Angular Router providers and directives such as the `` directive. For more information on Angular Routing and Navigation see https://angular.io/guide/router.

import { Routes, RouterModule } from '@angular/router';

import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';
import { AuthGuard } from './_helpers';

const routes: Routes = [
    { path: '', component: HomeComponent, canActivate: [AuthGuard] },
    { path: 'login', component: LoginComponent },

    // otherwise redirect to home
    { path: '**', redirectTo: '' }
];

export const appRoutingModule = RouterModule.forRoot(routes);
Production Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.prod.ts

The production environment config contains variables required to run the application in production. This enables you to build the application with a different configuration for each different environment (e.g. production & development) without updating the app code.

When you build the application for production with the command ng build --prod, the output environment.ts is replaced with environment.prod.ts.

export const environment = {
    production: true,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Development Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.ts

The development environment config contains variables required to run the application in development.

Environment config is accessed by importing the environment object into any Angular service of component with the line import { environment } from '@environments/environment' and accessing properties on the environment object, see the user service for an example.

export const environment = {
    production: false,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Main Index Html File

Path: /src/index.html

The main index.html file is the initial page loaded by the browser that kicks everything off. The Angular CLI (with Webpack under the hood) bundles all of the compiled javascript files together and injects them into the body of the index.html page so the scripts can be loaded and executed by the browser.




    
    Angular 8 - Basic HTTP Authentication Tutorial & Example
    

    
    


    Loading...


Main (Bootstrap) File

Path: /src/main.ts

The main file is the entry point used by angular to launch and bootstrap the application.

import { enableProdMode } from '@angular/core';
import { platformBrowserDynamic } from '@angular/platform-browser-dynamic';

import { AppModule } from './app/app.module';
import { environment } from './environments/environment';

if (environment.production) {
    enableProdMode();
}

platformBrowserDynamic().bootstrapModule(AppModule)
    .catch(err => console.error(err));
Polyfills

Path: /src/polyfills.ts

Some features used by Angular 8 are not yet supported natively by all major browsers, polyfills are used to add support for features where necessary so your Angular 8 application works across all major browsers.

This file is generated by the Angular CLI when creating a new project with the ng new command, I've excluded the comments in the file for brevity.

import 'zone.js/dist/zone';
Global LESS/CSS Styles

Path: /src/styles.less

The global styles file contains LESS/CSS styles that are applied globally throughout the application.

/* You can add global styles to this file, and also import other style files */
a { cursor: pointer }
npm package.json

Path: /package.json

The package.json file contains project configuration information including package dependencies which get installed when you run npm install. Full documentation is available on the npm docs website.

{
    "name": "angular-8-basic-authentication-example",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "scripts": {
        "ng": "ng",
        "start": "ng serve --open",
        "build": "ng build",
        "test": "ng test",
        "lint": "ng lint",
        "e2e": "ng e2e"
    },
    "private": true,
    "dependencies": {
        "@angular/animations": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/common": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/compiler": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/core": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/forms": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/router": "~8.0.1",
        "rxjs": "~6.4.0",
        "tslib": "^1.9.0",
        "zone.js": "~0.9.1"
    },
    "devDependencies": {
        "@angular-devkit/build-angular": "~0.800.0",
        "@angular/cli": "~8.0.3",
        "@angular/compiler-cli": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/language-service": "~8.0.1",
        "@types/node": "~8.9.4",
        "@types/jasmine": "~3.3.8",
        "@types/jasminewd2": "~2.0.3",
        "codelyzer": "^5.0.0",
        "jasmine-core": "~3.4.0",
        "jasmine-spec-reporter": "~4.2.1",
        "karma": "~4.1.0",
        "karma-chrome-launcher": "~2.2.0",
        "karma-coverage-istanbul-reporter": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine-html-reporter": "^1.4.0",
        "protractor": "~5.4.0",
        "ts-node": "~7.0.0",
        "tslint": "~5.15.0",
        "typescript": "~3.4.3"
    }
}
TypeScript tsconfig.json

Path: /tsconfig.json

The tsconfig.json file configures how the TypeScript compiler will convert TypeScript into JavaScript that is understood by the browser. More information is available on the TypeScript docs.

Most of the file is unchanged from when it was generated by the Angular CLI, only the paths property has been added to map @app and @environments to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

{
    "compileOnSave": false,
    "compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": "./",
        "outDir": "./dist/out-tsc",
        "sourceMap": true,
        "declaration": false,
        "downlevelIteration": true,
        "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
        "experimentalDecorators": true,
        "module": "esnext",
        "moduleResolution": "node",
        "importHelpers": true,
        "target": "es2015",
        "typeRoots": [
            "node_modules/@types"
        ],
        "lib": [
            "es2018",
            "dom"
        ],
        "paths": {
            "@app/*": ["src/app/*"],
            "@environments/*": ["src/environments/*"]
        }
    }
}

The tutorial code is available on GitHub

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - How to build user roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 App

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - How to build user roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 App

In this article, you'll learn how to user build roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 Application. You can do it acl in Laravel 5.8 using spatie composer package. I will explain how to implement User Roles and Permissions(ACL) using spatie/laravel-permission composer package.

In this article, you'll learn how to user build roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 Application. You can do it acl in Laravel 5.8 using spatie composer package. I will explain how to implement User Roles and Permissions(ACL) using spatie/laravel-permission composer package.

Spatie role permission composer package provide way to create acl in Laravel 5.8. They provide how to assign role to user, how to assign permission to user and how to assign permission assign to roles. I will write step by step creating roles and permissions in Laravel 5.8 application.

Roles and Permissions through you can create several types of users with different role and permission, i mean some user have only see listing of items module, some user can also edit items modules, for delete and etc.

In this examples i created three modules as listed bellow:

  • User Management
  • Role Management
  • Product Management

After register user, you don't have any roles, so you can edit your details and assign admin role to you from User Management. After that you can create your own role with permission like role-list, role-create, role-edit, role-delete, product-list, product-create, product-edit, product-delete. You can check with assign new user and check that.

Step 1: Laravel 5.8 Installation

We are going from scratch so, If you haven't installed Laravel in your system then you can run bellow command and get fresh Laravel project.

composer create-project --prefer-dist laravel/laravel blog

Step 2: Install Composer Packages

Now we require to install Spatie package for ACL, that way we can use it's method. Also we will install form collection package. So Open your terminal and run bellow command.

composer require spatie/laravel-permission
  
composer require laravelcollective/html

Now open config/app.php file and add service provider and aliase.

config/app.php

'providers' => [
	....
	Spatie\Permission\PermissionServiceProvider::class,
	Collective\Html\HtmlServiceProvider::class,
],
'aliases' => [
	....
	'Form' => Collective\Html\FormFacade::class,
	'Html' => Collective\Html\HtmlFacade::class,
],

We can also custom changes on Spatie package, so if you also want to changes then you can fire bellow command and get config file in config/permission.php.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Spatie\Permission\PermissionServiceProvider" --tag="config"

Step 3: Create Migrations

In this step we have to create three migrations for as listed bellow tables:

  1. users

  2. products

  3. roles

  4. permissions

  5. model_has_permissions

  6. model_has_roles

  7. role_has_permissions

So, if you install fresh project then you have already users table migration but if you don't have products table, so can create manually and other table can create using Spatie package command, so run bellow command and check migration file also.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Spatie\Permission\PermissionServiceProvider" --tag="migrations"
php artisan make:migration create_products_table

users table:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreateUsersTable extends Migration
{
    /**
     * Run the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function up()
    {
        Schema::create('users', function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->bigIncrements('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('email');
            $table->string('password');
            $table->rememberToken();
            $table->timestamps();
        });
    }

    /**
     * Reverse the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function down()
    {
        Schema::dropIfExists('users');
    }
}

products table:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreateProductsTable extends Migration
{
    /**
     * Run the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function up()
    {
        Schema::create('products', function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->bigIncrements('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->text('detail');
            $table->timestamps();
        });
    }

    /**
     * Reverse the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function down()
    {
        Schema::dropIfExists('products');
    }
}

Spatie tables:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreatePermissionTables extends Migration
{
    /**
     * Run the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function up()
    {
        $tableNames = config('permission.table_names');

        Schema::create($tableNames['permissions'], function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->increments('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('guard_name');
            $table->timestamps();
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['roles'], function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->increments('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('guard_name');
            $table->timestamps();
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['model_has_permissions'], function (Blueprint $table) use ($tableNames) {
            $table->integer('permission_id')->unsigned();
            $table->morphs('model');

            $table->foreign('permission_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['permissions'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->primary(['permission_id', 'model_id', 'model_type']);
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['model_has_roles'], function (Blueprint $table) use ($tableNames) {
            $table->integer('role_id')->unsigned();
            $table->morphs('model');

            $table->foreign('role_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['roles'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->primary(['role_id', 'model_id', 'model_type']);
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['role_has_permissions'], function (Blueprint $table) use ($tableNames) {
            $table->integer('permission_id')->unsigned();
            $table->integer('role_id')->unsigned();

            $table->foreign('permission_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['permissions'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->foreign('role_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['roles'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->primary(['permission_id', 'role_id']);

            app('cache')->forget('spatie.permission.cache');
        });
    }

    /**
     * Reverse the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function down()
    {
        $tableNames = config('permission.table_names');

        Schema::drop($tableNames['role_has_permissions']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['model_has_roles']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['model_has_permissions']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['roles']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['permissions']);
    }
}

Now run migration:

php artisan migrate

Step 4: Create Models

In this step we have to create model for User and Product table, so if you get fresh project then you have User Model have so just replace code and other you should create.

app/User.php

<?php
  
namespace App;
  
use Illuminate\Notifications\Notifiable;
use Illuminate\Contracts\Auth\MustVerifyEmail;
use Illuminate\Foundation\Auth\User as Authenticatable;
use Spatie\Permission\Traits\HasRoles;
  
class User extends Authenticatable
{
    use Notifiable;
    use HasRoles;
  
    /**
     * The attributes that are mass assignable.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $fillable = [
        'name', 'email', 'password',
    ];
  
    /**
     * The attributes that should be hidden for arrays.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $hidden = [
        'password', 'remember_token',
    ];
  
    /**
     * The attributes that should be cast to native types.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $casts = [
        'email_verified_at' => 'datetime',
    ];
}

app/Product.php

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Product extends Model
{
    /**
     * The attributes that are mass assignable.
     *	
     * @var array
     */
    protected $fillable = [
        'name', 'detail'
    ];
}

Step 5: Add Middleware

Spatie package provide it's in-built middleware that way we can use it simply and that is display as bellow:

role

permission

So, we have to add middleware in Kernel.php file this way :

app/Http/Kernel.php

....
protected $routeMiddleware = [
	....
	'role' => \Spatie\Permission\Middlewares\RoleMiddleware::class,
	'permission' => \Spatie\Permission\Middlewares\PermissionMiddleware::class,
]
....

Step 6: Create Authentication

In this step we require to create authentication of Laravel 5.8, so laravel provide artisan command to create authentication that way we don't require to create route and controller for login and registration. so run bellow command:

php artisan make:auth

Step 7: Create Routes

We require to add number of route for users module, products module and roles module. In this this route i also use middleware with permission for roles and products route, so add route this way:

routes/web.php

Auth::routes();

Route::get('/home', '[email protected]')->name('home');

Route::group(['middleware' => ['auth']], function() {
    Route::resource('roles','RoleController');
    Route::resource('users','UserController');
    Route::resource('products','ProductController');
});

Step 8: Add Controllers

In this step we have add three controller for users module, products module and roles module so you can create three controller like as bellow:

app/Http/Controllers/UserController.php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use App\Http\Controllers\Controller;
use App\User;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use DB;
use Hash;

class UserController extends Controller
{
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index(Request $request)
    {
        $data = User::orderBy('id','DESC')->paginate(5);
        return view('users.index',compact('data'))
            ->with('i', ($request->input('page', 1) - 1) * 5);
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for creating a new resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function create()
    {
        $roles = Role::pluck('name','name')->all();
        return view('users.create',compact('roles'));
    }

    /**
     * Store a newly created resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function store(Request $request)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required',
            'email' => 'required|email|unique:users,email',
            'password' => 'required|same:confirm-password',
            'roles' => 'required'
        ]);

        $input = $request->all();
        $input['password'] = Hash::make($input['password']);

        $user = User::create($input);
        $user->assignRole($request->input('roles'));

        return redirect()->route('users.index')
                        ->with('success','User created successfully');
    }

    /**
     * Display the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function show($id)
    {
        $user = User::find($id);
        return view('users.show',compact('user'));
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function edit($id)
    {
        $user = User::find($id);
        $roles = Role::pluck('name','name')->all();
        $userRole = $user->roles->pluck('name','name')->all();

        return view('users.edit',compact('user','roles','userRole'));
    }

    /**
     * Update the specified resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function update(Request $request, $id)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required',
            'email' => 'required|email|unique:users,email,'.$id,
            'password' => 'same:confirm-password',
            'roles' => 'required'
        ]);

        $input = $request->all();
        if(!empty($input['password'])){ 
            $input['password'] = Hash::make($input['password']);
        }else{
            $input = array_except($input,array('password'));    
        }

        $user = User::find($id);
        $user->update($input);
        DB::table('model_has_roles')->where('model_id',$id)->delete();

        $user->assignRole($request->input('roles'));

        return redirect()->route('users.index')
                        ->with('success','User updated successfully');
    }

    /**
     * Remove the specified resource from storage.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function destroy($id)
    {
        User::find($id)->delete();
        return redirect()->route('users.index')
                        ->with('success','User deleted successfully');
    }
}

app/Http/Controllers/ProductController.php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use App\Product;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;

class ProductController extends Controller
{ 
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    function __construct()
    {
         $this->middleware('permission:product-list|product-create|product-edit|product-delete', ['only' => ['index','show']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:product-create', ['only' => ['create','store']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:product-edit', ['only' => ['edit','update']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:product-delete', ['only' => ['destroy']]);
    }
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index()
    {
        $products = Product::latest()->paginate(5);
        return view('products.index',compact('products'))
            ->with('i', (request()->input('page', 1) - 1) * 5);
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for creating a new resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function create()
    {
        return view('products.create');
    }

    /**
     * Store a newly created resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function store(Request $request)
    {
        request()->validate([
            'name' => 'required',
            'detail' => 'required',
        ]);

        Product::create($request->all());

        return redirect()->route('products.index')
                        ->with('success','Product created successfully.');
    }

    /**
     * Display the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function show(Product $product)
    {
        return view('products.show',compact('product'));
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function edit(Product $product)
    {
        return view('products.edit',compact('product'));
    }

    /**
     * Update the specified resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function update(Request $request, Product $product)
    {
         request()->validate([
            'name' => 'required',
            'detail' => 'required',
        ]);

        $product->update($request->all());

        return redirect()->route('products.index')
                        ->with('success','Product updated successfully');
    }

    /**
     * Remove the specified resource from storage.
     *
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function destroy(Product $product)
    {
        $product->delete();

        return redirect()->route('products.index')
                        ->with('success','Product deleted successfully');
    }
}

app/Http/Controllers/RoleController.php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use App\Http\Controllers\Controller;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;
use DB;

class RoleController extends Controller
{
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    function __construct()
    {
         $this->middleware('permission:role-list|role-create|role-edit|role-delete', ['only' => ['index','store']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:role-create', ['only' => ['create','store']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:role-edit', ['only' => ['edit','update']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:role-delete', ['only' => ['destroy']]);
    }

    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index(Request $request)
    {
        $roles = Role::orderBy('id','DESC')->paginate(5);
        return view('roles.index',compact('roles'))
            ->with('i', ($request->input('page', 1) - 1) * 5);
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for creating a new resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function create()
    {
        $permission = Permission::get();
        return view('roles.create',compact('permission'));
    }

    /**
     * Store a newly created resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function store(Request $request)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required|unique:roles,name',
            'permission' => 'required',
        ]);

        $role = Role::create(['name' => $request->input('name')]);
        $role->syncPermissions($request->input('permission'));

        return redirect()->route('roles.index')
                        ->with('success','Role created successfully');
    }
    /**
     * Display the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function show($id)
    {
        $role = Role::find($id);
        $rolePermissions = Permission::join("role_has_permissions","role_has_permissions.permission_id","=","permissions.id")
            ->where("role_has_permissions.role_id",$id)
            ->get();

        return view('roles.show',compact('role','rolePermissions'));
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function edit($id)
    {
        $role = Role::find($id);
        $permission = Permission::get();
        $rolePermissions = DB::table("role_has_permissions")->where("role_has_permissions.role_id",$id)
            ->pluck('role_has_permissions.permission_id','role_has_permissions.permission_id')
            ->all();

        return view('roles.edit',compact('role','permission','rolePermissions'));
    }

    /**
     * Update the specified resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function update(Request $request, $id)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required',
            'permission' => 'required',
        ]);

        $role = Role::find($id);
        $role->name = $request->input('name');
        $role->save();

        $role->syncPermissions($request->input('permission'));

        return redirect()->route('roles.index')
                        ->with('success','Role updated successfully');
    }
    /**
     * Remove the specified resource from storage.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function destroy($id)
    {
        DB::table("roles")->where('id',$id)->delete();
        return redirect()->route('roles.index')
                        ->with('success','Role deleted successfully');
    }
}

Step 9: Add Blade Files

This is last step we have to add numbers view for layouts, users module, roles module, products modules and errors page, so create number of view like as bellow:

resources/views/layouts/app.blade.php

<html lang="{{ app()->getLocale() }}">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge">
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <!-- CSRF Token -->
    <meta name="csrf-token" content="{{ csrf_token() }}">
    <title>{{ config('app.name', 'Laravel 5.8 User Roles and Permissions Tutorial') }}</title>
    <!-- Scripts -->
    <script src="{{ asset('js/app.js') }}" defer></script>
    <!-- Fonts -->
    <link rel="dns-prefetch" href="https://fonts.gstatic.com">
    <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Raleway:300,400,600" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
    <!-- Styles -->
    <link href="{{ asset('css/app.css') }}" rel="stylesheet">
</head>
<body>
    <div id="app">
        <nav class="navbar navbar-expand-md navbar-light navbar-laravel">
            <div class="container">
                <a class="navbar-brand" href="{{ url('/') }}">
                    Laravel 5.8 User Roles and Permissions - ItSolutionStuff.com
                </a>
                <button class="navbar-toggler" type="button" data-toggle="collapse" data-target="#navbarSupportedContent" aria-controls="navbarSupportedContent" aria-expanded="false" aria-label="Toggle navigation">
                    <span class="navbar-toggler-icon"></span>
                </button>

                <div class="collapse navbar-collapse" id="navbarSupportedContent">
                    <!-- Left Side Of Navbar -->
                    <ul class="navbar-nav mr-auto"></ul>

                    <!-- Right Side Of Navbar -->
                    <ul class="navbar-nav ml-auto">
                        <!-- Authentication Links -->
                        @guest
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('login') }}">{{ __('Login') }}</a></li>
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('register') }}">{{ __('Register') }}</a></li>
                        @else
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('users.index') }}">Manage Users</a></li>
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}">Manage Role</a></li>
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('products.index') }}">Manage Product</a></li>
                            <li class="nav-item dropdown">
                                <a id="navbarDropdown" class="nav-link dropdown-toggle" href="#" role="button" data-toggle="dropdown" aria-haspopup="true" aria-expanded="false" v-pre>
                                    {{ Auth::user()->name }} <span class="caret"></span>
                                </a>

                                <div class="dropdown-menu" aria-labelledby="navbarDropdown">
                                    <a class="dropdown-item" href="{{ route('logout') }}"
                                       onclick="event.preventDefault();
                                                     document.getElementById('logout-form').submit();">
                                        {{ __('Logout') }}
                                    </a>

                                    <form id="logout-form" action="{{ route('logout') }}" method="POST" style="display: none;">
                                        @csrf
                                    </form>
                                </div>
                            </li>
                        @endguest
                    </ul>
                </div>
            </div>
        </nav>

        <main class="py-4">
            <div class="container">
            @yield('content')
            </div>
        </main>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

resources/views/users/index.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Users Management</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-success" href="{{ route('users.create') }}"> Create New User</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if ($message = Session::get('success'))
<div class="alert alert-success">
  <p>{{ $message }}</p>
</div>
@endif

<table class="table table-bordered">
 <tr>
   <th>No</th>
   <th>Name</th>
   <th>Email</th>
   <th>Roles</th>
   <th width="280px">Action</th>
 </tr>
 @foreach ($data as $key => $user)
  <tr>
    <td>{{ ++$i }}</td>
    <td>{{ $user->name }}</td>
    <td>{{ $user->email }}</td>
    <td>
      @if(!empty($user->getRoleNames()))
        @foreach($user->getRoleNames() as $v)
           <label class="badge badge-success">{{ $v }}</label>
        @endforeach
      @endif
    </td>
    <td>
       <a class="btn btn-info" href="{{ route('users.show',$user->id) }}">Show</a>
       <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.edit',$user->id) }}">Edit</a>
        {!! Form::open(['method' => 'DELETE','route' => ['users.destroy', $user->id],'style'=>'display:inline']) !!}
            {!! Form::submit('Delete', ['class' => 'btn btn-danger']) !!}
        {!! Form::close() !!}
    </td>
  </tr>
 @endforeach
</table>

{!! $data->render() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/users/create.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Create New User</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
  <div class="alert alert-danger">
    <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
    <ul>
       @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
         <li>{{ $error }}</li>
       @endforeach
    </ul>
  </div>
@endif


{!! Form::open(array('route' => 'users.store','method'=>'POST')) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Email:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('email', null, array('placeholder' => 'Email','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('password', array('placeholder' => 'Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Confirm Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('confirm-password', array('placeholder' => 'Confirm Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Role:</strong>
            {!! Form::select('roles[]', $roles,[], array('class' => 'form-control','multiple')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/users/edit.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Edit New User</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
  <div class="alert alert-danger">
    <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
    <ul>
       @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
         <li>{{ $error }}</li>
       @endforeach
    </ul>
  </div>
@endif

{!! Form::model($user, ['method' => 'PATCH','route' => ['users.update', $user->id]]) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Email:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('email', null, array('placeholder' => 'Email','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('password', array('placeholder' => 'Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Confirm Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('confirm-password', array('placeholder' => 'Confirm Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Role:</strong>
            {!! Form::select('roles[]', $roles,$userRole, array('class' => 'form-control','multiple')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/users/show.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2> Show User</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {{ $user->name }}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Email:</strong>
            {{ $user->email }}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Roles:</strong>
            @if(!empty($user->getRoleNames()))
                @foreach($user->getRoleNames() as $v)
                    <label class="badge badge-success">{{ $v }}</label>
                @endforeach
            @endif
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
@endsection

resources/views/roles/index.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Role Management</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
        @can('role-create')
            <a class="btn btn-success" href="{{ route('roles.create') }}"> Create New Role</a>
            @endcan
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if ($message = Session::get('success'))
    <div class="alert alert-success">
        <p>{{ $message }}</p>
    </div>
@endif

<table class="table table-bordered">
  <tr>
     <th>No</th>
     <th>Name</th>
     <th width="280px">Action</th>
  </tr>
    @foreach ($roles as $key => $role)
    <tr>
        <td>{{ ++$i }}</td>
        <td>{{ $role->name }}</td>
        <td>
            <a class="btn btn-info" href="{{ route('roles.show',$role->id) }}">Show</a>
            @can('role-edit')
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.edit',$role->id) }}">Edit</a>
            @endcan
            @can('role-delete')
                {!! Form::open(['method' => 'DELETE','route' => ['roles.destroy', $role->id],'style'=>'display:inline']) !!}
                    {!! Form::submit('Delete', ['class' => 'btn btn-danger']) !!}
                {!! Form::close() !!}
            @endcan
        </td>
    </tr>
    @endforeach
</table>

{!! $roles->render() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/roles/create.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Create New Role</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
    <div class="alert alert-danger">
        <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
        <ul>
        @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
            <li>{{ $error }}</li>
        @endforeach
        </ul>
    </div>
@endif

{!! Form::open(array('route' => 'roles.store','method'=>'POST')) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Permission:</strong>
            <br/>
            @foreach($permission as $value)
                <label>{{ Form::checkbox('permission[]', $value->id, false, array('class' => 'name')) }}
                {{ $value->name }}</label>
            <br/>
            @endforeach
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/roles/edit.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Edit Role</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
    <div class="alert alert-danger">
        <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
        <ul>
        @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
            <li>{{ $error }}</li>
        @endforeach
        </ul>
    </div>
@endif

{!! Form::model($role, ['method' => 'PATCH','route' => ['roles.update', $role->id]]) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Permission:</strong>
            <br/>
            @foreach($permission as $value)
                <label>{{ Form::checkbox('permission[]', $value->id, in_array($value->id, $rolePermissions) ? true : false, array('class' => 'name')) }}
                {{ $value->name }}</label>
            <br/>
            @endforeach
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

@endsection
<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>

resources/views/roles/show.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2> Show Role</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {{ $role->name }}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Permissions:</strong>
            @if(!empty($rolePermissions))
                @foreach($rolePermissions as $v)
                    <label class="label label-success">{{ $v->name }},</label>
                @endforeach
            @endif
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
@endsection

resources/views/products/index.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2>Products</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                @can('product-create')
                <a class="btn btn-success" href="{{ route('products.create') }}"> Create New Product</a>
                @endcan
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    @if ($message = Session::get('success'))
        <div class="alert alert-success">
            <p>{{ $message }}</p>
        </div>
    @endif

    <table class="table table-bordered">
        <tr>
            <th>No</th>
            <th>Name</th>
            <th>Details</th>
            <th width="280px">Action</th>
        </tr>
	    @foreach ($products as $product)
	    <tr>
	        <td>{{ ++$i }}</td>
	        <td>{{ $product->name }}</td>
	        <td>{{ $product->detail }}</td>
	        <td>
                <form action="{{ route('products.destroy',$product->id) }}" method="POST">
                    <a class="btn btn-info" href="{{ route('products.show',$product->id) }}">Show</a>
                    @can('product-edit')
                    <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.edit',$product->id) }}">Edit</a>
                    @endcan

                    @csrf
                    @method('DELETE')
                    @can('product-delete')
                    <button type="submit" class="btn btn-danger">Delete</button>
                    @endcan
                </form>
	        </td>
	    </tr>
	    @endforeach
    </table>

    {!! $products->links() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/products/create.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2>Add New Product</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.index') }}"> Back</a>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    @if ($errors->any())
        <div class="alert alert-danger">
            <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
            <ul>
                @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
                    <li>{{ $error }}</li>
                @endforeach
            </ul>
        </div>
    @endif

    <form action="{{ route('products.store') }}" method="POST">
    	@csrf

         <div class="row">
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Name:</strong>
		            <input type="text" name="name" class="form-control" placeholder="Name">
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Detail:</strong>
		            <textarea class="form-control" style="height:150px" name="detail" placeholder="Detail"></textarea>
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
		            <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
		    </div>
		</div>

    </form>

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/products/edit.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2>Edit Product</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.index') }}"> Back</a>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    @if ($errors->any())
        <div class="alert alert-danger">
            <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
            <ul>
                @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
                    <li>{{ $error }}</li>
                @endforeach
            </ul>
        </div>
    @endif

    <form action="{{ route('products.update',$product->id) }}" method="POST">
    	@csrf
        @method('PUT')

         <div class="row">
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Name:</strong>
		            <input type="text" name="name" value="{{ $product->name }}" class="form-control" placeholder="Name">
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Detail:</strong>
		            <textarea class="form-control" style="height:150px" name="detail" placeholder="Detail">{{ $product->detail }}</textarea>
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
		      <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
		    </div>
		</div>

    </form>

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/products/show.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2> Show Product</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.index') }}"> Back</a>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
            <div class="form-group">
                <strong>Name:</strong>
                {{ $product->name }}
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
            <div class="form-group">
                <strong>Details:</strong>
                {{ $product->detail }}
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
@endsection
<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>

Step 10: Handle Exertion Error

Now, in this step we will handle exertion. if you don't have a permission and try to access that page using browser url then you can give message as like bellow:

add/Exceptions/Handler.php

......
public function render($request, Exception $exception)
{
    if ($exception instanceof \Spatie\Permission\Exceptions\UnauthorizedException) {
        return response()->json(['User have not permission for this page access.']);
    }
 
    return parent::render($request, $exception);
}
....

Step 11: Create Seeder For Permissions and AdminUser

In this step we will create seeder for permissions, Right now we have fixed permission so we create using seeder as listed bellow, but if you can add more permission as you want:

1.role-list

2.role-create

3.role-edit

4.role-delete

5.product-list

6.product-create

7.product-edit

8.product-delete

So, first create seeder using bellow command:

php artisan make:seeder PermissionTableSeeder

And put bellow code in PermissionTableSeeder seeder this way:

database/seeds/PermissionTableSeeder.php

<?php

use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;

class PermissionTableSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
       $permissions = [
           'role-list',
           'role-create',
           'role-edit',
           'role-delete',
           'product-list',
           'product-create',
           'product-edit',
           'product-delete'
        ];

        foreach ($permissions as $permission) {
             Permission::create(['name' => $permission]);
        }
    }
}

After this we have to run bellow command for run PermissionTableSeeder seeder:

php artisan db:seed --class=PermissionTableSeeder

Now let's create new seeder for creating admin user.

php artisan make:seeder CreateAdminUserSeeder

database/seeds/PermissionTableSeeder.php

<?php
  
use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;
use App\User;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;
  
class CreateAdminUserSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
        $user = User::create([
        	'name' => 'Hardik Savani', 
        	'email' => '[email protected]',
        	'password' => bcrypt('123456')
        ]);
  
        $role = Role::create(['name' => 'Admin']);
   
        $permissions = Permission::pluck('id','id')->all();
  
        $role->syncPermissions($permissions);
   
        $user->assignRole([$role->id]);
    }
}
php artisan db:seed --class=CreateAdminUserSeeder

Now we are ready to to run full example of ACL. so let's run our example so run bellow command for quick run:

php artisan serve

Access By

http://localhost:8000/

Now you can login with following credential:

Email: [email protected]
Password: 123456

You can see bellow screenshots:

You can download code from GitHub

How to building a stable Node.js project architecture.

How to building a stable Node.js project architecture.

Often product development process which involves JavaScript, is accompanied by the use of Node.js, a JavaScript runtime environment. The birth of this technology has certainly turned the use of JS upside-down. Today, [JavaScript...

Often product development process which involves JavaScript, is accompanied by the use of Node.js, a JavaScript runtime environment. The birth of this technology has certainly turned the use of JS upside-down. Today, JavaScript is in the category of the most preferred languages to build apps thanks to Node.js.

What is so special about this technology? To answer this, let’s reflect on not only this technology’s benefits but also its architecture limitations and the ways to deal with cons.

Node JS brief history

Node.js was introduced by Ryan Dahl in 2009. The technology is mostly used for building app’s server side/ back-end development. What’s special about Node.js is that the technology is asynchronous.

This means that server continues to process other client requests without urging the client to wait till another previously sent request is processed. Let’s say, it’s Node.js “value proposition” for all who would like to create reliable JS-based apps.

What is Node JS commonly used for?

The non-blocking I/O machine behind the current framework is a great way to build real-time web app with NodeJS, mobile products, chats, data streaming apps, browser games, APIs and medium-performance JS apps.

Node JS real-time applications examples and showcase

Among the companies who rely their tech part to Node.js are LinkedIn, Yahoo, IBM, Netflix, PayPal, Uber and others.

Let’s see where else Node is used apart from back-end (2017 data):
This is image title

Source
As of business point of view, Node.js is used for:
This is image title

If you have worked with Node.js, you probably already know that with Node.js you can gain the following:

  • Since Node.js is created with the C++ help, you can call C functions

  • Asynchronous nature which accelerates app’s functioning and provides the ability to multitask. Apart from this, non-closing i/o method suits for high-traffic, real-time websites, resources creation.

  • Stable multiplatform app development

  • Lots of Node.js development tools for better workflow: npm-s, Express, Socket.io, etc. (we’ll touch upon these a bit later in the article)

  • Clear and flexible learning curve

But with Node.js architecture limitations you lose the opportunities to:

  • Create heavy-computed apps with the elements of 3D projection; calculation apps.
    As Node.js is single-threaded, it is not the right fit for such projects. All the actions happen on a single thread, and hence, overload CPU. For such types of apps or software, it’s better to utilize multithreading languages, like C, C#. For the full-scale video games, you can use Unity.

  • Use some npm-s.

Not all npm-s, we’ve mentioned in the pros, are of high quality and stable. Thus, you have to filter them properly and choose only the reliable ones. (Author’s note: Think of npm-s, like of plugins in Wordpress).

  • Taking in consideration Node.js architecture, you can’t utilize relational databases at full power.

Node.js come best with such document-oriented databases, like MongoDB

Let’s get into tech details and best practices for Node.js development and more detailed practical tips on working with this platform

  • Application Specifics
    First and foremost, think about what type of application you plan to release. To further proceed with Node.js project architecture building, ask yourself some of the following questions:

  • Are you going to build a real-time web app with Node.js? Is it meant to be a mobile or a console one? Or maybe it's a multiplatform app?

  • What data should the app operate with? Are these databases, files, or remote storages (like Amazon S3)?

  • Do you plan to use special software in your application? Are sophisticated data processing algorithms such as face detection or text recognition enlisted in your app's functionality business plan?

  • Does your application need an extra hardware, like camera, microphone, various sensors, or any other related devices?

  • What are the architectural specifics of the future app? Is this meant to be a client server, MVC or maybe any other type of architecture?

If you've answered all of these questions, make sure that Node.js is able to fully meet all requirements set for your project development. For example, if you need an API server that works with several types of databases, Node.js might be a good choice. But if you need an application that is designed to build 3D graphics using Directx, you might want to get acquainted with C ++ a bit closer.

Let's assume that your application uses special temperature and contamination sensors. You can pair such features with RaspberryPi, Arduino or any other special device to go further and create a 'smart' functionality model. But before you start, make sure that the driver of any mentioned device is compatible with Node.js.

Best practices for Node.js development workflow

Typically, an application is written by a team of developers. Everyone in the team is unique as well as their own code style. Therefore, it’s recommended to settle and take into account the following code organization nuances before the development stage.

  • Functional development style or object-oriented programming patterns usage?

Since JS is a weakly-typed language and allows you to write your code in a freestyle, it's still better to agree upon a single code writing rules in your team. This will keep most of the misunderstandings away and will help your colleagues to get the better understanding of the project’s code.

  • Code style
    Discuss with your teammates code writing do-s and don’t-s. Check the quality of what is written, using such Node.js development tools, like lint

  • Your team’s experiencewith the integration of third-party means and devices in your application (i.e. Google Maps, data collection, analytics tools, e-communication means,etc.)

  • Data models you’re up to work with (files, databases or third-party APIs)

  • Communication and data exchange tools you’re going to use (REST API, Blouse Protocol, Socket io, GraphQl, DDP protocol)

  • Possibility to utilize 3rd party libraries (hardware libraries, special algorithms)

The scope of work and its specifics can be as random as possible. Let's say one of your teammates works with SQL database, someone else deals with Amazon API. Thus, each of your colleagues is assigned to do the particular tasks.

Don't reinvent the bike

Currently Node.js community is up and thriving. A lot of neat features are invented and written by other developers already. So before you create a particular functionality for your application, make sure if someone else has not encountered the exact problem before.

If you’re not the only one who has experienced a certain issue, you might find the solution in npm packages. This is an entire catalogue of many ready-made useful libraries that will make life much easier for you.

The same applies to frameworks. Think about whether to use any of them to speed up the process to build a real-time web app with Node JS or a mobile one.

Let's say if you’re dealing with REST API, you can try out Express js. If you need to interact with a particular database type, you can refer to such frameworks, as Mongoose js or SQL depending on which database type you need.

Although packages can benefit your project, there are some significant dangers to be aware of. Given the fact, that these solutions are open source there are several threats to bear in mind:

  • Duplicates

There are too many packages already and some of them clone the others. Unfortunately, this mainstream is only growing. Be careful and make sure you choose the right and unique npm.

  • Malicious code
    Since these packages are not supervised, anyone can write anything they want. Read more about security issues in the article by David Gilbertson ‘I’m harvesting credit card numbers and passwords from your site. Here’s how’. So if your product has to provide AAA-security type check each code snippet of any package you instal meticulously.
Always stay ahead of the time

JS and Node.js community is constantly growing. ES standards are frequently updated. Old features are being replaced by the new, better ones and implemented in Node.js. Thus it’s important to always monitor the technology’s state of art.

For instance,

[calbackHell](http://callbackhell.com/) 
fs.action(source, function (err, res) {
  if (err) {
    console.log('Error: ' + err)
  } else {
     res.acton(function(err, res) {
       console.log('Error s: ' + err)
     })
    })
  }
})

Was replaced with

[promise](https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Promise)
fs.action(source)
  .then(res => res.action())
  .then(res => res.action())
  .then(res => res.action())
  .catch(err =>  console.log('Error : ' + err))
	

Now we can use async/await as the alternative to Promises:

[async/await](https://blog.risingstack.com/async-await-node-js-7-nightly)
try {
  const res = await fs.action(source);
  const res1 = await res.action(source);
  const res2 = await res1.action(source);
  const res3 = await res2.action(source);
} catch(error) {
   console.log('Error s: ' + err)
}

As for now, community’s opinion whether to use promises or async/await vary.

Try to update your knowledge base with the new Node.js and ES releases on the regular basis. This will help you keep a modernized development process.

Node.js app development techniques and tips

“Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.”
― Frank Herbert.

To overcome Node.js architecture limitations and trivial-to-challenging issues, keep to the clear development structure.

Since Node.js project might consist of only one file, this does not mean that you need to pile everything up into one great mess.

Make your code as readable and understandable for others as it could be. The following recommendations :

  • Follow the instructions on the structure development for the framework you are using. If you do not use any, try to place your code in the directories and subdirectories in the most logical way possible.

  • File naming

Keep to a single agreed file naming. For example, choose one of these: ErrorHandler or errorHandler orerror_handle or error-handler. Try to name the files according to their purpose but not according to their functionality. For example, it’s better to name the File NotifyAllUserByEmaisSMSLocal as Notifier.

  • The entry point must not contain unnecessary code lines

The entry point is the main.js,app.js and www files that are requested to launch your application. Such files contain only certain methods or classes calls, but not more.

  • index.js.

Keeping only import / export in these files is in general considered to be a justified practice.

Tips for better Node.js project architecture

The way the code is written signifies the ‘face’ (reputation) of the programmer. It also shows how the entire development team deals with the app’s creation using a certain technology or language. Node.js in our case. Therefore, always try to keep it up-to-date and structured (and comprehensive for other developers). Code readability is one of the main ways to build stable, real time web app with Node.js.

  • Use code quality control tools, like Lint

This tool will help you not to slip out/keep a keen eye on any trivial small error./Give a trivial error no chance. It will also allow you to keep the code in one unified form.

  • Keep track of your files size

Too large files are difficult in guiding and understanding. The optimal file size is of 300-500 lines or less. So if you have noted that the code is constantly growing within the same file, turn it to the directory with several files inside.

  • Comment on your code
    When you write a universal module that will be used in several places, don’t forget to create a quick guide on how to utilize this code.
/**
 * Provide sending notification for users by Local, Email , SMS
 *
 * @example
 *          new Notifier(user).notify(['sms', 'email'], ...)
 **/
class Notifier {

You can also leave instructions for methods in your code

/**
 * Provide parse date for single format on project
 * @param Date
 * @example
 *        dateToString(date) => String
 * **/
 

If you’re developing a particular REST API, you can embed instructions on its usage in the code itself. It’s recommended though, to create the complete documentation/guidelines and store it on a single resource.

/**
* Provide Api for Account
  Account Register  POST /api/v1/account/
  @params
         email {string}
         password {string}
  Account Login  POST /api/v1/account/login
  @params
         email {string}
         password {string}

  Account Logout  GET /api/v1/account/logout
  @header
         Authorization: Bearer {token}
 **/
 

There are 2 sides of a coin though.

To ensure the use of Node.js architecture best practices, keep your code as descriptive and organized as possible but don’t overdo.

Don’t comment each code string. It will do more harm than good and nothing but only make the development process more complex. The better tip is to comment the code snippet’s purpose but not its functionality (what does it do). Depending on the development style (callback, promise, async/await) write and use only one (if it’s possible) general error handler/processor.

Errors handling

Errors handling is another important aspect among other best practices for Node.js development to bear in mind.

Since JavaScript is not as strict as Java all the responsibility lies on the development team.

First and foremost, always try to process the errors. Otherwise it can lead to app’s uncontrolled behavior.

  • With callback
const withoutErrors = calback => (err, updatedTank) => {
  if (err) {
    return // do something
  }
  return calback(updatedTank);
};
fs.action(withoutErrors(data => ...))

With Promise

const handlError = error => {
  if (err) {
    return // do something
  }
};
fs.action()
    .then(data => )
    .then(data => )
    .cattch(handlError)
  • With async / await
class Actions
  async action1 (data) {
    return fs.action(data)
  }
  async action2 (data) {
    return fs.action(data)
  }
  .... 
}

try {
  await new Actions().action1();
  await new Actions().action1();
} catach(error) {
  return handlError(error)
}

Node JS development tools
  • Gulp

A toolkit which allows to launch several apps simultaneously. It might be useful if you’d like to run several services at the same time with one command/request.

  • Nodemon

Hot reload feature for Node.js. This tool automatically updates/ resets your project after any code change is made. A quite handy tool during the Node.js project architecture development.

  • Forever, pm2
    These two packages ensure app’s launch during the (OC) system’s start.

  • Winston
    Provides with the opportunity to record app’s logs to the primary source (file or database). The package comes to help, when you need the app to work remotely and don’t have the full access to it.

  • Threads
    A tool designed for the better work with threads.

To sum up with

We hope that Node.js architecture best practices represented in this article will help you reach the most desireable result when looking for the way to build performant real-time web or mobile apps with Node.js.