Rodney Vg

Rodney Vg

1561611737

How To Write Better Code in React

React makes it painless to create interactive UIs. Design simple views for each state in your application, and React will efficiently update and render just the right components when your data changes.

In this post, I will show you a few tips that will help you become a better React Developer. I will cover a range of things from tooling to actual code style, which can help you improve your skill with React. 💪

Let’s Talk about Linting

One thing that’s really important for writing better code is good linting. Because if we have a good set of linting rules set up, your code editor will be able to catch anything that could potentially cause a problem in your code.

But more than just catching problems, your ES Lintsetup will constantly make you aware of React best practices.

import react from 'react';
/* Other imports */

/* Code */

export default class App extends React.Component {
  render() {
    const {userIsLoaded, user} = this.props;
    if (!userIsLoaded) return ;
    
    return (
      /* Code */
    )
  }
}

lint.js

Take the code snippet above. Say you want to reference a new property called this.props.hello in your render() function. Your linter will immediately go red and say:

'hello' is missing in props validation (react/prop-types)

Linting will help you be aware of the best practices in React and shape your understanding of the code. Soon, you will start to avoid making mistakes when you write your code.

You can either head over to ESLint and set up a linting utility for JavaScript, or you can use Airbnb’s JavaScript Style Guide. You can also install the React ESLint Package.

Leverage component modularity, reuse and composition

Use tools like Bitto build modular apps faster with reusable components.

Using Bit you can quickly share and organize all your React components, which can then be used and developed in any other project.

Bit helps you isolate and share components from any project. Then, they become reusable “Lego pieces” you can find, play with and use anywhere.

It’s a great platform for turning component reusability into a way to build more applications in less time. Give it a go.

propTypes and defaultProps

In the earlier section, I talked about how my linter acted up when I tried to pass an unvalidated prop.

static propTypes = {
  userIsLoaded: PropTypes.boolean.isRequired,
  user: PropTypes.shape({
    _id: PropTypes.string,
  )}.isRequired,
}

proptypes.js

Here, if we say that the userIsLoaded is not required, then we would need to add this to our code:

static defaultProps = {
 userIsLoaded: false,
}

So anytime we have a PropType that’s used in our component, we need to set a propType for it. As in, we need to tell React that userIsLoaded is always going to be a boolean value.

And again if we say that userIsLoaded is not required then we’re going to need to have a default prop. If it is required, then we don’t have to define a default prop for it. However, the rule also states that you shouldn’t have an ambiguous propTypes like object or array.

This is why we are using shape to validate user, which has another an id inside it, which has a propType of string, and the entire user object is required.

Making sure you have your propTypes and defaultProps set up on every single component that uses props will go a long way.

The moment those props don’t get the data that they are expecting, your error log will let you know that you are either passing in something incorrectly or something that is expecting it is not there, making error finding just way easier especially if you are writing a lot of reusable components. It also makes them a little bit more self-documenting.

Note:

Unlike earlier versions of React, proptypes are no longer included inside React and you will have to add them separately to your project as a dependency.

Know when to make new components

export default class Profile extends PureComponent {
  static propTypes = {
    userIsLoaded: PropTypes.bool,
    user: PropTypes.shape({
      _id: PropTypes.string,
    }).isRequired,
  }

  static defaultProps = {
    userIsLoaded: false,
  }

  render() {
    const { userIsLoaded, user } = this.props;
    if (!userIsLoaded) return ;
    return (
      
        
          
            
            
          
          
            
            
          
        
        
          {isRole('affiliate', user={user._id} &&
            
          }
        
      
    )
  }
}
      

profile.js

Here I have a component called Profile. I have other components like MyOrder and MyDownloads inside this component. Now I could have written all these components inline here since I am just pulling the data from the same place (user), Turning all these smaller components into a one giant component.

While there aren’t any hard and fast rules on when to move your code into a component, ask yourself:

  • Is your code’s functionality becoming unwieldy?
  • Does it represent its own thing?
  • Are you going to reuse your code?

If any of these question’s answer is yes, then you need to move your code into a component.

Keep in mind that the last thing anyone wants to see in your code is a giant 200–300 line component full of crazy bells and whistles.

Component vs PureComponent vs Stateless Functional Component

It is very important for a React developer to know when to use a Component, PureComponent, and a Stateless Functional Component in your code.

You might have noticed in the above code snippet that instead of declaring Profile as a Component, I have instead called it as a PureComponent.

First, let’s check out a stateless functional component.

Stateless Functional Component

const Billboard = () => (
  
    React
    
      
        ![](#)
      
      
        ### React

        
Lorem Ipsum

      
    
  
);

stateless.js

Stateless functional components are one of the most common types of components in your arsenal. They provide us with a nice and concise way to create components that are not using any kind of state, refs, or lifecycle methods.

The idea with a stateless functional component is that it is state-less and just a function. So what’s great about this is that you are defining your component as a constant function that returns some data.

In simple words, stateless functional components are just functions that return JSX.

Update: React’s latest version has brought us React hooks, which will let us state, effects and refs in functional components without needing to convert them into class components.

PureComponents

Usually, when a component gets a new prop into it, React will re-render that component. But sometimes, a component gets new props that haven’t really changed, but React will still trigger a re-render.

Using PureComponent will help you prevent this wasted re-render. For instance, if a prop is a string or boolean and it changes, a PureComponent is going to recognize that, but if a property within an object is changing, a PureComponent is not going to trigger a re-render.

So how will you know when React is triggering an unnecessary re-render? You can check out this amazing React package called Why Did You Update. This package will notify you in the console when a potentially unnecessary re-render occurs.

Once you have recognized an unnecessary re-render, you can use a PureComponent rather than a Component to prevent things from having an unnecessary re-render.

Use React Dev Tools

If you are serious about becoming a pro React Developer, then using React Dev Tools should be commonplace practice in your development process.

If you have used React, there is a good chance that your console has yelled at you to use React Dev Tools.

React Dev Tools are available for all major browsers such as Chrome and Firefox.

React Dev Tools give you access to the entire structure of your React app and allow you to see all the props and state that are being used in the app.

React Dev Tools is an excellent way to explore our React components and helps diagnose any issues in your app.

Use Inline Conditional Statements

This opinion might ruffle a few feathers but I have found that using Inline-Conditional Statements considerably cleans up my React code.

Take a look at this code snippet:


  {isRole('affiliate', user._id) &&
    
  }

conditional.js

Here I have a basic function called that checks if a person is an “affiliate”, followed by a component called ``.

What’s great about this is that:

  • I didn’t have to write a separate function.
  • I didn’t have to write another “if” statement in my render function.
  • I didn’t have to create a “link” to somewhere else in the component.

Writing inline-conditional statements is quite simple. You begin by writing you conditional statement. You could say true and it will always show the `` component.

Next we link this conditional statement with `` using &&. This way, the component will only be rendered when the conditional statement returns true.

Use Snippet Libraries whenever possible

Open up a code editor (I use VS Code), and create a .js file.

Inside this file when you type rc, you will see something like this:

Hitting enter, you will instantly get this:

What’s great about these code snippets is that not only do they help you potentially save bugs but they also help you identify the latest and greatest syntax.

There are many different snippet libraries that can be installed in your code editor. The one I use for VS Code is called ES7 React/Redux/React-Native/JS Snippets.

React Internals — Learn how React works

React Internals is a five-part series that helped me understand the very basics of React, and eventually helped me become a better React Developer!

If you are having issues with something that you might not have understood fully, or if you understand how React works, then React Internals will help you understand the When and How to do things right in React.

This is especially helpful to those who have an idea but don’t quite know where to execute their code.

Understanding the basics of how React works will help you become a better React developer.

Quick Recap

  1. Get some good linting. Use ES Lint, Airbnb’s JavaScript Style Guide, and ESLint React Plugin.
  2. Use propTypes and defaultProps.
  3. Know when to make new components.
  4. Know when to write a Component, PureComponent, and a Stateless Functional Component.
  5. Use React Dev Tools.
  6. Use inline conditional statements in your code.
  7. Use Snippet Libraries to save a ton of time that is usually wasted on boilerplate code.
  8. Learn how React works with React Internals.
  9. Use tools like Bit / StoryBook to improve your component development workflow

Learn more

Master ReactJS: Learn React JS from Scratch

Learn ReactJS: Code Like A Facebook Developer

ReactJS Course: Learn JavaScript Library Used by Facebook&IG

React: Learn ReactJS Fundamentals for Front-End Developers

React From The Ground Up

#reactjs #javascript

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Buddha Community

How To Write Better Code in React
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

Mathew Rini

1615544450

How to Select and Hire the Best React JS and React Native Developers?

Since March 2020 reached 556 million monthly downloads have increased, It shows that React JS has been steadily growing. React.js also provides a desirable amount of pliancy and efficiency for developing innovative solutions with interactive user interfaces. It’s no surprise that an increasing number of businesses are adopting this technology. How do you select and recruit React.js developers who will propel your project forward? How much does a React developer make? We’ll bring you here all the details you need.

What is React.js?

Facebook built and maintains React.js, an open-source JavaScript library for designing development tools. React.js is used to create single-page applications (SPAs) that can be used in conjunction with React Native to develop native cross-platform apps.

React vs React Native

  • React Native is a platform that uses a collection of mobile-specific components provided by the React kit, while React.js is a JavaScript-based library.
  • React.js and React Native have similar syntax and workflows, but their implementation is quite different.
  • React Native is designed to create native mobile apps that are distinct from those created in Objective-C or Java. React, on the other hand, can be used to develop web apps, hybrid and mobile & desktop applications.
  • React Native, in essence, takes the same conceptual UI cornerstones as standard iOS and Android apps and assembles them using React.js syntax to create a rich mobile experience.

What is the Average React Developer Salary?

In the United States, the average React developer salary is $94,205 a year, or $30-$48 per hour, This is one of the highest among JavaScript developers. The starting salary for junior React.js developers is $60,510 per year, rising to $112,480 for senior roles.

* React.js Developer Salary by Country

  • United States- $120,000
  • Canada - $110,000
  • United Kingdom - $71,820
  • The Netherlands $49,095
  • Spain - $35,423.00
  • France - $44,284
  • Ukraine - $28,990
  • India - $9,843
  • Sweden - $55,173
  • Singapore - $43,801

In context of software developer wage rates, the United States continues to lead. In high-tech cities like San Francisco and New York, average React developer salaries will hit $98K and $114per year, overall.

However, the need for React.js and React Native developer is outpacing local labour markets. As a result, many businesses have difficulty locating and recruiting them locally.

It’s no surprise that for US and European companies looking for professional and budget engineers, offshore regions like India are becoming especially interesting. This area has a large number of app development companies, a good rate with quality, and a good pool of React.js front-end developers.

As per Linkedin, the country’s IT industry employs over a million React specialists. Furthermore, for the same or less money than hiring a React.js programmer locally, you may recruit someone with much expertise and a broader technical stack.

How to Hire React.js Developers?

  • Conduct thorough candidate research, including portfolios and areas of expertise.
  • Before you sit down with your interviewing panel, do some homework.
  • Examine the final outcome and hire the ideal candidate.

Why is React.js Popular?

React is a very strong framework. React.js makes use of a powerful synchronization method known as Virtual DOM, which compares the current page architecture to the expected page architecture and updates the appropriate components as long as the user input.

React is scalable. it utilises a single language, For server-client side, and mobile platform.

React is steady.React.js is completely adaptable, which means it seldom, if ever, updates the user interface. This enables legacy projects to be updated to the most new edition of React.js without having to change the codebase or make a few small changes.

React is adaptable. It can be conveniently paired with various state administrators (e.g., Redux, Flux, Alt or Reflux) and can be used to implement a number of architectural patterns.

Is there a market for React.js programmers?
The need for React.js developers is rising at an unparalleled rate. React.js is currently used by over one million websites around the world. React is used by Fortune 400+ businesses and popular companies such as Facebook, Twitter, Glassdoor and Cloudflare.

Final thoughts:

As you’ve seen, locating and Hire React js Developer and Hire React Native developer is a difficult challenge. You will have less challenges selecting the correct fit for your projects if you identify growing offshore locations (e.g. India) and take into consideration the details above.

If you want to make this process easier, You can visit our website for more, or else to write a email, we’ll help you to finding top rated React.js and React Native developers easier and with strives to create this operation

#hire-react-js-developer #hire-react-native-developer #react #react-native #react-js #hire-react-js-programmer

What are hooks in React JS? - INFO AT ONE

In this article, you will learn what are hooks in React JS? and when to use react hooks? React JS is developed by Facebook in the year 2013. There are many students and the new developers who have confusion between react and hooks in react. Well, it is not different, react is a programming language and hooks is a function which is used in react programming language.
Read More:- https://infoatone.com/what-are-hooks-in-react-js/

#react #hooks in react #react hooks example #react js projects for beginners #what are hooks in react js? #when to use react hooks

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604016000

Embold Is Like Autocorrect For Code, Says Vishal Rai, Founder & CEO

In our digital world, software is king. In a world so heavily dependent on software, poor code quality can result in grave consequence, from billions of dollars in lost revenue, to even fatal accidents. Here’s where Embold comes in—a static code analysis product aimed at empowering developers to do their best work.

Embold is a general-purpose static code analyser that has been designed for developers to analyse and improve their code by identifying issues across four dimensions, including design and duplication. We, at Analytics India Magazine, spoke to founder and CEO, Vishal Rai, to understand how Embold can detect anti-patterns in code for seamless integration.

Embold started a decade ago, with the vision of creating a product that can revolutionise the way developers write and design code. According to Vishal Rai, the idea was to develop a tool for software engineers and developers to write code faster and of better quality. And, after a time of extensive research and development, Vishal Rai, along with his partner Sudarshan Bhide launched their product in 2018.


Play

“We have noticed an interesting trend — as teams started becoming bigger, the issues in software started increasing as well and it was very frustrating when you were on programs which weren’t achieving their stated goals because of poor quality,” said Rai. “And that’s where we saw the opportunity of helping companies to write the product as great as Google or Apple and decided to reinvent software analytics.”

Embold — Empowering Developers to Reach Their Highest Potential

Developers always undergo immense pressure of building their products faster at the best quality possible, and such pressure can lead to compromised code quality. This impact of one line of code or one weak link can create significant issues and can massively affect the entire company. And that is why Rai believes that developers need support in being more productive. With Embold, Vishal and Sudharshan brought in a technology that can help developers be more efficient in their work and make the process of software development easy. Explaining the technology, Rai compared it with “autocorrect for code.” He said, “If you look at the legacy tools, they were built for the waterfall model, aka linear-sequential life cycle model, where one release took six months which gave enough time to test the tools. But in the current time, everything is fast, and thus developers require tools that can help them work fast and give them feedback that can be easily implemented in their workflow.” And that’s where Embold’s platform fits into the workflow that helps them find problems and maintain their code.  As a matter of fact, Rai acknowledges that there have been many great tools, already in the market, but all of them have been created for great engineers. However, today, not every engineer is necessarily as experienced as others, and in such cases, it is imperative to make tools that are easy to use and help developers analyse their software. “Embold has been built for the future, the technologies that we have ingrained have neural networks, state-of-the-art in-memory databases and analysers that are far more evolved than legacy tools,” said Rai. “Embold has been created to enable people who aren’t as skilled to write better codes. Not only it fills the skills gap but also brings the new age developers closer to the best developers on the planet.”


#featured #bugs and errors in code #embold a autocorrect for code #embold find bugs and errors in code #embold for developers #embold help developers #embold maintains code quality #embold revolutionise writing code #static code analyser