Why People Aren’t Switching to Svelte Yet

Why People Aren’t Switching to Svelte Yet

Why developers are not switching to Svelte yet: Late TypeScript support; No official CRA or Svelte CLI; Small community; Less package/tooling support;... Svelte is a lightweight component-based framework like React, Vue, or Angular that allows developers to write easy-to-read code in JavaScript and then compiles the written code to efficient vanilla JavaScript that runs super-fast in the browser.

Svelte is a lightweight component-based framework like React, Vue, or Angular that allows developers to write easy-to-read code in JavaScript and then compiles the written code to efficient vanilla JavaScript that runs super-fast in the browser.

While other frameworks like React employ the virtual DOM diffing technique, Svelte compiles your code into JavaScript that updates the DOM when state changes in your component.

Ever since its initial release in November 2016 by Richard Harris, a lot of developers have fallen in love with this new method of building apps, and with over 39k stars on its official Github repository, Svelte is here to stay and contend for its place amongst the top JavaScript frontend frameworks of choice.

Despite these stats, however, a lot of people are hesitating to adopt Svelte as a framework in their frontend development process.

According to trends.builtwith.com, there are only about 6,000 approximate registered live and historical websites using Svelte as their preferred frontend library in total as of October 2020. This stat is super low when compared to React which has around 3.4 million, Vue at over 1.5 million, and Angular at over 3.7 million respectively.

A screenshot of Svelte’s usage stats according to trends.builtwith.coA screenshot of Svelte’s usage stats according to trends.builtwith.co

Screenshot of Vue’s usage stats on trends.builtwith.comA screenshot of Vue’s usage stats according to trends.builtwith.com

Why developers are not switching to Svelte yet

Late TypeScript support

When coming from a framework like Angular, for example, you get pretty used to having a TypeScript development environment preconfigured for you out of the box. The Svelte team only just released an update containing official support for TypeScript in July 2020.

What this means is that developers can now run the following commands to set up TypeScript when creating a Svelte project:

npx degit sveltejs/template svelte-typescript-app
cd svelte-typescript-app
node scripts/setupTypeScript.js

Although TypeScript could be used beforehand, the initial setup process was rather tasking to go about because it involved a bunch of time-consuming custom Webpack and Svelte preprocess configuration. It’s a good thing Svelte now ships with TypeScript support included by default as this major missing point seemed to be one of the factors that discouraged developers from learning and using the framework. When Deno was officially released some time ago, one of its key selling points considered amongst developers was its TypeScript integration advantage over Node.

svelte javascript developer web-development programming

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