Hertha  Mayer

Hertha Mayer

1602724067

Integrate Kintone Data Using ADO.NET

The ComponentOne 2020v2 release enhances the number of data sources supported by .NET Standard service library DataConnectors, which provides a set of connectors that can connect to different types of data sources. You can now connect to four data sources, namely ODataMicrosoft Dynamics 365 SalesSalesforce Data and Kintone using an ADO. NET provider for each type. These providers have the same ADO. NET architecture as the native .NET data providers for SQL Server and OLEDB. Hence, they ease the complexity of accessing data by letting you follow a similar set of classes available in the .NET architecture. These providers also have advantageous features such as authenticationcaching, and SQL/LINQ query support. To add up to these features, the DataConnector also includes an Entity Framework (EF) Core provider for each type of data source, which makes this library useful even when working with Entity Framework Core.

This blog will help you understand how to use the ADO. NET provider for Kintone to connect to the Kintone data and explain the basic features, including authentication, querying, and caching.

To get started, you would need to install the C1.DataConnector and C1.AdoNet.Kintonepackages from NuGet:

Integrate Kintone Date Using ADO dotNET

You can also download and install the ComponentOne DataConnectors service component from here and find the installed samples at the following location: ‘C:\Users\xxxx\Documents\ComponentOne Samples\ServiceComponents\DataConnector.’

Establishing the Connection to the Kintone Data

The first step towards working with the provider is establishing a connection to the Kintonedata. The DataConnector service library provides you with the C1KintoneConnection class, just like the ADO. NET DataConnection class. It creates a connection to the data by creating the connection object and passing the connection string as a parameter to the class constructor. The connection string can either be predefined, or it can be generated using the C1KintoneConnectionStringBuilder class.

Here is a sample code snippet depicting how to generate a connection string and create a connection object:

//Configure Connection string  
C1KintoneConnectionStringBuilder builder = new C1KintoneConnectionStringBuilder();  
builder.Url = Url;  
builder.Username = Username;  
builder.Password = Password;  

//Setup Connection  
C1KintoneConnection conn = new C1KintoneConnection(builder.ConnectionString);

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Integrate Kintone Data Using ADO.NET
Einar  Hintz

Einar Hintz

1602560783

jQuery Ajax CRUD in ASP.NET Core MVC with Modal Popup

In this article, we’ll discuss how to use jQuery Ajax for ASP.NET Core MVC CRUD Operations using Bootstrap Modal. With jQuery Ajax, we can make HTTP request to controller action methods without reloading the entire page, like a single page application.

To demonstrate CRUD operations – insert, update, delete and retrieve, the project will be dealing with details of a normal bank transaction. GitHub repository for this demo project : https://bit.ly/33KTJAu.

Sub-topics discussed :

  • Form design for insert and update operation.
  • Display forms in modal popup dialog.
  • Form post using jQuery Ajax.
  • Implement MVC CRUD operations with jQuery Ajax.
  • Loading spinner in .NET Core MVC.
  • Prevent direct access to MVC action method.

Create ASP.NET Core MVC Project

In Visual Studio 2019, Go to File > New > Project (Ctrl + Shift + N).

From new project window, Select Asp.Net Core Web Application_._

Image showing how to create ASP.NET Core Web API project in Visual Studio.

Once you provide the project name and location. Select Web Application(Model-View-Controller) and uncheck HTTPS Configuration. Above steps will create a brand new ASP.NET Core MVC project.

Showing project template selection for .NET Core MVC.

Setup a Database

Let’s create a database for this application using Entity Framework Core. For that we’ve to install corresponding NuGet Packages. Right click on project from solution explorer, select Manage NuGet Packages_,_ From browse tab, install following 3 packages.

Showing list of NuGet Packages for Entity Framework Core

Now let’s define DB model class file – /Models/TransactionModel.cs.

public class TransactionModel
{
    [Key]
    public int TransactionId { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(12)")]
    [DisplayName("Account Number")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage ="This Field is required.")]
    [MaxLength(12,ErrorMessage ="Maximum 12 characters only")]
    public string AccountNumber { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(100)")]
    [DisplayName("Beneficiary Name")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public string BeneficiaryName { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(100)")]
    [DisplayName("Bank Name")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public string BankName { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(11)")]
    [DisplayName("SWIFT Code")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    [MaxLength(11)]
    public string SWIFTCode { get; set; }

    [DisplayName("Amount")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    [DisplayFormat(DataFormatString = "{0:MM/dd/yyyy}")]
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

C#Copy

Here we’ve defined model properties for the transaction with proper validation. Now let’s define  DbContextclass for EF Core.

#asp.net core article #asp.net core #add loading spinner in asp.net core #asp.net core crud without reloading #asp.net core jquery ajax form #asp.net core modal dialog #asp.net core mvc crud using jquery ajax #asp.net core mvc with jquery and ajax #asp.net core popup window #bootstrap modal popup in asp.net core mvc. bootstrap modal popup in asp.net core #delete and viewall in asp.net core #jquery ajax - insert #jquery ajax form post #modal popup dialog in asp.net core #no direct access action method #update #validation in modal popup

Siphiwe  Nair

Siphiwe Nair

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Virgil  Hagenes

Virgil Hagenes

1602702000

Data Quality Testing Skills Needed For Data Integration Projects

The impulse to cut project costs is often strong, especially in the final delivery phase of data integration and data migration projects. At this late phase of the project, a common mistake is to delegate testing responsibilities to resources with limited business and data testing skills.

Data integrations are at the core of data warehousing, data migration, data synchronization, and data consolidation projects.

In the past, most data integration projects involved data stored in databases. Today, it’s essential for organizations to also integrate their database or structured data with data from documents, e-mails, log files, websites, social media, audio, and video files.

Using data warehousing as an example, Figure 1 illustrates the primary checkpoints (testing points) in an end-to-end data quality testing process. Shown are points at which data (as it’s extracted, transformed, aggregated, consolidated, etc.) should be verified – that is, extracting source data, transforming source data for loads into target databases, aggregating data for loads into data marts, and more.

Only after data owners and all other stakeholders confirm that data integration was successful can the whole process be considered complete and ready for production.

#big data #data integration #data governance #data validation #data accuracy #data warehouse testing #etl testing #data integrations

Uriah  Dietrich

Uriah Dietrich

1618457700

What Is ETLT? Merging the Best of ETL and ELT Into a Single ETLT Data Integration Strategy

Data integration solutions typically advocate that one approach – either ETL or ELT – is better than the other. In reality, both ETL (extract, transform, load) and ELT (extract, load, transform) serve indispensable roles in the data integration space:

  • ETL is valuable when it comes to data quality, data security, and data compliance. It can also save money on data warehousing costs. However, ETL is slow when ingesting unstructured data, and it can lack flexibility.
  • ELT is fast when ingesting large amounts of raw, unstructured data. It also brings flexibility to your data integration and data analytics strategies. However, ELT sacrifices data quality, security, and compliance in many cases.

Because ETL and ELT present different strengths and weaknesses, many organizations are using a hybrid “ETLT” approach to get the best of both worlds. In this guide, we’ll help you understand the “why, what, and how” of ETLT, so you can determine if it’s right for your use-case.

#data science #data #data security #data integration #etl #data warehouse #data breach #elt #bid data

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

1620629020

Getting Started With Data Lakes

Frameworks for Efficient Enterprise Analytics

The opportunities big data offers also come with very real challenges that many organizations are facing today. Often, it’s finding the most cost-effective, scalable way to store and process boundless volumes of data in multiple formats that come from a growing number of sources. Then organizations need the analytical capabilities and flexibility to turn this data into insights that can meet their specific business objectives.

This Refcard dives into how a data lake helps tackle these challenges at both ends — from its enhanced architecture that’s designed for efficient data ingestion, storage, and management to its advanced analytics functionality and performance flexibility. You’ll also explore key benefits and common use cases.

Introduction

As technology continues to evolve with new data sources, such as IoT sensors and social media churning out large volumes of data, there has never been a better time to discuss the possibilities and challenges of managing such data for varying analytical insights. In this Refcard, we dig deep into how data lakes solve the problem of storing and processing enormous amounts of data. While doing so, we also explore the benefits of data lakes, their use cases, and how they differ from data warehouses (DWHs).


This is a preview of the Getting Started With Data Lakes Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

#big data #data analytics #data analysis #business analytics #data warehouse #data storage #data lake #data lake architecture #data lake governance #data lake management