Deno + Svelte (Part 2): Using Deno functions in Svelte ❤️🦕

Deno + Svelte (Part 2): Using Deno functions in Svelte ❤️🦕

Deno + Svelte (Part 2): Using Deno functions in Svelte ❤️🦕.Last time I wrote on this topic, the Svelte-Deno ecosystem was still in it’s infancy. We could compile a Svelte script using Deno, but that was about it. My thoughts on how to interact with Deno from Svelte have matured. We’ve come a long way from version 1.0 of this setup in my previous article about Deno + Svelte with a simple compile step.

Last time  I wrote on this topic, the Svelte-Deno ecosystem was still in it’s infancy. We could compile a Svelte script using Deno, but that was about it.

Since the original article, a couple nice improvements have happened:

  1. The Svelte ecosystem has grown to support Deno better (via Snel), and
  2. My thoughts on how to interact with Deno from Svelte have matured.

Let’s describe my coding experiences in these sections:

Section A: Snel — Build Svelte app using Deno!

Section B: Snel — Connect Svelte to Deno remotely

Section C: Using Deno methods from Svelte

Section A — Snel

Now we have a budding framework for building Svelte apps in Deno:  Snel. I wanted to try building the Svelte app 100% in Deno without any Nodejs interaction at all. Snel was the most promising answer.

TL;DR: *Essentially, it works! *For the most part.

Following the Snel instructions using their embedded Trex tool gets you scaffolded up with a project pretty fast. However, if you want to do some of the _fancier _Rollup work (like importjson file in your Svelte code) the support of rollup plugins and drollup ( Deno Rollup) is not quite mature enough yet. But importing a jsonfile was the only thing Snel really wouldn’t let me do, so far. Unfortunately it appears that Snel doesn’t let you call  Deno.readFile() from within your Svelte code either, so I was kind of stuck as to a workaround for this. In the end, I just copied and pasted the json config data I was looking for and moved on. I imagine there will be a way forward for little things like this shortly.

Part B: Snel — Deno Connection

Ok, so we have a working front end that we can build with Deno. Now for the exciting part!

We know that one of the best things about Deno is that you can sandbox your JavaScript code from the environment like “net” and “read/write” to really keep control of programmable access. This is especially important when running other peoples’ code (OPC). Even more important when you run other peoples code with _your _data. The last thing you want is some built-in feature, deeply nested library, or JavaScript bug to be secretly siphoning your personal details off to a remote server.

We want to execute other peoples’ code (OPC) in Deno, but outside the CLI, so we need a front end to interact with Deno —since there is  no Deno standard GUI —we can use Svelte for our GUI and spin up a client-server relationship to interact with each other.

But we need a way to get our commands and data to/from Deno from our Svelte browser code.

rpc deno webassembly svelte

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