Support for password authentication was removed. Please use a personal access token instead - ItsMyCode

#git #github #tokens #coding #programming 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Support for password authentication was removed. Please use a personal access token instead - ItsMyCode

How To Set Up Two-Factor Authentication in cPanel

What is 2FA
Two-Factor Authentication (or 2FA as it often referred to) is an extra layer of security that is used to provide users an additional level of protection when securing access to an account.
Employing a 2FA mechanism is a vast improvement in security over the Singe-Factor Authentication method of simply employing a username and password. Using this method, accounts that have 2FA enabled, require the user to enter a one-time passcode that is generated by an external application. The 2FA passcode (usually a six-digit number) is required to be input into the passcode field before access is granted. The 2FA input is usually required directly after the username and password are entered by the client.

#tutorials #2fa #access #account security #authentication #authentication method #authentication token #cli #command line #cpanel #feature manager #google authenticator #one time password #otp #otp authentication #passcode #password #passwords #qr code #security #security code #security policy #security practices #single factor authentication #time-based one-time password #totp #two factor authentication #whm

Ayan Code

1656193861

Simple Login Page in HTML and CSS | Source Code

Hello guys, Today in this post we’ll learn How to Create a Simple Login Page with a fantastic design. To create it we are going to use pure CSS and HTML. Hope you enjoy this post.

A login page is one of the most important component of a website or app that allows authorized users to access an entire site or a part of a website. You would have already seen them when visiting a website. Let's head to create it.

Whether it’s a signup or login page, it should be catchy, user-friendly and easy to use. These types of Forms lead to increased sales, lead generation, and customer growth.


Demo

Click to watch demo!

Simple Login Page HTML CSS (source code)

<!DOCTYPE html>
  <html lang="en" >
  <head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/normalize/5.0.0/normalize.min.css">
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="styledfer.css">
  </head>

  <body>
   <div id="login-form-wrap">
    <h2>Login</h2>
    <form id="login-form">
      <p>
      <input type="email" id="email" name="email" placeholder="Email " required><i class="validation"><span></span><span></span></i>
      </p>
      <p>
      <input type="password" id="password" name="password" placeholder="Password" required><i class="validation"><span></span><span></span></i>
      </p>
      <p>
      <input type="submit" id="login" value="Login">
      </p>

      </form>
    <div id="create-account-wrap">
      <p>Don't have an accout? <a href="#">Create One</a><p>
    </div>
   </div>
    
  <script src='https://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.2.4.min.js'></script>
  <script src='https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery-validate/1.15.0/jquery.validate.min.js'></script>
  </body>
</html>

CSS CODE

body {
  background-color: #020202;
  font-size: 1.6rem;
  font-family: "Open Sans", sans-serif;
  color: #2b3e51;
}
h2 {
  font-weight: 300;
  text-align: center;
}
p {
  position: relative;
}
a,
a:link,
a:visited,
a:active {
  color: #ff9100;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
}
a:focus, a:hover,
a:link:focus,
a:link:hover,
a:visited:focus,
a:visited:hover,
a:active:focus,
a:active:hover {
  color: #ff9f22;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
}
#login-form-wrap {
  background-color: #fff;
  width: 16em;
  margin: 30px auto;
  text-align: center;
  padding: 20px 0 0 0;
  border-radius: 4px;
  box-shadow: 0px 30px 50px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
}
#login-form {
  padding: 0 60px;
}
input {
  display: block;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 100%;
  outline: none;
  height: 60px;
  line-height: 60px;
  border-radius: 4px;
}
#email,
#password {
  width: 100%;
  padding: 0 0 0 10px;
  margin: 0;
  color: #8a8b8e;
  border: 1px solid #c2c0ca;
  font-style: normal;
  font-size: 16px;
  -webkit-appearance: none;
     -moz-appearance: none;
          appearance: none;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  background: none;
}
#email:focus,
#password:focus {
  border-color: #3ca9e2;
}
#email:focus:invalid,
#password:focus:invalid {
  color: #cc1e2b;
  border-color: #cc1e2b;
}
#email:valid ~ .validation,
#password:valid ~ .validation 
{
  display: block;
  border-color: #0C0;
}
#email:valid ~ .validation span,
#password:valid ~ .validation span{
  background: #0C0;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 6px;
}
#email:valid ~ .validation span:first-child,
#password:valid ~ .validation span:first-child{
  top: 30px;
  left: 14px;
  width: 20px;
  height: 3px;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg);
          transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
#email:valid ~ .validation span:last-child
#password:valid ~ .validation span:last-child
{
  top: 35px;
  left: 8px;
  width: 11px;
  height: 3px;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
          transform: rotate(45deg);
}
.validation {
  display: none;
  position: absolute;
  content: " ";
  height: 60px;
  width: 30px;
  right: 15px;
  top: 0px;
}
input[type="submit"] {
  border: none;
  display: block;
  background-color: #ff9100;
  color: #fff;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-transform: uppercase;
  cursor: pointer;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
  font-size: 18px;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  cursor: pointer;
  text-align: center;
}
input[type="submit"]:hover {
  background-color: #ff9b17;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
}

#create-account-wrap {
  background-color: #eeedf1;
  color: #8a8b8e;
  font-size: 14px;
  width: 100%;
  padding: 10px 0;
  border-radius: 0 0 4px 4px;
}

Congratulations! You have now successfully created our Simple Login Page in HTML and CSS.

My Website: codewithayan, see this to checkout all of my amazing Tutorials.

August  Larson

August Larson

1662480600

The Most Commonly Used Data Structures in Python

In any programming language, we need to deal with data.  Now, one of the most fundamental things that we need to work with the data is to store, manage, and access it efficiently in an organized way so it can be utilized whenever required for our purposes. Data Structures are used to take care of all our needs.

What are Data Structures?

Data Structures are fundamental building blocks of a programming language. It aims to provide a systematic approach to fulfill all the requirements mentioned previously in the article. The data structures in Python are List, Tuple, Dictionary, and Set. They are regarded as implicit or built-in Data Structures in Python. We can use these data structures and apply numerous methods to them to manage, relate, manipulate and utilize our data.

We also have custom Data Structures that are user-defined namely Stack, Queue, Tree, Linked List, and Graph. They allow users to have full control over their functionality and use them for advanced programming purposes. However, we will be focussing on the built-in Data Structures for this article.

Implicit Data Structures Python

Implicit Data Structures Python

LIST

Lists help us to store our data sequentially with multiple data types. They are comparable to arrays with the exception that they can store different data types like strings and numbers at the same time. Every item or element in a list has an assigned index. Since Python uses 0-based indexing, the first element has an index of 0 and the counting goes on. The last element of a list starts with -1 which can be used to access the elements from the last to the first. To create a list we have to write the items inside the square brackets.

One of the most important things to remember about lists is that they are Mutable. This simply means that we can change an element in a list by accessing it directly as part of the assignment statement using the indexing operator.  We can also perform operations on our list to get desired output. Let’s go through the code to gain a better understanding of list and list operations.

1. Creating a List

#creating the list
my_list = ['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'e']
print(my_list)

Output

['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'e']

2. Accessing items from the List

#accessing the list 
 
#accessing the first item of the list
my_list[0]

Output

'p'
#accessing the third item of the list
my_list[2]
'o'

3. Adding new items to the list

#adding item to the list
my_list + ['k']

Output

['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'e', 'k']

4. Removing Items

#removing item from the list
#Method 1:
 
#Deleting list items
my_list = ['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'l', 'e', 'm']
 
# delete one item
del my_list[2]
 
print(my_list)
 
# delete multiple items
del my_list[1:5]
 
print(my_list)

Output

['p', 'r', 'b', 'l', 'e', 'm']
['p', 'm']
#Method 2:
 
#with remove fucntion
my_list = ['p','r','o','k','l','y','m']
my_list.remove('p')
 
 
print(my_list)
 
#Method 3:
 
#with pop function
print(my_list.pop(1))
 
# Output: ['r', 'k', 'l', 'y', 'm']
print(my_list)

Output

['r', 'o', 'k', 'l', 'y', 'm']
o
['r', 'k', 'l', 'y', 'm']

5. Sorting List

#sorting of list in ascending order
 
my_list.sort()
print(my_list)

Output

['k', 'l', 'm', 'r', 'y']
#sorting of list in descending order
 
my_list.sort(reverse=True)
print(my_list)

Output

['y', 'r', 'm', 'l', 'k']

6. Finding the length of a List

#finding the length of list
 
len(my_list)

Output

5

TUPLE

Tuples are very similar to lists with a key difference that a tuple is IMMUTABLE, unlike a list. Once we create a tuple or have a tuple, we are not allowed to change the elements inside it. However, if we have an element inside a tuple, which is a list itself, only then we can access or change within that list. To create a tuple, we have to write the items inside the parenthesis. Like the lists, we have similar methods which can be used with tuples. Let’s go through some code snippets to understand using tuples.

1. Creating a Tuple

#creating of tuple
 
my_tuple = ("apple", "banana", "guava")
print(my_tuple)

Output

('apple', 'banana', 'guava')

2. Accessing items from a Tuple

#accessing first element in tuple
 
my_tuple[1]

Output

'banana'

3. Length of a Tuple

#for finding the lenght of tuple
 
len(my_tuple)

Output

3

4. Converting a Tuple to List

#converting tuple into a list
 
my_tuple_list = list(my_tuple)
type(my_tuple_list)

Output

list

5. Reversing a Tuple

#Reversing a tuple
 
tuple(sorted(my_tuple, reverse=True)) 

Output

('guava', 'banana', 'apple')

6. Sorting a Tuple

#sorting tuple in ascending order
 
tuple(sorted(my_tuple)) 

Output

('apple', 'banana', 'guava')

7. Removing elements from Tuple

For removing elements from the tuple, we first converted the tuple into a list as we did in one of our methods above( Point No. 4) then followed the same process of the list, and explicitly removed an entire tuple, just using the del statement.

DICTIONARY

Dictionary is a collection which simply means that it is used to store a value with some key and extract the value given the key. We can think of it as a set of key: value pairs and every key in a dictionary is supposed to be unique so that we can access the corresponding values accordingly.

A dictionary is denoted by the use of curly braces { } containing the key: value pairs. Each of the pairs in a dictionary is comma separated. The elements in a dictionary are un-ordered the sequence does not matter while we are accessing or storing them.

They are MUTABLE which means that we can add, delete or update elements in a dictionary. Here are some code examples to get a better understanding of a dictionary in python.

An important point to note is that we can’t use a mutable object as a key in the dictionary. So, a list is not allowed as a key in the dictionary.

1. Creating a Dictionary

#creating a dictionary
 
my_dict = {
    1:'Delhi',
    2:'Patna',
    3:'Bangalore'
}
print(my_dict)

Output

{1: 'Delhi', 2: 'Patna', 3: 'Bangalore'}

Here, integers are the keys of the dictionary and the city name associated with integers are the values of the dictionary.

2. Accessing items from a Dictionary

#access an item
 
print(my_dict[1])

Output

'Delhi'

3. Length of a Dictionary

#length of the dictionary
 
len(my_dict)

Output

3

4. Sorting a Dictionary

#sorting based on the key 
 
Print(sorted(my_dict.items()))
 
 
#sorting based on the values of dictionary
 
print(sorted(my_dict.values()))

Output

[(1, 'Delhi'), (2, 'Bangalore'), (3, 'Patna')]
 
['Bangalore', 'Delhi', 'Patna']

5. Adding elements in Dictionary

#adding a new item in dictionary 
 
my_dict[4] = 'Lucknow'
print(my_dict)

Output

{1: 'Delhi', 2: 'Patna', 3: 'Bangalore', 4: 'Lucknow'}

6. Removing elements from Dictionary

#for deleting an item from dict using the specific key
 
my_dict.pop(4)
print(my_dict)
 
#for deleting last item from the list
 
my_dict.popitem()
 
#for clearing the dictionary
 
my_dict.clear()
print(my_dict)

Output

{1: 'Delhi', 2: 'Patna', 3: 'Bangalore'}
(3, 'Bangalore')
{}

SET

Set is another data type in python which is an unordered collection with no duplicate elements. Common use cases for a set are to remove duplicate values and to perform membership testing. Curly braces or the set() function can be used to create sets. One thing to keep in mind is that while creating an empty set, we have to use set(), and not { }. The latter creates an empty dictionary.

Here are some code examples to get a better understanding of sets in python.

1. Creating a Set

#creating set
 
my_set = {"apple", "mango", "strawberry", "apple"}
print(my_set)

Output

{'apple', 'strawberry', 'mango'}

2. Accessing items from a Set

#to test for an element inside the set
 
"apple" in my_set

Output

True

3. Length of a Set

print(len(my_set))

Output

3

4. Sorting a Set

print(sorted(my_set))

Output

['apple', 'mango', 'strawberry']

5. Adding elements in Set

my_set.add("guava")
print(my_set)

Output

{'apple', 'guava', 'mango', 'strawberry'}

6. Removing elements from Set

my_set.remove("mango")
print(my_set)

Output

{'apple', 'guava', 'strawberry'}

Conclusion

In this article, we went through the most commonly used data structures in python and also saw various methods associated with them.

Link: https://www.askpython.com/python/data

#python #datastructures

Thierry  Perret

Thierry Perret

1662365538

Les Structures De Données Les Plus Couramment Utilisées En Python

Dans tout langage de programmation, nous devons traiter des données. Maintenant, l'une des choses les plus fondamentales dont nous avons besoin pour travailler avec les données est de les stocker, de les gérer et d'y accéder efficacement de manière organisée afin qu'elles puissent être utilisées chaque fois que cela est nécessaire pour nos besoins. Les structures de données sont utilisées pour répondre à tous nos besoins.

Que sont les Structures de Données ?

Les structures de données sont les blocs de construction fondamentaux d'un langage de programmation. Il vise à fournir une approche systématique pour répondre à toutes les exigences mentionnées précédemment dans l'article. Les structures de données en Python sont List, Tuple, Dictionary et Set . Ils sont considérés comme des structures de données implicites ou intégrées dans Python . Nous pouvons utiliser ces structures de données et leur appliquer de nombreuses méthodes pour gérer, relier, manipuler et utiliser nos données.

Nous avons également des structures de données personnalisées définies par l'utilisateur, à savoir Stack , Queue , Tree , Linked List et Graph . Ils permettent aux utilisateurs d'avoir un contrôle total sur leurs fonctionnalités et de les utiliser à des fins de programmation avancées. Cependant, nous nous concentrerons sur les structures de données intégrées pour cet article.

Structures de données implicites Python

Structures de données implicites Python

LISTE

Les listes nous aident à stocker nos données de manière séquentielle avec plusieurs types de données. Ils sont comparables aux tableaux à l'exception qu'ils peuvent stocker différents types de données comme des chaînes et des nombres en même temps. Chaque élément ou élément d'une liste a un index attribué. Étant donné que Python utilise l' indexation basée sur 0 , le premier élément a un index de 0 et le comptage continue. Le dernier élément d'une liste commence par -1 qui peut être utilisé pour accéder aux éléments du dernier au premier. Pour créer une liste, nous devons écrire les éléments à l'intérieur des crochets .

L'une des choses les plus importantes à retenir à propos des listes est qu'elles sont Mutable . Cela signifie simplement que nous pouvons modifier un élément dans une liste en y accédant directement dans le cadre de l'instruction d'affectation à l'aide de l'opérateur d'indexation. Nous pouvons également effectuer des opérations sur notre liste pour obtenir la sortie souhaitée. Passons en revue le code pour mieux comprendre les opérations de liste et de liste.

1. Créer une liste

#creating the list
my_list = ['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'e']
print(my_list)

Production

['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'e']

2. Accéder aux éléments de la liste

#accessing the list 
 
#accessing the first item of the list
my_list[0]

Production

'p'
#accessing the third item of the list
my_list[2]
'o'

3. Ajouter de nouveaux éléments à la liste

#adding item to the list
my_list + ['k']

Production

['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'e', 'k']

4. Suppression d'éléments

#removing item from the list
#Method 1:
 
#Deleting list items
my_list = ['p', 'r', 'o', 'b', 'l', 'e', 'm']
 
# delete one item
del my_list[2]
 
print(my_list)
 
# delete multiple items
del my_list[1:5]
 
print(my_list)

Production

['p', 'r', 'b', 'l', 'e', 'm']
['p', 'm']
#Method 2:
 
#with remove fucntion
my_list = ['p','r','o','k','l','y','m']
my_list.remove('p')
 
 
print(my_list)
 
#Method 3:
 
#with pop function
print(my_list.pop(1))
 
# Output: ['r', 'k', 'l', 'y', 'm']
print(my_list)

Production

['r', 'o', 'k', 'l', 'y', 'm']
o
['r', 'k', 'l', 'y', 'm']

5. Liste de tri

#sorting of list in ascending order
 
my_list.sort()
print(my_list)

Production

['k', 'l', 'm', 'r', 'y']
#sorting of list in descending order
 
my_list.sort(reverse=True)
print(my_list)

Production

['y', 'r', 'm', 'l', 'k']

6. Trouver la longueur d'une liste

#finding the length of list
 
len(my_list)

Production

5

TUPLE

Les tuples sont très similaires aux listes avec une différence clé qu'un tuple est IMMUTABLE , contrairement à une liste. Une fois que nous avons créé un tuple ou que nous avons un tuple, nous ne sommes pas autorisés à modifier les éléments qu'il contient. Cependant, si nous avons un élément à l'intérieur d'un tuple, qui est une liste elle-même, alors seulement nous pouvons accéder ou changer dans cette liste. Pour créer un tuple, nous devons écrire les éléments entre parenthèses . Comme les listes, nous avons des méthodes similaires qui peuvent être utilisées avec des tuples. Passons en revue quelques extraits de code pour comprendre l'utilisation des tuples.

1. Créer un tuple

#creating of tuple
 
my_tuple = ("apple", "banana", "guava")
print(my_tuple)

Production

('apple', 'banana', 'guava')

2. Accéder aux éléments d'un Tuple

#accessing first element in tuple
 
my_tuple[1]

Production

'banana'

3. Longueur d'un tuple

#for finding the lenght of tuple
 
len(my_tuple)

Production

3

4. Conversion d'un tuple en liste

#converting tuple into a list
 
my_tuple_list = list(my_tuple)
type(my_tuple_list)

Production

list

5. Inverser un tuple

#Reversing a tuple
 
tuple(sorted(my_tuple, reverse=True)) 

Production

('guava', 'banana', 'apple')

6. Trier un tuple

#sorting tuple in ascending order
 
tuple(sorted(my_tuple)) 

Production

('apple', 'banana', 'guava')

7. Supprimer des éléments de Tuple

Pour supprimer des éléments du tuple, nous avons d'abord converti le tuple en une liste comme nous l'avons fait dans l'une de nos méthodes ci-dessus (point n ° 4), puis avons suivi le même processus de la liste et avons explicitement supprimé un tuple entier, juste en utilisant le del déclaration .

DICTIONNAIRE

Dictionary est une collection, ce qui signifie simplement qu'il est utilisé pour stocker une valeur avec une clé et extraire la valeur donnée à la clé. Nous pouvons le considérer comme un ensemble de clés : des paires de valeurs et chaque clé d'un dictionnaire est supposée être unique afin que nous puissions accéder aux valeurs correspondantes en conséquence.

Un dictionnaire est indiqué par l'utilisation d' accolades { } contenant les paires clé : valeur. Chacune des paires d'un dictionnaire est séparée par des virgules. Les éléments d'un dictionnaire ne sont pas ordonnés , la séquence n'a pas d'importance pendant que nous y accédons ou que nous les stockons.

Ils sont MUTABLES ce qui signifie que nous pouvons ajouter, supprimer ou mettre à jour des éléments dans un dictionnaire. Voici quelques exemples de code pour mieux comprendre un dictionnaire en python.

Un point important à noter est que nous ne pouvons pas utiliser un objet mutable comme clé dans le dictionnaire. Ainsi, une liste n'est pas autorisée comme clé dans le dictionnaire.

1. Création d'un dictionnaire

#creating a dictionary
 
my_dict = {
    1:'Delhi',
    2:'Patna',
    3:'Bangalore'
}
print(my_dict)

Production

{1: 'Delhi', 2: 'Patna', 3: 'Bangalore'}

Ici, les entiers sont les clés du dictionnaire et le nom de ville associé aux entiers sont les valeurs du dictionnaire.

2. Accéder aux éléments d'un dictionnaire

#access an item
 
print(my_dict[1])

Production

'Delhi'

3. Longueur d'un dictionnaire

#length of the dictionary
 
len(my_dict)

Production

3

4. Trier un dictionnaire

#sorting based on the key 
 
Print(sorted(my_dict.items()))
 
 
#sorting based on the values of dictionary
 
print(sorted(my_dict.values()))

Production

[(1, 'Delhi'), (2, 'Bangalore'), (3, 'Patna')]
 
['Bangalore', 'Delhi', 'Patna']

5. Ajout d'éléments dans le dictionnaire

#adding a new item in dictionary 
 
my_dict[4] = 'Lucknow'
print(my_dict)

Production

{1: 'Delhi', 2: 'Patna', 3: 'Bangalore', 4: 'Lucknow'}

6. Suppression d'éléments du dictionnaire

#for deleting an item from dict using the specific key
 
my_dict.pop(4)
print(my_dict)
 
#for deleting last item from the list
 
my_dict.popitem()
 
#for clearing the dictionary
 
my_dict.clear()
print(my_dict)

Production

{1: 'Delhi', 2: 'Patna', 3: 'Bangalore'}
(3, 'Bangalore')
{}

POSITIONNER

Set est un autre type de données en python qui est une collection non ordonnée sans éléments en double. Les cas d'utilisation courants d'un ensemble consistent à supprimer les valeurs en double et à effectuer des tests d'appartenance. Les accolades ou la set()fonction peuvent être utilisées pour créer des ensembles. Une chose à garder à l'esprit est que lors de la création d'un ensemble vide, nous devons utiliser set(), et . Ce dernier crée un dictionnaire vide. not { }

Voici quelques exemples de code pour mieux comprendre les ensembles en python.

1. Créer un ensemble

#creating set
 
my_set = {"apple", "mango", "strawberry", "apple"}
print(my_set)

Production

{'apple', 'strawberry', 'mango'}

2. Accéder aux éléments d'un ensemble

#to test for an element inside the set
 
"apple" in my_set

Production

True

3. Longueur d'un ensemble

print(len(my_set))

Production

3

4. Trier un ensemble

print(sorted(my_set))

Production

['apple', 'mango', 'strawberry']

5. Ajout d'éléments dans Set

my_set.add("guava")
print(my_set)

Production

{'apple', 'guava', 'mango', 'strawberry'}

6. Suppression d'éléments de Set

my_set.remove("mango")
print(my_set)

Production

{'apple', 'guava', 'strawberry'}

Conclusion

Dans cet article, nous avons passé en revue les structures de données les plus couramment utilisées en python et avons également vu diverses méthodes qui leur sont associées.

Lien : https://www.askpython.com/python/data

#python #datastructures