TensorFlow Extended (TFX): Machine Learning Pipelines

TensorFlow Extended (TFX): Machine Learning Pipelines

TensorFlow Extended (TFX): Machine Learning Pipelines

TensorFlow Extended (TFX): Machine Learning Pipelines

Speaker: Martin Andrews

Event: Google I/O Recap 2019 Singapore AI - From Model to Device by BigDataX

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How to get started with Python for Deep Learning and Data Science

How to get started with Python for Deep Learning and Data Science

A step-by-step guide to setting up Python for Deep Learning and Data Science for a complete beginner

A step-by-step guide to setting up Python for Deep Learning and Data Science for a complete beginner

You can code your own Data Science or Deep Learning project in just a couple of lines of code these days. This is not an exaggeration; many programmers out there have done the hard work of writing tons of code for us to use, so that all we need to do is plug-and-play rather than write code from scratch.

You may have seen some of this code on Data Science / Deep Learning blog posts. Perhaps you might have thought: “Well, if it’s really that easy, then why don’t I try it out myself?”

If you’re a beginner to Python and you want to embark on this journey, then this post will guide you through your first steps. A common complaint I hear from complete beginners is that it’s pretty difficult to set up Python. How do we get everything started in the first place so that we can plug-and-play Data Science or Deep Learning code?

This post will guide you through in a step-by-step manner how to set up Python for your Data Science and Deep Learning projects. We will:

  • Set up Anaconda and Jupyter Notebook
  • Create Anaconda environments and install packages (code that others have written to make our lives tremendously easy) like tensorflow, keras, pandas, scikit-learn and matplotlib.

Once you’ve set up the above, you can build your first neural network to predict house prices in this tutorial here:

Build your first Neural Network to predict house prices with Keras

Setting up Anaconda and Jupyter Notebook

The main programming language we are going to use is called Python, which is the most common programming language used by Deep Learning practitioners.

The first step is to download Anaconda, which you can think of as a platform for you to use Python “out of the box”.

Visit this page: https://www.anaconda.com/distribution/ and scroll down to see this:

This tutorial is written specifically for Windows users, but the instructions for users of other Operating Systems are not all that different. Be sure to click on “Windows” as your Operating System (or whatever OS that you are on) to make sure that you are downloading the correct version.

This tutorial will be using Python 3, so click the green Download button under “Python 3.7 version”. A pop up should appear for you to click “Save” into whatever directory you wish.

Once it has finished downloading, just go through the setup step by step as follows:

Click Next

Click “I Agree”

Click Next

Choose a destination folder and click Next

Click Install with the default options, and wait for a few moments as Anaconda installs

Click Skip as we will not be using Microsoft VSCode in our tutorials

Click Finish, and the installation is done!

Once the installation is done, go to your Start Menu and you should see some newly installed software:

You should see this on your start menu

Click on Anaconda Navigator, which is a one-stop hub to navigate the apps we need. You should see a front page like this:

Anaconda Navigator Home Screen

Click on ‘Launch’ under Jupyter Notebook, which is the second panel on my screen above. Jupyter Notebook allows us to run Python code interactively on the web browser, and it’s where we will be writing most of our code.

A browser window should open up with your directory listing. I’m going to create a folder on my Desktop called “Intuitive Deep Learning Tutorial”. If you navigate to the folder, your browser should look something like this:

Navigating to a folder called Intuitive Deep Learning Tutorial on my Desktop

On the top right, click on New and select “Python 3”:

Click on New and select Python 3

A new browser window should pop up like this.

Browser window pop-up

Congratulations — you’ve created your first Jupyter notebook! Now it’s time to write some code. Jupyter notebooks allow us to write snippets of code and then run those snippets without running the full program. This helps us perhaps look at any intermediate output from our program.

To begin, let’s write code that will display some words when we run it. This function is called print. Copy and paste the code below into the grey box on your Jupyter notebook:

print("Hello World!")

Your notebook should look like this:

Entering in code into our Jupyter Notebook

Now, press Alt-Enter on your keyboard to run that snippet of code:

Press Alt-Enter to run that snippet of code

You can see that Jupyter notebook has displayed the words “Hello World!” on the display panel below the code snippet! The number 1 has also filled in the square brackets, meaning that this is the first code snippet that we’ve run thus far. This will help us to track the order in which we have run our code snippets.

Instead of Alt-Enter, note that you can also click Run when the code snippet is highlighted:

Click Run on the panel

If you wish to create new grey blocks to write more snippets of code, you can do so under Insert.

Jupyter Notebook also allows you to write normal text instead of code. Click on the drop-down menu that currently says “Code” and select “Markdown”:

Now, our grey box that is tagged as markdown will not have square brackets beside it. If you write some text in this grey box now and press Alt-Enter, the text will render it as plain text like this:

If we write text in our grey box tagged as markdown, pressing Alt-Enter will render it as plain text.

There are some other features that you can explore. But now we’ve got Jupyter notebook set up for us to start writing some code!

Setting up Anaconda environment and installing packages

Now we’ve got our coding platform set up. But are we going to write Deep Learning code from scratch? That seems like an extremely difficult thing to do!

The good news is that many others have written code and made it available to us! With the contribution of others’ code, we can play around with Deep Learning models at a very high level without having to worry about implementing all of it from scratch. This makes it extremely easy for us to get started with coding Deep Learning models.

For this tutorial, we will be downloading five packages that Deep Learning practitioners commonly use:

  • Set up Anaconda and Jupyter Notebook
  • Create Anaconda environments and install packages (code that others have written to make our lives tremendously easy) like tensorflow, keras, pandas, scikit-learn and matplotlib.

The first thing we will do is to create a Python environment. An environment is like an isolated working copy of Python, so that whatever you do in your environment (such as installing new packages) will not affect other environments. It’s good practice to create an environment for your projects.

Click on Environments on the left panel and you should see a screen like this:

Anaconda environments

Click on the button “Create” at the bottom of the list. A pop-up like this should appear:

A pop-up like this should appear.

Name your environment and select Python 3.7 and then click Create. This might take a few moments.

Once that is done, your screen should look something like this:

Notice that we have created an environment ‘intuitive-deep-learning’. We can see what packages we have installed in this environment and their respective versions.

Now let’s install some packages we need into our environment!

The first two packages we will install are called Tensorflow and Keras, which help us plug-and-play code for Deep Learning.

On Anaconda Navigator, click on the drop down menu where it currently says “Installed” and select “Not Installed”:

A whole list of packages that you have not installed will appear like this:

Search for “tensorflow”, and click the checkbox for both “keras” and “tensorflow”. Then, click “Apply” on the bottom right of your screen:

A pop up should appear like this:

Click Apply and wait for a few moments. Once that’s done, we will have Keras and Tensorflow installed in our environment!

Using the same method, let’s install the packages ‘pandas’, ‘scikit-learn’ and ‘matplotlib’. These are common packages that data scientists use to process the data as well as to visualize nice graphs in Jupyter notebook.

This is what you should see on your Anaconda Navigator for each of the packages.

Pandas:

Installing pandas into your environment

Scikit-learn:

Installing scikit-learn into your environment

Matplotlib:

Installing matplotlib into your environment

Once it’s done, go back to “Home” on the left panel of Anaconda Navigator. You should see a screen like this, where it says “Applications on intuitive-deep-learning” at the top:

Now, we have to install Jupyter notebook in this environment. So click the green button “Install” under the Jupyter notebook logo. It will take a few moments (again). Once it’s done installing, the Jupyter notebook panel should look like this:

Click on Launch, and the Jupyter notebook app should open.

Create a notebook and type in these five snippets of code and click Alt-Enter. This code tells the notebook that we will be using the five packages that you installed with Anaconda Navigator earlier in the tutorial.

import tensorflow as tf

import keras

import pandas

import sklearn

import matplotlib

If there are no errors, then congratulations — you’ve got everything installed correctly:

A sign that everything works!

If you have had any trouble with any of the steps above, please feel free to comment below and I’ll help you out!

*Originally published by Joseph Lee Wei En at *medium.freecodecamp.org

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Deep Learning from Scratch and Using Tensorflow in Python

Deep Learning from Scratch and Using Tensorflow in Python

In this article, we will learn how deep learning works and get familiar with its terminology — such as backpropagation and batch size

Originally published by Milad Toutounchian at https://towardsdatascience.com
Deep learning is one of the most popular models currently being used in real-world, Data Science applications. It’s been an effective model in areas that range from image to text to voice/music. With the increase in its use, the ability to quickly and scalably implement deep learning becomes paramount. The rise of deep learning platforms such as Tensorflow, help developers implement what they need to in easier ways.

In this article, we will learn how deep learning works and get familiar with its terminology — such as backpropagation and batch size. We will implement a simple deep learning model — from theory to scratch implementation — for a predefined input and output in Python, and then do the same using deep learning platforms such as Keras and Tensorflow. We have written this simple deep learning model using Keras and Tensorflow version 1.x and version 2.0 with three different levels of complexity and ease of coding.

Deep Learning Implementation from Scratch

Consider a simple multi-layer-perceptron with four input neurons, one hidden layer with three neurons and an output layer with one neuron. We have three data-samples for the input denoted as X, and three data-samples for the desired output denoted as yt. So, each input data-sample has four features.

# Inputs and outputs of the neural net:
import numpy as np

X=np.array([[1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0],[1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0],[0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0]])
yt=np.array([[1.0],[1.0],[0.0]])

The x*(m) in this figure is one-sample of Xh(m) is the output of the hidden layer for input x(m), and Wi* and Wh are the weights.

The goal of a neural net (NN) is to obtain weights and biases such that for a given input, the NN provides the desired output. But, we do not know the appropriate weights and biases in advance, so we update the weights and biases such that the error between the output of NN, yp(m), and desired ones, yt(m), is minimized. This iterative minimization process is called the NN training.

Assume the activation functions for both hidden and output layers are sigmoid functions. Therefore,

The size of weights, biases and the relationships between input and outputs of the neural net

Where activation function is the sigmoid, m is the mth data-sample and yp(m) is the NN output.

The error function, which measures the difference between the output of NN with the desired one, can be expressed mathematically as:

The Error defined for the neural net which is squared error

The pseudocode for the above NN has been summarized below:

pseudocode for the neural net training

From our pseudocode, we realize that the partial derivative of Error (E) with respect to parameters (weights and biases) should be computed. Using the chain rule from calculus we can write:

We have two options here for updating the weights and biases in backward path (backward path means updating weights and biases such that error is minimized):

  1. Use all *N * samples of the training data
  2. Use one sample (or a couple of samples)

For the first one, we say the batch size is N. For the second one, we say batch size is 1, if use one sample to updates the parameters. So batch size means how many data samples are being used for updating the weights and biases.

You can find the implementation of the above neural net, in which the gradient of the error with respect to parameters is calculated Symbolically, with different batch sizes here.

As you can see with the above example, creating a simple deep learning model from scratch involves methods that are very complex. In the next section, we will see how deep learning frameworks can assist in introducing scalability and greater ease of implementation to our model.

Deep Learning implementation using Keras, Tensorflow 1.x and 2.0

In the previous section, we computed the gradient of Error w.r.t. parameters from using the chain rule. We saw first-hand that it is not an easy or scalable approach. Also, keep in mind that we evaluate the partial derivatives at each iteration, and as a result, the Symbolic Gradient is not needed although its value is important. This is where deep-learning frameworks such as Keras and Tensorflow can play their role. The deep-learning frameworks use an AutoDiff method for numerical calculations of partial gradients. If you’re not familiar with AutoDiff, StackExchange has a great example to walk through.

The AutoDiff decomposes the complex expression into a set of primitive ones, i.e. expressions consisting of at most a single function call. As the differentiation rules for each separate expression are already known, the final results can be computed in an efficient way.

We have implemented the NN model with three different levels in Keras, Tensorflow 1.x and Tensorflow 2.0:

1- High-Level (Keras and Tensorflow 2.0): High-Level Tensorflow 2.0 with Batch Size 1

2- Medium-Level (Tensorflow 1.x and 2.0): Medium-Level Tensorflow 1.x with Batch Size 1 , Medium-Level Tensorflow 1.x with Batch Size NMedium-Level Tensorflow 2.0 with Batch Size 1Medium-Level Tensorflow v 2.0 with Batch Size N

3- Low-Level (Tensorflow 1.x): Low-Level Tensorflow 1.x with Batch Size N

Code Snippets:

For the High-Level, we have accomplished the implementation using Keras and Tensorflow v 2.0 with model.train_on_batch:

# High-Level implementation of the neural net in Tensorflow:
model.compile(loss=mse, optimizer=optimizer)
for _ in range(2000):
    for step, (x, y) in enumerate(zip(X_data, y_data)):
        model.train_on_batch(np.array([x]), np.array([y]))

In the Medium-Level using Tensorflow 1.x, we have defined:

E = tf.reduce_sum(tf.pow(ypred - Y, 2))
optimizer = tf.train.GradientDescentOptimizer(0.1)
grads = optimizer.compute_gradients(E, [W_h, b_h, W_o, b_o])
updates = optimizer.apply_gradients(grads)

This ensures that in the for loop, the updates variable will be updated. For Medium-Level, the gradients and their updates are defined outside the for_loop and inside the for_loop updates is iteratively updated. In the Medium-Level using Tensorflow v 2.x, we have used:

# Medium-Level implementation of the neural net in Tensorflow

# In for_loop
with tf.GradientTape() as tape:
   x = tf.convert_to_tensor(np.array([x]), dtype=tf.float64)
   y = tf.convert_to_tensor(np.array([y]), dtype=tf.float64)
   ypred = model(x)
   loss = mse(y, ypred)
gradients = tape.gradient(loss, model.trainable_weights)
optimizer.apply_gradients(zip(gradients, model.trainable_weights))

In Low-Level implementation, each weight and bias is updated separately. In the Low-Level using Tensorflow v 1.x, we have defined:

# Low-Level implementation of the neural net in Tensorflow:
E = tf.reduce_sum(tf.pow(ypred - Y, 2))
dE_dW_h = tf.gradients(E, [W_h])[0]
dE_db_h = tf.gradients(E, [b_h])[0]
dE_dW_o = tf.gradients(E, [W_o])[0]
dE_db_o = tf.gradients(E, [b_o])[0]
# In for_loop:
evaluated_dE_dW_h = sess.run(dE_dW_h,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        W_h_i = W_h_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_dW_h
        evaluated_dE_db_h = sess.run(dE_db_h,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        b_h_i = b_h_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_db_h
        evaluated_dE_dW_o = sess.run(dE_dW_o,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        W_o_i = W_o_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_dW_o
        evaluated_dE_db_o = sess.run(dE_db_o,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        b_o_i = b_o_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_db_o

As you can see with the above low level implementation, the developer has more control over every single step of numerical operations and calculations.

Conclusion

We have now shown that implementing from scratch even a simple deep learning model by using Symbolic gradient computation for weight and bias updates is not an easy or scalable approach. Using deep learning frameworks accelerates this process as a result of using AutoDiff, which is basically a stable numerical gradient computation for updating weights and biases.

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Best Python Libraries For Data Science & Machine Learning

Best Python Libraries For Data Science & Machine Learning | Data Science Python Libraries

This video will focus on the top Python libraries that you should know to master Data Science and Machine Learning. Here’s a list of topics that are covered in this session:

  • Introduction To Data Science And Machine Learning
  • Why Use Python For Data Science And Machine Learning?
  • Python Libraries for Data Science And Machine Learning
  • Python libraries for Statistics
  • Python libraries for Visualization
  • Python libraries for Machine Learning
  • Python libraries for Deep Learning
  • Python libraries for Natural Language Processing

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