Zander  Herzog

Zander Herzog

1619706237

Writing Robust Integration Tests In .NET with WireMock.NET

In this video I will show you how you can step your integration testing (or even acceptance testing) up using WireMock.NET. Third party APIs are a crucial part of a lot of applications and mocking them during integration testing can be really tricky. WireMock.NET is a library that can make your live so much easier by allowing your to cleanly create a mock version of the third party API that you’re integrating with.

Given WireMock.NET a star: https://github.com/WireMock-Net/WireMock.Net

#dotnet #developer

Writing Robust Integration Tests In .NET with WireMock.NET
Einar  Hintz

Einar Hintz

1602560783

jQuery Ajax CRUD in ASP.NET Core MVC with Modal Popup

In this article, we’ll discuss how to use jQuery Ajax for ASP.NET Core MVC CRUD Operations using Bootstrap Modal. With jQuery Ajax, we can make HTTP request to controller action methods without reloading the entire page, like a single page application.

To demonstrate CRUD operations – insert, update, delete and retrieve, the project will be dealing with details of a normal bank transaction. GitHub repository for this demo project : https://bit.ly/33KTJAu.

Sub-topics discussed :

  • Form design for insert and update operation.
  • Display forms in modal popup dialog.
  • Form post using jQuery Ajax.
  • Implement MVC CRUD operations with jQuery Ajax.
  • Loading spinner in .NET Core MVC.
  • Prevent direct access to MVC action method.

Create ASP.NET Core MVC Project

In Visual Studio 2019, Go to File > New > Project (Ctrl + Shift + N).

From new project window, Select Asp.Net Core Web Application_._

Image showing how to create ASP.NET Core Web API project in Visual Studio.

Once you provide the project name and location. Select Web Application(Model-View-Controller) and uncheck HTTPS Configuration. Above steps will create a brand new ASP.NET Core MVC project.

Showing project template selection for .NET Core MVC.

Setup a Database

Let’s create a database for this application using Entity Framework Core. For that we’ve to install corresponding NuGet Packages. Right click on project from solution explorer, select Manage NuGet Packages_,_ From browse tab, install following 3 packages.

Showing list of NuGet Packages for Entity Framework Core

Now let’s define DB model class file – /Models/TransactionModel.cs.

public class TransactionModel
{
    [Key]
    public int TransactionId { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(12)")]
    [DisplayName("Account Number")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage ="This Field is required.")]
    [MaxLength(12,ErrorMessage ="Maximum 12 characters only")]
    public string AccountNumber { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(100)")]
    [DisplayName("Beneficiary Name")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public string BeneficiaryName { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(100)")]
    [DisplayName("Bank Name")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public string BankName { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(11)")]
    [DisplayName("SWIFT Code")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    [MaxLength(11)]
    public string SWIFTCode { get; set; }

    [DisplayName("Amount")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    [DisplayFormat(DataFormatString = "{0:MM/dd/yyyy}")]
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

C#Copy

Here we’ve defined model properties for the transaction with proper validation. Now let’s define  DbContextclass for EF Core.

#asp.net core article #asp.net core #add loading spinner in asp.net core #asp.net core crud without reloading #asp.net core jquery ajax form #asp.net core modal dialog #asp.net core mvc crud using jquery ajax #asp.net core mvc with jquery and ajax #asp.net core popup window #bootstrap modal popup in asp.net core mvc. bootstrap modal popup in asp.net core #delete and viewall in asp.net core #jquery ajax - insert #jquery ajax form post #modal popup dialog in asp.net core #no direct access action method #update #validation in modal popup

jQuery Ajax CRUD in ASP.NET Core MVC with Modal Popup

Software Testing 101: Regression Tests, Unit Tests, Integration Tests

Automation and segregation can help you build better software
If you write automated tests and deliver them to the customer, he can make sure the software is working properly. And, at the end of the day, he paid for it.

Ok. We can segregate or separate the tests according to some criteria. For example, “white box” tests are used to measure the internal quality of the software, in addition to the expected results. They are very useful to know the percentage of lines of code executed, the cyclomatic complexity and several other software metrics. Unit tests are white box tests.

#testing #software testing #regression tests #unit tests #integration tests

Software Testing 101: Regression Tests, Unit Tests, Integration Tests
Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Testing Microservices Applications

Unit Testing Is NOT The Same As Integration Testing

When Integration Testing Gets Tricky

Certain truly external systems may be difficult to integrate into tests. This is because they have side effects in the real world that cannot be undone: A financial transaction, an email send, physically moving a paint robot. Before you give up and sidestep them in your testing, look around for solutions.

Many external systems will have a documented way to use them in an integration test. Payment processors often have test credit card numbers, and test users with test email accounts can be set up for testing delivery. The closer integration tests are to real-world interactions the more likely they are to catch problems and provide real value.

#testing #unit testing test #integration testing

Unit Testing Is NOT The Same As Integration Testing
Jamal  Lemke

Jamal Lemke

1603580400

Ten Principles For Agile Testers

In the previous blog we saw that what exactly is Agile testing and in this blog we will see in introduction to Principles For Agile Testers.

What is an Agile tester?

  • So get into the principles for Agile testers we first need to know what is an Agile tester? A professional tester who is not scared of change has knowledge about technical and business aspects as well and understands the concept of using tests to document requirements to drive development is an Agile tester.
  • Now let’s see what are in ten principles for Agile testers:
  • Provide continuous feedback.
  • Deliver value to the customer.
  • Enable face-to-face communication.
  • Have courage.
  • Keep it simple.
  • Practice continuous improvement.
  • Respond to change.
  • Self-organize.
  • Focus on people.
  • Enjoy

Provide Continuous Feedback

  • Continuous feedback is the key to agile testing success. By providing feedback we can improve and not make the same mistakes again and again. The main aim is to learn from your mistakes. Testers should help product owners or customers visualize requirements for the stories. Their feedbacks helps in designing the test cases early in the software life cycle. As retrospectives are an important part of the Agile process, providing feedback in it is also helpful. It is one of the most important principles for Agile testers.

Deliver Value to the Customer

  • As a tester, it’s your responsibility to tell customers which really is an important function and which is not. The testers help them identify the main functionality instead of just some cool features. The main focus is to try and deliver critical functionality and enhance it later. Critical functionalities should be worked on first as after seeing them implemented, customers can see what enhancements they want. Testing should work on corner cases but should not forget about the happy path of the service. As we get involved in testing it is possible to get involved in corner cases so much that we miss the core functionality. So, we need to maintain a balance between them.

Enable Face-to-Face Communication

  • Good communication is the key to success. Agile’s success is totally dependent upon communication. Whether it is between customer and developer or between developers and the testers all communication is very important. Testers should look for unique ways to communicate. Teams may be working in geographically divided. But it should not hinder communications between the teams.
  • Testers should never get in the way of any direct customer-developer communication but should help to make sure that communication happens. If a tester finds out that the developer has some confusion regarding the requirements. It’s the responsibility of the tester to set up a meeting between the developer and the business.
  • The testers understand the story from the customer’s perspective and from the developers’ technical angle as well. The tester should be able to communicate both ways, that’s why it’s in testers’ best interest to be good at communicating, as they need to do it more than any other team member. Testers act as a bridge between customers and developers.

Have Courage

  • The testers should have the courage to speak their minds. They should not be intimidated by anyone. If they find any issue they should report it. If they see any gap in the business requirements they should discuss it.
  • The testers should be comfortable in asking customers for examples or developers for help. Asking for examples is the best way for getting the real-world use case of the services. In Agile anyone can perform any task. So, a developer can help a tester in testing some particular scenario. And a tester can help the developers in debugging an issue ass well.
  • Testers should not be scared to fail but should learn from their mistake. It’s natural to make some mistakes but we should always learn from them and improve ourselves.

#api testing #integration testing #quality assurance (qa) #testing #unit testing #agile #agile teams #agile transformation #agiledeveloper #automation #automation testing #testing skills

Ten Principles For Agile Testers