Rusty  Shanahan

Rusty Shanahan

1599028080

Virtual Clusters for Kubernetes — Benefits and Use Cases

Virtual Kubernetes clusters (vClusters) have the potential to bring Kubernetes adoption to the next level. They run in a physical Kubernetes cluster and can be used in the same way as normal clusters, but they are still just a virtual construct. For a detailed definition and description of virtual Kubernetes clusters, take a look at this article.

Similarly to virtual machines that revolutionized the use of physical servers, virtual Kubernetes clusters have some benefits compared to physical clusters that make them particularly useful for some scenarios.

In this article, I will describe the benefits of virtual Kubernetes clusters and provide some use cases in which vClusters are more advantageous than other solutions such as many individual clusters or namespace-based multi-tenancy.


Benefits of Virtual Kubernetes Clusters

The benefits of virtual clusters for Kubernetes are mainly based on two characteristics:

  1. Sharing of a physical cluster
  2. Isolation

Cluster sharing/multi-tenancy

Since vClusters are a virtual abstraction within Kubernetes, it is possible to run many vClusters on just a single physical cluster, which has the following advantages:

  • Reduced management effort. Since there is only one physical cluster to maintain, the administrative effort is significantly reduced by virtual clusters. This becomes especially clear when comparing it to another alternative that would lead to a similar outcome from a user perspective: Instead of running virtual clusters in one physical cluster, it is possible to run many physical clusters that all have to be maintained, which can become infeasible pretty fast even in only mid-sized teams. Additionally, the physical cluster can be configured in a pretty “basic” way without extensive additional installations, as most of this will happen on the level of the vCluster.
  • Reduced cost. Besides the reduced management effort that also results in cost reductions, virtual clusters are also more efficient in utilizing computing resources because the resources are shared by the tenants. Again, similar efficiency improvements were gained by introducing virtual machines to a physical server infrastructure. This cost efficiency is further increased by the disposable nature of virtual clusters. They can be “thrown away” (shut off) when they are not needed. Alternatively, they can be “put to sleep” (scaled down), a process that can even be automized (e.g. with a sleep mode).

#kubernetes #programming #containers #devops #kubernetes-cluster

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Virtual Clusters for Kubernetes — Benefits and Use Cases
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

Maud  Rosenbaum

Maud Rosenbaum

1601051854

Kubernetes in the Cloud: Strategies for Effective Multi Cloud Implementations

Kubernetes is a highly popular container orchestration platform. Multi cloud is a strategy that leverages cloud resources from multiple vendors. Multi cloud strategies have become popular because they help prevent vendor lock-in and enable you to leverage a wide variety of cloud resources. However, multi cloud ecosystems are notoriously difficult to configure and maintain.

This article explains how you can leverage Kubernetes to reduce multi cloud complexities and improve stability, scalability, and velocity.

Kubernetes: Your Multi Cloud Strategy

Maintaining standardized application deployments becomes more challenging as your number of applications and the technologies they are based on increase. As environments, operating systems, and dependencies differ, management and operations require more effort and extensive documentation.

In the past, teams tried to get around these difficulties by creating isolated projects in the data center. Each project, including its configurations and requirements were managed independently. This required accurately predicting performance and the number of users before deployment and taking down applications to update operating systems or applications. There were many chances for error.

Kubernetes can provide an alternative to the old method, enabling teams to deploy applications independent of the environment in containers. This eliminates the need to create resource partitions and enables teams to operate infrastructure as a unified whole.

In particular, Kubernetes makes it easier to deploy a multi cloud strategy since it enables you to abstract away service differences. With Kubernetes deployments you can work from a consistent platform and optimize services and applications according to your business needs.

The Compelling Attributes of Multi Cloud Kubernetes

Multi cloud Kubernetes can provide multiple benefits beyond a single cloud deployment. Below are some of the most notable advantages.

Stability

In addition to the built-in scalability, fault tolerance, and auto-healing features of Kubernetes, multi cloud deployments can provide service redundancy. For example, you can mirror applications or split microservices across vendors. This reduces the risk of a vendor-related outage and enables you to create failovers.

#kubernetes #multicloud-strategy #kubernetes-cluster #kubernetes-top-story #kubernetes-cluster-install #kubernetes-explained #kubernetes-infrastructure #cloud

Rusty  Shanahan

Rusty Shanahan

1599028080

Virtual Clusters for Kubernetes — Benefits and Use Cases

Virtual Kubernetes clusters (vClusters) have the potential to bring Kubernetes adoption to the next level. They run in a physical Kubernetes cluster and can be used in the same way as normal clusters, but they are still just a virtual construct. For a detailed definition and description of virtual Kubernetes clusters, take a look at this article.

Similarly to virtual machines that revolutionized the use of physical servers, virtual Kubernetes clusters have some benefits compared to physical clusters that make them particularly useful for some scenarios.

In this article, I will describe the benefits of virtual Kubernetes clusters and provide some use cases in which vClusters are more advantageous than other solutions such as many individual clusters or namespace-based multi-tenancy.


Benefits of Virtual Kubernetes Clusters

The benefits of virtual clusters for Kubernetes are mainly based on two characteristics:

  1. Sharing of a physical cluster
  2. Isolation

Cluster sharing/multi-tenancy

Since vClusters are a virtual abstraction within Kubernetes, it is possible to run many vClusters on just a single physical cluster, which has the following advantages:

  • Reduced management effort. Since there is only one physical cluster to maintain, the administrative effort is significantly reduced by virtual clusters. This becomes especially clear when comparing it to another alternative that would lead to a similar outcome from a user perspective: Instead of running virtual clusters in one physical cluster, it is possible to run many physical clusters that all have to be maintained, which can become infeasible pretty fast even in only mid-sized teams. Additionally, the physical cluster can be configured in a pretty “basic” way without extensive additional installations, as most of this will happen on the level of the vCluster.
  • Reduced cost. Besides the reduced management effort that also results in cost reductions, virtual clusters are also more efficient in utilizing computing resources because the resources are shared by the tenants. Again, similar efficiency improvements were gained by introducing virtual machines to a physical server infrastructure. This cost efficiency is further increased by the disposable nature of virtual clusters. They can be “thrown away” (shut off) when they are not needed. Alternatively, they can be “put to sleep” (scaled down), a process that can even be automized (e.g. with a sleep mode).

#kubernetes #programming #containers #devops #kubernetes-cluster

How to Install and Configure Kubectl: A Tutorial

What is Kubectl?

Kubectl is a command-line tool for Kubernetes. It allows us to execute Kubernetes operations via the API. We can use Kubectl to deploy apps, check logs as well as manage all the other resources of the cluster.

Kubernetes uses an HTTP-based REST API which is the actual Kubernetes user interface employed to manage it. This means that every Kubernetes operation is represented as an API endpoint and can be carried out based on an HTTP-request sent to the endpoint.

In this article, we will review Kubectl, and outline its installation, configuration, and use.

What is Kubernetes?

The name Kubernetes has its origins from the original Greek term for helmsman or pilot. Kubernetes, or ‘k8s’ (pronounced “Kate’s”) is an open-source software tool that was created by Google and is used for scaling, deploying and coordinating containerized applications into easy to manage groups. It supports multiple containerization technologies as well as orchestrates hardware virtualization.

To manage a Kubernetes server cluster effectively, we utilize kubectl as the command-line tool of choice. Basically, kubectl communicates with the master Kubernetes node(s) which in turn submits commands to the worker nodes to manage the cluster. A Kubernetes cluster basically consists of two types of resources.

  • Master server – a master server organizes the cluster
  • Node server – Nodes are the workers that contain and run the applications

Each node contains a Kubelet, which is the agent for managing the node and communicating with the master. We can use kubectl to deploy, explore, review and remove Kubernetes objects (like nodes, images or containers).

Initially, Kubernetes was designed and developed by Google engineers to employ and utilize containers for its workload management. Google generates more than 2 billion containers deployments a week which was provided for by their internal platform code-named Borg (the predecessor to Kubernetes). During Borg’s development, the experience gained was one of the main factors that influenced a significant part of Kubernetes current technologies. Currently, Kubernetes is maintained by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

How to Install Kubectl?

The easiest way to install kubectl is to use one of the default package managers for a Linux OS.

Debian/Ubuntu

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install -y apt-transport-https gnupg2

curl -s https://packages.cloud.google.com/apt/doc/apt-key.gpg | sudo apt-key add -

echo "deb https://apt.kubernetes.io/ kubernetes-xenial main" | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list.d/kubernetes.list

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install -y kubectl

#tutorials #choco #cluster #debian #docker #hyper-v #hyperkit #hypervisor #kubectl #kubernetes #mac #ubuntu #virtual box #virtual environment #virtual machines #virtualized #vm #vm driver #vt-x #windows 10 #windows 8

Michel  Kub

Michel Kub

1596110100

Webinar: Things to consider to operate a Multi-Tenant Kubernetes Cluster

Using Kubernetes to serve multi tenants is not a trivial task. Kubernetes provides the tools that are necessary(RBAC, Rolebinding, Network Policy, ResourceQuota and etc) to provide isolation between tenants but building/implementing an architecture is solely upon users. In this webinar, we would like to introduce multiple approaches that can be taken to provide multi-tenancy in the kubernetes cluster. We will also talk about how others in the communities are doing to achieve multi-tenancy. We’ll analyze pros and cons of different approaches and share specific use-cases that fit each approach. Finally, we will look in to lessons we’ve learned and we have implemented these factors into our on-premise cloud environment.

#kubernetes #a multi-tenant kubernetes cluster #kubernetes cluster #on-premise cloud environment