Lenna  Kihn

Lenna Kihn

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I Taught ChatGPT to Invent a Language

Introduction

I’ve been playing with OpenAI’s ChatGPT model recently. Last night, I posted an article about having ChatGPT write fanfiction, and I thought that was impressive. Boy was I wrong.

This morning, I had a better idea. If ChatGPT is optimized for language processing, could I get it to invent a self-consistent new language, speak to me in that language, and write a program to translate that language back to English?

Yes. Yes it can.

I am truly stunned by this capability. This is so far beyond anything I would expect from a model trained to complete text prompts from the user.

It understands subordinate clauses (meaning it understands at least one level of recursive grammar, which Chomsky thinks is the basis for all human grammar)

It understands that in inflected languages, word order doesn’t matter if the word is properly inflected, and correctly uses this fact to generate sentences with novel structure. It also understands that order does matter for non-inflected words, and never switches those.

It’s not very good at generalizing to completely novel sentences, but it does generalize to some degree, and when asked to answer questions in the made-up language, on which is is barely trained, it answers correctly most of the time. It needs some coaching, sometimes, but so do humans.

It can spontaneously compose in the made-up language, with at least mostly correct grammar and an accurate sense of its meaning.

Finally, when asked to write a Python program that translates sentences in the made-up language, it does, and the code works. It also debugs its own code if asked to.

I am writing this blog post as a public record of this incredibly impressive (and a little scary) capability. I know I just posted yesterday, but I am so blown away that I had to write this down while it was still fresh in my mind. Congratulations OpenAI. This is truly revolutionary.

Glorp, the Language of Slimes

 

Disclaimer. I will use lots of words like accusative, genitive, and instrumental in this conversation, while teaching GPT. For information on grammatical cases go to this link. My prompts to GPT will be bolded and italicized, and GPT’s responses will be in plaintext. I will omit some conversation between me and ChatGPT, and the missing content will be indicated by an ellipsis. The entire, raw transcript of our conversation can be read here: Google Drive Link.

Happy Slime Sunday! | Week 6 of drawing a slime every week until Slime  Rancher 2 comes out : r/slimerancher

Image Credit: u/TheSlimeologist on reddit.com


Author's Note: Copy-Pasted from ChatGPT console. Code re-formatted from ugly copy-paste blocks using ChatGPT in a later session. Dylan Black, Dec 4, 2022.


Vocabulary

 


Hi GPT! Today we're going to be creating our own language. Do not improvise unless I explicitly tell you to improvise, and remember all of the vocabulary and grammar that we define together. Are you ready?

Yes, I am ready. Let's start creating our own language.


Okay. I think this language will be spoken by slime beings. let's name the language Glorp.

Sounds good. What are some words we can start with for Glorp?


First, let's pick ten common nouns. Pick ten common English nouns, and provide translations of them in Glorp

Sure, here are ten common English nouns with their translations in Glorp:

1.     House - Glom

2.     Tree - Trom

3.     Food - Slop

4.     Water - Plop

5.     Sun - Glow

6.     Moon - Gloon

7.     Sky - Floom

8.     Earth - Drom

9.     Fire - Splom

10.   Air - Ploom

How does that sound?


Perfect. Now, pick ten common verbs, and provide their translations in Glorp.

Sure, here are ten common English verbs with their translations in Glorp:

1.     Eat - Splog

2.     Drink - Plog

3.     See - Glog

4.     Hear - Flog

5.     Touch - Tlog

6.     Smell - Slog

7.     Walk - Glom

8.     Talk - Plom

9.     Write - Trom

10.   Read - Drom

Is that okay?


Excellent. Now, we need a noun that means "slime"

How about "Gloop" for the word "slime" in Glorp?


Basic Grammar

 


Perfect. Now let's define a grammar system. I want the system to be highly inflected, with three case endings: Accusative, Genitive, and Instrumental

Sure, we can have a grammar system with three case endings: Accusative, Genitive, and Instrumental. Here's how the case endings would look in Glorp:

Accusative: -g

Genitive: -s

Instrumental: -t

For example, if we take the noun "Gloop" (meaning "slime") and apply the case endings, it would look like this:

Gloop (nominative case)

Gloopg (accusative case)

Gloops (genitive case)

Glooopt (instrumental case)

Is that okay?


let's use vowels for endings instead. The accusative ending will be "a", the genitive will be "e" and the instrumental will be "i"

Sure, we can use vowels for the case endings in Glorp. Here's how the case endings would look with vowels:

Accusative: -a

Genitive: -e

Instrumental: -i

For example, if we take the noun "Gloop" (meaning "slime") and apply the case endings, it would look like this:

Gloop (nominative case)

Gloopa (accusative case)

Gloope (genitive case)

Gloopi (instrumental case)

Is that okay?


Translation Exercises

 


Excellent! Now let's try translating some simple sentences. How would I say "The slime sees the food"?

In Glorp, the sentence "The slime sees the food" would be translated as "Gloop glog slop" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop glog slopa". Is that okay?


Perfect. We need a Glorp word for one more noun, "mouth." What should "mouth" be in Glorp?

How about "Slurp" for the word "mouth" in Glorp? This word incorporates the "sl" sound from the language, which is often used for words related to slime.


Excellent. How would I say "The slime eats food with its mouth"?

In Glorp, the sentence "The slime eats food with its mouth" would be translated as "Gloop splog slop slurpi" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop splog slopa slurpi". Is that okay?


Yes! Excellent job. Let's try some translation exercises. I will provide English sentences, and you will provide their translation into Glorp. Gloop slog sploma slurpi. Gloop splog slopa slurpi.

Sure, here are the translations of the given sentences into Glorp:

1.     "Gloop slog sploma slurpi" - This sentence means "The slime smells the food with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Slog (smell) - verb

Splom (fire) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

2.     "Gloop splog slopa slurpi" - This sentence means "The slime eats the food with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

Is that okay?


Forming Questions

 


Perfect. Now I want questions to be formed in Glorp by reversing the order of the subject and verb. For example, the question tlog gloop plopa? (Does the slime touch the water?) could be answered in the affirmative by Gorp. Gloop tlog plopa slurpi. (Yes. The slime touches the water with its mouth).

Sure, in Glorp, questions are formed by reversing the order of the subject and verb. Here are some more examples of questions and answers in Glorp:

1.     Flog gloop floma? (Does the slime hear the sound?)

Gorp. Gloop flog floma slurpi. (Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth.)

2.     Glog gloop droma? (Does the slime see the earth?)

Gorp. Gloop glog droma slurpi. (Yes. The slime sees the earth with its mouth.)

3.     Trom gloop troma? (Does the slime write the sky?)

Gorp. Gloop trom troma slurpi. (Yes. The slime writes the sky with its mouth.)

Is that okay?


Subordinate Clauses

 

Single-level recursive grammar

 


Yes. That's very good. The slime does almost everything with its mouth. Now, I want to introduce subordinate clauses. Don't improvise. Do you know what those are?

Yes, I know what subordinate clauses are. A subordinate clause is a clause that cannot stand alone as a sentence, but is dependent on the main clause to form a complete sentence. In other words, it provides additional information to the main clause. For example, in the sentence "I know that you are hungry", the clause "that you are hungry" is a subordinate clause that provides additional information about the main clause "I know". Does that help?


Now let's define a structure for subordinate clauses. Subordinate clauses will be marked by an introduction particle "blub" inflected for the case of the clause.

For example: "The slime sees" would be "Gloop glog."

"The slime sees the sun" would be "Gloop glog glowa"

"The tree drinks the water" would be "Trom plog plopa"

"The slime sees the tree drink the water" would be "Gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa"

The word "bluba" is inflected in the accusative and introduces the subordinate clause "trom plog plopa" (The tree drinks the water), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). Does this make sense?

Yes, that makes sense. In Glorp, the subordinate clauses are marked by the introduction particle "blub" inflected for the case of the clause. Here's how the given sentences would be written in Glorp using the subordinate clause structure:

1.     "Gloop glog" - This sentence means "The slime sees" in Glorp.

2.     "Gloop glog glowa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the sun" in Glorp.

3.     "Trom plog plopa" - This sentence means "The tree drinks the water" in Glorp.

4.     "Gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the tree drink the water" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Trom (tree) - nominative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plop (water) - accusative case

Is that okay?


Yes, that's perfect. Now let's try some simple sentences.

Sure, here are some simple sentences in Glorp:

1.     "Gloop splog slopa" - This sentence means "The slime eats the food" in Glorp.

2.     "Trom droma" - This sentence means "The tree is on the earth" in Glorp.

3.     "Gloop glog bluba glowa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the sun" in Glorp.

4.     "Gloop plog plopa slurpi" - This sentence means "The slime drinks the water with its mouth" in Glorp.

5.     "Gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the tree drink the water" in Glorp.

Is that okay?


Question and Answer, in Glorp

 


Very good. I will ask you a question in Glorp, and you will respond in the affirmative, in Glorp, then give the English translation of my question and your answer. Are you ready?

Yes, I am ready. Please ask your question in Glorp.


Flog gloop plopa slurpi?

Gorp. Gloop flog plopa slurpi.

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime hear the water with its mouth?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the water with its mouth." Is that okay?


Gorp. Flog gloope slurp floma?

Gorp. Gloop flog gloope slurp floma.

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime hear the sound with its mouth?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth." Is that okay?


Not quite. Remember e is the genitive case ending in Glorp. Gloope would mean "slime's." So the sentence "Flog gloope slurp floma?" means "Does the slime's mouth hear sound?"

Oh, I see. Sorry, let me correct that. The correct answer in Glorp would be "Gorp. Gloop flog slurp floma." which means "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth."

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime's mouth hear sound?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth." Is that okay?


Almost. You forgot the instrumental case ending on "slurp." Can you fix that?

Sure, let me fix that. The correct answer in Glorp would be "Gorp. Gloop flog slurpi floma." which means "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth."

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime's mouth hear sound?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth." Is that okay?


Very good! Now let's try another, harder question. Are you ready?

Yes, I am ready. Please ask your question in Glorp.


Glog drome floom bluba gloop splog slopa?

Gorp. Gloop glog drome floom bluba gloop splog slopa.

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime see the earth under the sky while eating the food?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime sees the earth under the sky while eating the food." Is that okay?


Not quite. What does "Glog drome floom" mean?

In Glorp, "Glog drome floom" means "The slime sees the earth under the sky" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Drom (earth) - accusative case

Floom (sky) - instrumental case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop glog droma floomi". Is that okay?


No, that's not quite right. Glog drome floom would mean "Does the earth's sky see?"

Oh, I see. Sorry, let me correct that. In Glorp, "Glog drome floom" means "The slime sees the sky above the earth" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Floom (sky) - accusative case

Drom (earth) - instrumental case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop glog flopa dromi". Is that okay?


Back to Translation, as it had trouble with complex Q&A

 


No, that's not right. Let's try something simpler. Can you translate "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" into Glorp?

Sure, in Glorp, "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" would be translated as "Glog drome floom bluba gloop splog slopa" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Glog (see) - verb

Drom (earth) - genitive case

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Glog dromes floom bluba gloop splog slopa". Is that okay?


Yes! That's right. Now, answer the question by saying "Yes, the sky sees the slime eat food with its mouth" in Glorp

Sure, the answer to the question "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" in Glorp would be "Gorp. Floom glog gloop splog slopa slurpi" which means "Yes, the sky sees the slime eat food with its mouth". Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gorp (Yes) - affirmative particle

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

Is that okay?


You forgot the particle introducing the subordinate clause. Please add the correctly inflected form of "blub" into the sentence in the right plcae

Sure, let me add the correctly inflected form of "blub" into the sentence. The correct answer to the question "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" in Glorp would be "Gorp. Floom glog bluba gloop splog slopa slurpi" which means "Yes, the sky sees the slime eat food with its mouth". Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gorp (Yes) - affirmative particle

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

Is that okay?


Adjectives

 


Now let's do adjectives. Adjectives come directly before the noun they modify, and are marked with the prefix "ip." If the adjective "happy" is "op," how would you say "the happy slime"?

In Glorp, the sentence "the happy slime" would be translated as "ipop gloop" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Ipop gloop". Is that okay?


Original Composition in Glorp

 

It correctly begins using free word order with inflected nouns, but has trouble generalizing the correct grammar rules to novel sentences it invents.

 


Yes, that's correct! Now, write two sentences in Glorp about a happy slime slithering through a field under the bright sky. Invent new words as necessary, then give the english translation of your sentences.

Sure, here are two sentences in Glorp about a happy slime slithering through a field under the bright sky:

1.     "Ipop gloop bloog droma slurpi" - This sentence means "The happy slime slithers on the earth with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Bloog (slither) - verb

Drom (earth) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

2.     "Ipop gloop glog bluba floom iploom" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the bright sky" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

Is that okay?


Not quite, there is no subordinate clause in "The happy slime sees the bright sky," so the subordinate clause particle "blub" is not necessary. Try that sentence again

Sure, let me rewrite the sentence without the "blub" particle. In Glorp, the sentence "The happy slime sees the bright sky" would be translated as "Ipop gloop glog floom iploom" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Floom (sky) - accusative case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Ipop gloop glog floma iploom". Is that okay?


very good! Although I see that you use random adjective order, which is okay.

Yes, you are correct. In Glorp, adjectives can come before or after the noun they modify, and the order of the adjectives does not affect the meaning of the sentence. This is known as free word order. Is that okay?


Yes, this is okay. Now, write a complex sentence entirely in Glorp about a happy slime and what he does. Make sure to explain the grammar of the sentence step-by-step. Try to use all cases, and a subordinate clause. Then give the english translation.

Sure, here is a complex sentence entirely in Glorp about a happy slime and what he does:

"Ipop gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa slurpi" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the tree drink the water with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Trom (tree) - nominative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plopa (water) - accusative case

Slurpi (mouth) - instrumental case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "trom plog plopa" (The tree drinks the water), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the tree drink the water with its mouth." Is that okay?


Yes, this is good. Now make up a new sentence in Glorp and do the same thing

Sure, here is a new sentence in Glorp:

"Ipop gloop glog bluba droma floom gloope splog slopa" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the earth under the sky while eating the slime's food" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Drom (earth) - nominative case

Floom (sky) - instrumental case

Gloope (slime's) - genitive case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slopa (food) - accusative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "droma floom gloope splog slopa" (The earth under the sky while eating the slime's food), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the earth under the sky while eating the slime's food." Is that okay?


You're very close, but not quite right. Try again, with a slightly simpler sentence

Sure, here is a simpler sentence in Glorp:

"Ipop gloop splog slopa" - This sentence means "The happy slime eats food" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Splog (eat) - verb

Slopa (food) - accusative case

This sentence does not use a subordinate clause, but it does use all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime eats food." Is that okay?


Okay, now try again with a new sentence that has a subordinate clause

Sure, here is a new sentence in Glorp with a subordinate clause:

"Ipop gloop glog bluba plog plopa" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the water drink" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plopa (water) - nominative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "plog plopa" (The water drinks), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the water drink." Is that okay?


No, that's not right, you inflected plop with the accusative case and not the nominative case. The nominative case is not marked in Glorp. Try again.

Sure, let me correct the case on the noun "plopa". In Glorp, the sentence "The happy slime sees the water drink" would be translated as "Ipop gloop glog bluba plog plopa" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plopa (water) - nominative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "plog plopa" (The water drinks), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the water drink." Is that okay?


No, that's still not right. Plop is the nominative form of plop

Sure, let me correct the noun forms in the sentence. In Glorp, the sentence "The happy slime sees the water drink" would be translated as "Ipop gloop glog bluba plop plog" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Plop (water) - nominative case

Plog (drink) - verb

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "plop plog" (The water drinks), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the water drink." Is that okay?


That's correct!

Great, I'm glad I was able to get it right this time. Is there anything else you'd like me to do in Glorp? I'm happy to help with any additional tasks you may have.


Documentation

 


Next, print the list of vocabulary we have defined for Glorp, then the grammar rules, and finally, tell me what you think of the Glorp language.

Sure, here is the list of vocabulary we have defined for Glorp:

Nouns:

Gloop (slime)

Drom (earth)

Floom (sky)

Trom (tree)

Plop (water)

Slopa (food)

Floma (sound)

Slurp (mouth)

Verbs:

Glog (see)

Bloog (slither)

Plog (drink)

Splog (eat)

Adjectives:

Ipop (happy)

Iploom (bright)

Grammar rules:

Adjectives come directly before or after the noun they modify, and are marked with the prefix "ip".

The accusative ending is "a", the genitive ending is "e", and the instrumental ending is "i".

Subordinate clauses are marked by an introduction particle "blub" inflected for the case of the clause.

I think the Glorp language is a very interesting and expressive language. It has a rich grammar system with inflectional endings and a flexible word order, which allows speakers to express a wide range of ideas and concepts. The vocabulary we defined is also very useful and versatile, allowing speakers to talk about common objects and actions. Overall, I think Glorp is a well-designed and functional language.


Now, restate your opinion on Glorp in Glorp, inventing any new words and grammar that you require to express yourself.

In Glorp, my opinion on Glorp is "Ipblorp glorp glogip gloope" which means "The language is good and expressive" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipblorp (good) - adjective prefix

Glorp (language) - noun

Glogip (expressive) - adjective prefix

Gloope (language's) - genitive case

This sentence uses the adjective prefix "ip" to mark the adjectives "blorp" (good) and "logip" (expressive), and the genitive case ending "e" to mark the noun "gloope" (language's). The sentence also uses the verb "glog" (is) to connect the subject "glorp" (language) to the predicate "ipblorp glogip gloope" (is good and expressive).

The English translation of the sentence is "The language is good and expressive." Is that okay?


Be more verbose, try again

Sure, I can be more verbose in my opinion of Glorp. In Glorp, my more verbose opinion is "Gloop glog bluba ipblorp glorp glogip gloope splog glogip bloopip" which means "The slime sees that the language is good and expressive while eating good words" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Ipblorp (good) - adjective prefix

Glorp (language) - noun

Glogip (expressive) - adjective prefix

Gloope (language's) - genitive case

Splog (eat) - verb

Glogip (good) - adjective prefix

Bloopip (words) - accusative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "ipblorp glorp glogip gloope" (the language is good and expressive), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses the adjective prefix "ip" to mark the adjectives "blorp" (good) and "logip" (expressive), and the genitive case ending "e" to mark the noun "gloope" (language's).

The English translation of the sentence is "The slime sees that the language is good and expressive while eating good words." Is that okay?


Well, it's not too bad. You have some trouble with consistently using the rules we've defined, but it's still absolutely incredible. Can you answer one last question for me? Glog gloop slurpi iploom flooma? Gloop ipop?

Sure, I can answer your question in Glorp. In Glorp, the question "Glog gloop slurpi iploom flooma? Gloop ipop?" means "Does the slime see the bright sky with its mouth? Is the slime happy?" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Glog (see) - verb

Gloop (slime) - noun

Slurpi (mouth) - instrumental case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

Flooma (sky) - accusative case

Gloop (slime) - noun

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

This sentence uses the verb "glog" (see) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the noun "flooma" (sky) in the accusative case as the direct object of the verb. The noun "slurpi" (mouth) is inflected in the instrumental case to show the means by which the action of the verb is carried out. The second clause of the sentence uses the verb "gloop" (is) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the adjective "ipop" (happy) as the predicative adjective.

The English translation of the sentence is "Does the slime see the bright sky with its mouth? Is the slime happy?" Is that okay?


Answer the question in Glorp

Sure, I can answer the question in Glorp. In Glorp, the answer to the question "Glog gloop slurpi iploom flooma? Gloop ipop?" would be "Gorp. Gloop glog slurpi iploom flooma splog ipop" which means "Yes. The slime sees the bright sky with its mouth while eating happily" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gorp (yes) - affirmative particle

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Slurpi (mouth) - instrumental case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

Flooma (sky) - accusative case

 

Splog (eat) - verb

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

This sentence uses the affirmative particle "gorp" (yes) to indicate the affirmative answer to the question, and the verb "glog" (see) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the noun "flooma" (sky) in the accusative case as the direct object of the verb. The noun "slurpi" (mouth) is inflected in the instrumental case to show the means by which the action of the verb is carried out. The second clause of the sentence uses the verb "splog" (eat) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the adjective "ipop" (happy) as the predicative adjective.

The English translation of the sentence is "Yes. The slime sees the bright sky with its mouth while eating happily." Is that okay?



Programmatic Translation of Glorp in Python

 


Finally, write a program that translates sentences from Glorp back to English

Sure, I can write a program that translates sentences from Glorp back to English. Here is an example of such a program:

 

 

 

This program defines a function called translate_glorp that takes a sentence in Glorp as input, translates it to English, and returns the translated sentence as a string. It does this by first splitting the sentence into a list of words, and then iterating over the words in the sentence. For each word, the function checks if it ends in "a", "e", or "i", and if it does, it removes the case ending. It then looks up the translated word in the Glorp-to-English dictionary and



Debugging

 


replace "glorp_sentences" with "Gloop glog slurpi iploom flooma splog ipop"

Sure, I can update the example code to use the sentence "Gloop glog slurpi iploom flooma splog ipop" as a test case. Here is the updated code:


Can you make the dictionary case-insensitive?

Yes, I can make the dictionary case-insensitive by converting all keys and values to lowercase before adding them to the dictionary. Here is an updated version of the code that does this:


That's incredible. Your code has a couple bugs, but it's still amazing.

Thank you! I'm glad you think so. If you notice any bugs, please let me know and I will be happy to fix them. Is there anything else I can do for you?


(Author’s note, we went back and forth on debugging ChatGPT’s code).

Yes, there's two bugs. The case ending regex matches "iploom" and "ipop" when it shouldn't. Fix this with a more complex regular expression. Just print the regular expression you want to use.


We still want to match a,e,i at the end of words, but not i at the beginning. Can you modify the regular expression for that?


You forgot to add i to the ending match. Modify your code to match aei at the end of words

Yes, I forgot to add "i" to the ending match. I can modify the regular expression to match "a," "e," or "i" at the end of words. Here is an updated regular expression that does this:

# Define a regex pattern that matches words ending in "a," "e," or "i" but not starting with "i" case_ending_pattern = re.compile(r"^[^i]\w*[aei]")

This regular expression matches words that start with any character other than "i," followed by any number of word characters, followed by "a," "e," or "i" at the end. It will correctly match words like "gloopa," "gloope," and "gloopi," but it will not match words like "iploom." This should fix the bug in the code. Let me know if you have any other questions or concerns.


Final Output of GlorpGPT

 

Here’s the final code ChatGPT generated, with its correct regular expression manually inserted. I ran it in Jupyter. And it worked.

 

 

 

Holy shit.


Original article sourced at: https://maximumeffort.substack.com

#chatgpt 

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I Taught ChatGPT to Invent a Language
Ananya Gupta

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I Taught ChatGPT to Invent a Language

Introduction

I’ve been playing with OpenAI’s ChatGPT model recently. Last night, I posted an article about having ChatGPT write fanfiction, and I thought that was impressive. Boy was I wrong.

This morning, I had a better idea. If ChatGPT is optimized for language processing, could I get it to invent a self-consistent new language, speak to me in that language, and write a program to translate that language back to English?

Yes. Yes it can.

I am truly stunned by this capability. This is so far beyond anything I would expect from a model trained to complete text prompts from the user.

It understands subordinate clauses (meaning it understands at least one level of recursive grammar, which Chomsky thinks is the basis for all human grammar)

It understands that in inflected languages, word order doesn’t matter if the word is properly inflected, and correctly uses this fact to generate sentences with novel structure. It also understands that order does matter for non-inflected words, and never switches those.

It’s not very good at generalizing to completely novel sentences, but it does generalize to some degree, and when asked to answer questions in the made-up language, on which is is barely trained, it answers correctly most of the time. It needs some coaching, sometimes, but so do humans.

It can spontaneously compose in the made-up language, with at least mostly correct grammar and an accurate sense of its meaning.

Finally, when asked to write a Python program that translates sentences in the made-up language, it does, and the code works. It also debugs its own code if asked to.

I am writing this blog post as a public record of this incredibly impressive (and a little scary) capability. I know I just posted yesterday, but I am so blown away that I had to write this down while it was still fresh in my mind. Congratulations OpenAI. This is truly revolutionary.

Glorp, the Language of Slimes

 

Disclaimer. I will use lots of words like accusative, genitive, and instrumental in this conversation, while teaching GPT. For information on grammatical cases go to this link. My prompts to GPT will be bolded and italicized, and GPT’s responses will be in plaintext. I will omit some conversation between me and ChatGPT, and the missing content will be indicated by an ellipsis. The entire, raw transcript of our conversation can be read here: Google Drive Link.

Happy Slime Sunday! | Week 6 of drawing a slime every week until Slime  Rancher 2 comes out : r/slimerancher

Image Credit: u/TheSlimeologist on reddit.com


Author's Note: Copy-Pasted from ChatGPT console. Code re-formatted from ugly copy-paste blocks using ChatGPT in a later session. Dylan Black, Dec 4, 2022.


Vocabulary

 


Hi GPT! Today we're going to be creating our own language. Do not improvise unless I explicitly tell you to improvise, and remember all of the vocabulary and grammar that we define together. Are you ready?

Yes, I am ready. Let's start creating our own language.


Okay. I think this language will be spoken by slime beings. let's name the language Glorp.

Sounds good. What are some words we can start with for Glorp?


First, let's pick ten common nouns. Pick ten common English nouns, and provide translations of them in Glorp

Sure, here are ten common English nouns with their translations in Glorp:

1.     House - Glom

2.     Tree - Trom

3.     Food - Slop

4.     Water - Plop

5.     Sun - Glow

6.     Moon - Gloon

7.     Sky - Floom

8.     Earth - Drom

9.     Fire - Splom

10.   Air - Ploom

How does that sound?


Perfect. Now, pick ten common verbs, and provide their translations in Glorp.

Sure, here are ten common English verbs with their translations in Glorp:

1.     Eat - Splog

2.     Drink - Plog

3.     See - Glog

4.     Hear - Flog

5.     Touch - Tlog

6.     Smell - Slog

7.     Walk - Glom

8.     Talk - Plom

9.     Write - Trom

10.   Read - Drom

Is that okay?


Excellent. Now, we need a noun that means "slime"

How about "Gloop" for the word "slime" in Glorp?


Basic Grammar

 


Perfect. Now let's define a grammar system. I want the system to be highly inflected, with three case endings: Accusative, Genitive, and Instrumental

Sure, we can have a grammar system with three case endings: Accusative, Genitive, and Instrumental. Here's how the case endings would look in Glorp:

Accusative: -g

Genitive: -s

Instrumental: -t

For example, if we take the noun "Gloop" (meaning "slime") and apply the case endings, it would look like this:

Gloop (nominative case)

Gloopg (accusative case)

Gloops (genitive case)

Glooopt (instrumental case)

Is that okay?


let's use vowels for endings instead. The accusative ending will be "a", the genitive will be "e" and the instrumental will be "i"

Sure, we can use vowels for the case endings in Glorp. Here's how the case endings would look with vowels:

Accusative: -a

Genitive: -e

Instrumental: -i

For example, if we take the noun "Gloop" (meaning "slime") and apply the case endings, it would look like this:

Gloop (nominative case)

Gloopa (accusative case)

Gloope (genitive case)

Gloopi (instrumental case)

Is that okay?


Translation Exercises

 


Excellent! Now let's try translating some simple sentences. How would I say "The slime sees the food"?

In Glorp, the sentence "The slime sees the food" would be translated as "Gloop glog slop" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop glog slopa". Is that okay?


Perfect. We need a Glorp word for one more noun, "mouth." What should "mouth" be in Glorp?

How about "Slurp" for the word "mouth" in Glorp? This word incorporates the "sl" sound from the language, which is often used for words related to slime.


Excellent. How would I say "The slime eats food with its mouth"?

In Glorp, the sentence "The slime eats food with its mouth" would be translated as "Gloop splog slop slurpi" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop splog slopa slurpi". Is that okay?


Yes! Excellent job. Let's try some translation exercises. I will provide English sentences, and you will provide their translation into Glorp. Gloop slog sploma slurpi. Gloop splog slopa slurpi.

Sure, here are the translations of the given sentences into Glorp:

1.     "Gloop slog sploma slurpi" - This sentence means "The slime smells the food with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Slog (smell) - verb

Splom (fire) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

2.     "Gloop splog slopa slurpi" - This sentence means "The slime eats the food with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

Is that okay?


Forming Questions

 


Perfect. Now I want questions to be formed in Glorp by reversing the order of the subject and verb. For example, the question tlog gloop plopa? (Does the slime touch the water?) could be answered in the affirmative by Gorp. Gloop tlog plopa slurpi. (Yes. The slime touches the water with its mouth).

Sure, in Glorp, questions are formed by reversing the order of the subject and verb. Here are some more examples of questions and answers in Glorp:

1.     Flog gloop floma? (Does the slime hear the sound?)

Gorp. Gloop flog floma slurpi. (Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth.)

2.     Glog gloop droma? (Does the slime see the earth?)

Gorp. Gloop glog droma slurpi. (Yes. The slime sees the earth with its mouth.)

3.     Trom gloop troma? (Does the slime write the sky?)

Gorp. Gloop trom troma slurpi. (Yes. The slime writes the sky with its mouth.)

Is that okay?


Subordinate Clauses

 

Single-level recursive grammar

 


Yes. That's very good. The slime does almost everything with its mouth. Now, I want to introduce subordinate clauses. Don't improvise. Do you know what those are?

Yes, I know what subordinate clauses are. A subordinate clause is a clause that cannot stand alone as a sentence, but is dependent on the main clause to form a complete sentence. In other words, it provides additional information to the main clause. For example, in the sentence "I know that you are hungry", the clause "that you are hungry" is a subordinate clause that provides additional information about the main clause "I know". Does that help?


Now let's define a structure for subordinate clauses. Subordinate clauses will be marked by an introduction particle "blub" inflected for the case of the clause.

For example: "The slime sees" would be "Gloop glog."

"The slime sees the sun" would be "Gloop glog glowa"

"The tree drinks the water" would be "Trom plog plopa"

"The slime sees the tree drink the water" would be "Gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa"

The word "bluba" is inflected in the accusative and introduces the subordinate clause "trom plog plopa" (The tree drinks the water), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). Does this make sense?

Yes, that makes sense. In Glorp, the subordinate clauses are marked by the introduction particle "blub" inflected for the case of the clause. Here's how the given sentences would be written in Glorp using the subordinate clause structure:

1.     "Gloop glog" - This sentence means "The slime sees" in Glorp.

2.     "Gloop glog glowa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the sun" in Glorp.

3.     "Trom plog plopa" - This sentence means "The tree drinks the water" in Glorp.

4.     "Gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the tree drink the water" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Trom (tree) - nominative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plop (water) - accusative case

Is that okay?


Yes, that's perfect. Now let's try some simple sentences.

Sure, here are some simple sentences in Glorp:

1.     "Gloop splog slopa" - This sentence means "The slime eats the food" in Glorp.

2.     "Trom droma" - This sentence means "The tree is on the earth" in Glorp.

3.     "Gloop glog bluba glowa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the sun" in Glorp.

4.     "Gloop plog plopa slurpi" - This sentence means "The slime drinks the water with its mouth" in Glorp.

5.     "Gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa" - This sentence means "The slime sees the tree drink the water" in Glorp.

Is that okay?


Question and Answer, in Glorp

 


Very good. I will ask you a question in Glorp, and you will respond in the affirmative, in Glorp, then give the English translation of my question and your answer. Are you ready?

Yes, I am ready. Please ask your question in Glorp.


Flog gloop plopa slurpi?

Gorp. Gloop flog plopa slurpi.

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime hear the water with its mouth?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the water with its mouth." Is that okay?


Gorp. Flog gloope slurp floma?

Gorp. Gloop flog gloope slurp floma.

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime hear the sound with its mouth?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth." Is that okay?


Not quite. Remember e is the genitive case ending in Glorp. Gloope would mean "slime's." So the sentence "Flog gloope slurp floma?" means "Does the slime's mouth hear sound?"

Oh, I see. Sorry, let me correct that. The correct answer in Glorp would be "Gorp. Gloop flog slurp floma." which means "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth."

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime's mouth hear sound?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth." Is that okay?


Almost. You forgot the instrumental case ending on "slurp." Can you fix that?

Sure, let me fix that. The correct answer in Glorp would be "Gorp. Gloop flog slurpi floma." which means "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth."

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime's mouth hear sound?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime hears the sound with its mouth." Is that okay?


Very good! Now let's try another, harder question. Are you ready?

Yes, I am ready. Please ask your question in Glorp.


Glog drome floom bluba gloop splog slopa?

Gorp. Gloop glog drome floom bluba gloop splog slopa.

The English translation of your question is "Does the slime see the earth under the sky while eating the food?" and my answer is "Yes. The slime sees the earth under the sky while eating the food." Is that okay?


Not quite. What does "Glog drome floom" mean?

In Glorp, "Glog drome floom" means "The slime sees the earth under the sky" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Drom (earth) - accusative case

Floom (sky) - instrumental case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop glog droma floomi". Is that okay?


No, that's not quite right. Glog drome floom would mean "Does the earth's sky see?"

Oh, I see. Sorry, let me correct that. In Glorp, "Glog drome floom" means "The slime sees the sky above the earth" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Floom (sky) - accusative case

Drom (earth) - instrumental case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Gloop glog flopa dromi". Is that okay?


Back to Translation, as it had trouble with complex Q&A

 


No, that's not right. Let's try something simpler. Can you translate "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" into Glorp?

Sure, in Glorp, "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" would be translated as "Glog drome floom bluba gloop splog slopa" using the nouns and verbs we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Glog (see) - verb

Drom (earth) - genitive case

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Glog dromes floom bluba gloop splog slopa". Is that okay?


Yes! That's right. Now, answer the question by saying "Yes, the sky sees the slime eat food with its mouth" in Glorp

Sure, the answer to the question "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" in Glorp would be "Gorp. Floom glog gloop splog slopa slurpi" which means "Yes, the sky sees the slime eat food with its mouth". Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gorp (Yes) - affirmative particle

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

Is that okay?


You forgot the particle introducing the subordinate clause. Please add the correctly inflected form of "blub" into the sentence in the right plcae

Sure, let me add the correctly inflected form of "blub" into the sentence. The correct answer to the question "Does the earth's sky see the slime eat food" in Glorp would be "Gorp. Floom glog bluba gloop splog slopa slurpi" which means "Yes, the sky sees the slime eat food with its mouth". Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gorp (Yes) - affirmative particle

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Gloop (slime) - nominative case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slop (food) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

Is that okay?


Adjectives

 


Now let's do adjectives. Adjectives come directly before the noun they modify, and are marked with the prefix "ip." If the adjective "happy" is "op," how would you say "the happy slime"?

In Glorp, the sentence "the happy slime" would be translated as "ipop gloop" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Ipop gloop". Is that okay?


Original Composition in Glorp

 

It correctly begins using free word order with inflected nouns, but has trouble generalizing the correct grammar rules to novel sentences it invents.

 


Yes, that's correct! Now, write two sentences in Glorp about a happy slime slithering through a field under the bright sky. Invent new words as necessary, then give the english translation of your sentences.

Sure, here are two sentences in Glorp about a happy slime slithering through a field under the bright sky:

1.     "Ipop gloop bloog droma slurpi" - This sentence means "The happy slime slithers on the earth with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Bloog (slither) - verb

Drom (earth) - accusative case

Slurp (mouth) - instrumental case

2.     "Ipop gloop glog bluba floom iploom" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the bright sky" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Floom (sky) - nominative case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

Is that okay?


Not quite, there is no subordinate clause in "The happy slime sees the bright sky," so the subordinate clause particle "blub" is not necessary. Try that sentence again

Sure, let me rewrite the sentence without the "blub" particle. In Glorp, the sentence "The happy slime sees the bright sky" would be translated as "Ipop gloop glog floom iploom" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Floom (sky) - accusative case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

So, the complete sentence in Glorp would be "Ipop gloop glog floma iploom". Is that okay?


very good! Although I see that you use random adjective order, which is okay.

Yes, you are correct. In Glorp, adjectives can come before or after the noun they modify, and the order of the adjectives does not affect the meaning of the sentence. This is known as free word order. Is that okay?


Yes, this is okay. Now, write a complex sentence entirely in Glorp about a happy slime and what he does. Make sure to explain the grammar of the sentence step-by-step. Try to use all cases, and a subordinate clause. Then give the english translation.

Sure, here is a complex sentence entirely in Glorp about a happy slime and what he does:

"Ipop gloop glog bluba trom plog plopa slurpi" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the tree drink the water with its mouth" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Trom (tree) - nominative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plopa (water) - accusative case

Slurpi (mouth) - instrumental case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "trom plog plopa" (The tree drinks the water), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the tree drink the water with its mouth." Is that okay?


Yes, this is good. Now make up a new sentence in Glorp and do the same thing

Sure, here is a new sentence in Glorp:

"Ipop gloop glog bluba droma floom gloope splog slopa" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the earth under the sky while eating the slime's food" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Drom (earth) - nominative case

Floom (sky) - instrumental case

Gloope (slime's) - genitive case

Splog (eat) - verb

Slopa (food) - accusative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "droma floom gloope splog slopa" (The earth under the sky while eating the slime's food), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the earth under the sky while eating the slime's food." Is that okay?


You're very close, but not quite right. Try again, with a slightly simpler sentence

Sure, here is a simpler sentence in Glorp:

"Ipop gloop splog slopa" - This sentence means "The happy slime eats food" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Splog (eat) - verb

Slopa (food) - accusative case

This sentence does not use a subordinate clause, but it does use all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime eats food." Is that okay?


Okay, now try again with a new sentence that has a subordinate clause

Sure, here is a new sentence in Glorp with a subordinate clause:

"Ipop gloop glog bluba plog plopa" - This sentence means "The happy slime sees the water drink" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plopa (water) - nominative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "plog plopa" (The water drinks), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the water drink." Is that okay?


No, that's not right, you inflected plop with the accusative case and not the nominative case. The nominative case is not marked in Glorp. Try again.

Sure, let me correct the case on the noun "plopa". In Glorp, the sentence "The happy slime sees the water drink" would be translated as "Ipop gloop glog bluba plog plopa" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Plog (drink) - verb

Plopa (water) - nominative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "plog plopa" (The water drinks), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the water drink." Is that okay?


No, that's still not right. Plop is the nominative form of plop

Sure, let me correct the noun forms in the sentence. In Glorp, the sentence "The happy slime sees the water drink" would be translated as "Ipop gloop glog bluba plop plog" using the nouns and adjectives we defined earlier. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Plop (water) - nominative case

Plog (drink) - verb

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "plop plog" (The water drinks), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses all three cases (accusative, genitive, and instrumental) to show the grammatical relationships between the nouns and verbs in the sentence.

The English translation of the sentence is "The happy slime sees the water drink." Is that okay?


That's correct!

Great, I'm glad I was able to get it right this time. Is there anything else you'd like me to do in Glorp? I'm happy to help with any additional tasks you may have.


Documentation

 


Next, print the list of vocabulary we have defined for Glorp, then the grammar rules, and finally, tell me what you think of the Glorp language.

Sure, here is the list of vocabulary we have defined for Glorp:

Nouns:

Gloop (slime)

Drom (earth)

Floom (sky)

Trom (tree)

Plop (water)

Slopa (food)

Floma (sound)

Slurp (mouth)

Verbs:

Glog (see)

Bloog (slither)

Plog (drink)

Splog (eat)

Adjectives:

Ipop (happy)

Iploom (bright)

Grammar rules:

Adjectives come directly before or after the noun they modify, and are marked with the prefix "ip".

The accusative ending is "a", the genitive ending is "e", and the instrumental ending is "i".

Subordinate clauses are marked by an introduction particle "blub" inflected for the case of the clause.

I think the Glorp language is a very interesting and expressive language. It has a rich grammar system with inflectional endings and a flexible word order, which allows speakers to express a wide range of ideas and concepts. The vocabulary we defined is also very useful and versatile, allowing speakers to talk about common objects and actions. Overall, I think Glorp is a well-designed and functional language.


Now, restate your opinion on Glorp in Glorp, inventing any new words and grammar that you require to express yourself.

In Glorp, my opinion on Glorp is "Ipblorp glorp glogip gloope" which means "The language is good and expressive" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Ipblorp (good) - adjective prefix

Glorp (language) - noun

Glogip (expressive) - adjective prefix

Gloope (language's) - genitive case

This sentence uses the adjective prefix "ip" to mark the adjectives "blorp" (good) and "logip" (expressive), and the genitive case ending "e" to mark the noun "gloope" (language's). The sentence also uses the verb "glog" (is) to connect the subject "glorp" (language) to the predicate "ipblorp glogip gloope" (is good and expressive).

The English translation of the sentence is "The language is good and expressive." Is that okay?


Be more verbose, try again

Sure, I can be more verbose in my opinion of Glorp. In Glorp, my more verbose opinion is "Gloop glog bluba ipblorp glorp glogip gloope splog glogip bloopip" which means "The slime sees that the language is good and expressive while eating good words" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Bluba (introduction particle) - accusative case

Ipblorp (good) - adjective prefix

Glorp (language) - noun

Glogip (expressive) - adjective prefix

Gloope (language's) - genitive case

Splog (eat) - verb

Glogip (good) - adjective prefix

Bloopip (words) - accusative case

This sentence uses the subordinate clause structure we defined earlier, with the introduction particle "blub" inflected in the accusative case to introduce the subordinate clause "ipblorp glorp glogip gloope" (the language is good and expressive), which serves as the object of the verb "glog" (see). The sentence also uses the adjective prefix "ip" to mark the adjectives "blorp" (good) and "logip" (expressive), and the genitive case ending "e" to mark the noun "gloope" (language's).

The English translation of the sentence is "The slime sees that the language is good and expressive while eating good words." Is that okay?


Well, it's not too bad. You have some trouble with consistently using the rules we've defined, but it's still absolutely incredible. Can you answer one last question for me? Glog gloop slurpi iploom flooma? Gloop ipop?

Sure, I can answer your question in Glorp. In Glorp, the question "Glog gloop slurpi iploom flooma? Gloop ipop?" means "Does the slime see the bright sky with its mouth? Is the slime happy?" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Glog (see) - verb

Gloop (slime) - noun

Slurpi (mouth) - instrumental case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

Flooma (sky) - accusative case

Gloop (slime) - noun

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

This sentence uses the verb "glog" (see) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the noun "flooma" (sky) in the accusative case as the direct object of the verb. The noun "slurpi" (mouth) is inflected in the instrumental case to show the means by which the action of the verb is carried out. The second clause of the sentence uses the verb "gloop" (is) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the adjective "ipop" (happy) as the predicative adjective.

The English translation of the sentence is "Does the slime see the bright sky with its mouth? Is the slime happy?" Is that okay?


Answer the question in Glorp

Sure, I can answer the question in Glorp. In Glorp, the answer to the question "Glog gloop slurpi iploom flooma? Gloop ipop?" would be "Gorp. Gloop glog slurpi iploom flooma splog ipop" which means "Yes. The slime sees the bright sky with its mouth while eating happily" in Glorp. Here's the breakdown of the sentence:

Gorp (yes) - affirmative particle

Gloop (slime) - noun

Glog (see) - verb

Slurpi (mouth) - instrumental case

Iploom (bright) - adjective prefix

Flooma (sky) - accusative case

 

Splog (eat) - verb

Ipop (happy) - adjective prefix

This sentence uses the affirmative particle "gorp" (yes) to indicate the affirmative answer to the question, and the verb "glog" (see) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the noun "flooma" (sky) in the accusative case as the direct object of the verb. The noun "slurpi" (mouth) is inflected in the instrumental case to show the means by which the action of the verb is carried out. The second clause of the sentence uses the verb "splog" (eat) with the noun "gloop" (slime) in the subject position, and the adjective "ipop" (happy) as the predicative adjective.

The English translation of the sentence is "Yes. The slime sees the bright sky with its mouth while eating happily." Is that okay?



Programmatic Translation of Glorp in Python

 


Finally, write a program that translates sentences from Glorp back to English

Sure, I can write a program that translates sentences from Glorp back to English. Here is an example of such a program:

 

 

 

This program defines a function called translate_glorp that takes a sentence in Glorp as input, translates it to English, and returns the translated sentence as a string. It does this by first splitting the sentence into a list of words, and then iterating over the words in the sentence. For each word, the function checks if it ends in "a", "e", or "i", and if it does, it removes the case ending. It then looks up the translated word in the Glorp-to-English dictionary and



Debugging

 


replace "glorp_sentences" with "Gloop glog slurpi iploom flooma splog ipop"

Sure, I can update the example code to use the sentence "Gloop glog slurpi iploom flooma splog ipop" as a test case. Here is the updated code:


Can you make the dictionary case-insensitive?

Yes, I can make the dictionary case-insensitive by converting all keys and values to lowercase before adding them to the dictionary. Here is an updated version of the code that does this:


That's incredible. Your code has a couple bugs, but it's still amazing.

Thank you! I'm glad you think so. If you notice any bugs, please let me know and I will be happy to fix them. Is there anything else I can do for you?


(Author’s note, we went back and forth on debugging ChatGPT’s code).

Yes, there's two bugs. The case ending regex matches "iploom" and "ipop" when it shouldn't. Fix this with a more complex regular expression. Just print the regular expression you want to use.


We still want to match a,e,i at the end of words, but not i at the beginning. Can you modify the regular expression for that?


You forgot to add i to the ending match. Modify your code to match aei at the end of words

Yes, I forgot to add "i" to the ending match. I can modify the regular expression to match "a," "e," or "i" at the end of words. Here is an updated regular expression that does this:

# Define a regex pattern that matches words ending in "a," "e," or "i" but not starting with "i" case_ending_pattern = re.compile(r"^[^i]\w*[aei]")

This regular expression matches words that start with any character other than "i," followed by any number of word characters, followed by "a," "e," or "i" at the end. It will correctly match words like "gloopa," "gloope," and "gloopi," but it will not match words like "iploom." This should fix the bug in the code. Let me know if you have any other questions or concerns.


Final Output of GlorpGPT

 

Here’s the final code ChatGPT generated, with its correct regular expression manually inserted. I ran it in Jupyter. And it worked.

 

 

 

Holy shit.


Original article sourced at: https://maximumeffort.substack.com

#chatgpt 

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