Building a Network Controlled Robot with Arduino and Raspberry Pi

Building a Network Controlled Robot with Arduino and Raspberry Pi

Hobby robotics is a fascinating mix of different skill sets — a bit of electronics, a dash of mechanics, some code. Designing and coding an intermediate level hobby robot. Let's learn how to build a network controlled robot with andruino and Raspberry Pi.

Overview

Hobby robotics is a fascinating mix of different skill sets — a bit of electronics, a dash of mechanics, some code. You can go as deep as you want — open source projects make advanced projects like vision or Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) easier to implement than ever before. There are even free simulators if you want to play with algorithms and aren’t interested in building hardware. It’s a terrific playground for DIY enthusiasts, programmers, and budding engineers.

Having built several simple Arduino robots with a few sensors, I wanted a platform that I could use to experiment with more advanced features. I settled on a robot that, for first steps, could stream high quality video and be driven over the network. I wanted enough compute power on board to pursue autonomy or light machine vision projects later.

Design Goals

  1. Good quality, low latency video stream as a top priority
  2. Robust network control from a gamepad
  3. The ability to monitor the robot’s battery pack and send telemetry back to the user
  4. A cool moon rover vibe

Interested? Let’s step through the design piece by piece. We’ll discuss the hardware, onboard software, and the PC client controller software in detail, and all the code is available in a Github repository.

Image for post

The hardware layout

Required Disclosure

I’ve included links to many of the parts I used. The Amazon links below are affiliate links — if you buy the product below, I may receive compensation from Amazon. I hope it saves you some time and hassle, and it helps pay for my next project.

Chassis

Since the goal was a rapid build of an inexpensive platform for an experimental control system, I picked a light tracked chassis with a suspension and used inexpensive materials that were easy to work with. I liked that it had a suspension system on the tracks — it looks like a sub-assembly of a toy tank, and saved me the trouble of tearing one apart.

The bottom of the equipment bay was uneven and would be hard to mount electronics to, so I first installed a floor made of foam core board to get a flat surface. I installed some plates made of modeler’s plywood in the places I needed to put electronics — that gave me something to screw PCB standoffs to.

electronics arduino raspberry-pi diy robotics

Bootstrap 5 Complete Course with Examples

Bootstrap 5 Tutorial - Bootstrap 5 Crash Course for Beginners

Nest.JS Tutorial for Beginners

Hello Vue 3: A First Look at Vue 3 and the Composition API

Building a simple Applications with Vue 3

Deno Crash Course: Explore Deno and Create a full REST API with Deno

How to Build a Real-time Chat App with Deno and WebSockets

Convert HTML to Markdown Online

HTML entity encoder decoder Online

Tools and Images to Build a Raspberry Pi n8n server

Tools and Images to Build a Raspberry Pi n8n server .The purpose of this project is to create a Raspberry Pi image preconfigured with n8n so that it runs out of the box.

How to run Joystick with Raspberry Pi | Raspberry Pi Ultimate Robot

In this video we are going to learn how to install and run the Ps4 joystick in raspberry pi. We will also created a module out of this so that we can run it with the motor module that we created in the previous video.

DIY Remote Camera using Raspberry Pi, Pi Camera, and Socket.IO

There may be situations where you may have to take pictures remotely and view them. With a Raspberry Pi single-board computer, Pi Camera and Socket.IO server, creating a DIY remote camera has never been easier

Raspberry Pi 3 Tutorial For Beginners | Raspberry Pi 3 Projects Explained

This "Raspberry Pi 3 Tutorial" will help you in getting started with Raspberry Pi 3 with examples.

Nandu's lockdown Raspberry Pi robot project

Nandu Vadakkath was inspired by a line-following robot built (literally) entirely from salvage materials that could wait patiently and purchase beer for its maker in Tamil Nadu, India. So he set about making his own, but with the goal of making it capable of slightly more sophisticated tasks.