Waylon  Bruen

Waylon Bruen

1617627180

Fix - Call to A Member Function Getclientoriginalextension() on Null

In this short article, i will share how to fix call to a member function getclientoriginalextension() on null error.

If you this error while uploading an imagecall to a member function getclientoriginalextension() on null

This means that no file input has been seen for that file. So, check that you input something in each file input.

#errors solved #laravel

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Fix - Call to A Member Function Getclientoriginalextension() on Null

A Collection Of Swift Tips & Tricks That I've Shared on Twitter

⚠️ This list is no longer being updated. For my latest Swift tips, checkout the "Tips" section on Swift by Sundell.

Swift tips & tricks ⚡️

One of the things I really love about Swift is how I keep finding interesting ways to use it in various situations, and when I do - I usually share them on Twitter. Here's a collection of all the tips & tricks that I've shared so far. Each entry has a link to the original tweet, if you want to respond with some feedback or question, which is always super welcome! 🚀

Also make sure to check out all of my other Swift content:

#102 Making async tests faster and more stable

🚀 Here are some quick tips to make async tests faster & more stable:

  • 😴 Avoid sleep() - use expectations instead
  • ⏱ Use generous timeouts to avoid flakiness on CI
  • 🧐 Put all assertions at the end of each test, not inside closures
// BEFORE:

class MentionDetectorTests: XCTestCase {
    func testDetectingMention() {
        let detector = MentionDetector()
        let string = "This test was written by @johnsundell."

        detector.detectMentions(in: string) { mentions in
            XCTAssertEqual(mentions, ["johnsundell"])
        }
        
        sleep(2)
    }
}

// AFTER:

class MentionDetectorTests: XCTestCase {
    func testDetectingMention() {
        let detector = MentionDetector()
        let string = "This test was written by @johnsundell."

        var mentions: [String]?
        let expectation = self.expectation(description: #function)

        detector.detectMentions(in: string) {
            mentions = $0
            expectation.fulfill()
        }

        waitForExpectations(timeout: 10)
        XCTAssertEqual(mentions, ["johnsundell"])
    }
}

For more on async testing, check out "Unit testing asynchronous Swift code".

#101 Adding support for Apple Pencil double-taps

✍️ Adding support for the new Apple Pencil double-tap feature is super easy! All you have to do is to create a UIPencilInteraction, add it to a view, and implement one delegate method. Hopefully all pencil-compatible apps will soon adopt this.

let interaction = UIPencilInteraction()
interaction.delegate = self
view.addInteraction(interaction)

extension ViewController: UIPencilInteractionDelegate {
    func pencilInteractionDidTap(_ interaction: UIPencilInteraction) {
        // Handle pencil double-tap
    }
}

For more on using this and other iPad Pro features, check out "Building iPad Pro features in Swift".

#100 Combining values with functions

😎 Here's a cool function that combines a value with a function to return a closure that captures that value, so that it can be called without any arguments. Super useful when working with closure-based APIs and we want to use some of our properties without having to capture self.

func combine<A, B>(_ value: A, with closure: @escaping (A) -> B) -> () -> B {
    return { closure(value) }
}

// BEFORE:

class ProductViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        buyButton.handler = { [weak self] in
            guard let self = self else {
                return
            }
            
            self.productManager.startCheckout(for: self.product)
        }
    }
}

// AFTER:

class ProductViewController: UIViewController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        buyButton.handler = combine(product, with: productManager.startCheckout)
    }
}

#99 Dependency injection using functions

💉 When I'm only using a single function from a dependency, I love to inject that function as a closure, instead of having to create a protocol and inject the whole object. Makes dependency injection & testing super simple.

final class ArticleLoader {
    typealias Networking = (Endpoint) -> Future<Data>
    
    private let networking: Networking
    
    init(networking: @escaping Networking = URLSession.shared.load) {
        self.networking = networking
    }
    
    func loadLatest() -> Future<[Article]> {
        return networking(.latestArticles).decode()
    }
}

For more on this technique, check out "Simple Swift dependency injection with functions".

#98 Using a custom exception handler

💥 It's cool that you can easily assign a closure as a custom NSException handler. This is super useful when building things in Playgrounds - since you can't use breakpoints - so instead of just signal SIGABRT, you'll get the full exception description if something goes wrong.

NSSetUncaughtExceptionHandler { exception in
    print(exception)
}

#97 Using type aliases to give semantic meaning to primitives

❤️ I love that in Swift, we can use the type system to make our code so much more self-documenting - one way of doing so is to use type aliases to give the primitive types that we use a more semantic meaning.

extension List.Item {
    // Using type aliases, we can give semantic meaning to the
    // primitive types that we use, without having to introduce
    // wrapper types.
    typealias Index = Int
}

extension List {
    enum Mutation {
        // Our enum cases now become a lot more self-documenting,
        // without having to add additional parameter labels to
        // explain them.
        case add(Item, Item.Index)
        case update(Item, Item.Index)
        case remove(Item.Index)
    }
}

For more on self-documenting code, check out "Writing self-documenting Swift code".

#96 Specializing protocols using constraints

🤯 A little late night prototyping session reveals that protocol constraints can not only be applied to extensions - they can also be added to protocol definitions!

This is awesome, since it lets us easily define specialized protocols based on more generic ones.

protocol Component {
    associatedtype Container
    func add(to container: Container)
}

// Protocols that inherit from other protocols can include
// constraints to further specialize them.
protocol ViewComponent: Component where Container == UIView {
    associatedtype View: UIView
    var view: View { get }
}

extension ViewComponent {
    func add(to container: UIView) {
        container.addSubview(view)
    }
}

For more on specializing protocols, check out "Specializing protocols in Swift".

#95 Unwrapping an optional or throwing an error

📦 Here's a super handy extension on Swift's Optional type, which gives us a really nice API for easily unwrapping an optional, or throwing an error in case the value turned out to be nil:

extension Optional {
    func orThrow(_ errorExpression: @autoclosure () -> Error) throws -> Wrapped {
        switch self {
        case .some(let value):
            return value
        case .none:
            throw errorExpression()
        }
    }
}

let file = try loadFile(at: path).orThrow(MissingFileError())

For more ways that optionals can be extended, check out "Extending optionals in Swift".

#94 Testing code that uses static APIs

👩‍🔬 Testing code that uses static APIs can be really tricky, but there's a way that it can often be done - using Swift's first class function capabilities!

Instead of accessing that static API directly, we can inject the function we want to use, which enables us to mock it!

// BEFORE

class FriendsLoader {
    func loadFriends(then handler: @escaping (Result<[Friend]>) -> Void) {
        Networking.loadData(from: .friends) { result in
            ...
        }
    }
}

// AFTER

class FriendsLoader {
    typealias Handler<T> = (Result<T>) -> Void
    typealias DataLoadingFunction = (Endpoint, @escaping Handler<Data>) -> Void

    func loadFriends(using dataLoading: DataLoadingFunction = Networking.loadData,
                     then handler: @escaping Handler<[Friend]>) {
        dataLoading(.friends) { result in
            ...
        }
    }
}

// MOCKING IN TESTS

let dataLoading: FriendsLoader.DataLoadingFunction = { _, handler in
    handler(.success(mockData))
}

friendsLoader.loadFriends(using: dataLoading) { result in
    ...
}

#93 Matching multiple enum cases with associated values

🐾 Swift's pattern matching capabilities are so powerful! Two enum cases with associated values can even be matched and handled by the same switch case - which is super useful when handling state changes with similar data.

enum DownloadState {
    case inProgress(progress: Double)
    case paused(progress: Double)
    case cancelled
    case finished(Data)
}

func downloadStateDidChange(to state: DownloadState) {
    switch state {
    case .inProgress(let progress), .paused(let progress):
        updateProgressView(with: progress)
    case .cancelled:
        showCancelledMessage()
    case .finished(let data):
        process(data)
    }
}

#92 Multiline string literals

🅰 One really nice benefit of Swift multiline string literals - even for single lines of text - is that they don't require quotes to be escaped. Perfect when working with things like HTML, or creating a custom description for an object.

let html = highlighter.highlight("Array<String>")

XCTAssertEqual(html, """
<span class="type">Array</span>&lt;<span class="type">String</span>&gt;
""")

#91 Reducing sequences

💎 While it's very common in functional programming, the reduce function might be a bit of a hidden gem in Swift. It provides a super useful way to transform a sequence into a single value.

extension Sequence where Element: Equatable {
    func numberOfOccurrences(of target: Element) -> Int {
        return reduce(0) { result, element in
            guard element == target else {
                return result
            }

            return result + 1
        }
    }
}

You can read more about transforming collections in "Transforming collections in Swift".

#90 Avoiding manual Codable implementations

📦 When I use Codable in Swift, I want to avoid manual implementations as much as possible, even when there's a mismatch between my code structure and the JSON I'm decoding.

One way that can often be achieved is to use private data containers combined with computed properties.

struct User: Codable {
    let name: String
    let age: Int

    var homeTown: String { return originPlace.name }

    private let originPlace: Place
}

private extension User {
    struct Place: Codable {
        let name: String
    }
}

extension User {
    struct Container: Codable {
        let user: User
    }
}

#89 Using feature flags instead of feature branches

🚢 Instead of using feature branches, I merge almost all of my code directly into master - and then I use feature flags to conditionally enable features when they're ready. That way I can avoid merge conflicts and keep shipping!

extension ListViewController {
    func addSearchIfNeeded() {
        // Rather than having to keep maintaining a separate
        // feature branch for a new feature, we can use a flag
        // to conditionally turn it on.
        guard FeatureFlags.searchEnabled else {
            return
        }

        let resultsVC = SearchResultsViewController()
        let searchVC = UISearchController(
            searchResultsController: resultsVC
        )

        searchVC.searchResultsUpdater = resultsVC
        navigationItem.searchController = searchVC
    }
}

You can read more about feature flags in "Feature flags in Swift".

#88 Lightweight data hierarchies using tuples

💾 Here I'm using tuples to create a lightweight hierarchy for my data, giving me a nice structure without having to introduce any additional types.

struct CodeSegment {
    var tokens: (
        previous: String?,
        current: String
    )

    var delimiters: (
        previous: Character?
        next: Character?
    )
}

handle(segment.tokens.current)

You can read more about tuples in "Using tuples as lightweight types in Swift"

#87 The rule of threes

3️⃣ Whenever I have 3 properties or local variables that share the same prefix, I usually try to extract them into their own method or type. That way I can avoid massive types & methods, and also increase readability, without falling into a "premature optimization" trap.

Before

public func generate() throws {
    let contentFolder = try folder.subfolder(named: "content")

    let articleFolder = try contentFolder.subfolder(named: "posts")
    let articleProcessor = ContentProcessor(folder: articleFolder)
    let articles = try articleProcessor.process()

    ...
}

After

public func generate() throws {
    let contentFolder = try folder.subfolder(named: "content")
    let articles = try processArticles(in: contentFolder)
    ...
}

private func processArticles(in folder: Folder) throws -> [ContentItem] {
    let folder = try folder.subfolder(named: "posts")
    let processor = ContentProcessor(folder: folder)
    return try processor.process()
}

#86 Useful Codable extensions

👨‍🔧 Here's two extensions that I always add to the Encodable & Decodable protocols, which for me really make the Codable API nicer to use. By using type inference for decoding, a lot of boilerplate can be removed when the compiler is already able to infer the resulting type.

extension Encodable {
    func encoded() throws -> Data {
        return try JSONEncoder().encode(self)
    }
}

extension Data {
    func decoded<T: Decodable>() throws -> T {
        return try JSONDecoder().decode(T.self, from: self)
    }
}

let data = try user.encoded()

// By using a generic type in the decoded() method, the
// compiler can often infer the type we want to decode
// from the current context.
try userDidLogin(data.decoded())

// And if not, we can always supply the type, still making
// the call site read very nicely.
let otherUser = try data.decoded() as User

#85 Using shared UserDefaults suites

📦 UserDefaults is a lot more powerful than what it first might seem like. Not only can it store more complex values (like dates & dictionaries) and parse command line arguments - it also enables easy sharing of settings & lightweight data between apps in the same App Group.

let sharedDefaults = UserDefaults(suiteName: "my-app-group")!
let useDarkMode = sharedDefaults.bool(forKey: "dark-mode")

// This value is put into the shared suite.
sharedDefaults.set(true, forKey: "dark-mode")

// If you want to treat the shared settings as read-only (and add
// local overrides on top of them), you can simply add the shared
// suite to the standard UserDefaults.
let combinedDefaults = UserDefaults.standard
combinedDefaults.addSuite(named: "my-app-group")

// This value is a local override, not added to the shared suite.
combinedDefaults.set(true, forKey: "app-specific-override")

#84 Custom UIView backing layers

🎨 By overriding layerClass you can tell UIKit what CALayer class to use for a UIView's backing layer. That way you can reduce the amount of layers, and don't have to do any manual layout.

final class GradientView: UIView {
    override class var layerClass: AnyClass { return CAGradientLayer.self }

    var colors: (start: UIColor, end: UIColor)? {
        didSet { updateLayer() }
    }

    private func updateLayer() {
        let layer = self.layer as! CAGradientLayer
        layer.colors = colors.map { [$0.start.cgColor, $0.end.cgColor] }
    }
}

#83 Auto-Equatable enums with associated values

✅ That the compiler now automatically synthesizes Equatable conformances is such a huge upgrade for Swift! And the cool thing is that it works for all kinds of types - even for enums with associated values! Especially useful when using enums for verification in unit tests.

struct Article: Equatable {
    let title: String
    let text: String
}

struct User: Equatable {
    let name: String
    let age: Int
}

extension Navigator {
    enum Destination: Equatable {
        case profile(User)
        case article(Article)
    }
}

func testNavigatingToArticle() {
    let article = Article(title: "Title", text: "Text")
    controller.select(article)
    XCTAssertEqual(navigator.destinations, [.article(article)])
}

#82 Defaults for associated types

🤝 Associated types can have defaults in Swift - which is super useful for types that are not easily inferred (for example when they're not used for a specific instance method or property).

protocol Identifiable {
    associatedtype RawIdentifier: Codable = String

    var id: Identifier<Self> { get }
}

struct User: Identifiable {
    let id: Identifier<User>
    let name: String
}

struct Group: Identifiable {
    typealias RawIdentifier = Int

    let id: Identifier<Group>
    let name: String
}

#81 Creating a dedicated identifier type

🆔 If you want to avoid using plain strings as identifiers (which can increase both type safety & readability), it's really easy to create a custom Identifier type that feels just like a native Swift type, thanks to protocols!

More on this topic in "Type-safe identifiers in Swift".

struct Identifier: Hashable {
    let string: String
}

extension Identifier: ExpressibleByStringLiteral {
    init(stringLiteral value: String) {
        string = value
    }
}

extension Identifier: CustomStringConvertible {
    var description: String {
        return string
    }
}

extension Identifier: Codable {
    init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.singleValueContainer()
        string = try container.decode(String.self)
    }

    func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws {
        var container = encoder.singleValueContainer()
        try container.encode(string)
    }
}

struct Article: Codable {
    let id: Identifier
    let title: String
}

let article = Article(id: "my-article", title: "Hello world!")

#80 Assigning optional tuple members to variables

🙌 A really cool thing about using tuples to model the internal state of a Swift type, is that you can unwrap an optional tuple's members directly into local variables.

Very useful in order to group multiple optional values together for easy unwrapping & handling.

class ImageTransformer {
    private var queue = [(image: UIImage, transform: Transform)]()

    private func processNext() {
        // When unwrapping an optional tuple, you can assign the members
        // directly to local variables.
        guard let (image, transform) = queue.first else {
            return
        }

        let context = Context()
        context.draw(image)
        context.apply(transform)
        ...
    }
}

#79 Struct convenience initializers

❤️ I love to structure my code using extensions in Swift. One big benefit of doing so when it comes to struct initializers, is that defining a convenience initializer doesn't remove the default one the compiler generates - best of both worlds!

struct Article {
    let date: Date
    var title: String
    var text: String
    var comments: [Comment]
}

extension Article {
    init(title: String, text: String) {
        self.init(date: Date(), title: title, text: text, comments: [])
    }
}

let articleA = Article(title: "Best Cupcake Recipe", text: "...")

let articleB = Article(
    date: Date(),
    title: "Best Cupcake Recipe",
    text: "...",
    comments: [
        Comment(user: currentUser, text: "Yep, can confirm!")
    ]
)

#78 Usages of throwing functions

🏈 A big benefit of using throwing functions for synchronous Swift APIs is that the caller can decide whether they want to treat the return value as optional (try?) or required (try).

func loadFile(named name: String) throws -> File {
    guard let url = urlForFile(named: name) else {
        throw File.Error.missing
    }

    do {
        let data = try Data(contentsOf: url)
        return File(url: url, data: data)
    } catch {
        throw File.Error.invalidData(error)
    }
}

let requiredFile = try loadFile(named: "AppConfig.json")

let optionalFile = try? loadFile(named: "UserSettings.json")

#77 Nested generic types

🐝 Types that are nested in generics automatically inherit their parent's generic types - which is super useful when defining accessory types (for things like states or outcomes).

struct Task<Input, Output> {
    typealias Closure = (Input) throws -> Output

    let closure: Closure
}

extension Task {
    enum Result {
        case success(Output)
        case failure(Error)
    }
}

#76 Equatable & Hashable structures

🤖 Now that the Swift compiler automatically synthesizes Equatable & Hashable conformances for value types, it's easier than ever to setup model structures with nested types that are all Equatable/Hashable!

typealias Value = Hashable & Codable

struct User: Value {
    var name: String
    var age: Int
    var lastLoginDate: Date?
    var settings: Settings
}

extension User {
    struct Settings: Value {
        var itemsPerPage: Int
        var theme: Theme
    }
}

extension User.Settings {
    enum Theme: String, Value {
        case light
        case dark
    }
}

You can read more about using nested types in Swift here.

#75 Conditional conformances

🎉 Swift 4.1 is here! One of the key features it brings is conditional conformances, which lets you have a type only conform to a protocol under certain constraints.

protocol UnboxTransformable {
    associatedtype RawValue

    static func transform(_ value: RawValue) throws -> Self?
}

extension Array: UnboxTransformable where Element: UnboxTransformable {
    typealias RawValue = [Element.RawValue]

    static func transform(_ value: RawValue) throws -> [Element]? {
        return try value.compactMap(Element.transform)
    }
}

I also have an article with lots of more info on conditional conformances here. Paul Hudson also has a great overview of all Swift 4.1 features here.

#74 Generic type aliases

🕵️‍♀️ A cool thing about Swift type aliases is that they can be generic! Combine that with tuples and you can easily define simple generic types.

typealias Pair<T> = (T, T)

extension Game {
    func calculateScore(for players: Pair<Player>) -> Int {
        ...
    }
}

You can read more about using tuples as lightweight types here.

#73 Parsing command line arguments using UserDefaults

☑️ A really cool "hidden" feature of UserDefaults is that it contains any arguments that were passed to the app at launch!

Super useful both in Swift command line tools & scripts, but also to temporarily override a value when debugging iOS apps.

let defaults = UserDefaults.standard
let query = defaults.string(forKey: "query")
let resultCount = defaults.integer(forKey: "results")

#72 Using the & operator

👏 Swift's & operator is awesome! Not only can you use it to compose protocols, you can compose other types too! Very useful if you want to hide concrete types & implementation details.

protocol LoadableFromURL {
    func load(from url: URL)
}

class ContentViewController: UIViewController, LoadableFromURL {
    func load(from url: URL) {
        ...
    }
}

class ViewControllerFactory {
    func makeContentViewController() -> UIViewController & LoadableFromURL {
        return ContentViewController()
    }
}

#71 Capturing multiple values in mocks

🤗 When capturing values in mocks, using an array (instead of just a single value) makes it easy to verify that only a certain number of values were passed.

Perfect for protecting against "over-calling" something.

class UserManagerTests: XCTestCase {
    func testObserversCalledWhenUserFirstLogsIn() {
        let manager = UserManager()

        let observer = ObserverMock()
        manager.addObserver(observer)

        // First login, observers should be notified
        let user = User(id: 123, name: "John")
        manager.userDidLogin(user)
        XCTAssertEqual(observer.users, [user])

        // If the same user logs in again, observers shouldn't be notified
        manager.userDidLogin(user)
        XCTAssertEqual(observer.users, [user])
    }
}

private extension UserManagerTests {
    class ObserverMock: UserManagerObserver {
        private(set) var users = [User]()

        func userDidChange(to user: User) {
            users.append(user)
        }
    }
}

#70 Reducing the need for mocks

👋 When writing tests, you don't always need to create mocks - you can create stubs using real instances of things like errors, URLs & UserDefaults.

Here's how to do that for some common tasks/object types in Swift:

// Create errors using NSError (#function can be used to reference the name of the test)
let error = NSError(domain: #function, code: 1, userInfo: nil)

// Create non-optional URLs using file paths
let url = URL(fileURLWithPath: "Some/URL")

// Reference the test bundle using Bundle(for:)
let bundle = Bundle(for: type(of: self))

// Create an explicit UserDefaults object (instead of having to use a mock)
let userDefaults = UserDefaults(suiteName: #function)

// Create queues to control/await concurrent operations
let queue = DispatchQueue(label: #function)

For when you actually do need mocking, check out "Mocking in Swift".

#69 Using "then" as an external parameter label for closures

⏱ I've started using "then" as an external parameter label for completion handlers. Makes the call site read really nicely (Because I do ❤️ conversational API design) regardless of whether trailing closure syntax is used or not.

protocol DataLoader {
    // Adding type aliases to protocols can be a great way to
    // reduce verbosity for parameter types.
    typealias Handler = (Result<Data>) -> Void
    associatedtype Endpoint

    func loadData(from endpoint: Endpoint, then handler: @escaping Handler)
}

loader.loadData(from: .messages) { result in
    ...
}

loader.loadData(from: .messages, then: { result in
    ...
})

#68 Combining lazily evaluated sequences with the builder pattern

😴 Combining lazily evaluated sequences with builder pattern-like properties can lead to some pretty sweet APIs for configurable sequences in Swift.

Also useful for queries & other things you "build up" and then execute.

// Extension adding builder pattern-like properties that return
// a new sequence value with the given configuration applied
extension FileSequence {
    var recursive: FileSequence {
        var sequence = self
        sequence.isRecursive = true
        return sequence
    }

    var includingHidden: FileSequence {
        var sequence = self
        sequence.includeHidden = true
        return sequence
    }
}

// BEFORE

let files = folder.makeFileSequence(recursive: true, includeHidden: true)

// AFTER

let files = folder.files.recursive.includingHidden

Want an intro to lazy sequences? Check out "Swift sequences: The art of being lazy".

#67 Faster & more stable UI tests

My top 3 tips for faster & more stable UI tests:

📱 Reset the app's state at the beginning of every test.

🆔 Use accessibility identifiers instead of UI strings.

⏱ Use expectations instead of waiting time.

func testOpeningArticle() {
    // Launch the app with an argument that tells it to reset its state
    let app = XCUIApplication()
    app.launchArguments.append("--uitesting")
    app.launch()
    
    // Check that the app is displaying an activity indicator
    let activityIndicator = app.activityIndicator.element
    XCTAssertTrue(activityIndicator.exists)
    
    // Wait for the loading indicator to disappear = content is ready
    expectation(for: NSPredicate(format: "exists == 0"),
                evaluatedWith: activityIndicator)
                
    // Use a generous timeout in case the network is slow
    waitForExpectations(timeout: 10)
    
    // Tap the cell for the first article
    app.tables.cells["Article.0"].tap()
    
    // Assert that a label with the accessibility identifier "Article.Title" exists
    let label = app.staticTexts["Article.Title"]
    XCTAssertTrue(label.exists)
}

#66 Accessing the clipboard from a Swift script

📋 It's super easy to access the contents of the clipboard from a Swift script. A big benefit of Swift scripting is being able to use Cocoa's powerful APIs for Mac apps.

import Cocoa

let clipboard = NSPasteboard.general.string(forType: .string)

#65 Using tuples for view state

🎯 Using Swift tuples for view state can be a super nice way to group multiple properties together and render them reactively using the layout system.

By using a tuple we don't have to either introduce a new type or make our view model-aware.

class TextView: UIView {
    var state: (title: String?, text: String?) {
        // By telling UIKit that our view needs layout and binding our
        // state in layoutSubviews, we can react to state changes without
        // doing unnecessary layout work.
        didSet { setNeedsLayout() }
    }

    private let titleLabel = UILabel()
    private let textLabel = UILabel()

    override func layoutSubviews() {
        super.layoutSubviews()

        titleLabel.text = state.title
        textLabel.text = state.text

        ...
    }
}

#64 Throwing tests and LocalizedError

⚾️ Swift tests can throw, which is super useful in order to avoid complicated logic or force unwrapping. By making errors conform to LocalizedError, you can also get a nice error message in Xcode if there's a failure.

class ImageCacheTests: XCTestCase {
    func testCachingAndLoadingImage() throws {
        let bundle = Bundle(for: type(of: self))
        let cache = ImageCache(bundle: bundle)
        
        // Bonus tip: You can easily load images from your test
        // bundle using this UIImage initializer
        let image = try require(UIImage(named: "sample", in: bundle, compatibleWith: nil))
        try cache.cache(image, forKey: "key")
        
        let cachedImage = try cache.image(forKey: "key")
        XCTAssertEqual(image, cachedImage)
    }
}

enum ImageCacheError {
    case emptyKey
    case dataConversionFailed
}

// When using throwing tests, making your errors conform to
// LocalizedError will render a much nicer error message in
// Xcode (per default only the error code is shown).
extension ImageCacheError: LocalizedError {
    var errorDescription: String? {
        switch self {
        case .emptyKey:
            return "An empty key was given"
        case .dataConversionFailed:
            return "Failed to convert the given image to Data"
        }
    }
}

For more information, and the implementation of the require method used above, check out "Avoiding force unwrapping in Swift unit tests".

#63 The difference between static and class properties

✍️ Unlike static properties, class properties can be overridden by subclasses (however, they can't be stored, only computed).

class TableViewCell: UITableViewCell {
    class var preferredHeight: CGFloat { return 60 }
}

class TallTableViewCell: TableViewCell {
    override class var preferredHeight: CGFloat { return 100 }
}

#62 Creating extensions with static factory methods

👨‍🎨 Creating extensions with static factory methods can be a great alternative to subclassing in Swift, especially for things like setting up UIViews, CALayers or other kinds of styling.

It also lets you remove a lot of styling & setup from your view controllers.

extension UILabel {
    static func makeForTitle() -> UILabel {
        let label = UILabel()
        label.font = .boldSystemFont(ofSize: 24)
        label.textColor = .darkGray
        label.adjustsFontSizeToFitWidth = true
        label.minimumScaleFactor = 0.75
        return label
    }

    static func makeForText() -> UILabel {
        let label = UILabel()
        label.font = .systemFont(ofSize: 16)
        label.textColor = .black
        label.numberOfLines = 0
        return label
    }
}

class ArticleViewController: UIViewController {
    lazy var titleLabel = UILabel.makeForTitle()
    lazy var textLabel = UILabel.makeForText()
}

#61 Child view controller auto-resizing

🧒 An awesome thing about child view controllers is that they're automatically resized to match their parent, making them a super nice solution for things like loading & error views.

class ListViewController: UIViewController {
    func loadItems() {
        let loadingViewController = LoadingViewController()
        add(loadingViewController)

        dataLoader.loadItems { [weak self] result in
            loadingViewController.remove()
            self?.handle(result)
        }
    }
}

For more about child view controller (including the add and remove methods used above), check out "Using child view controllers as plugins in Swift".

#60 Using zip

🤐 Using the zip function in Swift you can easily combine two sequences. Super useful when using two sequences to do some work, since zip takes care of all the bounds-checking.

func render(titles: [String]) {
    for (label, text) in zip(titleLabels, titles) {
        print(text)
        label.text = text
    }
}

#59 Defining custom option sets

🎛 The awesome thing about option sets in Swift is that they can automatically either be passed as a single member or as a set. Even cooler is that you can easily define your own option sets as well, perfect for options and other non-exclusive values.

// Option sets are awesome, because you can easily pass them
// both using dot syntax and array literal syntax, like when
// using the UIView animation API:
UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.3,
               delay: 0,
               options: .allowUserInteraction,
               animations: animations)

UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.3,
               delay: 0,
               options: [.allowUserInteraction, .layoutSubviews],
               animations: animations)

// The cool thing is that you can easily define your own option
// sets as well, by defining a struct that has an Int rawValue,
// that will be used as a bit mask.
extension Cache {
    struct Options: OptionSet {
        static let saveToDisk = Options(rawValue: 1)
        static let clearOnMemoryWarning = Options(rawValue: 1 << 1)
        static let clearDaily = Options(rawValue: 1 << 2)

        let rawValue: Int
    }
}

// We can now use Cache.Options just like UIViewAnimationOptions:
Cache(options: .saveToDisk)
Cache(options: [.saveToDisk, .clearDaily])

#58 Using the where clause with associated types

🙌 Using the where clause when designing protocol-oriented APIs in Swift can let your implementations (or others' if it's open source) have a lot more freedom, especially when it comes to collections.

See "Using generic type constraints in Swift 4" for more info.

public protocol PathFinderMap {
    associatedtype Node
    // Using the 'where' clause for associated types, we can
    // ensure that a type meets certain requirements (in this
    // case that it's a sequence with Node elements).
    associatedtype NodeSequence: Sequence where NodeSequence.Element == Node

    // Instead of using a concrete type (like [Node]) here, we
    // give implementors of this protocol more freedom while
    // still meeting our requirements. For example, one
    // implementation might use Set<Node>.
    func neighbors(of node: Node) -> NodeSequence
}

#57 Using first class functions when iterating over a dictionary

👨‍🍳 Combine first class functions in Swift with the fact that Dictionary elements are (Key, Value) tuples and you can build yourself some pretty awesome functional chains when iterating over a Dictionary.

func makeActor(at coordinate: Coordinate, for building: Building) -> Actor {
    let actor = Actor()
    actor.position = coordinate.point
    actor.animation = building.animation
    return actor
}

func render(_ buildings: [Coordinate : Building]) {
    buildings.map(makeActor).forEach(add)
}

#56 Calling instance methods as static functions

😎 In Swift, you can call any instance method as a static function and it will return a closure representing that method. This is how running tests using SPM on Linux works.

More about this topic in my blog post "First class functions in Swift".

// This produces a '() -> Void' closure which is a reference to the
// given view's 'removeFromSuperview' method.
let closure = UIView.removeFromSuperview(view)

// We can now call it just like we would any other closure, and it
// will run 'view.removeFromSuperview()'
closure()

// This is how running tests using the Swift Package Manager on Linux
// works, you return your test functions as closures:
extension UserManagerTests {
    static var allTests = [
        ("testLoggingIn", testLoggingIn),
        ("testLoggingOut", testLoggingOut),
        ("testUserPermissions", testUserPermissions)
    ]
}

#55 Dropping suffixes from method names to support multiple arguments

👏 One really nice benefit of dropping suffixes from method names (and just using verbs, when possible) is that it becomes super easy to support both single and multiple arguments, and it works really well semantically.

extension UIView {
    func add(_ subviews: UIView...) {
        subviews.forEach(addSubview)
    }
}

view.add(button)
view.add(label)

// By dropping the "Subview" suffix from the method name, both
// single and multiple arguments work really well semantically.
view.add(button, label)

#54 Constraining protocols to classes to ensure mutability

👽 Using the AnyObject (or class) constraint on protocols is not only useful when defining delegates (or other weak references), but also when you always want instances to be mutable without copying.

// By constraining a protocol with 'AnyObject' it can only be adopted
// by classes, which means all instances will always be mutable, and
// that it's the original instance (not a copy) that will be mutated.
protocol DataContainer: AnyObject {
    var data: Data? { get set }
}

class UserSettingsManager {
    private var settings: Settings
    private let dataContainer: DataContainer

    // Since DataContainer is a protocol, we an easily mock it in
    // tests if we use dependency injection
    init(settings: Settings, dataContainer: DataContainer) {
        self.settings = settings
        self.dataContainer = dataContainer
    }

    func saveSettings() throws {
        let data = try settings.serialize()

        // We can now assign properties on an instance of our protocol
        // because the compiler knows it's always going to be a class
        dataContainer.data = data
    }
}

#53 String-based enums in string interpolation

🍣 Even if you define a custom raw value for a string-based enum in Swift, the full case name will be used in string interpolation.

Super useful when using separate raw values for JSON, while still wanting to use the full case name in other contexts.

extension Building {
    // This enum has custom raw values that are used when decoding
    // a value, for example from JSON.
    enum Kind: String {
        case castle = "C"
        case town = "T"
        case barracks = "B"
        case goldMine = "G"
        case camp = "CA"
        case blacksmith = "BL"
    }

    var animation: Animation {
        return Animation(
            // When used in string interpolation, the full case name is still used.
            // For 'castle' this will be 'buildings/castle'.
            name: "buildings/\(kind)",
            frameCount: frameCount,
            frameDuration: frameDuration
        )
    }
}

#52 Expressively comparing a value with a list of candidates

👨‍🔬 Continuing to experiment with expressive ways of comparing a value with a list of candidates in Swift. Adding an extension on Equatable is probably my favorite approach so far.

extension Equatable {
    func isAny(of candidates: Self...) -> Bool {
        return candidates.contains(self)
    }
}

let isHorizontal = direction.isAny(of: .left, .right)

See tip #35 for my previous experiment.

#51 UIView bounds and transforms

📐 A really interesting side-effect of a UIView's bounds being its rect within its own coordinate system is that transforms don't affect it at all. That's why it's usually a better fit than frame when doing layout calculations of subviews.

let view = UIView()
view.frame.size = CGSize(width: 100, height: 100)
view.transform = CGAffineTransform(scaleX: 2, y: 2)

print(view.frame) // (-50.0, -50.0, 200.0, 200.0)
print(view.bounds) // (0.0, 0.0, 100.0, 100.0)

#50 UIKit default arguments

👏 It's awesome that many UIKit APIs with completion handlers and other optional parameters import into Swift with default arguments (even though they are written in Objective-C). Getting rid of all those nil arguments is so nice!

// BEFORE: All parameters are specified, just like in Objective-C

viewController.present(modalViewController, animated: true, completion: nil)

modalViewController.dismiss(animated: true, completion: nil)

viewController.transition(from: loadingViewController,
                          to: contentViewController,
                          duration: 0.3,
                          options: [],
                          animations: animations,
                          completion: nil)

// AFTER: Since many UIKit APIs with completion handlers and other
// optional parameters import into Swift with default arguments,
// we can make our calls shorter

viewController.present(modalViewController, animated: true)

modalViewController.dismiss(animated: true)

viewController.transition(from: loadingViewController,
                          to: contentViewController,
                          duration: 0.3,
                          animations: animations)

#49 Avoiding Massive View Controllers

✂️ Avoiding Massive View Controllers is all about finding the right levels of abstraction and splitting things up.

My personal rule of thumb is that as soon as I have 3 methods or properties that have the same prefix, I break them out into their own type.

// BEFORE

class LoginViewController: UIViewController {
    private lazy var signUpLabel = UILabel()
    private lazy var signUpImageView = UIImageView()
    private lazy var signUpButton = UIButton()
}

// AFTER

class LoginViewController: UIViewController {
    private lazy var signUpView = SignUpView()
}

class SignUpView: UIView {
    private lazy var label = UILabel()
    private lazy var imageView = UIImageView()
    private lazy var button = UIButton()
}

#48 Extending optionals

❤️ I love the fact that optionals are enums in Swift - it makes it so easy to extend them with convenience APIs for certain types. Especially useful when doing things like data validation on optional values.

func validateTextFields() -> Bool {
    guard !usernameTextField.text.isNilOrEmpty else {
        return false
    }

    ...

    return true
}

// Since all optionals are actual enum values in Swift, we can easily
// extend them for certain types, to add our own convenience APIs

extension Optional where Wrapped == String {
    var isNilOrEmpty: Bool {
        switch self {
        case let string?:
            return string.isEmpty
        case nil:
            return true
        }
    }
}

// Since strings are now Collections in Swift 4, you can even
// add this property to all optional collections:

extension Optional where Wrapped: Collection {
    var isNilOrEmpty: Bool {
        switch self {
        case let collection?:
            return collection.isEmpty
        case nil:
            return true
        }
    }
}

#47 Using where with for-loops

🗺 Using the where keyword can be a super nice way to quickly apply a filter in a for-loop in Swift. You can of course use map, filter and forEach, or guard, but for simple loops I think this is very expressive and nice.

func archiveMarkedPosts() {
    for post in posts where post.isMarked {
        archive(post)
    }
}

func healAllies() {
    for player in players where player.isAllied(to: currentPlayer) {
        player.heal()
    }
}

#46 Variable shadowing

👻 Variable shadowing can be super useful in Swift, especially when you want to create a local copy of a parameter value in order to use it as state within a closure.

init(repeatMode: RepeatMode, closure: @escaping () -> UpdateOutcome) {
    // Shadow the argument with a local, mutable copy
    var repeatMode = repeatMode
    
    self.closure = {
        // With shadowing, there's no risk of accidentially
        // referring to the immutable version
        switch repeatMode {
        case .forever:
            break
        case .times(let count):
            guard count > 0 else {
                return .finished
            }
            
            // We can now capture the mutable version and use
            // it for state in a closure
            repeatMode = .times(count - 1)
        }
        
        return closure()
    }
}

#45 Using dot syntax for static properties and initializers

✒️ Dot syntax is one of my favorite features of Swift. What's really cool is that it's not only for enums, any static method or property can be used with dot syntax - even initializers! Perfect for convenience APIs and default parameters.

public enum RepeatMode {
    case times(Int)
    case forever
}

public extension RepeatMode {
    static var never: RepeatMode {
        return .times(0)
    }

    static var once: RepeatMode {
        return .times(1)
    }
}

view.perform(animation, repeated: .once)

// To make default parameters more compact, you can even use init with dot syntax

class ImageLoader {
    init(cache: Cache = .init(), decoder: ImageDecoder = .init()) {
        ...
    }
}

#44 Calling functions as closures with a tuple as parameters

🚀 One really cool aspect of Swift having first class functions is that you can pass any function (or even initializer) as a closure, and even call it with a tuple containing its parameters!

// This function lets us treat any "normal" function or method as
// a closure and run it with a tuple that contains its parameters
func call<Input, Output>(_ function: (Input) -> Output, with input: Input) -> Output {
    return function(input)
}

class ViewFactory {
    func makeHeaderView() -> HeaderView {
        // We can now pass an initializer as a closure, and a tuple
        // containing its parameters
        return call(HeaderView.init, with: loadTextStyles())
    }
    
    private func loadTextStyles() -> (font: UIFont, color: UIColor) {
        return (theme.font, theme.textColor)
    }
}

class HeaderView {
    init(font: UIFont, textColor: UIColor) {
        ...
    }
}

#43 Enabling static dependency injection

💉 If you've been struggling to test code that uses static APIs, here's a technique you can use to enable static dependency injection without having to modify any call sites:

// Before: Almost impossible to test due to the use of singletons

class Analytics {
    static func log(_ event: Event) {
        Database.shared.save(event)
        
        let dictionary = event.serialize()
        NetworkManager.shared.post(dictionary, to: eventURL)
    }
}

// After: Much easier to test, since we can inject mocks as arguments

class Analytics {
    static func log(_ event: Event,
                    database: Database = .shared,
                    networkManager: NetworkManager = .shared) {
        database.save(event)
        
        let dictionary = event.serialize()
        networkManager.post(dictionary, to: eventURL)
    }
}

#42 Type inference for lazy properties in Swift 4

🎉 In Swift 4, type inference works for lazy properties and you don't need to explicitly refer to self!

// Swift 3

class PurchaseView: UIView {
    private lazy var buyButton: UIButton = self.makeBuyButton()
    
    private func makeBuyButton() -> UIButton {
        let button = UIButton()
        button.setTitle("Buy", for: .normal)
        button.setTitleColor(.blue, for: .normal)
        return button
    }
}

// Swift 4

class PurchaseView: UIView {
    private lazy var buyButton = makeBuyButton()
    
    private func makeBuyButton() -> UIButton {
        let button = UIButton()
        button.setTitle("Buy", for: .normal)
        button.setTitleColor(.blue, for: .normal)
        return button
    }
}

#41 Converting Swift errors to NSError

😎 You can turn any Swift Error into an NSError, which is super useful when pattern matching with a code 👍. Also, switching on optionals is pretty cool!

let task = urlSession.dataTask(with: url) { data, _, error in
    switch error {
    case .some(let error as NSError) where error.code == NSURLErrorNotConnectedToInternet:
        presenter.showOfflineView()
    case .some(let error):
        presenter.showGenericErrorView()
    case .none:
        presenter.renderContent(from: data)
    }
}

task.resume()

Also make sure to check out Kostas Kremizas' tip about how you can pattern match directly against a member of URLError.

#40 Making UIImage macOS compatible

🖥 Here's an easy way to make iOS model code that uses UIImage macOS compatible - like me and Gui Rambo discussed on the Swift by Sundell Podcast.

// Either put this in a separate file that you only include in your macOS target or wrap the code in #if os(macOS) / #endif

import Cocoa

// Step 1: Typealias UIImage to NSImage
typealias UIImage = NSImage

// Step 2: You might want to add these APIs that UIImage has but NSImage doesn't.
extension NSImage {
    var cgImage: CGImage? {
        var proposedRect = CGRect(origin: .zero, size: size)

        return cgImage(forProposedRect: &proposedRect,
                       context: nil,
                       hints: nil)
    }

    convenience init?(named name: String) {
        self.init(named: Name(name))
    }
}

// Step 3: Profit - you can now make your model code that uses UIImage cross-platform!
struct User {
    let name: String
    let profileImage: UIImage
}

#39 Internally mutable protocol-oriented APIs

🤖 You can easily define a protocol-oriented API that can only be mutated internally, by using an internal protocol that extends a public one.

// Declare a public protocol that acts as your immutable API
public protocol ModelHolder {
    associatedtype Model
    var model: Model { get }
}

// Declare an extended, internal protocol that provides a mutable API
internal protocol MutableModelHolder: ModelHolder {
    var model: Model { get set }
}

// You can now implement the requirements using 'public internal(set)'
public class UserHolder: MutableModelHolder {
    public internal(set) var model: User

    internal init(model: User) {
        self.model = model
    }
}

#38 Switching on a set

🎛 You can switch on a set using array literals as cases in Swift! Can be really useful to avoid many if/else if statements.

class RoadTile: Tile {
    var connectedDirections = Set<Direction>()

    func render() {
        switch connectedDirections {
        case [.up, .down]:
            image = UIImage(named: "road-vertical")
        case [.left, .right]:
            image = UIImage(named: "road-horizontal")
        default:
            image = UIImage(named: "road")
        }
    }
}

#37 Adding the current locale to cache keys

🌍 When caching localized content in an app, it's a good idea to add the current locale to all keys, to prevent bugs when switching languages.

func cache(_ content: Content, forKey key: String) throws {
    let data = try wrap(content) as Data
    let key = localize(key: key)
    try storage.store(data, forKey: key)
}

func loadCachedContent(forKey key: String) -> Content? {
    let key = localize(key: key)
    let data = storage.loadData(forKey: key)
    return data.flatMap { try? unbox(data: $0) }
}

private func localize(key: String) -> String {
    return key + "-" + Bundle.main.preferredLocalizations[0]
}

#36 Setting up tests to avoid retain cycles with weak references

🚳 Here's an easy way to setup a test to avoid accidental retain cycles with object relationships (like weak delegates & observers) in Swift:

func testDelegateNotRetained() {
    // Assign the delegate (weak) and also retain it using a local var
    var delegate: Delegate? = DelegateMock()
    controller.delegate = delegate
    XCTAssertNotNil(controller.delegate)
    
    // Release the local var, which should also release the weak reference
    delegate = nil
    XCTAssertNil(controller.delegate)
}

#35 Expressively matching a value against a list of candidates

👨‍🔬 Playing around with an expressive way to check if a value matches any of a list of candidates in Swift:

// Instead of multiple conditions like this:

if string == "One" || string == "Two" || string == "Three" {

}

// You can now do:

if string == any(of: "One", "Two", "Three") {

}

You can find a gist with the implementation here.

#34 Organizing code using extensions

👪 APIs in a Swift extension automatically inherit its access control level, making it a neat way to organize public, internal & private APIs.

public extension Animation {
    init(textureNamed textureName: String) {
        frames = [Texture(name: textureName)]
    }
    
    init(texturesNamed textureNames: [String], frameDuration: TimeInterval = 1) {
        frames = textureNames.map(Texture.init)
        self.frameDuration = frameDuration
    }
    
    init(image: Image) {
        frames = [Texture(image: image)]
    }
}

internal extension Animation {
    func loadFrameImages() -> [Image] {
        return frames.map { $0.loadImageIfNeeded() }
    }
}

#33 Using map to transform an optional into a Result type

🗺 Using map you can transform an optional value into an optional Result type by simply passing in the enum case.

enum Result<Value> {
    case value(Value)
    case error(Error)
}

class Promise<Value> {
    private var result: Result<Value>?
    
    init(value: Value? = nil) {
        result = value.map(Result.value)
    }
}

#32 Assigning to self in struct initializers

👌 It's so nice that you can assign directly to self in struct initializers in Swift. Very useful when adding conformance to protocols.

extension Bool: AnswerConvertible {
    public init(input: String) throws {
        switch input.lowercased() {
        case "y", "yes", "👍":
            self = true
        default:
            self = false
        }
    }
}

#31 Recursively calling closures as inline functions

☎️ Defining Swift closures as inline functions enables you to recursively call them, which is super useful in things like custom sequences.

class Database {
    func records(matching query: Query) -> AnySequence<Record> {
        var recordIterator = loadRecords().makeIterator()
        
        func iterate() -> Record? {
            guard let nextRecord = recordIterator.next() else {
                return nil
            }
            
            guard nextRecord.matches(query) else {
                // Since the closure is an inline function, it can be recursively called,
                // in this case in order to advance to the next item.
                return iterate()
            }
            
            return nextRecord
        }
        
        // AnySequence/AnyIterator are part of the standard library and provide an easy way
        // to define custom sequences using closures.
        return AnySequence { AnyIterator(iterate) }
    }
}

Rob Napier points out that using the above might cause crashes if used on a large databaset, since Swift has no guaranteed Tail Call Optimization (TCO).

Slava Pestov also points out that another benefit of inline functions vs closures is that they can have their own generic parameter list.

#30 Passing self to required Objective-C dependencies

🏖 Using lazy properties in Swift, you can pass self to required Objective-C dependencies without having to use force-unwrapped optionals.

class DataLoader: NSObject {
    lazy var urlSession: URLSession = self.makeURLSession()
    
    private func makeURLSession() -> URLSession {
        return URLSession(configuration: .default, delegate: self, delegateQueue: .main)
    }
}

class Renderer {
    lazy var displayLink: CADisplayLink = self.makeDisplayLink()
    
    private func makeDisplayLink() -> CADisplayLink {
        return CADisplayLink(target: self, selector: #selector(screenDidRefresh))
    }
}

#29 Making weak or lazy properties readonly

👓 If you have a property in Swift that needs to be weak or lazy, you can still make it readonly by using private(set).

class Node {
    private(set) weak var parent: Node?
    private(set) lazy var children = [Node]()

    func add(child: Node) {
        children.append(child)
        child.parent = self
    }
}

#28 Defining static URLs using string literals

🌏 Tired of using URL(string: "url")! for static URLs? Make URL conform to ExpressibleByStringLiteral and you can now simply use "url" instead.

extension URL: ExpressibleByStringLiteral {
    // By using 'StaticString' we disable string interpolation, for safety
    public init(stringLiteral value: StaticString) {
        self = URL(string: "\(value)").require(hint: "Invalid URL string literal: \(value)")
    }
}

// We can now define URLs using static string literals 🎉
let url: URL = "https://www.swiftbysundell.com"
let task = URLSession.shared.dataTask(with: "https://www.swiftbysundell.com")

// In Swift 3 or earlier, you also have to implement 2 additional initializers
extension URL {
    public init(extendedGraphemeClusterLiteral value: StaticString) {
        self.init(stringLiteral: value)
    }

    public init(unicodeScalarLiteral value: StaticString) {
        self.init(stringLiteral: value)
    }
}

To find the extension that adds the require() method on Optional that I use above, check out Require.

#27 Manipulating points, sizes and frames using math operators

✚ I'm always careful with operator overloading, but for manipulating things like sizes, points & frames I find them super useful.

extension CGSize {
    static func *(lhs: CGSize, rhs: CGFloat) -> CGSize {
        return CGSize(width: lhs.width * rhs, height: lhs.height * rhs)
    }
}

button.frame.size = image.size * 2

If you like the above idea, check out CGOperators, which contains math operator overloads for all Core Graphics' vector types.

#26 Using closure types in generic constraints

🔗 You can use closure types in generic constraints in Swift. Enables nice APIs for handling sequences of closures.

extension Sequence where Element == () -> Void {
    func callAll() {
        forEach { $0() }
    }
}

extension Sequence where Element == () -> String {
    func joinedResults(separator: String) -> String {
        return map { $0() }.joined(separator: separator)
    }
}

callbacks.callAll()
let names = nameProviders.joinedResults(separator: ", ")

(If you're using Swift 3, you have to change Element to Iterator.Element)

#25 Using associated enum values to avoid state-specific optionals

🎉 Using associated enum values is a super nice way to encapsulate mutually exclusive state info (and avoiding state-specific optionals).

// BEFORE: Lots of state-specific, optional properties

class Player {
    var isWaitingForMatchMaking: Bool
    var invitingUser: User?
    var numberOfLives: Int
    var playerDefeatedBy: Player?
    var roundDefeatedIn: Int?
}

// AFTER: All state-specific information is encapsulated in enum cases

class Player {
    enum State {
        case waitingForMatchMaking
        case waitingForInviteResponse(from: User)
        case active(numberOfLives: Int)
        case defeated(by: Player, roundNumber: Int)
    }
    
    var state: State
}

#24 Using enums for async result types

👍 I really like using enums for all async result types, even boolean ones. Self-documenting, and makes the call site a lot nicer to read too!

protocol PushNotificationService {
    // Before
    func enablePushNotifications(completionHandler: @escaping (Bool) -> Void)
    
    // After
    func enablePushNotifications(completionHandler: @escaping (PushNotificationStatus) -> Void)
}

enum PushNotificationStatus {
    case enabled
    case disabled
}

service.enablePushNotifications { status in
    if status == .enabled {
        enableNotificationsButton.removeFromSuperview()
    }
}

#23 Working on async code in a playground

🏃 Want to work on your async code in a Swift Playground? Just set needsIndefiniteExecution to true to keep it running:

import PlaygroundSupport

PlaygroundPage.current.needsIndefiniteExecution = true

DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 3) {
    let greeting = "Hello after 3 seconds"
    print(greeting)
}

To stop the playground from executing, simply call PlaygroundPage.current.finishExecution().

#22 Overriding self with a weak reference

💦 Avoid memory leaks when accidentially refering to self in closures by overriding it locally with a weak reference:

Swift >= 4.2

dataLoader.loadData(from: url) { [weak self] result in
    guard let self = self else { 
        return 
    }

    self.cache(result)
    
    ...

Swift < 4.2

dataLoader.loadData(from: url) { [weak self] result in
    guard let `self` = self else {
        return
    }

    self.cache(result)
    
    ...

Note that the reason the above currently works is because of a compiler bug (which I hope gets turned into a properly supported feature soon).

#21 Using DispatchWorkItem

🕓 Using dispatch work items you can easily cancel a delayed asynchronous GCD task if you no longer need it:

let workItem = DispatchWorkItem {
    // Your async code goes in here
}

// Execute the work item after 1 second
DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 1, execute: workItem)

// You can cancel the work item if you no longer need it
workItem.cancel()

#20 Combining a sequence of functions

➕ While working on a new Swift developer tool (to be open sourced soon 😉), I came up with a pretty neat way of organizing its sequence of operations, by combining their functions into a closure:

internal func +<A, B, C>(lhs: @escaping (A) throws -> B,
                         rhs: @escaping (B) throws -> C) -> (A) throws -> C {
    return { try rhs(lhs($0)) }
}

public func run() throws {
    try (determineTarget + build + analyze + output)()
}

If you're familiar with the functional programming world, you might know the above technique as the pipe operator (thanks to Alexey Demedreckiy for pointing this out!)

#19 Chaining optionals with map() and flatMap()

🗺 Using map() and flatMap() on optionals you can chain multiple operations without having to use lengthy if lets or guards:

// BEFORE

guard let string = argument(at: 1) else {
    return
}

guard let url = URL(string: string) else {
    return
}

handle(url)

// AFTER

argument(at: 1).flatMap(URL.init).map(handle)

#18 Using self-executing closures for lazy properties

🚀 Using self-executing closures is a great way to encapsulate lazy property initialization:

class StoreViewController: UIViewController {
    private lazy var collectionView: UICollectionView = {
        let layout = UICollectionViewFlowLayout()
        let view = UICollectionView(frame: self.view.bounds, collectionViewLayout: layout)
        view.delegate = self
        view.dataSource = self
        return view
    }()
    
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        view.addSubview(collectionView)
    }
}

#17 Speeding up Swift package tests

⚡️ You can speed up your Swift package tests using the --parallel flag. For Marathon, the tests execute 3 times faster that way!

swift test --parallel

#16 Avoiding mocking UserDefaults

🛠 Struggling with mocking UserDefaults in a test? The good news is: you don't need mocking - just create a real instance:

class LoginTests: XCTestCase {
    private var userDefaults: UserDefaults!
    private var manager: LoginManager!
    
    override func setUp() {
        super.setup()
        
        userDefaults = UserDefaults(suiteName: #file)
        userDefaults.removePersistentDomain(forName: #file)
        
        manager = LoginManager(userDefaults: userDefaults)
    }
}

#15 Using variadic parameters

👍 Using variadic parameters in Swift, you can create some really nice APIs that take a list of objects without having to use an array:

extension Canvas {
    func add(_ shapes: Shape...) {
        shapes.forEach(add)
    }
}

let circle = Circle(center: CGPoint(x: 5, y: 5), radius: 5)
let lineA = Line(start: .zero, end: CGPoint(x: 10, y: 10))
let lineB = Line(start: CGPoint(x: 0, y: 10), end: CGPoint(x: 10, y: 0))

let canvas = Canvas()
canvas.add(circle, lineA, lineB)
canvas.render()

#14 Referring to enum cases with associated values as closures

😮 Just like you can refer to a Swift function as a closure, you can do the same thing with enum cases with associated values:

enum UnboxPath {
    case key(String)
    case keyPath(String)
}

struct UserSchema {
    static let name = key("name")
    static let age = key("age")
    static let posts = key("posts")
    
    private static let key = UnboxPath.key
}

#13 Using the === operator to compare objects by instance

📈 The === operator lets you check if two objects are the same instance. Very useful when verifying that an array contains an instance in a test:

protocol InstanceEquatable: class, Equatable {}

extension InstanceEquatable {
    static func ==(lhs: Self, rhs: Self) -> Bool {
        return lhs === rhs
    }
}

extension Enemy: InstanceEquatable {}

func testDestroyingEnemy() {
    player.attack(enemy)
    XCTAssertTrue(player.destroyedEnemies.contains(enemy))
}

#12 Calling initializers with dot syntax and passing them as closures

😎 Cool thing about Swift initializers: you can call them using dot syntax and pass them as closures! Perfect for mocking dates in tests.

class Logger {
    private let storage: LogStorage
    private let dateProvider: () -> Date
    
    init(storage: LogStorage = .init(), dateProvider: @escaping () -> Date = Date.init) {
        self.storage = storage
        self.dateProvider = dateProvider
    }
    
    func log(event: Event) {
        storage.store(event: event, date: dateProvider())
    }
}

#11 Structuring UI tests as extensions on XCUIApplication

📱 Most of my UI testing logic is now categories on XCUIApplication. Makes the test cases really easy to read:

func testLoggingInAndOut() {
    XCTAssertFalse(app.userIsLoggedIn)
    
    app.launch()
    app.login()
    XCTAssertTrue(app.userIsLoggedIn)
    
    app.logout()
    XCTAssertFalse(app.userIsLoggedIn)
}

func testDisplayingCategories() {
    XCTAssertFalse(app.isDisplayingCategories)
    
    app.launch()
    app.login()
    app.goToCategories()
    XCTAssertTrue(app.isDisplayingCategories)
}

#10 Avoiding default cases in switch statements

🙂 It’s a good idea to avoid “default” cases when switching on Swift enums - it’ll “force you” to update your logic when a new case is added:

enum State {
    case loggedIn
    case loggedOut
    case onboarding
}

func handle(_ state: State) {
    switch state {
    case .loggedIn:
        showMainUI()
    case .loggedOut:
        showLoginUI()
    // Compiler error: Switch must be exhaustive
    }
}

#9 Using the guard statement in many different scopes

💂 It's really cool that you can use Swift's 'guard' statement to exit out of pretty much any scope, not only return from functions:

// You can use the 'guard' statement to...

for string in strings {
    // ...continue an iteration
    guard shouldProcess(string) else {
        continue
    }
    
    // ...or break it
    guard !shouldBreak(for: string) else {
        break
    }
    
    // ...or return
    guard !shouldReturn(for: string) else {
        return
    }
    
    // ..or throw an error
    guard string.isValid else {
        throw StringError.invalid(string)
    }
    
    // ...or exit the program
    guard !shouldExit(for: string) else {
        exit(1)
    }
}

#8 Passing functions & operators as closures

❤️ Love how you can pass functions & operators as closures in Swift. For example, it makes the syntax for sorting arrays really nice!

let array = [3, 9, 1, 4, 6, 2]
let sorted = array.sorted(by: <)

#7 Using #function for UserDefaults key consistency

🗝 Here's a neat little trick I use to get UserDefault key consistency in Swift (#function expands to the property name in getters/setters). Just remember to write a good suite of tests that'll guard you against bugs when changing property names.

extension UserDefaults {
    var onboardingCompleted: Bool {
        get { return bool(forKey: #function) }
        set { set(newValue, forKey: #function) }
    }
}

#6 Using a name already taken by the standard library

📛 Want to use a name already taken by the standard library for a nested type? No problem - just use Swift. to disambiguate:

extension Command {
    enum Error: Swift.Error {
        case missing
        case invalid(String)
    }
}

#5 Using Wrap to implement Equatable

📦 Playing around with using Wrap to implement Equatable for any type, primarily for testing:

protocol AutoEquatable: Equatable {}

extension AutoEquatable {
    static func ==(lhs: Self, rhs: Self) -> Bool {
        let lhsData = try! wrap(lhs) as Data
        let rhsData = try! wrap(rhs) as Data
        return lhsData == rhsData
    }
}

#4 Using typealiases to reduce the length of method signatures

📏 One thing that I find really useful in Swift is to use typealiases to reduce the length of method signatures in generic types:

public class PathFinder<Object: PathFinderObject> {
    public typealias Map = Object.Map
    public typealias Node = Map.Node
    public typealias Path = PathFinderPath<Object>
    
    public static func possiblePaths(for object: Object, at rootNode: Node, on map: Map) -> Path.Sequence {
        return .init(object: object, rootNode: rootNode, map: map)
    }
}

#3 Referencing either external or internal parameter name when writing docs

📖 You can reference either the external or internal parameter label when writing Swift docs - and they get parsed the same:

// EITHER:

class Foo {
    /**
    *   - parameter string: A string
    */
    func bar(with string: String) {}
}

// OR:

class Foo {
    /**
    *   - parameter with: A string
    */
    func bar(with string: String) {}
}

#2 Using auto closures

👍 Finding more and more uses for auto closures in Swift. Can enable some pretty nice APIs:

extension Dictionary {
    mutating func value(for key: Key, orAdd valueClosure: @autoclosure () -> Value) -> Value {
        if let value = self[key] {
            return value
        }
        
        let value = valueClosure()
        self[key] = value
        return value
    }
}

#1 Namespacing with nested types

🚀 I’ve started to become a really big fan of nested types in Swift. Love the additional namespacing it gives you!

public struct Map {
    public struct Model {
        public let size: Size
        public let theme: Theme
        public var terrain: [Position : Terrain.Model]
        public var units: [Position : Unit.Model]
        public var buildings: [Position : Building.Model]
    }
    
    public enum Direction {
        case up
        case right
        case down
        case left
    }
    
    public struct Position {
        public var x: Int
        public var y: Int
    }
    
    public enum Size: String {
        case small = "S"
        case medium = "M"
        case large = "L"
        case extraLarge = "XL"
    }
}

Download Details:

Author: JohnSundell
Source code: https://github.com/JohnSundell/SwiftTips

License: MIT license
#swift 

Variables Globales De Python: Cómo Definir Un Ejemplo De Variable Glob

En este artículo, aprenderá los conceptos básicos de las variables globales.

Para empezar, aprenderá cómo declarar variables en Python y qué significa realmente el término 'ámbito de variable'.

Luego, aprenderá las diferencias entre variables locales y globales y comprenderá cómo definir variables globales y cómo usar la globalpalabra clave.

¿Qué son las variables en Python y cómo se crean? Una introducción para principiantes

Puede pensar en las variables como contenedores de almacenamiento .

Son contenedores de almacenamiento para almacenar datos, información y valores que le gustaría guardar en la memoria de la computadora. Luego puede hacer referencia a ellos o incluso manipularlos en algún momento a lo largo de la vida del programa.

Una variable tiene un nombre simbólico y puede pensar en ese nombre como la etiqueta en el contenedor de almacenamiento que actúa como su identificador.

El nombre de la variable será una referencia y un puntero a los datos almacenados en su interior. Por lo tanto, no es necesario recordar los detalles de sus datos e información; solo necesita hacer referencia al nombre de la variable que contiene esos datos e información.

Al dar un nombre a una variable, asegúrese de que sea descriptivo de los datos que contiene. Los nombres de las variables deben ser claros y fácilmente comprensibles tanto para usted en el futuro como para los otros desarrolladores con los que puede estar trabajando.

Ahora, veamos cómo crear una variable en Python.

Al declarar variables en Python, no necesita especificar su tipo de datos.

Por ejemplo, en el lenguaje de programación C, debe mencionar explícitamente el tipo de datos que contendrá la variable.

Entonces, si quisiera almacenar su edad, que es un número entero, o inttipo, esto es lo que tendría que hacer en C:

#include <stdio.h>
 
int main(void)
{
  int age = 28;
  // 'int' is the data type
  // 'age' is the name 
  // 'age' is capable of holding integer values
  // positive/negative whole numbers or 0
  // '=' is the assignment operator
  // '28' is the value
}

Sin embargo, así es como escribirías lo anterior en Python:

age = 28

#'age' is the variable name, or identifier
# '=' is the assignment operator
#'28' is the value assigned to the variable, so '28' is the value of 'age'

El nombre de la variable siempre está en el lado izquierdo y el valor que desea asignar va en el lado derecho después del operador de asignación.

Tenga en cuenta que puede cambiar los valores de las variables a lo largo de la vida de un programa:

my_age = 28

print(f"My age in 2022 is {my_age}.")

my_age = 29

print(f"My age in 2023 will be {my_age}.")

#output

#My age in 2022 is 28.
#My age in 2023 will be 29.

Mantienes el mismo nombre de variable my_age, pero solo cambias el valor de 28a 29.

¿Qué significa el alcance variable en Python?

El alcance de la variable se refiere a las partes y los límites de un programa de Python donde una variable está disponible, accesible y visible.

Hay cuatro tipos de alcance para las variables de Python, que también se conocen como la regla LEGB :

  • local ,
  • Encerrando ,
  • globales ,
  • Incorporado .

En el resto de este artículo, se centrará en aprender a crear variables con alcance global y comprenderá la diferencia entre los alcances de variables locales y globales.

Cómo crear variables con alcance local en Python

Las variables definidas dentro del cuerpo de una función tienen alcance local , lo que significa que solo se puede acceder a ellas dentro de esa función en particular. En otras palabras, son 'locales' para esa función.

Solo puede acceder a una variable local llamando a la función.

def learn_to_code():
    #create local variable
    coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call function
learn_to_code()


#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!

Mire lo que sucede cuando trato de acceder a esa variable con un alcance local desde fuera del cuerpo de la función:

def learn_to_code():
    #create local variable
    coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#try to print local variable 'coding_website' from outside the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#NameError: name 'coding_website' is not defined

Plantea un NameErrorporque no es 'visible' en el resto del programa. Solo es 'visible' dentro de la función donde se definió.

Cómo crear variables con alcance global en Python

Cuando define una variable fuera de una función, como en la parte superior del archivo, tiene un alcance global y se conoce como variable global.

Se accede a una variable global desde cualquier parte del programa.

Puede usarlo dentro del cuerpo de una función, así como acceder desde fuera de una función:

#create a global variable
coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"

def learn_to_code():
    #access the variable 'coding_website' inside the function
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call the function
learn_to_code()

#access the variable 'coding_website' from outside the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!
#freeCodeCamp

¿Qué sucede cuando hay una variable global y local, y ambas tienen el mismo nombre?

#global variable
city = "Athens"

def travel_plans():
    #local variable with the same name as the global variable
    city = "London"
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function - this will output the value of local variable
travel_plans()

#reference global variable - this will output the value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#output

#I want to visit London next year!
#I want to visit Athens next year!

En el ejemplo anterior, tal vez no esperaba ese resultado específico.

Tal vez pensaste que el valor de citycambiaría cuando le asignara un valor diferente dentro de la función.

Tal vez esperabas que cuando hice referencia a la variable global con la línea print(f" I want to visit {city} next year!"), la salida sería en #I want to visit London next year!lugar de #I want to visit Athens next year!.

Sin embargo, cuando se llamó a la función, imprimió el valor de la variable local.

Luego, cuando hice referencia a la variable global fuera de la función, se imprimió el valor asignado a la variable global.

No interfirieron entre sí.

Dicho esto, usar el mismo nombre de variable para variables globales y locales no se considera una buena práctica. Asegúrese de que sus variables no tengan el mismo nombre, ya que puede obtener algunos resultados confusos cuando ejecute su programa.

Cómo usar la globalpalabra clave en Python

¿Qué sucede si tiene una variable global pero desea cambiar su valor dentro de una función?

Mira lo que sucede cuando trato de hacer eso:

#global variable
city = "Athens"

def travel_plans():
    #First, this is like when I tried to access the global variable defined outside the function. 
    # This works fine on its own, as you saw earlier on.
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

    #However, when I then try to re-assign a different value to the global variable 'city' from inside the function,
    #after trying to print it,
    #it will throw an error
    city = "London"
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function
travel_plans()

#output

#UnboundLocalError: local variable 'city' referenced before assignment

Por defecto, Python piensa que quieres usar una variable local dentro de una función.

Entonces, cuando intento imprimir el valor de la variable por primera vez y luego reasignar un valor a la variable a la que intento acceder, Python se confunde.

La forma de cambiar el valor de una variable global dentro de una función es usando la globalpalabra clave:

#global variable
city = "Athens"

#print value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

def travel_plans():
    global city
    #print initial value of global variable
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")
    #assign a different value to global variable from within function
    city = "London"
    #print new value
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function
travel_plans()

#print value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

Utilice la globalpalabra clave antes de hacer referencia a ella en la función, ya que obtendrá el siguiente error: SyntaxError: name 'city' is used prior to global declaration.

Anteriormente, vio que no podía acceder a las variables creadas dentro de las funciones ya que tienen un alcance local.

La globalpalabra clave cambia la visibilidad de las variables declaradas dentro de las funciones.

def learn_to_code():
   global coding_website
   coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
   print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call function
learn_to_code()

#access variable from within the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!
#freeCodeCamp

Conclusión

¡Y ahí lo tienes! Ahora conoce los conceptos básicos de las variables globales en Python y puede distinguir las diferencias entre las variables locales y globales.

Espero que hayas encontrado útil este artículo.

Comenzará desde lo básico y aprenderá de una manera interactiva y amigable para principiantes. También construirá cinco proyectos al final para poner en práctica y ayudar a reforzar lo que ha aprendido.

¡Gracias por leer y feliz codificación!

Fuente: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/python-global-variables-examples/

#python 

Python Global Variables – How to Define a Global Variable Example

In this article, you will learn the basics of global variables.

To begin with, you will learn how to declare variables in Python and what the term 'variable scope' actually means.

Then, you will learn the differences between local and global variables and understand how to define global variables and how to use the global keyword.

What Are Variables in Python and How Do You Create Them? An Introduction for Beginners

You can think of variables as storage containers.

They are storage containers for holding data, information, and values that you would like to save in the computer's memory. You can then reference or even manipulate them at some point throughout the life of the program.

A variable has a symbolic name, and you can think of that name as the label on the storage container that acts as its identifier.

The variable name will be a reference and pointer to the data stored inside it. So, there is no need to remember the details of your data and information – you only need to reference the variable name that holds that data and information.

When giving a variable a name, make sure that it is descriptive of the data it holds. Variable names need to be clear and easily understandable both for your future self and the other developers you may be working with.

Now, let's see how to actually create a variable in Python.

When declaring variables in Python, you don't need to specify their data type.

For example, in the C programming language, you have to mention explicitly the type of data the variable will hold.

So, if you wanted to store your age which is an integer, or int type, this is what you would have to do in C:

#include <stdio.h>
 
int main(void)
{
  int age = 28;
  // 'int' is the data type
  // 'age' is the name 
  // 'age' is capable of holding integer values
  // positive/negative whole numbers or 0
  // '=' is the assignment operator
  // '28' is the value
}

However, this is how you would write the above in Python:

age = 28

#'age' is the variable name, or identifier
# '=' is the assignment operator
#'28' is the value assigned to the variable, so '28' is the value of 'age'

The variable name is always on the left-hand side, and the value you want to assign goes on the right-hand side after the assignment operator.

Keep in mind that you can change the values of variables throughout the life of a program:

my_age = 28

print(f"My age in 2022 is {my_age}.")

my_age = 29

print(f"My age in 2023 will be {my_age}.")

#output

#My age in 2022 is 28.
#My age in 2023 will be 29.

You keep the same variable name, my_age, but only change the value from 28 to 29.

What Does Variable Scope in Python Mean?

Variable scope refers to the parts and boundaries of a Python program where a variable is available, accessible, and visible.

There are four types of scope for Python variables, which are also known as the LEGB rule:

  • Local,
  • Enclosing,
  • Global,
  • Built-in.

For the rest of this article, you will focus on learning about creating variables with global scope, and you will understand the difference between the local and global variable scopes.

How to Create Variables With Local Scope in Python

Variables defined inside a function's body have local scope, which means they are accessible only within that particular function. In other words, they are 'local' to that function.

You can only access a local variable by calling the function.

def learn_to_code():
    #create local variable
    coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call function
learn_to_code()


#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!

Look at what happens when I try to access that variable with a local scope from outside the function's body:

def learn_to_code():
    #create local variable
    coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#try to print local variable 'coding_website' from outside the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#NameError: name 'coding_website' is not defined

It raises a NameError because it is not 'visible' in the rest of the program. It is only 'visible' within the function where it was defined.

How to Create Variables With Global Scope in Python

When you define a variable outside a function, like at the top of the file, it has a global scope and it is known as a global variable.

A global variable is accessed from anywhere in the program.

You can use it inside a function's body, as well as access it from outside a function:

#create a global variable
coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"

def learn_to_code():
    #access the variable 'coding_website' inside the function
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call the function
learn_to_code()

#access the variable 'coding_website' from outside the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!
#freeCodeCamp

What happens when there is a global and local variable, and they both have the same name?

#global variable
city = "Athens"

def travel_plans():
    #local variable with the same name as the global variable
    city = "London"
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function - this will output the value of local variable
travel_plans()

#reference global variable - this will output the value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#output

#I want to visit London next year!
#I want to visit Athens next year!

In the example above, maybe you were not expecting that specific output.

Maybe you thought that the value of city would change when I assigned it a different value inside the function.

Maybe you expected that when I referenced the global variable with the line print(f" I want to visit {city} next year!"), the output would be #I want to visit London next year! instead of #I want to visit Athens next year!.

However, when the function was called, it printed the value of the local variable.

Then, when I referenced the global variable outside the function, the value assigned to the global variable was printed.

They didn't interfere with one another.

That said, using the same variable name for global and local variables is not considered a best practice. Make sure that your variables don't have the same name, as you may get some confusing results when you run your program.

How to Use the global Keyword in Python

What if you have a global variable but want to change its value inside a function?

Look at what happens when I try to do that:

#global variable
city = "Athens"

def travel_plans():
    #First, this is like when I tried to access the global variable defined outside the function. 
    # This works fine on its own, as you saw earlier on.
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

    #However, when I then try to re-assign a different value to the global variable 'city' from inside the function,
    #after trying to print it,
    #it will throw an error
    city = "London"
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function
travel_plans()

#output

#UnboundLocalError: local variable 'city' referenced before assignment

By default Python thinks you want to use a local variable inside a function.

So, when I first try to print the value of the variable and then re-assign a value to the variable I am trying to access, Python gets confused.

The way to change the value of a global variable inside a function is by using the global keyword:

#global variable
city = "Athens"

#print value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

def travel_plans():
    global city
    #print initial value of global variable
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")
    #assign a different value to global variable from within function
    city = "London"
    #print new value
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function
travel_plans()

#print value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

Use the global keyword before referencing it in the function, as you will get the following error: SyntaxError: name 'city' is used prior to global declaration.

Earlier, you saw that you couldn't access variables created inside functions since they have local scope.

The global keyword changes the visibility of variables declared inside functions.

def learn_to_code():
   global coding_website
   coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
   print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call function
learn_to_code()

#access variable from within the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!
#freeCodeCamp

Conclusion

And there you have it! You now know the basics of global variables in Python and can tell the differences between local and global variables.

I hope you found this article useful.

You'll start from the basics and learn in an interactive and beginner-friendly way. You'll also build five projects at the end to put into practice and help reinforce what you've learned.

Thanks for reading and happy coding!

Source: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/python-global-variables-examples/

#python 

Gordon  Taylor

Gordon Taylor

1650512040

SheetJS Community Edition -- Spreadsheet Data Toolkit

SheetJS

The SheetJS Community Edition offers battle-tested open-source solutions for extracting useful data from almost any complex spreadsheet and generating new spreadsheets that will work with legacy and modern software alike.

SheetJS Pro offers solutions beyond data processing: Edit complex templates with ease; let out your inner Picasso with styling; make custom sheets with images/graphs/PivotTables; evaluate formula expressions and port calculations to web apps; automate common spreadsheet tasks, and much more!    Analytics

Getting Started

Installation

Standalone Browser Scripts

Each standalone release script is available at https://cdn.sheetjs.com/.

The current version is 0.18.6 and can be referenced as follows:

<!-- use version 0.18.6 -->
<script lang="javascript" src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

The latest tag references the latest version and updates with each release:

<!-- use the latest version -->
<script lang="javascript" src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/package/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

For production use, scripts should be downloaded and added to a public folder alongside other scripts.

Browser builds (click to show)

The complete single-file version is generated at dist/xlsx.full.min.js

dist/xlsx.core.min.js omits codepage library (no support for XLS encodings)

A slimmer build is generated at dist/xlsx.mini.min.js. Compared to full build:

  • codepage library skipped (no support for XLS encodings)
  • no support for XLSB / XLS / Lotus 1-2-3 / SpreadsheetML 2003 / Numbers
  • node stream utils removed

These scripts are also available on the CDN:

<!-- use xlsx.mini.min.js from version 0.18.6 -->
<script lang="javascript" src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/dist/xlsx.mini.min.js"></script>

Bower will pull the entire repo:

$ bower install js-xlsx

Bower will place the standalone scripts in bower_components/js-xlsx/dist/

Internet Explorer and ECMAScript 3 Compatibility (click to show)

For broad compatibility with JavaScript engines, the library is written using ECMAScript 3 language dialect as well as some ES5 features like Array#forEach. Older browsers require shims to provide missing functions.

To use the shim, add the shim before the script tag that loads xlsx.js:

<!-- add the shim first -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="shim.min.js"></script>
<!-- after the shim is referenced, add the library -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

Due to SSL certificate compatibility issues, it is highly recommended to save the Standalone and Shim scripts from https://cdn.sheetjs.com/ and add to a public directory in the site.

The script also includes IE_LoadFile and IE_SaveFile for loading and saving files in Internet Explorer versions 6-9. The xlsx.extendscript.js script bundles the shim in a format suitable for Photoshop and other Adobe products.

ECMAScript Modules

Browser ESM

The ECMAScript Module build is saved to xlsx.mjs and can be directly added to a page with a script tag using type="module":

<script type="module">
import { read, writeFileXLSX } from "https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/xlsx.mjs";

/* load the codepage support library for extended support with older formats  */
import { set_cptable } from "https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/xlsx.mjs";
import * as cptable from 'https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/dist/cpexcel.full.mjs';
set_cptable(cptable);
</script>

Frameworks (Angular, VueJS, React) and Bundlers (webpack, etc)

The NodeJS package is readily installed from the tarballs:

$ npm  install --save https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # npm
$ pnpm install --save https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # pnpm
$ yarn add     --save https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # yarn

Once installed, the library can be imported under the name xlsx:

import { read, writeFileXLSX } from "xlsx";

/* load the codepage support library for extended support with older formats  */
import { set_cptable } from "xlsx";
import * as cptable from 'xlsx/dist/cpexcel.full.mjs';
set_cptable(cptable);

Deno

xlsx.mjs can be imported in Deno:

// @deno-types="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/types/index.d.ts"
import * as XLSX from 'https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/xlsx.mjs';

/* load the codepage support library for extended support with older formats  */
import * as cptable from 'https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/dist/cpexcel.full.mjs';
XLSX.set_cptable(cptable);

NodeJS

Tarballs are available on https://cdn.sheetjs.com.

Each individual version can be referenced using a similar URL pattern. https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz is the URL for 0.18.6

https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/xlsx-latest.tgz is a link to the latest version and will refresh on each release.

Installation

Tarballs can be directly installed using a package manager:

$ npm  install https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # npm
$ pnpm install https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # pnpm
$ yarn add     https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # yarn

For general stability, "vendoring" modules is the recommended approach:

Download the tarball (xlsx-0.18.6.tgz) for the desired version. The current version is available at https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz

Create a vendor subdirectory at the root of your project and move the tarball to that folder. Add it to your project repository.

Install the tarball using a package manager:

$ npm  install --save file:vendor/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # npm
$ pnpm install --save file:vendor/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # pnpm
$ yarn add            file:vendor/xlsx-0.18.6.tgz # yarn

The package will be installed and accessible as xlsx.

Usage

By default, the module supports require and it will automatically add support for streams and filesystem access:

var XLSX = require("xlsx");

The module also ships with xlsx.mjs for use with import. The mjs version does not automatically load native node modules:

import * as XLSX from 'xlsx/xlsx.mjs';

/* load 'fs' for readFile and writeFile support */
import * as fs from 'fs';
XLSX.set_fs(fs);

/* load 'stream' for stream support */
import { Readable } from 'stream';
XLSX.stream.set_readable(Readable);

/* load the codepage support library for extended support with older formats  */
import * as cpexcel from 'xlsx/dist/cpexcel.full.mjs';
XLSX.set_cptable(cpexcel);

Photoshop and InDesign

dist/xlsx.extendscript.js is an ExtendScript build for Photoshop and InDesign. https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-0.18.6/package/dist/xlsx.extendscript.js is the current version. After downloading the script, it can be directly referenced with a #include directive:

#include "xlsx.extendscript.js"

Usage

Most scenarios involving spreadsheets and data can be broken into 5 parts:

Acquire Data: Data may be stored anywhere: local or remote files, databases, HTML TABLE, or even generated programmatically in the web browser.

Extract Data: For spreadsheet files, this involves parsing raw bytes to read the cell data. For general JS data, this involves reshaping the data.

Process Data: From generating summary statistics to cleaning data records, this step is the heart of the problem.

Package Data: This can involve making a new spreadsheet or serializing with JSON.stringify or writing XML or simply flattening data for UI tools.

Release Data: Spreadsheet files can be uploaded to a server or written locally. Data can be presented to users in an HTML TABLE or data grid.

A common problem involves generating a valid spreadsheet export from data stored in an HTML table. In this example, an HTML TABLE on the page will be scraped, a row will be added to the bottom with the date of the report, and a new file will be generated and downloaded locally. XLSX.writeFile takes care of packaging the data and attempting a local download:

// Acquire Data (reference to the HTML table)
var table_elt = document.getElementById("my-table-id");

// Extract Data (create a workbook object from the table)
var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(table_elt);

// Process Data (add a new row)
var ws = workbook.Sheets["Sheet1"];
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [["Created "+new Date().toISOString()]], {origin:-1});

// Package and Release Data (`writeFile` tries to write and save an XLSB file)
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "Report.xlsb");

This library tries to simplify steps 2 and 4 with functions to extract useful data from spreadsheet files (read / readFile) and generate new spreadsheet files from data (write / writeFile). Additional utility functions like table_to_book work with other common data sources like HTML tables.

This documentation and various demo projects cover a number of common scenarios and approaches for steps 1 and 5.

Utility functions help with step 3.

"Acquiring and Extracting Data" describes solutions for common data import scenarios.

"Packaging and Releasing Data" describes solutions for common data export scenarios.

"Processing Data" describes solutions for common workbook processing and manipulation scenarios.

"Utility Functions" details utility functions for translating JSON Arrays and other common JS structures into worksheet objects.

The Zen of SheetJS

Data processing should fit in any workflow

The library does not impose a separate lifecycle. It fits nicely in websites and apps built using any framework. The plain JS data objects play nice with Web Workers and future APIs.

JavaScript is a powerful language for data processing

The "Common Spreadsheet Format" is a simple object representation of the core concepts of a workbook. The various functions in the library provide low-level tools for working with the object.

For friendly JS processing, there are utility functions for converting parts of a worksheet to/from an Array of Arrays. The following example combines powerful JS Array methods with a network request library to download data, select the information we want and create a workbook file:

Get Data from a JSON Endpoint and Generate a Workbook (click to show)

The goal is to generate a XLSB workbook of US President names and birthdays.

Acquire Data

Raw Data

https://theunitedstates.io/congress-legislators/executive.json has the desired data. For example, John Adams:

{
  "id": { /* (data omitted) */ },
  "name": {
    "first": "John",          // <-- first name
    "last": "Adams"           // <-- last name
  },
  "bio": {
    "birthday": "1735-10-19", // <-- birthday
    "gender": "M"
  },
  "terms": [
    { "type": "viceprez", /* (other fields omitted) */ },
    { "type": "viceprez", /* (other fields omitted) */ },
    { "type": "prez", /* (other fields omitted) */ } // <-- look for "prez"
  ]
}

Filtering for Presidents

The dataset includes Aaron Burr, a Vice President who was never President!

Array#filter creates a new array with the desired rows. A President served at least one term with type set to "prez". To test if a particular row has at least one "prez" term, Array#some is another native JS function. The complete filter would be:

const prez = raw_data.filter(row => row.terms.some(term => term.type === "prez"));

Lining up the data

For this example, the name will be the first name combined with the last name (row.name.first + " " + row.name.last) and the birthday will be the subfield row.bio.birthday. Using Array#map, the dataset can be massaged in one call:

const rows = prez.map(row => ({
  name: row.name.first + " " + row.name.last,
  birthday: row.bio.birthday
}));

The result is an array of "simple" objects with no nesting:

[
  { name: "George Washington", birthday: "1732-02-22" },
  { name: "John Adams", birthday: "1735-10-19" },
  // ... one row per President
]

Extract Data

With the cleaned dataset, XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet generates a worksheet:

const worksheet = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet(rows);

XLSX.utils.book_new creates a new workbook and XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet appends a worksheet to the workbook. The new worksheet will be called "Dates":

const workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, "Dates");

Process Data

Fixing headers

By default, json_to_sheet creates a worksheet with a header row. In this case, the headers come from the JS object keys: "name" and "birthday".

The headers are in cells A1 and B1. XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa can write text values to the existing worksheet starting at cell A1:

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [["Name", "Birthday"]], { origin: "A1" });

Fixing Column Widths

Some of the names are longer than the default column width. Column widths are set by setting the "!cols" worksheet property.

The following line sets the width of column A to approximately 10 characters:

worksheet["!cols"] = [ { wch: 10 } ]; // set column A width to 10 characters

One Array#reduce call over rows can calculate the maximum width:

const max_width = rows.reduce((w, r) => Math.max(w, r.name.length), 10);
worksheet["!cols"] = [ { wch: max_width } ];

Note: If the starting point was a file or HTML table, XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json will generate an array of JS objects.

Package and Release Data

XLSX.writeFile creates a spreadsheet file and tries to write it to the system. In the browser, it will try to prompt the user to download the file. In NodeJS, it will write to the local directory.

XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "Presidents.xlsx");

Complete Example

// Uncomment the next line for use in NodeJS:
// const XLSX = require("xlsx"), axios = require("axios");

(async() => {
  /* fetch JSON data and parse */
  const url = "https://theunitedstates.io/congress-legislators/executive.json";
  const raw_data = (await axios(url, {responseType: "json"})).data;

  /* filter for the Presidents */
  const prez = raw_data.filter(row => row.terms.some(term => term.type === "prez"));

  /* flatten objects */
  const rows = prez.map(row => ({
    name: row.name.first + " " + row.name.last,
    birthday: row.bio.birthday
  }));

  /* generate worksheet and workbook */
  const worksheet = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet(rows);
  const workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();
  XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, "Dates");

  /* fix headers */
  XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [["Name", "Birthday"]], { origin: "A1" });

  /* calculate column width */
  const max_width = rows.reduce((w, r) => Math.max(w, r.name.length), 10);
  worksheet["!cols"] = [ { wch: max_width } ];

  /* create an XLSX file and try to save to Presidents.xlsx */
  XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "Presidents.xlsx");
})();

For use in the web browser, assuming the snippet is saved to snippet.js, script tags should be used to include the axios and xlsx standalone builds:

<script src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/package/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/axios/dist/axios.min.js"></script>
<script src="snippet.js"></script>

File formats are implementation details

The parser covers a wide gamut of common spreadsheet file formats to ensure that "HTML-saved-as-XLS" files work as well as actual XLS or XLSX files.

The writer supports a number of common output formats for broad compatibility with the data ecosystem.

To the greatest extent possible, data processing code should not have to worry about the specific file formats involved.

JS Ecosystem Demos

The demos directory includes sample projects for:

Frameworks and APIs

Bundlers and Tooling

Platforms and Integrations

Other examples are included in the showcase.

https://sheetjs.com/demos/modify.html shows a complete example of reading, modifying, and writing files.

https://github.com/SheetJS/sheetjs/blob/HEAD/bin/xlsx.njs is the command-line tool included with node installations, reading spreadsheet files and exporting the contents in various formats.

Acquiring and Extracting Data

Parsing Workbooks

API

Extract data from spreadsheet bytes

var workbook = XLSX.read(data, opts);

The read method can extract data from spreadsheet bytes stored in a JS string, "binary string", NodeJS buffer or typed array (Uint8Array or ArrayBuffer).

Read spreadsheet bytes from a local file and extract data

var workbook = XLSX.readFile(filename, opts);

The readFile method attempts to read a spreadsheet file at the supplied path. Browsers generally do not allow reading files in this way (it is deemed a security risk), and attempts to read files in this way will throw an error.

The second opts argument is optional. "Parsing Options" covers the supported properties and behaviors.

Examples

Here are a few common scenarios (click on each subtitle to see the code):

Local file in a NodeJS server (click to show)

readFile uses fs.readFileSync under the hood:

var XLSX = require("xlsx");

var workbook = XLSX.readFile("test.xlsx");

For Node ESM, the readFile helper is not enabled. Instead, fs.readFileSync should be used to read the file data as a Buffer for use with XLSX.read:

import { readFileSync } from "fs";
import { read } from "xlsx/xlsx.mjs";

const buf = readFileSync("test.xlsx");
/* buf is a Buffer */
const workbook = read(buf);

Local file in a Deno application (click to show)

readFile uses Deno.readFileSync under the hood:

// @deno-types="https://deno.land/x/sheetjs/types/index.d.ts"
import * as XLSX from 'https://deno.land/x/sheetjs/xlsx.mjs'

const workbook = XLSX.readFile("test.xlsx");

Applications reading files must be invoked with the --allow-read flag. The deno demo has more examples

User-submitted file in a web page ("Drag-and-Drop") (click to show)

For modern websites targeting Chrome 76+, File#arrayBuffer is recommended:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

async function handleDropAsync(e) {
  e.stopPropagation(); e.preventDefault();
  const f = e.dataTransfer.files[0];
  /* f is a File */
  const data = await f.arrayBuffer();
  /* data is an ArrayBuffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
}
drop_dom_element.addEventListener("drop", handleDropAsync, false);

For maximal compatibility, the FileReader API should be used:

function handleDrop(e) {
  e.stopPropagation(); e.preventDefault();
  var f = e.dataTransfer.files[0];
  /* f is a File */
  var reader = new FileReader();
  reader.onload = function(e) {
    var data = e.target.result;
    /* reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file) -> data will be an ArrayBuffer */
    var workbook = XLSX.read(data);

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  };
  reader.readAsArrayBuffer(f);
}
drop_dom_element.addEventListener("drop", handleDrop, false);

https://oss.sheetjs.com/sheetjs/ demonstrates the FileReader technique.

User-submitted file with an HTML INPUT element (click to show)

Starting with an HTML INPUT element with type="file":

<input type="file" id="input_dom_element">

For modern websites targeting Chrome 76+, Blob#arrayBuffer is recommended:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

async function handleFileAsync(e) {
  const file = e.target.files[0];
  const data = await file.arrayBuffer();
  /* data is an ArrayBuffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
}
input_dom_element.addEventListener("change", handleFileAsync, false);

For broader support (including IE10+), the FileReader approach is recommended:

function handleFile(e) {
  var file = e.target.files[0];
  var reader = new FileReader();
  reader.onload = function(e) {
    var data = e.target.result;
    /* reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file) -> data will be an ArrayBuffer */
    var workbook = XLSX.read(e.target.result);

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  };
  reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file);
}
input_dom_element.addEventListener("change", handleFile, false);

The oldie demo shows an IE-compatible fallback scenario.

Fetching a file in the web browser ("Ajax") (click to show)

For modern websites targeting Chrome 42+, fetch is recommended:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

(async() => {
  const url = "http://oss.sheetjs.com/test_files/formula_stress_test.xlsx";
  const data = await (await fetch(url)).arrayBuffer();
  /* data is an ArrayBuffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
})();

For broader support, the XMLHttpRequest approach is recommended:

var url = "http://oss.sheetjs.com/test_files/formula_stress_test.xlsx";

/* set up async GET request */
var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
req.open("GET", url, true);
req.responseType = "arraybuffer";

req.onload = function(e) {
  var workbook = XLSX.read(req.response);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
};

req.send();

The xhr demo includes a longer discussion and more examples.

http://oss.sheetjs.com/sheetjs/ajax.html shows fallback approaches for IE6+.

Local file in a PhotoShop or InDesign plugin (click to show)

readFile wraps the File logic in Photoshop and other ExtendScript targets. The specified path should be an absolute path:

#include "xlsx.extendscript.js"

/* Read test.xlsx from the Documents folder */
var workbook = XLSX.readFile(Folder.myDocuments + "/test.xlsx");

The extendscript demo includes a more complex example.

Local file in an Electron app (click to show)

readFile can be used in the renderer process:

/* From the renderer process */
var XLSX = require("xlsx");

var workbook = XLSX.readFile(path);

Electron APIs have changed over time. The electron demo shows a complete example and details the required version-specific settings.

Local file in a mobile app with React Native (click to show)

The react demo includes a sample React Native app.

Since React Native does not provide a way to read files from the filesystem, a third-party library must be used. The following libraries have been tested:

The base64 encoding returns strings compatible with the base64 type:

import XLSX from "xlsx";
import { FileSystem } from "react-native-file-access";

const b64 = await FileSystem.readFile(path, "base64");
/* b64 is a base64 string */
const workbook = XLSX.read(b64, {type: "base64"});

The ascii encoding returns binary strings compatible with the binary type:

import XLSX from "xlsx";
import { readFile } from "react-native-fs";

const bstr = await readFile(path, "ascii");
/* bstr is a binary string */
const workbook = XLSX.read(bstr, {type: "binary"});

NodeJS Server File Uploads (click to show)

read can accept a NodeJS buffer. readFile can read files generated by a HTTP POST request body parser like formidable:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const http = require("http");
const formidable = require("formidable");

const server = http.createServer((req, res) => {
  const form = new formidable.IncomingForm();
  form.parse(req, (err, fields, files) => {
    /* grab the first file */
    const f = Object.entries(files)[0][1];
    const path = f.filepath;
    const workbook = XLSX.readFile(path);

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  });
}).listen(process.env.PORT || 7262);

The server demo has more advanced examples.

Download files in a NodeJS process (click to show)

Node 17.5 and 18.0 have native support for fetch:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");

const data = await (await fetch(url)).arrayBuffer();
/* data is an ArrayBuffer */
const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

For broader compatibility, third-party modules are recommended.

request requires a null encoding to yield Buffers:

var XLSX = require("xlsx");
var request = require("request");

request({url: url, encoding: null}, function(err, resp, body) {
  var workbook = XLSX.read(body);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
});

axios works the same way in browser and in NodeJS:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const axios = require("axios");

(async() => {
  const res = await axios.get(url, {responseType: "arraybuffer"});
  /* res.data is a Buffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(res.data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
})();

Download files in an Electron app (click to show)

The net module in the main process can make HTTP/HTTPS requests to external resources. Responses should be manually concatenated using Buffer.concat:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const { net } = require("electron");

const req = net.request(url);
req.on("response", (res) => {
  const bufs = []; // this array will collect all of the buffers
  res.on("data", (chunk) => { bufs.push(chunk); });
  res.on("end", () => {
    const workbook = XLSX.read(Buffer.concat(bufs));

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  });
});
req.end();

Readable Streams in NodeJS (click to show)

When dealing with Readable Streams, the easiest approach is to buffer the stream and process the whole thing at the end:

var fs = require("fs");
var XLSX = require("xlsx");

function process_RS(stream, cb) {
  var buffers = [];
  stream.on("data", function(data) { buffers.push(data); });
  stream.on("end", function() {
    var buffer = Buffer.concat(buffers);
    var workbook = XLSX.read(buffer, {type:"buffer"});

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook IN THE CALLBACK */
    cb(workbook);
  });
}

ReadableStream in the browser (click to show)

When dealing with ReadableStream, the easiest approach is to buffer the stream and process the whole thing at the end:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

async function process_RS(stream) {
  /* collect data */
  const buffers = [];
  const reader = stream.getReader();
  for(;;) {
    const res = await reader.read();
    if(res.value) buffers.push(res.value);
    if(res.done) break;
  }

  /* concat */
  const out = new Uint8Array(buffers.reduce((acc, v) => acc + v.length, 0));

  let off = 0;
  for(const u8 of arr) {
    out.set(u8, off);
    off += u8.length;
  }

  return out;
}

const data = await process_RS(stream);
/* data is Uint8Array */
const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

More detailed examples are covered in the included demos

Processing JSON and JS Data

JSON and JS data tend to represent single worksheets. This section will use a few utility functions to generate workbooks.

Create a new Workbook

var workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();

The book_new utility function creates an empty workbook with no worksheets.

Spreadsheet software generally require at least one worksheet and enforce the requirement in the user interface. This library enforces the requirement at write time, throwing errors if an empty workbook is passed to write functions.

API

Create a worksheet from an array of arrays of JS values

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet(aoa, opts);

The aoa_to_sheet utility function walks an "array of arrays" in row-major order, generating a worksheet object. The following snippet generates a sheet with cell A1 set to the string A1, cell B1 set to B1, etc:

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  ["A1", "B1", "C1"],
  ["A2", "B2", "C2"],
  ["A3", "B3", "C3"]
]);

"Array of Arrays Input" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Create a worksheet from an array of JS objects

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet(jsa, opts);

The json_to_sheet utility function walks an array of JS objects in order, generating a worksheet object. By default, it will generate a header row and one row per object in the array. The optional opts argument has settings to control the column order and header output.

"Array of Objects Input" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Examples

"Zen of SheetJS" contains a detailed example "Get Data from a JSON Endpoint and Generate a Workbook"

x-spreadsheet is an interactive data grid for previewing and modifying structured data in the web browser. The xspreadsheet demo includes a sample script with the xtos function for converting from x-spreadsheet data object to a workbook. https://oss.sheetjs.com/sheetjs/x-spreadsheet is a live demo.

Records from a database query (SQL or no-SQL) (click to show)

The database demo includes examples of working with databases and query results.

Numerical Computations with TensorFlow.js (click to show)

@tensorflow/tfjs and other libraries expect data in simple arrays, well-suited for worksheets where each column is a data vector. That is the transpose of how most people use spreadsheets, where each row is a vector.

When recovering data from tfjs, the returned data points are stored in a typed array. An array of arrays can be constructed with loops. Array#unshift can prepend a title row before the conversion:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const tf = require('@tensorflow/tfjs');

/* suppose xs and ys are vectors (1D tensors) -> tfarr will be a typed array */
const tfdata = tf.stack([xs, ys]).transpose();
const shape = tfdata.shape;
const tfarr = tfdata.dataSync();

/* construct the array of arrays */
const aoa = [];
for(let j = 0; j < shape[0]; ++j) {
  aoa[j] = [];
  for(let i = 0; i < shape[1]; ++i) aoa[j][i] = tfarr[j * shape[1] + i];
}
/* add headers to the top */
aoa.unshift(["x", "y"]);

/* generate worksheet */
const worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet(aoa);

The array demo shows a complete example.

Processing HTML Tables

API

Create a worksheet by scraping an HTML TABLE in the page

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(dom_element, opts);

The table_to_sheet utility function takes a DOM TABLE element and iterates through the rows to generate a worksheet. The opts argument is optional. "HTML Table Input" describes the function in more detail.

Create a workbook by scraping an HTML TABLE in the page

var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(dom_element, opts);

The table_to_book utility function follows the same logic as table_to_sheet. After generating a worksheet, it creates a blank workbook and appends the spreadsheet.

The options argument supports the same options as table_to_sheet, with the addition of a sheet property to control the worksheet name. If the property is missing or no options are specified, the default name Sheet1 is used.

Examples

Here are a few common scenarios (click on each subtitle to see the code):

HTML TABLE element in a webpage (click to show)

<!-- include the standalone script and shim.  this uses the UNPKG CDN -->
<script src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/package/dist/shim.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/package/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

<!-- example table with id attribute -->
<table id="tableau">
  <tr><td>Sheet</td><td>JS</td></tr>
  <tr><td>12345</td><td>67</td></tr>
</table>

<!-- this block should appear after the table HTML and the standalone script -->
<script type="text/javascript">
  var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(document.getElementById("tableau"));

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
</script>

Multiple tables on a web page can be converted to individual worksheets:

/* create new workbook */
var workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();

/* convert table "table1" to worksheet named "Sheet1" */
var sheet1 = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(document.getElementById("table1"));
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheet1, "Sheet1");

/* convert table "table2" to worksheet named "Sheet2" */
var sheet2 = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(document.getElementById("table2"));
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheet2, "Sheet2");

/* workbook now has 2 worksheets */

Alternatively, the HTML code can be extracted and parsed:

var htmlstr = document.getElementById("tableau").outerHTML;
var workbook = XLSX.read(htmlstr, {type:"string"});

Chrome/Chromium Extension (click to show)

The chrome demo shows a complete example and details the required permissions and other settings.

In an extension, it is recommended to generate the workbook in a content script and pass the object back to the extension:

/* in the worker script */
chrome.runtime.onMessage.addListener(function(msg, sender, cb) {
  /* pass a message like { sheetjs: true } from the extension to scrape */
  if(!msg || !msg.sheetjs) return;
  /* create a new workbook */
  var workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();
  /* loop through each table element */
  var tables = document.getElementsByTagName("table")
  for(var i = 0; i < tables.length; ++i) {
    var worksheet = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(tables[i]);
    XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, "Table" + i);
  }
  /* pass back to the extension */
  return cb(workbook);
});

Server-Side HTML Tables with Headless Chrome (click to show)

The headless demo includes a complete demo to convert HTML files to XLSB workbooks. The core idea is to add the script to the page, parse the table in the page context, generate a base64 workbook and send it back for further processing:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const { readFileSync } = require("fs"), puppeteer = require("puppeteer");

const url = `https://sheetjs.com/demos/table`;

/* get the standalone build source (node_modules/xlsx/dist/xlsx.full.min.js) */
const lib = readFileSync(require.resolve("xlsx/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"), "utf8");

(async() => {
  /* start browser and go to web page */
  const browser = await puppeteer.launch();
  const page = await browser.newPage();
  await page.goto(url, {waitUntil: "networkidle2"});

  /* inject library */
  await page.addScriptTag({content: lib});

  /* this function `s5s` will be called by the script below, receiving the Base64-encoded file */
  await page.exposeFunction("s5s", async(b64) => {
    const workbook = XLSX.read(b64, {type: "base64" });

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  });

  /* generate XLSB file in webpage context and send back result */
  await page.addScriptTag({content: `
    /* call table_to_book on first table */
    var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(document.querySelector("TABLE"));

    /* generate XLSX file */
    var b64 = XLSX.write(workbook, {type: "base64", bookType: "xlsb"});

    /* call "s5s" hook exposed from the node process */
    window.s5s(b64);
  `});

  /* cleanup */
  await browser.close();
})();

Server-Side HTML Tables with Headless WebKit (click to show)

The headless demo includes a complete demo to convert HTML files to XLSB workbooks using PhantomJS. The core idea is to add the script to the page, parse the table in the page context, generate a binary workbook and send it back for further processing:

var XLSX = require('xlsx');
var page = require('webpage').create();

/* this code will be run in the page */
var code = [ "function(){",
  /* call table_to_book on first table */
  "var wb = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(document.body.getElementsByTagName('table')[0]);",

  /* generate XLSB file and return binary string */
  "return XLSX.write(wb, {type: 'binary', bookType: 'xlsb'});",
"}" ].join("");

page.open('https://sheetjs.com/demos/table', function() {
  /* Load the browser script from the UNPKG CDN */
  page.includeJs("https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/package/dist/xlsx.full.min.js", function() {
    /* The code will return an XLSB file encoded as binary string */
    var bin = page.evaluateJavaScript(code);

    var workbook = XLSX.read(bin, {type: "binary"});
    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */

    phantom.exit();
  });
});

NodeJS HTML Tables without a browser (click to show)

NodeJS does not include a DOM implementation and Puppeteer requires a hefty Chromium build. jsdom is a lightweight alternative:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const { readFileSync } = require("fs");
const { JSDOM } = require("jsdom");

/* obtain HTML string.  This example reads from test.html */
const html_str = fs.readFileSync("test.html", "utf8");
/* get first TABLE element */
const doc = new JSDOM(html_str).window.document.querySelector("table");
/* generate workbook */
const workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(doc);

Processing Data

The "Common Spreadsheet Format" is a simple object representation of the core concepts of a workbook. The utility functions work with the object representation and are intended to handle common use cases.

Modifying Workbook Structure

API

Append a Worksheet to a Workbook

XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, sheet_name);

The book_append_sheet utility function appends a worksheet to the workbook. The third argument specifies the desired worksheet name. Multiple worksheets can be added to a workbook by calling the function multiple times. If the worksheet name is already used in the workbook, it will throw an error.

Append a Worksheet to a Workbook and find a unique name

var new_name = XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, name, true);

If the fourth argument is true, the function will start with the specified worksheet name. If the sheet name exists in the workbook, a new worksheet name will be chosen by finding the name stem and incrementing the counter:

XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheetA, "Sheet2", true); // Sheet2
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheetB, "Sheet2", true); // Sheet3
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheetC, "Sheet2", true); // Sheet4
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheetD, "Sheet2", true); // Sheet5

List the Worksheet names in tab order

var wsnames = workbook.SheetNames;

The SheetNames property of the workbook object is a list of the worksheet names in "tab order". API functions will look at this array.

Replace a Worksheet in place

workbook.Sheets[sheet_name] = new_worksheet;

The Sheets property of the workbook object is an object whose keys are names and whose values are worksheet objects. By reassigning to a property of the Sheets object, the worksheet object can be changed without disrupting the rest of the worksheet structure.

Examples

Add a new worksheet to a workbook (click to show)

This example uses XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet.

var ws_name = "SheetJS";

/* Create worksheet */
var ws_data = [
  [ "S", "h", "e", "e", "t", "J", "S" ],
  [  1 ,  2 ,  3 ,  4 ,  5 ]
];
var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet(ws_data);

/* Add the worksheet to the workbook */
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(wb, ws, ws_name);

Modifying Cell Values

API

Modify a single cell value in a worksheet

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [[new_value]], { origin: address });

Modify multiple cell values in a worksheet

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, aoa, opts);

The sheet_add_aoa utility function modifies cell values in a worksheet. The first argument is the worksheet object. The second argument is an array of arrays of values. The origin key of the third argument controls where cells will be written. The following snippet sets B3=1 and E5="abc":

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [
  [1],                             // <-- Write 1 to cell B3
  ,                                // <-- Do nothing in row 4
  [/*B5*/, /*C5*/, /*D5*/, "abc"]  // <-- Write "abc" to cell E5
], { origin: "B3" });

"Array of Arrays Input" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Examples

Appending rows to a worksheet (click to show)

The special origin value -1 instructs sheet_add_aoa to start in column A of the row after the last row in the range, appending the data:

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [
  ["first row after data", 1],
  ["second row after data", 2]
], { origin: -1 });

Modifying Other Worksheet / Workbook / Cell Properties

The "Common Spreadsheet Format" section describes the object structures in greater detail.

Packaging and Releasing Data

Writing Workbooks

API

Generate spreadsheet bytes (file) from data

var data = XLSX.write(workbook, opts);

The write method attempts to package data from the workbook into a file in memory. By default, XLSX files are generated, but that can be controlled with the bookType property of the opts argument. Based on the type option, the data can be stored as a "binary string", JS string, Uint8Array or Buffer.

The second opts argument is required. "Writing Options" covers the supported properties and behaviors.

Generate and attempt to save file

XLSX.writeFile(workbook, filename, opts);

The writeFile method packages the data and attempts to save the new file. The export file format is determined by the extension of filename (SheetJS.xlsx signals XLSX export, SheetJS.xlsb signals XLSB export, etc).

The writeFile method uses platform-specific APIs to initiate the file save. In NodeJS, fs.readFileSync can create a file. In the web browser, a download is attempted using the HTML5 download attribute, with fallbacks for IE.

Generate and attempt to save an XLSX file

XLSX.writeFileXLSX(workbook, filename, opts);

The writeFile method embeds a number of different export functions. This is great for developer experience but not amenable to tree shaking using the current developer tools. When only XLSX exports are needed, this method avoids referencing the other export functions.

The second opts argument is optional. "Writing Options" covers the supported properties and behaviors.

Examples

Local file in a NodeJS server (click to show)

writeFile uses fs.writeFileSync in server environments:

var XLSX = require("xlsx");

/* output format determined by filename */
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "out.xlsb");

For Node ESM, the writeFile helper is not enabled. Instead, fs.writeFileSync should be used to write the file data to a Buffer for use with XLSX.write:

import { writeFileSync } from "fs";
import { write } from "xlsx/xlsx.mjs";

const buf = write(workbook, {type: "buffer", bookType: "xlsb"});
/* buf is a Buffer */
const workbook = writeFileSync("out.xlsb", buf);

Local file in a Deno application (click to show)

writeFile uses Deno.writeFileSync under the hood:

// @deno-types="https://deno.land/x/sheetjs/types/index.d.ts"
import * as XLSX from 'https://deno.land/x/sheetjs/xlsx.mjs'

XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "test.xlsx");

Applications writing files must be invoked with the --allow-write flag. The deno demo has more examples

Local file in a PhotoShop or InDesign plugin (click to show)

writeFile wraps the File logic in Photoshop and other ExtendScript targets. The specified path should be an absolute path:

#include "xlsx.extendscript.js"

/* output format determined by filename */
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "out.xlsx");
/* at this point, out.xlsx is a file that you can distribute */

The extendscript demo includes a more complex example.

Download a file in the browser to the user machine (click to show)

XLSX.writeFile wraps a few techniques for triggering a file save:

  • URL browser API creates an object URL for the file, which the library uses by creating a link and forcing a click. It is supported in modern browsers.
  • msSaveBlob is an IE10+ API for triggering a file save.
  • IE_FileSave uses VBScript and ActiveX to write a file in IE6+ for Windows XP and Windows 7. The shim must be included in the containing HTML page.

There is no standard way to determine if the actual file has been downloaded.

/* output format determined by filename */
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "out.xlsb");
/* at this point, out.xlsb will have been downloaded */

Download a file in legacy browsers (click to show)

XLSX.writeFile techniques work for most modern browsers as well as older IE. For much older browsers, there are workarounds implemented by wrapper libraries.

FileSaver.js implements saveAs. Note: XLSX.writeFile will automatically call saveAs if available.

/* bookType can be any supported output type */
var wopts = { bookType:"xlsx", bookSST:false, type:"array" };

var wbout = XLSX.write(workbook,wopts);

/* the saveAs call downloads a file on the local machine */
saveAs(new Blob([wbout],{type:"application/octet-stream"}), "test.xlsx");

Downloadify uses a Flash SWF button to generate local files, suitable for environments where ActiveX is unavailable:

Downloadify.create(id,{
  /* other options are required! read the downloadify docs for more info */
  filename: "test.xlsx",
  data: function() { return XLSX.write(wb, {bookType:"xlsx", type:"base64"}); },
  append: false,
  dataType: "base64"
});

The oldie demo shows an IE-compatible fallback scenario.

Browser upload file (ajax) (click to show)

A complete example using XHR is included in the XHR demo, along with examples for fetch and wrapper libraries. This example assumes the server can handle Base64-encoded files (see the demo for a basic nodejs server):

/* in this example, send a base64 string to the server */
var wopts = { bookType:"xlsx", bookSST:false, type:"base64" };

var wbout = XLSX.write(workbook,wopts);

var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
req.open("POST", "/upload", true);
var formdata = new FormData();
formdata.append("file", "test.xlsx"); // <-- server expects `file` to hold name
formdata.append("data", wbout); // <-- `data` holds the base64-encoded data
req.send(formdata);

PhantomJS (Headless Webkit) File Generation (click to show)

The headless demo includes a complete demo to convert HTML files to XLSB workbooks using PhantomJS. PhantomJS fs.write supports writing files from the main process but has a different interface from the NodeJS fs module:

var XLSX = require('xlsx');
var fs = require('fs');

/* generate a binary string */
var bin = XLSX.write(workbook, { type:"binary", bookType: "xlsx" });
/* write to file */
fs.write("test.xlsx", bin, "wb");

Note: The section "Processing HTML Tables" shows how to generate a workbook from HTML tables in a page in "Headless WebKit".

The included demos cover mobile apps and other special deployments.

Writing Examples

Streaming Write

The streaming write functions are available in the XLSX.stream object. They take the same arguments as the normal write functions but return a NodeJS Readable Stream.

  • XLSX.stream.to_csv is the streaming version of XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv.
  • XLSX.stream.to_html is the streaming version of XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html.
  • XLSX.stream.to_json is the streaming version of XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json.

nodejs convert to CSV and write file (click to show)

var output_file_name = "out.csv";
var stream = XLSX.stream.to_csv(worksheet);
stream.pipe(fs.createWriteStream(output_file_name));

nodejs write JSON stream to screen (click to show)

/* to_json returns an object-mode stream */
var stream = XLSX.stream.to_json(worksheet, {raw:true});

/* the following stream converts JS objects to text via JSON.stringify */
var conv = new Transform({writableObjectMode:true});
conv._transform = function(obj, e, cb){ cb(null, JSON.stringify(obj) + "\n"); };

stream.pipe(conv); conv.pipe(process.stdout);

Exporting NUMBERS files (click to show)

The NUMBERS writer requires a fairly large base. The supplementary xlsx.zahl scripts provide support. xlsx.zahl.js is designed for standalone and NodeJS use, while xlsx.zahl.mjs is suitable for ESM.

Browser

<meta charset="utf8">
<script src="xlsx.full.min.js"></script>
<script src="xlsx.zahl.js"></script>
<script>
var wb = XLSX.utils.book_new(); var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  ["SheetJS", "<3","விரிதாள்"],
  [72,,"Arbeitsblätter"],
  [,62,"数据"],
  [true,false,],
]); XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(wb, ws, "Sheet1");
XLSX.writeFile(wb, "textport.numbers", {numbers: XLSX_ZAHL, compression: true});
</script>

Node

var XLSX = require("./xlsx.flow");
var XLSX_ZAHL = require("./dist/xlsx.zahl");
var wb = XLSX.utils.book_new(); var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  ["SheetJS", "<3","விரிதாள்"],
  [72,,"Arbeitsblätter"],
  [,62,"数据"],
  [true,false,],
]); XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(wb, ws, "Sheet1");
XLSX.writeFile(wb, "textport.numbers", {numbers: XLSX_ZAHL, compression: true});

Deno

import * as XLSX from './xlsx.mjs';
import XLSX_ZAHL from './dist/xlsx.zahl.mjs';

var wb = XLSX.utils.book_new(); var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  ["SheetJS", "<3","விரிதாள்"],
  [72,,"Arbeitsblätter"],
  [,62,"数据"],
  [true,false,],
]); XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(wb, ws, "Sheet1");
XLSX.writeFile(wb, "textports.numbers", {numbers: XLSX_ZAHL, compression: true});

https://github.com/sheetjs/sheetaki pipes write streams to nodejs response.

Generating JSON and JS Data

JSON and JS data tend to represent single worksheets. The utility functions in this section work with single worksheets.

The "Common Spreadsheet Format" section describes the object structure in more detail. workbook.SheetNames is an ordered list of the worksheet names. workbook.Sheets is an object whose keys are sheet names and whose values are worksheet objects.

The "first worksheet" is stored at workbook.Sheets[workbook.SheetNames[0]].

API

Create an array of JS objects from a worksheet

var jsa = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(worksheet, opts);

Create an array of arrays of JS values from a worksheet

var aoa = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(worksheet, {...opts, header: 1});

The sheet_to_json utility function walks a workbook in row-major order, generating an array of objects. The second opts argument controls a number of export decisions including the type of values (JS values or formatted text). The "JSON" section describes the argument in more detail.

By default, sheet_to_json scans the first row and uses the values as headers. With the header: 1 option, the function exports an array of arrays of values.

Examples

x-spreadsheet is an interactive data grid for previewing and modifying structured data in the web browser. The xspreadsheet demo includes a sample script with the stox function for converting from a workbook to x-spreadsheet data object. https://oss.sheetjs.com/sheetjs/x-spreadsheet is a live demo.

Previewing data in a React data grid (click to show)

react-data-grid is a data grid tailored for react. It expects two properties: rows of data objects and columns which describe the columns. For the purposes of massaging the data to fit the react data grid API it is easiest to start from an array of arrays.

This demo starts by fetching a remote file and using XLSX.read to extract:

import { useEffect, useState } from "react";
import DataGrid from "react-data-grid";
import { read, utils } from "xlsx";

const url = "https://oss.sheetjs.com/test_files/RkNumber.xls";

export default function App() {
  const [columns, setColumns] = useState([]);
  const [rows, setRows] = useState([]);
  useEffect(() => {(async () => {
    const wb = read(await (await fetch(url)).arrayBuffer(), { WTF: 1 });

    /* use sheet_to_json with header: 1 to generate an array of arrays */
    const data = utils.sheet_to_json(wb.Sheets[wb.SheetNames[0]], { header: 1 });

    /* see react-data-grid docs to understand the shape of the expected data */
    setColumns(data[0].map((r) => ({ key: r, name: r })));
    setRows(data.slice(1).map((r) => r.reduce((acc, x, i) => {
      acc[data[0][i]] = x;
      return acc;
    }, {})));
  })(); });

  return <DataGrid columns={columns} rows={rows} />;
}

Previewing data in a VueJS data grid (click to show)

vue3-table-lite is a simple VueJS 3 data table. It is featured in the VueJS demo.

Populating a database (SQL or no-SQL) (click to show)

The database demo includes examples of working with databases and query results.

Numerical Computations with TensorFlow.js (click to show)

@tensorflow/tfjs and other libraries expect data in simple arrays, well-suited for worksheets where each column is a data vector. That is the transpose of how most people use spreadsheets, where each row is a vector.

A single Array#map can pull individual named rows from sheet_to_json export:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const tf = require('@tensorflow/tfjs');

const key = "age"; // this is the field we want to pull
const ages = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(worksheet).map(r => r[key]);
const tf_data = tf.tensor1d(ages);

All fields can be processed at once using a transpose of the 2D tensor generated with the sheet_to_json export with header: 1. The first row, if it contains header labels, should be removed with a slice:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const tf = require('@tensorflow/tfjs');

/* array of arrays of the data starting on the second row */
const aoa = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(worksheet, {header: 1}).slice(1);
/* dataset in the "correct orientation" */
const tf_dataset = tf.tensor2d(aoa).transpose();
/* pull out each dataset with a slice */
const tf_field0 = tf_dataset.slice([0,0], [1,tensor.shape[1]]).flatten();
const tf_field1 = tf_dataset.slice([1,0], [1,tensor.shape[1]]).flatten();

The array demo shows a complete example.

Generating HTML Tables

API

Generate HTML Table from Worksheet

var html = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(worksheet);

The sheet_to_html utility function generates HTML code based on the worksheet data. Each cell in the worksheet is mapped to a <TD> element. Merged cells in the worksheet are serialized by setting colspan and rowspan attributes.

Examples

The sheet_to_html utility function generates HTML code that can be added to any DOM element by setting the innerHTML:

var container = document.getElementById("tavolo");
container.innerHTML = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(worksheet);

Combining with fetch, constructing a site from a workbook is straightforward:

Vanilla JS + HTML fetch workbook and generate table previews (click to show)

<body>
  <style>TABLE { border-collapse: collapse; } TD { border: 1px solid; }</style>
  <div id="tavolo"></div>
  <script src="https://cdn.sheetjs.com/xlsx-latest/package/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript">
(async() => {
  /* fetch and parse workbook -- see the fetch example for details */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(await (await fetch("sheetjs.xlsx")).arrayBuffer());

  let output = [];
  /* loop through the worksheet names in order */
  workbook.SheetNames.forEach(name => {

    /* generate HTML from the corresponding worksheets */
    const worksheet = workbook.Sheets[name];
    const html = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(worksheet);

    /* add a header with the title name followed by the table */
    output.push(`<H3>${name}</H3>${html}`);
  });
  /* write to the DOM at the end */
  tavolo.innerHTML = output.join("\n");
})();
  </script>
</body>

React fetch workbook and generate HTML table previews (click to show)

It is generally recommended to use a React-friendly workflow, but it is possible to generate HTML and use it in React with dangerouslySetInnerHTML:

function Tabeller(props) {
  /* the workbook object is the state */
  const [workbook, setWorkbook] = React.useState(XLSX.utils.book_new());

  /* fetch and update the workbook with an effect */
  React.useEffect(() => { (async() => {
    /* fetch and parse workbook -- see the fetch example for details */
    const wb = XLSX.read(await (await fetch("sheetjs.xlsx")).arrayBuffer());
    setWorkbook(wb);
  })(); });

  return workbook.SheetNames.map(name => (<>
    <h3>name</h3>
    <div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{
      /* this __html mantra is needed to set the inner HTML */
      __html: XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(workbook.Sheets[name])
    }} />
  </>));
}

The react demo includes more React examples.

VueJS fetch workbook and generate HTML table previews (click to show)

It is generally recommended to use a VueJS-friendly workflow, but it is possible to generate HTML and use it in VueJS with the v-html directive:

import { read, utils } from 'xlsx';
import { reactive } from 'vue';

const S5SComponent = {
  mounted() { (async() => {
    /* fetch and parse workbook -- see the fetch example for details */
    const workbook = read(await (await fetch("sheetjs.xlsx")).arrayBuffer());
    /* loop through the worksheet names in order */
    workbook.SheetNames.forEach(name => {
      /* generate HTML from the corresponding worksheets */
      const html = utils.sheet_to_html(workbook.Sheets[name]);
      /* add to state */
      this.wb.wb.push({ name, html });
    });
  })(); },
  /* this state mantra is required for array updates to work */
  setup() { return { wb: reactive({ wb: [] }) }; },
  template: `
  <div v-for="ws in wb.wb" :key="ws.name">
    <h3>{{ ws.name }}</h3>
    <div v-html="ws.html"></div>
  </div>`
};

The vuejs demo includes more React examples.

Generating Single-Worksheet Snapshots

The sheet_to_* functions accept a worksheet object.

API

Generate a CSV from a single worksheet

var csv = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(worksheet, opts);

This snapshot is designed to replicate the "CSV UTF8 (.csv)" output type. "Delimiter-Separated Output" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Generate "Text" from a single worksheet

var txt = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_txt(worksheet, opts);

This snapshot is designed to replicate the "UTF16 Text (.txt)" output type. "Delimiter-Separated Output" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Generate a list of formulae from a single worksheet

var fmla = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_formulae(worksheet);

This snapshot generates an array of entries representing the embedded formulae. Array formulae are rendered in the form range=formula while plain cells are rendered in the form cell=formula or value. String literals are prefixed with an apostrophe ', consistent with Excel's formula bar display.

"Formulae Output" describes the function in more detail.

Interface

XLSX is the exposed variable in the browser and the exported node variable

XLSX.version is the version of the library (added by the build script).

XLSX.SSF is an embedded version of the format library.

Parsing functions

XLSX.read(data, read_opts) attempts to parse data.

XLSX.readFile(filename, read_opts) attempts to read filename and parse.

Parse options are described in the Parsing Options section.

Writing functions

XLSX.write(wb, write_opts) attempts to write the workbook wb

XLSX.writeFile(wb, filename, write_opts) attempts to write wb to filename. In browser-based environments, it will attempt to force a client-side download.

XLSX.writeFileAsync(filename, wb, o, cb) attempts to write wb to filename. If o is omitted, the writer will use the third argument as the callback.

XLSX.stream contains a set of streaming write functions.

Write options are described in the Writing Options section.

Utilities

Utilities are available in the XLSX.utils object and are described in the Utility Functions section:

Constructing:

  • book_new creates an empty workbook
  • book_append_sheet adds a worksheet to a workbook

Importing:

  • aoa_to_sheet converts an array of arrays of JS data to a worksheet.
  • json_to_sheet converts an array of JS objects to a worksheet.
  • table_to_sheet converts a DOM TABLE element to a worksheet.
  • sheet_add_aoa adds an array of arrays of JS data to an existing worksheet.
  • sheet_add_json adds an array of JS objects to an existing worksheet.

Exporting:

  • sheet_to_json converts a worksheet object to an array of JSON objects.
  • sheet_to_csv generates delimiter-separated-values output.
  • sheet_to_txt generates UTF16 formatted text.
  • sheet_to_html generates HTML output.
  • sheet_to_formulae generates a list of the formulae (with value fallbacks).

Cell and cell address manipulation:

  • format_cell generates the text value for a cell (using number formats).
  • encode_row / decode_row converts between 0-indexed rows and 1-indexed rows.
  • encode_col / decode_col converts between 0-indexed columns and column names.
  • encode_cell / decode_cell converts cell addresses.
  • encode_range / decode_range converts cell ranges.

Common Spreadsheet Format

SheetJS conforms to the Common Spreadsheet Format (CSF):

General Structures

Cell address objects are stored as {c:C, r:R} where C and R are 0-indexed column and row numbers, respectively. For example, the cell address B5 is represented by the object {c:1, r:4}.

Cell range objects are stored as {s:S, e:E} where S is the first cell and E is the last cell in the range. The ranges are inclusive. For example, the range A3:B7 is represented by the object {s:{c:0, r:2}, e:{c:1, r:6}}. Utility functions perform a row-major order walk traversal of a sheet range:

for(var R = range.s.r; R <= range.e.r; ++R) {
  for(var C = range.s.c; C <= range.e.c; ++C) {
    var cell_address = {c:C, r:R};
    /* if an A1-style address is needed, encode the address */
    var cell_ref = XLSX.utils.encode_cell(cell_address);
  }
}

Cell Object

Cell objects are plain JS objects with keys and values following the convention:

KeyDescription
vraw value (see Data Types section for more info)
wformatted text (if applicable)
ttype: b Boolean, e Error, n Number, d Date, s Text, z Stub
fcell formula encoded as an A1-style string (if applicable)
Frange of enclosing array if formula is array formula (if applicable)
Dif true, array formula is dynamic (if applicable)
rrich text encoding (if applicable)
hHTML rendering of the rich text (if applicable)
ccomments associated with the cell
znumber format string associated with the cell (if requested)
lcell hyperlink object (.Target holds link, .Tooltip is tooltip)
sthe style/theme of the cell (if applicable)

Built-in export utilities (such as the CSV exporter) will use the w text if it is available. To change a value, be sure to delete cell.w (or set it to undefined) before attempting to export. The utilities will regenerate the w text from the number format (cell.z) and the raw value if possible.

The actual array formula is stored in the f field of the first cell in the array range. Other cells in the range will omit the f field.

Data Types

The raw value is stored in the v value property, interpreted based on the t type property. This separation allows for representation of numbers as well as numeric text. There are 6 valid cell types:

TypeDescription
bBoolean: value interpreted as JS boolean
eError: value is a numeric code and w property stores common name **
nNumber: value is a JS number **
dDate: value is a JS Date object or string to be parsed as Date **
sText: value interpreted as JS string and written as text **
zStub: blank stub cell that is ignored by data processing utilities **

Error values and interpretation (click to show)

ValueError Meaning
0x00#NULL!
0x07#DIV/0!
0x0F#VALUE!
0x17#REF!
0x1D#NAME?
0x24#NUM!
0x2A#N/A
0x2B#GETTING_DATA

Type n is the Number type. This includes all forms of data that Excel stores as numbers, such as dates/times and Boolean fields. Excel exclusively uses data that can be fit in an IEEE754 floating point number, just like JS Number, so the v field holds the raw number. The w field holds formatted text. Dates are stored as numbers by default and converted with XLSX.SSF.parse_date_code.

Type d is the Date type, generated only when the option cellDates is passed. Since JSON does not have a natural Date type, parsers are generally expected to store ISO 8601 Date strings like you would get from date.toISOString(). On the other hand, writers and exporters should be able to handle date strings and JS Date objects. Note that Excel disregards timezone modifiers and treats all dates in the local timezone. The library does not correct for this error.

Type s is the String type. Values are explicitly stored as text. Excel will interpret these cells as "number stored as text". Generated Excel files automatically suppress that class of error, but other formats may elicit errors.

Type z represents blank stub cells. They are generated in cases where cells have no assigned value but hold comments or other metadata. They are ignored by the core library data processing utility functions. By default these cells are not generated; the parser sheetStubs option must be set to true.

Dates

Excel Date Code details (click to show)

By default, Excel stores dates as numbers with a format code that specifies date processing. For example, the date 19-Feb-17 is stored as the number 42785 with a number format of d-mmm-yy. The SSF module understands number formats and performs the appropriate conversion.

XLSX also supports a special date type d where the data is an ISO 8601 date string. The formatter converts the date back to a number.

The default behavior for all parsers is to generate number cells. Setting cellDates to true will force the generators to store dates.

Time Zones and Dates (click to show)

Excel has no native concept of universal time. All times are specified in the local time zone. Excel limitations prevent specifying true absolute dates.

Following Excel, this library treats all dates as relative to local time zone.

Epochs: 1900 and 1904 (click to show)

Excel supports two epochs (January 1 1900 and January 1 1904). The workbook's epoch can be determined by examining the workbook's wb.Workbook.WBProps.date1904 property:

!!(((wb.Workbook||{}).WBProps||{}).date1904)

Sheet Objects

Each key that does not start with ! maps to a cell (using A-1 notation)

sheet[address] returns the cell object for the specified address.

Special sheet keys (accessible as sheet[key], each starting with !):

sheet['!ref']: A-1 based range representing the sheet range. Functions that work with sheets should use this parameter to determine the range. Cells that are assigned outside of the range are not processed. In particular, when writing a sheet by hand, cells outside of the range are not included

Functions that handle sheets should test for the presence of !ref field. If the !ref is omitted or is not a valid range, functions are free to treat the sheet as empty or attempt to guess the range. The standard utilities that ship with this library treat sheets as empty (for example, the CSV output is empty string).

When reading a worksheet with the sheetRows property set, the ref parameter will use the restricted range. The original range is set at ws['!fullref']

sheet['!margins']: Object representing the page margins. The default values follow Excel's "normal" preset. Excel also has a "wide" and a "narrow" preset but they are stored as raw measurements. The main properties are listed below:

Page margin details (click to show)

keydescription"normal""wide""narrow"
leftleft margin (inches)0.71.00.25
rightright margin (inches)0.71.00.25
toptop margin (inches)0.751.00.75
bottombottom margin (inches)0.751.00.75
headerheader margin (inches)0.30.50.3
footerfooter margin (inches)0.30.50.3
/* Set worksheet sheet to "normal" */
ws["!margins"]={left:0.7, right:0.7, top:0.75,bottom:0.75,header:0.3,footer:0.3}
/* Set worksheet sheet to "wide" */
ws["!margins"]={left:1.0, right:1.0, top:1.0, bottom:1.0, header:0.5,footer:0.5}
/* Set worksheet sheet to "narrow" */
ws["!margins"]={left:0.25,right:0.25,top:0.75,bottom:0.75,header:0.3,footer:0.3}

Worksheet Object

In addition to the base sheet keys, worksheets also add:

ws['!cols']: array of column properties objects. Column widths are actually stored in files in a normalized manner, measured in terms of the "Maximum Digit Width" (the largest width of the rendered digits 0-9, in pixels). When parsed, the column objects store the pixel width in the wpx field, character width in the wch field, and the maximum digit width in the MDW field.

ws['!rows']: array of row properties objects as explained later in the docs. Each row object encodes properties including row height and visibility.

ws['!merges']: array of range objects corresponding to the merged cells in the worksheet. Plain text formats do not support merge cells. CSV export will write all cells in the merge range if they exist, so be sure that only the first cell (upper-left) in the range is set.

ws['!outline']: configure how outlines should behave. Options default to the default settings in Excel 2019:

keyExcel featuredefault
aboveUncheck "Summary rows below detail"false
leftUncheck "Summary rows to the right of detail"false
  • ws['!protect']: object of write sheet protection properties. The password key specifies the password for formats that support password-protected sheets (XLSX/XLSB/XLS). The writer uses the XOR obfuscation method. The following keys control the sheet protection -- set to false to enable a feature when sheet is locked or set to true to disable a feature:

Worksheet Protection Details (click to show)

keyfeature (true=disabled / false=enabled)default
selectLockedCellsSelect locked cellsenabled
selectUnlockedCellsSelect unlocked cellsenabled
formatCellsFormat cellsdisabled
formatColumnsFormat columnsdisabled
formatRowsFormat rowsdisabled
insertColumnsInsert columnsdisabled
insertRowsInsert rowsdisabled
insertHyperlinksInsert hyperlinksdisabled
deleteColumnsDelete columnsdisabled
deleteRowsDelete rowsdisabled
sortSortdisabled
autoFilterFilterdisabled
pivotTablesUse PivotTable reportsdisabled
objectsEdit objectsenabled
scenariosEdit scenariosenabled
  • ws['!autofilter']: AutoFilter object following the schema:
type AutoFilter = {
  ref:string; // A-1 based range representing the AutoFilter table range
}

Chartsheet Object

Chartsheets are represented as standard sheets. They are distinguished with the !type property set to "chart".

The underlying data and !ref refer to the cached data in the chartsheet. The first row of the chartsheet is the underlying header.

Macrosheet Object

Macrosheets are represented as standard sheets. They are distinguished with the !type property set to "macro".

Dialogsheet Object

Dialogsheets are represented as standard sheets. They are distinguished with the !type property set to "dialog".

Workbook Object

workbook.SheetNames is an ordered list of the sheets in the workbook

wb.Sheets[sheetname] returns an object representing the worksheet.

wb.Props is an object storing the standard properties. wb.Custprops stores custom properties. Since the XLS standard properties deviate from the XLSX standard, XLS parsing stores core properties in both places.

wb.Workbook stores workbook-level attributes.

Workbook File Properties

The various file formats use different internal names for file properties. The workbook Props object normalizes the names:

File Properties (click to show)

JS NameExcel Description
TitleSummary tab "Title"
SubjectSummary tab "Subject"
AuthorSummary tab "Author"
ManagerSummary tab "Manager"
CompanySummary tab "Company"
CategorySummary tab "Category"
KeywordsSummary tab "Keywords"
CommentsSummary tab "Comments"
LastAuthorStatistics tab "Last saved by"
CreatedDateStatistics tab "Created"

For example, to set the workbook title property:

if(!wb.Props) wb.Props = {};
wb.Props.Title = "Insert Title Here";

Custom properties are added in the workbook Custprops object:

if(!wb.Custprops) wb.Custprops = {};
wb.Custprops["Custom Property"] = "Custom Value";

Writers will process the Props key of the options object:

/* force the Author to be "SheetJS" */
XLSX.write(wb, {Props:{Author:"SheetJS"}});

Workbook-Level Attributes

wb.Workbook stores workbook-level attributes.

Defined Names

wb.Workbook.Names is an array of defined name objects which have the keys:

Defined Name Properties (click to show)

KeyDescription
SheetName scope. Sheet Index (0 = first sheet) or null (Workbook)
NameCase-sensitive name. Standard rules apply **
RefA1-style Reference ("Sheet1!$A$1:$D$20")
CommentComment (only applicable for XLS/XLSX/XLSB)

Excel allows two sheet-scoped defined names to share the same name. However, a sheet-scoped name cannot collide with a workbook-scope name. Workbook writers may not enforce this constraint.

Workbook Views

wb.Workbook.Views is an array of workbook view objects which have the keys:

KeyDescription
RTLIf true, display right-to-left

Miscellaneous Workbook Properties

wb.Workbook.WBProps holds other workbook properties:

KeyDescription
CodeNameVBA Project Workbook Code Name
date1904epoch: 0/false for 1900 system, 1/true for 1904
filterPrivacyWarn or strip personally identifying info on save

Document Features

Even for basic features like date storage, the official Excel formats store the same content in different ways. The parsers are expected to convert from the underlying file format representation to the Common Spreadsheet Format. Writers are expected to convert from CSF back to the underlying file format.

Formulae

The A1-style formula string is stored in the f field. Even though different file formats store the formulae in different ways, the formats are translated. Even though some formats store formulae with a leading equal sign, CSF formulae do not start with =.

Formulae File Format Support (click to show)

Storage RepresentationFormatsReadWrite
A1-style stringsXLSX
RC-style stringsXLML and plain text
BIFF Parsed formulaeXLSB and all XLS formats 
OpenFormula formulaeODS/FODS/UOS
Lotus Parsed formulaeAll Lotus WK_ formats 

Since Excel prohibits named cells from colliding with names of A1 or RC style cell references, a (not-so-simple) regex conversion is possible. BIFF Parsed formulae and Lotus Parsed formulae have to be explicitly unwound. OpenFormula formulae can be converted with regular expressions.

Shared formulae are decompressed and each cell has the formula corresponding to its cell. Writers generally do not attempt to generate shared formulae.

Single-Cell Formulae

For simple formulae, the f key of the desired cell can be set to the actual formula text. This worksheet represents A1=1, A2=2, and A3=A1+A2:

var worksheet = {
  "!ref": "A1:A3",
  A1: { t:'n', v:1 },
  A2: { t:'n', v:2 },
  A3: { t:'n', v:3, f:'A1+A2' }
};

Utilities like aoa_to_sheet will accept cell objects in lieu of values:

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  [ 1 ], // A1
  [ 2 ], // A2
  [ {t: "n", v: 3, f: "A1+A2"} ] // A3
]);

Cells with formula entries but no value will be serialized in a way that Excel and other spreadsheet tools will recognize. This library will not automatically compute formula results! For example, the following worksheet will include the BESSELJ function but the result will not be available in JavaScript:

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  [ 3.14159, 2 ], // Row "1"
  [ { t:'n', f:'BESSELJ(A1,B1)' } ] // Row "2" will be calculated on file open
}

If the actual results are needed in JS, SheetJS Pro offers a formula calculator component for evaluating expressions, updating values and dependent cells, and refreshing entire workbooks.

Array Formulae

Assign an array formula

XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, range, formula);

Array formulae are stored in the top-left cell of the array block. All cells of an array formula have a F field corresponding to the range. A single-cell formula can be distinguished from a plain formula by the presence of F field.

For example, setting the cell C1 to the array formula {=SUM(A1:A3*B1:B3)}:

// API function
XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, "C1", "SUM(A1:A3*B1:B3)");

// ... OR raw operations
worksheet['C1'] = { t:'n', f: "SUM(A1:A3*B1:B3)", F:"C1:C1" };

For a multi-cell array formula, every cell has the same array range but only the first cell specifies the formula. Consider D1:D3=A1:A3*B1:B3:

// API function
XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, "D1:D3", "A1:A3*B1:B3");

// ... OR raw operations
worksheet['D1'] = { t:'n', F:"D1:D3", f:"A1:A3*B1:B3" };
worksheet['D2'] = { t:'n', F:"D1:D3" };
worksheet['D3'] = { t:'n', F:"D1:D3" };

Utilities and writers are expected to check for the presence of a F field and ignore any possible formula element f in cells other than the starting cell. They are not expected to perform validation of the formulae!

Dynamic Array Formulae

Assign a dynamic array formula

XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, range, formula, true);

Released in 2020, Dynamic Array Formulae are supported in the XLSX/XLSM and XLSB file formats. They are represented like normal array formulae but have special cell metadata indicating that the formula should be allowed to adjust the range.

An array formula can be marked as dynamic by setting the cell's D property to true. The F range is expected but can be the set to the current cell:

// API function
XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, "C1", "_xlfn.UNIQUE(A1:A3)", 1);

// ... OR raw operations
worksheet['C1'] = { t: "s", f: "_xlfn.UNIQUE(A1:A3)", F:"C1", D: 1 }; // dynamic

Localization with Function Names

SheetJS operates at the file level. Excel stores formula expressions using the English (United States) function names. For non-English users, Excel uses a localized set of function names.

For example, when the computer language and region is set to French (France), Excel interprets =SOMME(A1:C3) as if SOMME is the SUM function. However, in the actual file, Excel stores SUM(A1:C3).

Prefixed "Future Functions"

Functions introduced in newer versions of Excel are prefixed with _xlfn. when stored in files. When writing formula expressions using these functions, the prefix is required for maximal compatibility:

// Broadest compatibility
XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, "C1", "_xlfn.UNIQUE(A1:A3)", 1);

// Can cause errors in spreadsheet software
XLSX.utils.sheet_set_array_formula(worksheet, "C1", "UNIQUE(A1:A3)", 1);

When reading a file, the xlfn option preserves the prefixes.

Functions requiring `_xlfn.` prefix (click to show)

This list is growing with each Excel release.

ACOT
ACOTH
AGGREGATE
ARABIC
BASE
BETA.DIST
BETA.INV
BINOM.DIST
BINOM.DIST.RANGE
BINOM.INV
BITAND
BITLSHIFT
BITOR
BITRSHIFT
BITXOR
BYCOL
BYROW
CEILING.MATH
CEILING.PRECISE
CHISQ.DIST
CHISQ.DIST.RT
CHISQ.INV
CHISQ.INV.RT
CHISQ.TEST
COMBINA
CONFIDENCE.NORM
CONFIDENCE.T
COT
COTH
COVARIANCE.P
COVARIANCE.S
CSC
CSCH
DAYS
DECIMAL
ERF.PRECISE
ERFC.PRECISE
EXPON.DIST
F.DIST
F.DIST.RT
F.INV
F.INV.RT
F.TEST
FIELDVALUE
FILTERXML
FLOOR.MATH
FLOOR.PRECISE
FORMULATEXT
GAMMA
GAMMA.DIST
GAMMA.INV
GAMMALN.PRECISE
GAUSS
HYPGEOM.DIST
IFNA
IMCOSH
IMCOT
IMCSC
IMCSCH
IMSEC
IMSECH
IMSINH
IMTAN
ISFORMULA
ISOMITTED
ISOWEEKNUM
LAMBDA
LET
LOGNORM.DIST
LOGNORM.INV
MAKEARRAY
MAP
MODE.MULT
MODE.SNGL
MUNIT
NEGBINOM.DIST
NORM.DIST
NORM.INV
NORM.S.DIST
NORM.S.INV
NUMBERVALUE
PDURATION
PERCENTILE.EXC
PERCENTILE.INC
PERCENTRANK.EXC
PERCENTRANK.INC
PERMUTATIONA
PHI
POISSON.DIST
QUARTILE.EXC
QUARTILE.INC
QUERYSTRING
RANDARRAY
RANK.AVG
RANK.EQ
REDUCE
RRI
SCAN
SEC
SECH
SEQUENCE
SHEET
SHEETS
SKEW.P
SORTBY
STDEV.P
STDEV.S
T.DIST
T.DIST.2T
T.DIST.RT
T.INV
T.INV.2T
T.TEST
UNICHAR
UNICODE
UNIQUE
VAR.P
VAR.S
WEBSERVICE
WEIBULL.DIST
XLOOKUP
XOR
Z.TEST

Row and Column Properties

Format Support (click to show)

Row Properties: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML, SYLK, DOM, ODS

Column Properties: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML, SYLK, DOM

Row and Column properties are not extracted by default when reading from a file and are not persisted by default when writing to a file. The option cellStyles: true must be passed to the relevant read or write function.

Column Properties

The !cols array in each worksheet, if present, is a collection of ColInfo objects which have the following properties:

type ColInfo = {
  /* visibility */
  hidden?: boolean; // if true, the column is hidden

  /* column width is specified in one of the following ways: */
  wpx?:    number;  // width in screen pixels
  width?:  number;  // width in Excel's "Max Digit Width", width*256 is integral
  wch?:    number;  // width in characters

  /* other fields for preserving features from files */
  level?:  number;  // 0-indexed outline / group level
  MDW?:    number;  // Excel's "Max Digit Width" unit, always integral
};

Row Properties

The !rows array in each worksheet, if present, is a collection of RowInfo objects which have the following properties:

type RowInfo = {
  /* visibility */
  hidden?: boolean; // if true, the row is hidden

  /* row height is specified in one of the following ways: */
  hpx?:    number;  // height in screen pixels
  hpt?:    number;  // height in points

  level?:  number;  // 0-indexed outline / group level
};

Outline / Group Levels Convention

The Excel UI displays the base outline level as 1 and the max level as 8. Following JS conventions, SheetJS uses 0-indexed outline levels wherein the base outline level is 0 and the max level is 7.

Why are there three width types? (click to show)

There are three different width types corresponding to the three different ways spreadsheets store column widths:

SYLK and other plain text formats use raw character count. Contemporaneous tools like Visicalc and Multiplan were character based. Since the characters had the same width, it sufficed to store a count. This tradition was continued into the BIFF formats.

SpreadsheetML (2003) tried to align with HTML by standardizing on screen pixel count throughout the file. Column widths, row heights, and other measures use pixels. When the pixel and character counts do not align, Excel rounds values.

XLSX internally stores column widths in a nebulous "Max Digit Width" form. The Max Digit Width is the width of the largest digit when rendered (generally the "0" character is the widest). The internal width must be an integer multiple of the the width divided by 256. ECMA-376 describes a formula for converting between pixels and the internal width. This represents a hybrid approach.

Read functions attempt to populate all three properties. Write functions will try to cycle specified values to the desired type. In order to avoid potential conflicts, manipulation should delete the other properties first. For example, when changing the pixel width, delete the wch and width properties.

Implementation details (click to show)

Row Heights

Excel internally stores row heights in points. The default resolution is 72 DPI or 96 PPI, so the pixel and point size should agree. For different resolutions they may not agree, so the library separates the concepts.

Even though all of the information is made available, writers are expected to follow the priority order:

  1. use hpx pixel height if available
  2. use hpt point height if available

Column Widths

Given the constraints, it is possible to determine the MDW without actually inspecting the font! The parsers guess the pixel width by converting from width to pixels and back, repeating for all possible MDW and selecting the MDW that minimizes the error. XLML actually stores the pixel width, so the guess works in the opposite direction.

Even though all of the information is made available, writers are expected to follow the priority order:

  1. use width field if available
  2. use wpx pixel width if available
  3. use wch character count if available

Number Formats

The cell.w formatted text for each cell is produced from cell.v and cell.z format. If the format is not specified, the Excel General format is used. The format can either be specified as a string or as an index into the format table. Parsers are expected to populate workbook.SSF with the number format table. Writers are expected to serialize the table.

Custom tools should ensure that the local table has each used format string somewhere in the table. Excel convention mandates that the custom formats start at index 164. The following example creates a custom format from scratch:

New worksheet with custom format (click to show)

var wb = {
  SheetNames: ["Sheet1"],
  Sheets: {
    Sheet1: {
      "!ref":"A1:C1",
      A1: { t:"n", v:10000 },                    // <-- General format
      B1: { t:"n", v:10000, z: "0%" },           // <-- Builtin format
      C1: { t:"n", v:10000, z: "\"T\"\ #0.00" }  // <-- Custom format
    }
  }
}

The rules are slightly different from how Excel displays custom number formats. In particular, literal characters must be wrapped in double quotes or preceded by a backslash. For more info, see the Excel documentation article Create or delete a custom number format or ECMA-376 18.8.31 (Number Formats)

Default Number Formats (click to show)

The default formats are listed in ECMA-376 18.8.30:

IDFormat
0General
10
20.00
3#,##0
4#,##0.00
90%
100.00%
110.00E+00
12# ?/?
13# ??/??
14m/d/yy (see below)
15d-mmm-yy
16d-mmm
17mmm-yy
18h:mm AM/PM
19h:mm:ss AM/PM
20h:mm
21h:mm:ss
22m/d/yy h:mm
37#,##0 ;(#,##0)
38#,##0 ;[Red](#,##0)
39#,##0.00;(#,##0.00)
40#,##0.00;[Red](#,##0.00)
45mm:ss
46[h]:mm:ss
47mmss.0
48##0.0E+0
49@

Format 14 (m/d/yy) is localized by Excel: even though the file specifies that number format, it will be drawn differently based on system settings. It makes sense when the producer and consumer of files are in the same locale, but that is not always the case over the Internet. To get around this ambiguity, parse functions accept the dateNF option to override the interpretation of that specific format string.

Hyperlinks

Format Support (click to show)

Cell Hyperlinks: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML, ODS

Tooltips: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML

Hyperlinks are stored in the l key of cell objects. The Target field of the hyperlink object is the target of the link, including the URI fragment. Tooltips are stored in the Tooltip field and are displayed when you move your mouse over the text.

For example, the following snippet creates a link from cell A3 to https://sheetjs.com with the tip "Find us @ SheetJS.com!":

ws['A1'].l = { Target:"https://sheetjs.com", Tooltip:"Find us @ SheetJS.com!" };

Note that Excel does not automatically style hyperlinks -- they will generally be displayed as normal text.

Remote Links

HTTP / HTTPS links can be used directly:

ws['A2'].l = { Target:"https://docs.sheetjs.com/#hyperlinks" };
ws['A3'].l = { Target:"http://localhost:7262/yes_localhost_works" };

Excel also supports mailto email links with subject line:

ws['A4'].l = { Target:"mailto:ignored@dev.null" };
ws['A5'].l = { Target:"mailto:ignored@dev.null?subject=Test Subject" };

Local Links

Links to absolute paths should use the file:// URI scheme:

ws['B1'].l = { Target:"file:///SheetJS/t.xlsx" }; /* Link to /SheetJS/t.xlsx */
ws['B2'].l = { Target:"file:///c:/SheetJS.xlsx" }; /* Link to c:\SheetJS.xlsx */

Links to relative paths can be specified without a scheme:

ws['B3'].l = { Target:"SheetJS.xlsb" }; /* Link to SheetJS.xlsb */
ws['B4'].l = { Target:"../SheetJS.xlsm" }; /* Link to ../SheetJS.xlsm */

Relative Paths have undefined behavior in the SpreadsheetML 2003 format. Excel 2019 will treat a ..\ parent mark as two levels up.

Internal Links

Links where the target is a cell or range or defined name in the same workbook ("Internal Links") are marked with a leading hash character:

ws['C1'].l = { Target:"#E2" }; /* Link to cell E2 */
ws['C2'].l = { Target:"#Sheet2!E2" }; /* Link to cell E2 in sheet Sheet2 */
ws['C3'].l = { Target:"#SomeDefinedName" }; /* Link to Defined Name */

Cell Comments

Cell comments are objects stored in the c array of cell objects. The actual contents of the comment are split into blocks based on the comment author. The a field of each comment object is the author of the comment and the t field is the plain text representation.

For example, the following snippet appends a cell comment into cell A1:

if(!ws.A1.c) ws.A1.c = [];
ws.A1.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"I'm a little comment, short and stout!"});

Note: XLSB enforces a 54 character limit on the Author name. Names longer than 54 characters may cause issues with other formats.

To mark a comment as normally hidden, set the hidden property:

if(!ws.A1.c) ws.A1.c = [];
ws.A1.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"This comment is visible"});

if(!ws.A2.c) ws.A2.c = [];
ws.A2.c.hidden = true;
ws.A2.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"This comment will be hidden"});

Threaded Comments

Introduced in Excel 365, threaded comments are plain text comment snippets with author metadata and parent references. They are supported in XLSX and XLSB.

To mark a comment as threaded, each comment part must have a true T property:

if(!ws.A1.c) ws.A1.c = [];
ws.A1.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"This is not threaded"});

if(!ws.A2.c) ws.A2.c = [];
ws.A2.c.hidden = true;
ws.A2.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"This is threaded", T: true});
ws.A2.c.push({a:"JSSheet", t:"This is also threaded", T: true});

There is no Active Directory or Office 365 metadata associated with authors in a thread.

Sheet Visibility

Excel enables hiding sheets in the lower tab bar. The sheet data is stored in the file but the UI does not readily make it available. Standard hidden sheets are revealed in the "Unhide" menu. Excel also has "very hidden" sheets which cannot be revealed in the menu. It is only accessible in the VB Editor!

The visibility setting is stored in the Hidden property of sheet props array.

More details (click to show)

ValueDefinition
0Visible
1Hidden
2Very Hidden

With https://rawgit.com/SheetJS/test_files/HEAD/sheet_visibility.xlsx:

> wb.Workbook.Sheets.map(function(x) { return [x.name, x.Hidden] })
[ [ 'Visible', 0 ], [ 'Hidden', 1 ], [ 'VeryHidden', 2 ] ]

Non-Excel formats do not support the Very Hidden state. The best way to test if a sheet is visible is to check if the Hidden property is logical truth:

> wb.Workbook.Sheets.map(function(x) { return [x.name, !x.Hidden] })
[ [ 'Visible', true ], [ 'Hidden', false ], [ 'VeryHidden', false ] ]

VBA and Macros

VBA Macros are stored in a special data blob that is exposed in the vbaraw property of the workbook object when the bookVBA option is true. They are supported in XLSM, XLSB, and BIFF8 XLS formats. The supported format writers automatically insert the data blobs if it is present in the workbook and associate with the worksheet names.

Custom Code Names (click to show)

The workbook code name is stored in wb.Workbook.WBProps.CodeName. By default, Excel will write ThisWorkbook or a translated phrase like DieseArbeitsmappe. Worksheet and Chartsheet code names are in the worksheet properties object at wb.Workbook.Sheets[i].CodeName. Macrosheets and Dialogsheets are ignored.

The readers and writers preserve the code names, but they have to be manually set when adding a VBA blob to a different workbook.

Macrosheets (click to show)

Older versions of Excel also supported a non-VBA "macrosheet" sheet type that stored automation commands. These are exposed in objects with the !type property set to "macro".

Detecting macros in workbooks (click to show)

The vbaraw field will only be set if macros are present, so testing is simple:

function wb_has_macro(wb/*:workbook*/)/*:boolean*/ {
    if(!!wb.vbaraw) return true;
    const sheets = wb.SheetNames.map((n) => wb.Sheets[n]);
    return sheets.some((ws) => !!ws && ws['!type']=='macro');
}

Parsing Options

The exported read and readFile functions accept an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
type Input data encoding (see Input Type below)
rawfalseIf true, plain text parsing will not parse values **
codepage If specified, use code page when appropriate **
cellFormulatrueSave formulae to the .f field
cellHTMLtrueParse rich text and save HTML to the .h field
cellNFfalseSave number format string to the .z field
cellStylesfalseSave style/theme info to the .s field
cellTexttrueGenerated formatted text to the .w field
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
dateNF If specified, use the string for date code 14 **
sheetStubsfalseCreate cell objects of type z for stub cells
sheetRows0If >0, read the first sheetRows rows **
bookDepsfalseIf true, parse calculation chains
bookFilesfalseIf true, add raw files to book object **
bookPropsfalseIf true, only parse enough to get book metadata **
bookSheetsfalseIf true, only parse enough to get the sheet names
bookVBAfalseIf true, copy VBA blob to vbaraw field **
password""If defined and file is encrypted, use password **
WTFfalseIf true, throw errors on unexpected file features **
sheets If specified, only parse specified sheets **
PRNfalseIf true, allow parsing of PRN files **
xlfnfalseIf true, preserve _xlfn. prefixes in formulae **
FS DSV Field Separator override
  • Even if cellNF is false, formatted text will be generated and saved to .w
  • In some cases, sheets may be parsed even if bookSheets is false.
  • Excel aggressively tries to interpret values from CSV and other plain text. This leads to surprising behavior! The raw option suppresses value parsing.
  • bookSheets and bookProps combine to give both sets of information
  • Deps will be an empty object if bookDeps is false
  • bookFiles behavior depends on file type:
    • keys array (paths in the ZIP) for ZIP-based formats
    • files hash (mapping paths to objects representing the files) for ZIP
    • cfb object for formats using CFB containers
  • sheetRows-1 rows will be generated when looking at the JSON object output (since the header row is counted as a row when parsing the data)
  • By default all worksheets are parsed. sheets restricts based on input type:
    • number: zero-based index of worksheet to parse (0 is first worksheet)
    • string: name of worksheet to parse (case insensitive)
    • array of numbers and strings to select multiple worksheets.
  • bookVBA merely exposes the raw VBA CFB object. It does not parse the data. XLSM and XLSB store the VBA CFB object in xl/vbaProject.bin. BIFF8 XLS mixes the VBA entries alongside the core Workbook entry, so the library generates a new XLSB-compatible blob from the XLS CFB container.
  • codepage is applied to BIFF2 - BIFF5 files without CodePage records and to CSV files without BOM in type:"binary". BIFF8 XLS always defaults to 1200.
  • PRN affects parsing of text files without a common delimiter character.
  • Currently only XOR encryption is supported. Unsupported error will be thrown for files employing other encryption methods.
  • Newer Excel functions are serialized with the _xlfn. prefix, hidden from the user. SheetJS will strip _xlfn. normally. The xlfn option preserves them.
  • WTF is mainly for development. By default, the parser will suppress read errors on single worksheets, allowing you to read from the worksheets that do parse properly. Setting WTF:true forces those errors to be thrown.

Input Type

Strings can be interpreted in multiple ways. The type parameter for read tells the library how to parse the data argument:

typeexpected input
"base64"string: Base64 encoding of the file
"binary"string: binary string (byte n is data.charCodeAt(n))
"string"string: JS string (characters interpreted as UTF8)
"buffer"nodejs Buffer
"array"array: array of 8-bit unsigned int (byte n is data[n])
"file"string: path of file that will be read (nodejs only)

Guessing File Type

Implementation Details (click to show)

Excel and other spreadsheet tools read the first few bytes and apply other heuristics to determine a file type. This enables file type punning: renaming files with the .xls extension will tell your computer to use Excel to open the file but Excel will know how to handle it. This library applies similar logic:

Byte 0Raw File TypeSpreadsheet Types
0xD0CFB ContainerBIFF 5/8 or protected XLSX/XLSB or WQ3/QPW or XLR
0x09BIFF StreamBIFF 2/3/4/5
0x3CXML/HTMLSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x50ZIP ArchiveXLSB or XLSX/M or ODS or UOS2 or NUMBERS or text
0x49Plain TextSYLK or plain text
0x54Plain TextDIF or plain text
0xEFUTF8 EncodedSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0xFFUTF16 EncodedSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x00Record StreamLotus WK* or Quattro Pro or plain text
0x7BPlain textRTF or plain text
0x0APlain textSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x0DPlain textSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x20Plain textSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text

DBF files are detected based on the first byte as well as the third and fourth bytes (corresponding to month and day of the file date)

Works for Windows files are detected based on the BOF record with type 0xFF

Plain text format guessing follows the priority order:

FormatTest
XML<?xml appears in the first 1024 characters
HTMLstarts with < and HTML tags appear in the first 1024 characters *
XMLstarts with < and the first tag is valid
RTFstarts with {\rt
DSVstarts with /sep=.$/, separator is the specified character
DSVmore unquoted `
DSVmore unquoted ; chars than \t or , in the first 1024
TSVmore unquoted \t chars than , chars in the first 1024
CSVone of the first 1024 characters is a comma ","
ETHstarts with socialcalc:version:
PRNPRN option is set to true
CSV(fallback)
  • HTML tags include: html, table, head, meta, script, style, div

Why are random text files valid? (click to show)

Excel is extremely aggressive in reading files. Adding an XLS extension to any display text file (where the only characters are ANSI display chars) tricks Excel into thinking that the file is potentially a CSV or TSV file, even if it is only one column! This library attempts to replicate that behavior.

The best approach is to validate the desired worksheet and ensure it has the expected number of rows or columns. Extracting the range is extremely simple:

var range = XLSX.utils.decode_range(worksheet['!ref']);
var ncols = range.e.c - range.s.c + 1, nrows = range.e.r - range.s.r + 1;

Writing Options

The exported write and writeFile functions accept an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
type Output data encoding (see Output Type below)
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
bookSSTfalseGenerate Shared String Table **
bookType"xlsx"Type of Workbook (see below for supported formats)
sheet""Name of Worksheet for single-sheet formats **
compressionfalseUse ZIP compression for ZIP-based formats **
Props Override workbook properties when writing **
themeXLSX Override theme XML when writing XLSX/XLSB/XLSM **
ignoreECtrueSuppress "number as text" errors **
numbers Payload for NUMBERS export **
  • bookSST is slower and more memory intensive, but has better compatibility with older versions of iOS Numbers
  • The raw data is the only thing guaranteed to be saved. Features not described in this README may not be serialized.
  • cellDates only applies to XLSX output and is not guaranteed to work with third-party readers. Excel itself does not usually write cells with type d so non-Excel tools may ignore the data or error in the presence of dates.
  • Props is an object mirroring the workbook Props field. See the table from the Workbook File Properties section.
  • if specified, the string from themeXLSX will be saved as the primary theme for XLSX/XLSB/XLSM files (to xl/theme/theme1.xml in the ZIP)
  • Due to a bug in the program, some features like "Text to Columns" will crash Excel on worksheets where error conditions are ignored. The writer will mark files to ignore the error by default. Set ignoreEC to false to suppress.
  • Due to the size of the data, the NUMBERS data is not included by default. The included xlsx.zahl.js and xlsx.zahl.mjs scripts include the data.

Supported Output Formats

For broad compatibility with third-party tools, this library supports many output formats. The specific file type is controlled with bookType option:

bookTypefile extcontainersheetsDescription
xlsx.xlsxZIPmultiExcel 2007+ XML Format
xlsm.xlsmZIPmultiExcel 2007+ Macro XML Format
xlsb.xlsbZIPmultiExcel 2007+ Binary Format
biff8.xlsCFBmultiExcel 97-2004 Workbook Format
biff5.xlsCFBmultiExcel 5.0/95 Workbook Format
biff4.xlsnonesingleExcel 4.0 Worksheet Format
biff3.xlsnonesingleExcel 3.0 Worksheet Format
biff2.xlsnonesingleExcel 2.0 Worksheet Format
xlml.xlsnonemultiExcel 2003-2004 (SpreadsheetML)
numbers.numbersZIPsingleNumbers 3.0+ Spreadsheet
ods.odsZIPmultiOpenDocument Spreadsheet
fods.fodsnonemultiFlat OpenDocument Spreadsheet
wk3.wk3nonemultiLotus Workbook (WK3)
csv.csvnonesingleComma Separated Values
txt.txtnonesingleUTF-16 Unicode Text (TXT)
sylk.sylknonesingleSymbolic Link (SYLK)
html.htmlnonesingleHTML Document
dif.difnonesingleData Interchange Format (DIF)
dbf.dbfnonesingledBASE II + VFP Extensions (DBF)
wk1.wk1nonesingleLotus Worksheet (WK1)
rtf.rtfnonesingleRich Text Format (RTF)
prn.prnnonesingleLotus Formatted Text
eth.ethnonesingleEthercalc Record Format (ETH)
  • compression only applies to formats with ZIP containers.
  • Formats that only support a single sheet require a sheet option specifying the worksheet. If the string is empty, the first worksheet is used.
  • writeFile will automatically guess the output file format based on the file extension if bookType is not specified. It will choose the first format in the aforementioned table that matches the extension.

Output Type

The type argument for write mirrors the type argument for read:

typeoutput
"base64"string: Base64 encoding of the file
"binary"string: binary string (byte n is data.charCodeAt(n))
"string"string: JS string (characters interpreted as UTF8)
"buffer"nodejs Buffer
"array"ArrayBuffer, fallback array of 8-bit unsigned int
"file"string: path of file that will be created (nodejs only)
  • For compatibility with Excel, csv output will always include the UTF-8 byte order mark.

Utility Functions

The sheet_to_* functions accept a worksheet and an optional options object.

The *_to_sheet functions accept a data object and an optional options object.

The examples are based on the following worksheet:

XXX| A | B | C | D | E | F | G |
---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1 | S | h | e | e | t | J | S |
 2 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 |
 3 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 |

Array of Arrays Input

XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet takes an array of arrays of JS values and returns a worksheet resembling the input data. Numbers, Booleans and Strings are stored as the corresponding styles. Dates are stored as date or numbers. Array holes and explicit undefined values are skipped. null values may be stubbed. All other values are stored as strings. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetStubsfalseCreate cell objects of type z for null values
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values

Examples (click to show)

To generate the example sheet:

var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  "SheetJS".split(""),
  [1,2,3,4,5,6,7],
  [2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
]);

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa takes an array of arrays of JS values and updates an existing worksheet object. It follows the same process as aoa_to_sheet and accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetStubsfalseCreate cell objects of type z for null values
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values
origin Use specified cell as starting point (see below)

origin is expected to be one of:

originDescription
(cell object)Use specified cell (cell object)
(string)Use specified cell (A1-style cell)
(number >= 0)Start from the first column at specified row (0-indexed)
-1Append to bottom of worksheet starting on first column
(default)Start from cell A1

Examples (click to show)

Consider the worksheet:

XXX| A | B | C | D | E | F | G |
---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1 | S | h | e | e | t | J | S |
 2 | 1 | 2 |   |   | 5 | 6 | 7 |
 3 | 2 | 3 |   |   | 6 | 7 | 8 |
 4 | 3 | 4 |   |   | 7 | 8 | 9 |
 5 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 0 |

This worksheet can be built up in the order A1:G1, A2:B4, E2:G4, A5:G5:

/* Initial row */
var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([ "SheetJS".split("") ]);

/* Write data starting at A2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [[1,2], [2,3], [3,4]], {origin: "A2"});

/* Write data starting at E2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [[5,6,7], [6,7,8], [7,8,9]], {origin:{r:1, c:4}});

/* Append row */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [[4,5,6,7,8,9,0]], {origin: -1});

Array of Objects Input

XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet takes an array of objects and returns a worksheet with automatically-generated "headers" based on the keys of the objects. The default column order is determined by the first appearance of the field using Object.keys. The function accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
header Use specified field order (default Object.keys) **
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
skipHeaderfalseIf true, do not include header row in output
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values
  • All fields from each row will be written. If header is an array and it does not contain a particular field, the key will be appended to the array.
  • Cell types are deduced from the type of each value. For example, a Date object will generate a Date cell, while a string will generate a Text cell.
  • Null values will be skipped by default. If nullError is true, an error cell corresponding to #NULL! will be written to the worksheet.

Examples (click to show)

The original sheet cannot be reproduced using plain objects since JS object keys must be unique. After replacing the second e and S with e_1 and S_1:

var ws = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet([
  { S:1, h:2, e:3, e_1:4, t:5, J:6, S_1:7 },
  { S:2, h:3, e:4, e_1:5, t:6, J:7, S_1:8 }
], {header:["S","h","e","e_1","t","J","S_1"]});

Alternatively, the header row can be skipped:

var ws = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet([
  { A:"S", B:"h", C:"e", D:"e", E:"t", F:"J", G:"S" },
  { A: 1,  B: 2,  C: 3,  D: 4,  E: 5,  F: 6,  G: 7  },
  { A: 2,  B: 3,  C: 4,  D: 5,  E: 6,  F: 7,  G: 8  }
], {header:["A","B","C","D","E","F","G"], skipHeader:true});

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json takes an array of objects and updates an existing worksheet object. It follows the same process as json_to_sheet and accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
header Use specified column order (default Object.keys)
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
skipHeaderfalseIf true, do not include header row in output
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values
origin Use specified cell as starting point (see below)

origin is expected to be one of:

originDescription
(cell object)Use specified cell (cell object)
(string)Use specified cell (A1-style cell)
(number >= 0)Start from the first column at specified row (0-indexed)
-1Append to bottom of worksheet starting on first column
(default)Start from cell A1

Examples (click to show)

Consider the worksheet:

XXX| A | B | C | D | E | F | G |
---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1 | S | h | e | e | t | J | S |
 2 | 1 | 2 |   |   | 5 | 6 | 7 |
 3 | 2 | 3 |   |   | 6 | 7 | 8 |
 4 | 3 | 4 |   |   | 7 | 8 | 9 |
 5 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 0 |

This worksheet can be built up in the order A1:G1, A2:B4, E2:G4, A5:G5:

/* Initial row */
var ws = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet([
  { A: "S", B: "h", C: "e", D: "e", E: "t", F: "J", G: "S" }
], {header: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"], skipHeader: true});

/* Write data starting at A2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json(ws, [
  { A: 1, B: 2 }, { A: 2, B: 3 }, { A: 3, B: 4 }
], {skipHeader: true, origin: "A2"});

/* Write data starting at E2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json(ws, [
  { A: 5, B: 6, C: 7 }, { A: 6, B: 7, C: 8 }, { A: 7, B: 8, C: 9 }
], {skipHeader: true, origin: { r: 1, c: 4 }, header: [ "A", "B", "C" ]});

/* Append row */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json(ws, [
  { A: 4, B: 5, C: 6, D: 7, E: 8, F: 9, G: 0 }
], {header: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"], skipHeader: true, origin: -1});

HTML Table Input

XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet takes a table DOM element and returns a worksheet resembling the input table. Numbers are parsed. All other data will be stored as strings.

XLSX.utils.table_to_book produces a minimal workbook based on the worksheet.

Both functions accept options arguments:

Option NameDefaultDescription
raw If true, every cell will hold raw strings
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetRows0If >0, read the first sheetRows rows of the table
displayfalseIf true, hidden rows and cells will not be parsed

Examples (click to show)

To generate the example sheet, start with the HTML table:

<table id="sheetjs">
<tr><td>S</td><td>h</td><td>e</td><td>e</td><td>t</td><td>J</td><td>S</td></tr>
<tr><td>1</td><td>2</td><td>3</td><td>4</td><td>5</td><td>6</td><td>7</td></tr>
<tr><td>2</td><td>3</td><td>4</td><td>5</td><td>6</td><td>7</td><td>8</td></tr>
</table>

To process the table:

var tbl = document.getElementById('sheetjs');
var wb = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(tbl);

Note: XLSX.read can handle HTML represented as strings.

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_dom takes a table DOM element and updates an existing worksheet object. It follows the same process as table_to_sheet and accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
raw If true, every cell will hold raw strings
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetRows0If >0, read the first sheetRows rows of the table
displayfalseIf true, hidden rows and cells will not be parsed

origin is expected to be one of:

originDescription
(cell object)Use specified cell (cell object)
(string)Use specified cell (A1-style cell)
(number >= 0)Start from the first column at specified row (0-indexed)
-1Append to bottom of worksheet starting on first column
(default)Start from cell A1

Examples (click to show)

A small helper function can create gap rows between tables:

function create_gap_rows(ws, nrows) {
  var ref = XLSX.utils.decode_range(ws["!ref"]);       // get original range
  ref.e.r += nrows;                                    // add to ending row
  ws["!ref"] = XLSX.utils.encode_range(ref);           // reassign row
}

/* first table */
var ws = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(document.getElementById('table1'));
create_gap_rows(ws, 1); // one row gap after first table

/* second table */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_dom(ws, document.getElementById('table2'), {origin: -1});
create_gap_rows(ws, 3); // three rows gap after second table

/* third table */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_dom(ws, document.getElementById('table3'), {origin: -1});

Formulae Output

XLSX.utils.sheet_to_formulae generates an array of commands that represent how a person would enter data into an application. Each entry is of the form A1-cell-address=formula-or-value. String literals are prefixed with a ' in accordance with Excel.

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> var o = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_formulae(ws);
> [o[0], o[5], o[10], o[15], o[20]];
[ 'A1=\'S', 'F1=\'J', 'D2=4', 'B3=3', 'G3=8' ]

Delimiter-Separated Output

As an alternative to the writeFile CSV type, XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv also produces CSV output. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
FS",""Field Separator" delimiter between fields
RS"\n""Record Separator" delimiter between rows
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
stripfalseRemove trailing field separators in each record **
blankrowstrueInclude blank lines in the CSV output
skipHiddenfalseSkips hidden rows/columns in the CSV output
forceQuotesfalseForce quotes around fields
  • strip will remove trailing commas from each line under default FS/RS
  • blankrows must be set to false to skip blank lines.
  • Fields containing the record or field separator will automatically be wrapped in double quotes; forceQuotes forces all cells to be wrapped in quotes.
  • XLSX.write with csv type will always prepend the UTF-8 byte-order mark for Excel compatibility. sheet_to_csv returns a JS string and omits the mark. Using XLSX.write with type string will also skip the mark.

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(ws));
S,h,e,e,t,J,S
1,2,3,4,5,6,7
2,3,4,5,6,7,8
> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(ws, {FS:"\t"}));
S    h    e    e    t    J    S
1    2    3    4    5    6    7
2    3    4    5    6    7    8
> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(ws,{FS:":",RS:"|"}));
S:h:e:e:t:J:S|1:2:3:4:5:6:7|2:3:4:5:6:7:8|

UTF-16 Unicode Text

The txt output type uses the tab character as the field separator. If the codepage library is available (included in full distribution but not core), the output will be encoded in CP1200 and the BOM will be prepended.

XLSX.utils.sheet_to_txt takes the same arguments as sheet_to_csv.

HTML Output

As an alternative to the writeFile HTML type, XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html also produces HTML output. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
id Specify the id attribute for the TABLE element
editablefalseIf true, set contenteditable="true" for every TD
header Override header (default html body)
footer Override footer (default /body /html)

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(ws));
// ...

JSON

XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json generates different types of JS objects. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
rawtrueUse raw values (true) or formatted strings (false)
rangefrom WSOverride Range (see table below)
header Control output format (see table below)
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
defval Use specified value in place of null or undefined
blankrows**Include blank lines in the output **
  • raw only affects cells which have a format code (.z) field or a formatted text (.w) field.
  • If header is specified, the first row is considered a data row; if header is not specified, the first row is the header row and not considered data.
  • When header is not specified, the conversion will automatically disambiguate header entries by affixing _ and a count starting at 1. For example, if three columns have header foo the output fields are foo, foo_1, foo_2
  • null values are returned when raw is true but are skipped when false.
  • If defval is not specified, null and undefined values are skipped normally. If specified, all null and undefined points will be filled with defval
  • When header is 1, the default is to generate blank rows. blankrows must be set to false to skip blank rows.
  • When header is not 1, the default is to skip blank rows. blankrows must be true to generate blank rows

range is expected to be one of:

rangeDescription
(number)Use worksheet range but set starting row to the value
(string)Use specified range (A1-style bounded range string)
(default)Use worksheet range (ws['!ref'])

header is expected to be one of:

headerDescription
1Generate an array of arrays ("2D Array")
"A"Row object keys are literal column labels
array of stringsUse specified strings as keys in row objects
(default)Read and disambiguate first row as keys
  • If header is not 1, the row object will contain the non-enumerable property __rowNum__ that represents the row of the sheet corresponding to the entry.
  • If header is an array, the keys will not be disambiguated. This can lead to unexpected results if the array values are not unique!

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws);
[ { S: 1, h: 2, e: 3, e_1: 4, t: 5, J: 6, S_1: 7 },
  { S: 2, h: 3, e: 4, e_1: 5, t: 6, J: 7, S_1: 8 } ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:"A"});
[ { A: 'S', B: 'h', C: 'e', D: 'e', E: 't', F: 'J', G: 'S' },
  { A: '1', B: '2', C: '3', D: '4', E: '5', F: '6', G: '7' },
  { A: '2', B: '3', C: '4', D: '5', E: '6', F: '7', G: '8' } ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:["A","E","I","O","U","6","9"]});
[ { '6': 'J', '9': 'S', A: 'S', E: 'h', I: 'e', O: 'e', U: 't' },
  { '6': '6', '9': '7', A: '1', E: '2', I: '3', O: '4', U: '5' },
  { '6': '7', '9': '8', A: '2', E: '3', I: '4', O: '5', U: '6' } ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:1});
[ [ 'S', 'h', 'e', 'e', 't', 'J', 'S' ],
  [ '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7' ],
  [ '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8' ] ]

Example showing the effect of raw:

> ws['A2'].w = "3";                          // set A2 formatted string value

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:1, raw:false});
[ [ 'S', 'h', 'e', 'e', 't', 'J', 'S' ],
  [ '3', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7' ],     // <-- A2 uses the formatted string
  [ '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8' ] ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:1});
[ [ 'S', 'h', 'e', 'e', 't', 'J', 'S' ],
  [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ],                   // <-- A2 uses the raw value
  [ 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ] ]

File Formats

Despite the library name xlsx, it supports numerous spreadsheet file formats:

FormatReadWrite
Excel Worksheet/Workbook Formats:-----::-----:
Excel 2007+ XML Formats (XLSX/XLSM)
Excel 2007+ Binary Format (XLSB BIFF12)
Excel 2003-2004 XML Format (XML "SpreadsheetML")
Excel 97-2004 (XLS BIFF8)
Excel 5.0/95 (XLS BIFF5)
Excel 4.0 (XLS/XLW BIFF4)
Excel 3.0 (XLS BIFF3)
Excel 2.0/2.1 (XLS BIFF2)
Excel Supported Text Formats:-----::-----:
Delimiter-Separated Values (CSV/TXT)
Data Interchange Format (DIF)
Symbolic Link (SYLK/SLK)
Lotus Formatted Text (PRN)
UTF-16 Unicode Text (TXT)
Other Workbook/Worksheet Formats:-----::-----:
Numbers 3.0+ / iWork 2013+ Spreadsheet (NUMBERS)
OpenDocument Spreadsheet (ODS)
Flat XML ODF Spreadsheet (FODS)
Uniform Office Format Spreadsheet (标文通 UOS1/UOS2) 
dBASE II/III/IV / Visual FoxPro (DBF)
Lotus 1-2-3 (WK1/WK3)
Lotus 1-2-3 (WKS/WK2/WK4/123) 
Quattro Pro Spreadsheet (WQ1/WQ2/WB1/WB2/WB3/QPW) 
Works 1.x-3.x DOS / 2.x-5.x Windows Spreadsheet (WKS) 
Works 6.x-9.x Spreadsheet (XLR) 
Other Common Spreadsheet Output Formats:-----::-----:
HTML Tables
Rich Text Format tables (RTF) 
Ethercalc Record Format (ETH)

Features not supported by a given file format will not be written. Formats with range limits will be silently truncated:

FormatLast CellMax ColsMax Rows
Excel 2007+ XML Formats (XLSX/XLSM)XFD1048576163841048576
Excel 2007+ Binary Format (XLSB BIFF12)XFD1048576163841048576
Numbers 12.0 (NUMBERS)ALL100000010001000000
Excel 97-2004 (XLS BIFF8)IV6553625665536
Excel 5.0/95 (XLS BIFF5)IV1638425616384
Excel 4.0 (XLS BIFF4)IV1638425616384
Excel 3.0 (XLS BIFF3)IV1638425616384
Excel 2.0/2.1 (XLS BIFF2)IV1638425616384
Lotus 1-2-3 R2 - R5 (WK1/WK3/WK4)IV81922568192
Lotus 1-2-3 R1 (WKS)IV20482562048

Excel 2003 SpreadsheetML range limits are governed by the version of Excel and are not enforced by the writer.

File Format Details (click to show)

Core Spreadsheet Formats

  • Excel 2007+ XML (XLSX/XLSM)

XLSX and XLSM files are ZIP containers containing a series of XML files in accordance with the Open Packaging Conventions (OPC). The XLSM format, almost identical to XLSX, is used for files containing macros.

The format is standardized in ECMA-376 and later in ISO/IEC 29500. Excel does not follow the specification, and there are additional documents discussing how Excel deviates from the specification.

  • Excel 2.0-95 (BIFF2/BIFF3/BIFF4/BIFF5)

BIFF 2/3 XLS are single-sheet streams of binary records. Excel 4 introduced the concept of a workbook (XLW files) but also had single-sheet XLS format. The structure is largely similar to the Lotus 1-2-3 file formats. BIFF5/8/12 extended the format in various ways but largely stuck to the same record format.

There is no official specification for any of these formats. Excel 95 can write files in these formats, so record lengths and fields were determined by writing in all of the supported formats and comparing files. Excel 2016 can generate BIFF5 files, enabling a full suite of file tests starting from XLSX or BIFF2.

  • Excel 97-2004 Binary (BIFF8)

BIFF8 exclusively uses the Compound File Binary container format, splitting some content into streams within the file. At its core, it still uses an extended version of the binary record format from older versions of BIFF.

The MS-XLS specification covers the basics of the file format, and other specifications expand on serialization of features like properties.

  • Excel 2003-2004 (SpreadsheetML)

Predating XLSX, SpreadsheetML files are simple XML files. There is no official and comprehensive specification, although MS has released documentation on the format. Since Excel 2016 can generate SpreadsheetML files, mapping features is pretty straightforward.

  • Excel 2007+ Binary (XLSB, BIFF12)

Introduced in parallel with XLSX, the XLSB format combines the BIFF architecture with the content separation and ZIP container of XLSX. For the most part nodes in an XLSX sub-file can be mapped to XLSB records in a corresponding sub-file.

The MS-XLSB specification covers the basics of the file format, and other specifications expand on serialization of features like properties.

  • Delimiter-Separated Values (CSV/TXT)

Excel CSV deviates from RFC4180 in a number of important ways. The generated CSV files should generally work in Excel although they may not work in RFC4180 compatible readers. The parser should generally understand Excel CSV. The writer proactively generates cells for formulae if values are unavailable.

Excel TXT uses tab as the delimiter and code page 1200.

Like in Excel, files starting with 0x49 0x44 ("ID") are treated as Symbolic Link files. Unlike Excel, if the file does not have a valid SYLK header, it will be proactively reinterpreted as CSV. There are some files with semicolon delimiter that align with a valid SYLK file. For the broadest compatibility, all cells with the value of ID are automatically wrapped in double-quotes.

Miscellaneous Workbook Formats

Support for other formats is generally far behind XLS/XLSB/XLSX support, due in part to a lack of publicly available documentation. Test files were produced in the respective apps and compared to their XLS exports to determine structure. The main focus is data extraction.

  • Lotus 1-2-3 (WKS/WK1/WK2/WK3/WK4/123)

The Lotus formats consist of binary records similar to the BIFF structure. Lotus did release a specification decades ago covering the original WK1 format. Other features were deduced by producing files and comparing to Excel support.

Generated WK1 worksheets are compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 R2 and Excel 5.0.

Generated WK3 workbooks are compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 R9 and Excel 5.0.

  • Quattro Pro (WQ1/WQ2/WB1/WB2/WB3/QPW)

The Quattro Pro formats use binary records in the same way as BIFF and Lotus. Some of the newer formats (namely WB3 and QPW) use a CFB enclosure just like BIFF8 XLS.

  • Works for DOS / Windows Spreadsheet (WKS/XLR)

All versions of Works were limited to a single worksheet.

Works for DOS 1.x - 3.x and Works for Windows 2.x extends the Lotus WKS format with additional record types.

Works for Windows 3.x - 5.x uses the same format and WKS extension. The BOF record has type FF

Works for Windows 6.x - 9.x use the XLR format. XLR is nearly identical to BIFF8 XLS: it uses the CFB container with a Workbook stream. Works 9 saves the exact Workbook stream for the XLR and the 97-2003 XLS export. Works 6 XLS includes two empty worksheets but the main worksheet has an identical encoding. XLR also includes a WksSSWorkBook stream similar to Lotus FM3/FMT files.

  • Numbers 3.0+ / iWork 2013+ Spreadsheet (NUMBERS)

iWork 2013 (Numbers 3.0 / Pages 5.0 / Keynote 6.0) switched from a proprietary XML-based format to the current file format based on the iWork Archive (IWA). This format has been used up through the current release (Numbers 11.2).

The parser focuses on extracting raw data from tables. Numbers technically supports multiple tables in a logical worksheet, including custom titles. This parser will generate one worksheet per Numbers table.

The writer currently exports a small range from the first worksheet.

  • OpenDocument Spreadsheet (ODS/FODS)

ODS is an XML-in-ZIP format akin to XLSX while FODS is an XML format akin to SpreadsheetML. Both are detailed in the OASIS standard, but tools like LO/OO add undocumented extensions. The parsers and writers do not implement the full standard, instead focusing on parts necessary to extract and store raw data.

  • Uniform Office Spreadsheet (UOS1/2)

UOS is a very similar format, and it comes in 2 varieties corresponding to ODS and FODS respectively. For the most part, the difference between the formats is in the names of tags and attributes.

Miscellaneous Worksheet Formats

Many older formats supported only one worksheet:

  • dBASE and Visual FoxPro (DBF)

DBF is really a typed table format: each column can only hold one data type and each record omits type information. The parser generates a header row and inserts records starting at the second row of the worksheet. The writer makes files compatible with Visual FoxPro extensions.

Multi-file extensions like external memos and tables are currently unsupported, limited by the general ability to read arbitrary files in the web browser. The reader understands DBF Level 7 extensions like DATETIME.

  • Symbolic Link (SYLK)

There is no real documentation. All knowledge was gathered by saving files in various versions of Excel to deduce the meaning of fields. Notes:

Plain formulae are stored in the RC form.

Column widths are rounded to integral characters.

Lotus Formatted Text (PRN)

There is no real documentation, and in fact Excel treats PRN as an output-only file format. Nevertheless we can guess the column widths and reverse-engineer the original layout. Excel's 240 character width limitation is not enforced.

  • Data Interchange Format (DIF)

There is no unified definition. Visicalc DIF differs from Lotus DIF, and both differ from Excel DIF. Where ambiguous, the parser/writer follows the expected behavior from Excel. In particular, Excel extends DIF in incompatible ways:

Since Excel automatically converts numbers-as-strings to numbers, numeric string constants are converted to formulae: "0.3" -> "=""0.3""

DIF technically expects numeric cells to hold the raw numeric data, but Excel permits formatted numbers (including dates)

DIF technically has no support for formulae, but Excel will automatically convert plain formulae. Array formulae are not preserved.

HTML

Excel HTML worksheets include special metadata encoded in styles. For example, mso-number-format is a localized string containing the number format. Despite the metadata the output is valid HTML, although it does accept bare & symbols.

The writer adds type metadata to the TD elements via the t tag. The parser looks for those tags and overrides the default interpretation. For example, text like <td>12345</td> will be parsed as numbers but <td t="s">12345</td> will be parsed as text.

  • Rich Text Format (RTF)

Excel RTF worksheets are stored in clipboard when copying cells or ranges from a worksheet. The supported codes are a subset of the Word RTF support.

  • Ethercalc Record Format (ETH)

Ethercalc is an open source web spreadsheet powered by a record format reminiscent of SYLK wrapped in a MIME multi-part message.

Testing

Node

(click to show)

make test will run the node-based tests. By default it runs tests on files in every supported format. To test a specific file type, set FMTS to the format you want to test. Feature-specific tests are available with make test_misc

$ make test_misc   # run core tests
$ make test        # run full tests
$ make test_xls    # only use the XLS test files
$ make test_xlsx   # only use the XLSX test files
$ make test_xlsb   # only use the XLSB test files
$ make test_xml    # only use the XML test files
$ make test_ods    # only use the ODS test files

To enable all errors, set the environment variable WTF=1:

$ make test        # run full tests
$ WTF=1 make test  # enable all error messages

flow and eslint checks are available:

$ make lint        # eslint checks
$ make flow        # make lint + Flow checking
$ make tslint      # check TS definitions

Browser

(click to show)

The core in-browser tests are available at tests/index.html within this repo. Start a local server and navigate to that directory to run the tests. make ctestserv will start a server on port 8000.

make ctest will generate the browser fixtures. To add more files, edit the tests/fixtures.lst file and add the paths.

To run the full in-browser tests, clone the repo for oss.sheetjs.com and replace the xlsx.js file (then open a browser window and go to stress.html):

$ cp xlsx.js ../SheetJS.github.io
$ cd ../SheetJS.github.io
$ simplehttpserver # or "python -mSimpleHTTPServer" or "serve"
$ open -a Chromium.app http://localhost:8000/stress.html

Tested Environments

(click to show)

  • NodeJS 0.8, 0.10, 0.12, 4.x, 5.x, 6.x, 7.x, 8.x
  • IE 6/7/8/9/10/11 (IE 6-9 require shims)
  • Chrome 24+ (including Android 4.0+)
  • Safari 6+ (iOS and Desktop)
  • Edge 13+, FF 18+, and Opera 12+

Tests utilize the mocha testing framework.

The test suite also includes tests for various time zones. To change the timezone locally, set the TZ environment variable:

$ env TZ="Asia/Kolkata" WTF=1 make test_misc

Test Files

Test files are housed in another repo.

Running make init will refresh the test_files submodule and get the files. Note that this requires svn, git, hg and other commands that may not be available. If make init fails, please download the latest version of the test files snapshot from the repo

Latest Snapshot (click to show)

Latest test files snapshot: http://github.com/SheetJS/test_files/releases/download/20170409/test_files.zip

(download and unzip to the test_files subdirectory)

Contributing

Due to the precarious nature of the Open Specifications Promise, it is very important to ensure code is cleanroom. Contribution Notes

File organization (click to show)

At a high level, the final script is a concatenation of the individual files in the bits folder. Running make should reproduce the final output on all platforms. The README is similarly split into bits in the docbits folder.

Folders:

foldercontents
bitsraw source files that make up the final script
docbitsraw markdown files that make up README.md
binserver-side bin scripts (xlsx.njs)
distdist files for web browsers and nonstandard JS environments
demosdemo projects for platforms like ExtendScript and Webpack
testsbrowser tests (run make ctest to rebuild)
typestypescript definitions and tests
miscmiscellaneous supporting scripts
test_filestest files (pulled from the test files repository)

After cloning the repo, running make help will display a list of commands.

OSX/Linux

(click to show)

The xlsx.js file is constructed from the files in the bits subdirectory. The build script (run make) will concatenate the individual bits to produce the script. Before submitting a contribution, ensure that running make will produce the xlsx.js file exactly. The simplest way to test is to add the script:

$ git add xlsx.js
$ make clean
$ make
$ git diff xlsx.js

To produce the dist files, run make dist. The dist files are updated in each version release and should not be committed between versions.

Windows

(click to show)

The included make.cmd script will build xlsx.js from the bits directory. Building is as simple as:

> make

To prepare development environment:

> make init

The full list of commands available in Windows are displayed in make help:

make init -- install deps and global modules
make lint -- run eslint linter
make test -- run mocha test suite
make misc -- run smaller test suite
make book -- rebuild README and summary
make help -- display this message

As explained in Test Files, on Windows the release ZIP file must be downloaded and extracted. If Bash on Windows is available, it is possible to run the OSX/Linux workflow. The following steps prepares the environment:

# Install support programs for the build and test commands
sudo apt-get install make git subversion mercurial

# Install nodejs and NPM within the WSL
wget -qO- https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_8.x | sudo bash
sudo apt-get install nodejs

# Install dev dependencies
sudo npm install -g mocha voc blanket xlsjs

Tests

(click to show)

The test_misc target (make test_misc on Linux/OSX / make misc on Windows) runs the targeted feature tests. It should take 5-10 seconds to perform feature tests without testing against the entire test battery. New features should be accompanied with tests for the relevant file formats and features.

For tests involving the read side, an appropriate feature test would involve reading an existing file and checking the resulting workbook object. If a parameter is involved, files should be read with different values to verify that the feature is working as expected.

For tests involving a new write feature which can already be parsed, appropriate feature tests would involve writing a workbook with the feature and then opening and verifying that the feature is preserved.

For tests involving a new write feature without an existing read ability, please add a feature test to the kitchen sink tests/write.js.

References

OSP-covered Specifications (click to show)

  • MS-CFB: Compound File Binary File Format
  • MS-CTXLS: Excel Custom Toolbar Binary File Format
  • MS-EXSPXML3: Excel Calculation Version 2 Web Service XML Schema
  • MS-ODATA: Open Data Protocol (OData)
  • MS-ODRAW: Office Drawing Binary File Format
  • MS-ODRAWXML: Office Drawing Extensions to Office Open XML Structure
  • MS-OE376: Office Implementation Information for ECMA-376 Standards Support
  • MS-OFFCRYPTO: Office Document Cryptography Structure
  • MS-OI29500: Office Implementation Information for ISO/IEC 29500 Standards Support
  • MS-OLEDS: Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) Data Structures
  • MS-OLEPS: Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) Property Set Data Structures
  • MS-OODF3: Office Implementation Information for ODF 1.2 Standards Support
  • MS-OSHARED: Office Common Data Types and Objects Structures
  • MS-OVBA: Office VBA File Format Structure
  • MS-XLDM: Spreadsheet Data Model File Format
  • MS-XLS: Excel Binary File Format (.xls) Structure Specification
  • MS-XLSB: Excel (.xlsb) Binary File Format
  • MS-XLSX: Excel (.xlsx) Extensions to the Office Open XML SpreadsheetML File Format
  • XLS: Microsoft Office Excel 97-2007 Binary File Format Specification
  • RTF: Rich Text Format
  • ISO/IEC 29500:2012(E) "Information technology — Document description and processing languages — Office Open XML File Formats"
  • Open Document Format for Office Applications Version 1.2 (29 September 2011)
  • Worksheet File Format (From Lotus) December 1984

Browser Test and Support Matrix

Build Status

Supported File Formats

circo graph of format support

graph legend

Author: SheetJS
Source Code: https://github.com/SheetJS/sheetjs 
License: Apache-2.0 License

#javascript #react #node #html 

SheetJS Community Edition - Spreadsheet Data Toolkit

SheetJS

The SheetJS Community Edition offers battle-tested open-source solutions for extracting useful data from almost any complex spreadsheet and generating new spreadsheets that will work with legacy and modern software alike.

SheetJS Pro offers solutions beyond data processing: Edit complex templates with ease; let out your inner Picasso with styling; make custom sheets with images/graphs/PivotTables; evaluate formula expressions and port calculations to web apps; automate common spreadsheet tasks, and much more! Analytics

Browser Test and Support Matrix

Build Status

Supported File Formats

circo graph of format support

Diagram Legend (click to show)

graph legend

Table of Contents

Expand to show Table of Contents

Getting Started

Installation

The complete browser standalone build is saved to dist/xlsx.full.min.js and can be directly added to a page with a script tag:

<script lang="javascript" src="dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

CDN Availability (click to show)

CDNURL
unpkghttps://unpkg.com/xlsx/
jsDelivrhttps://jsdelivr.com/package/npm/xlsx
CDNjshttps://cdnjs.com/libraries/xlsx
packdhttps://bundle.run/xlsx@latest?name=XLSX

For example, unpkg makes the latest version available at:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/xlsx/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

Browser builds (click to show)

The complete single-file version is generated at dist/xlsx.full.min.js

A slimmer build is generated at dist/xlsx.mini.min.js. Compared to full build:

  • codepage library skipped (no support for XLS encodings)
  • XLSX compression option not currently available
  • no support for XLSB / XLS / Lotus 1-2-3 / SpreadsheetML 2003
  • node stream utils removed

Webpack and Browserify builds include optional modules by default. Webpack can be configured to remove support with resolve.alias:

  /* uncomment the lines below to remove support */
  resolve: {
    alias: { "./dist/cpexcel.js": "" } // <-- omit international support
  }

With npm:

$ npm install xlsx

With bower:

$ bower install js-xlsx

dist/xlsx.extendscript.js is an ExtendScript build for Photoshop and InDesign that is included in the npm package. It can be directly referenced with a #include directive:

#include "xlsx.extendscript.js"

Internet Explorer and ECMAScript 3 Compatibility (click to show)

For broad compatibility with JavaScript engines, the library is written using ECMAScript 3 language dialect as well as some ES5 features like Array#forEach. Older browsers require shims to provide missing functions.

To use the shim, add the shim before the script tag that loads xlsx.js:

<!-- add the shim first -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="shim.min.js"></script>
<!-- after the shim is referenced, add the library -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

The script also includes IE_LoadFile and IE_SaveFile for loading and saving files in Internet Explorer versions 6-9. The xlsx.extendscript.js script bundles the shim in a format suitable for Photoshop and other Adobe products.

Usage

Most scenarios involving spreadsheets and data can be broken into 5 parts:

Acquire Data: Data may be stored anywhere: local or remote files, databases, HTML TABLE, or even generated programmatically in the web browser.

Extract Data: For spreadsheet files, this involves parsing raw bytes to read the cell data. For general JS data, this involves reshaping the data.

Process Data: From generating summary statistics to cleaning data records, this step is the heart of the problem.

Package Data: This can involve making a new spreadsheet or serializing with JSON.stringify or writing XML or simply flattening data for UI tools.

Release Data: Spreadsheet files can be uploaded to a server or written locally. Data can be presented to users in an HTML TABLE or data grid.

A common problem involves generating a valid spreadsheet export from data stored in an HTML table. In this example, an HTML TABLE on the page will be scraped, a row will be added to the bottom with the date of the report, and a new file will be generated and downloaded locally. XLSX.writeFile takes care of packaging the data and attempting a local download:

// Acquire Data (reference to the HTML table)
var table_elt = document.getElementById("my-table-id");

// Extract Data (create a workbook object from the table)
var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(table_elt);

// Process Data (add a new row)
var ws = workbook.Sheets["Sheet1"];
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [["Created "+new Date().toISOString()]], {origin:-1});

// Package and Release Data (`writeFile` tries to write and save an XLSB file)
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "Report.xlsb");

This library tries to simplify steps 2 and 4 with functions to extract useful data from spreadsheet files (read / readFile) and generate new spreadsheet files from data (write / writeFile). Additional utility functions like table_to_book work with other common data sources like HTML tables.

This documentation and various demo projects cover a number of common scenarios and approaches for steps 1 and 5.

Utility functions help with step 3.

The Zen of SheetJS

Data processing should fit in any workflow

The library does not impose a separate lifecycle. It fits nicely in websites and apps built using any framework. The plain JS data objects play nice with Web Workers and future APIs.

"Acquiring and Extracting Data" describes solutions for common data import scenarios.

"Writing Workbooks" describes solutions for common data export scenarios involving actual spreadsheet files.

"Utility Functions" details utility functions for translating JSON Arrays and other common JS structures into worksheet objects.

JavaScript is a powerful language for data processing

The "Common Spreadsheet Format" is a simple object representation of the core concepts of a workbook. The various functions in the library provide low-level tools for working with the object.

For friendly JS processing, there are utility functions for converting parts of a worksheet to/from an Array of Arrays. The following example combines powerful JS Array methods with a network request library to download data, select the information we want and create a workbook file:

Get Data from a JSON Endpoint and Generate a Workbook (click to show)

The goal is to generate a XLSB workbook of US President names and birthdays.

Acquire Data

Raw Data

https://theunitedstates.io/congress-legislators/executive.json has the desired data. For example, John Adams:

{
  "id": { /* (data omitted) */ },
  "name": {
    "first": "John",          // <-- first name
    "last": "Adams"           // <-- last name
  },
  "bio": {
    "birthday": "1735-10-19", // <-- birthday
    "gender": "M"
  },
  "terms": [
    { "type": "viceprez", /* (other fields omitted) */ },
    { "type": "viceprez", /* (other fields omitted) */ },
    { "type": "prez", /* (other fields omitted) */ } // <-- look for "prez"
  ]
}

Filtering for Presidents

The dataset includes Aaron Burr, a Vice President who was never President!

Array#filter creates a new array with the desired rows. A President served at least one term with type set to "prez". To test if a particular row has at least one "prez" term, Array#some is another native JS function. The complete filter would be:

const prez = raw_data.filter(row => row.terms.some(term => term.type === "prez"));

Lining up the data

For this example, the name will be the first name combined with the last name (row.name.first + " " + row.name.last) and the birthday will be the subfield row.bio.birthday. Using Array#map, the dataset can be massaged in one call:

const rows = prez.map(row => ({
  name: row.name.first + " " + row.name.last,
  birthday: row.bio.birthday
}));

The result is an array of "simple" objects with no nesting:

[
  { name: "George Washington", birthday: "1732-02-22" },
  { name: "John Adams", birthday: "1735-10-19" },
  // ... one row per President
]

Extract Data

With the cleaned dataset, XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet generates a worksheet:

const worksheet = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet(rows);

XLSX.utils.book_new creates a new workbook and XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet appends a worksheet to the workbook. The new worksheet will be called "Dates":

const workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, "Dates");

Process Data

Fixing headers

By default, json_to_sheet creates a worksheet with a header row. In this case, the headers come from the JS object keys: "name" and "birthday".

The headers are in cells A1 and B1. XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa can write text values to the existing worksheet starting at cell A1:

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [["Name", "Birthday"]], { origin: "A1" });

Fixing Column Widths

Some of the names are longer than the default column width. Column widths are set by setting the "!cols" worksheet property.

The following line sets the width of column A to approximately 10 characters:

worksheet["!cols"] = [ { wch: 10 } ]; // set column A width to 10 characters

One Array#reduce call over rows can calculate the maximum width:

const max_width = rows.reduce((w, r) => Math.max(w, r.name.length), 10);
worksheet["!cols"] = [ { wch: max_width } ];

Note: If the starting point was a file or HTML table, XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json will generate an array of JS objects.

Package and Release Data

XLSX.writeFile creates a spreadsheet file and tries to write it to the system. In the browser, it will try to prompt the user to download the file. In NodeJS, it will write to the local directory.

XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "Presidents.xlsx");

Complete Example

// Uncomment the next line for use in NodeJS:
// const XLSX = require("xlsx"), axios = require("axios");

(async() => {
  /* fetch JSON data and parse */
  const url = "https://theunitedstates.io/congress-legislators/executive.json";
  const raw_data = (await axios(url, {responseType: "json"})).data;

  /* filter for the Presidents */
  const prez = raw_data.filter(row => row.terms.some(term => term.type === "prez"));

  /* flatten objects */
  const rows = prez.map(row => ({
    name: row.name.first + " " + row.name.last,
    birthday: row.bio.birthday
  }));

  /* generate worksheet and workbook */
  const worksheet = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet(rows);
  const workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();
  XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, "Dates");

  /* fix headers */
  XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(worksheet, [["Name", "Birthday"]], { origin: "A1" });

  /* calculate column width */
  const max_width = rows.reduce((w, r) => Math.max(w, r.name.length), 10);
  worksheet["!cols"] = [ { wch: max_width } ];

  /* create an XLSX file and try to save to Presidents.xlsx */
  XLSX.writeFile(workbook, "Presidents.xlsx");
})();

For use in the web browser, assuming the snippet is saved to snippet.js, script tags should be used to include the axios and xlsx standalone builds:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/xlsx/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/axios/dist/axios.min.js"></script>
<script src="snippet.js"></script>

File formats are implementation details

The parser covers a wide gamut of common spreadsheet file formats to ensure that "HTML-saved-as-XLS" files work as well as actual XLS or XLSX files.

The writer supports a number of common output formats for broad compatibility with the data ecosystem.

To the greatest extent possible, data processing code should not have to worry about the specific file formats involved.

JS Ecosystem Demos

The demos directory includes sample projects for:

Frameworks and APIs

Bundlers and Tooling

Platforms and Integrations

Other examples are included in the showcase.

Acquiring and Extracting Data

Parsing Workbooks

API

Extract data from spreadsheet bytes

var workbook = XLSX.read(data, opts);

The read method can extract data from spreadsheet bytes stored in a JS string, "binary string", NodeJS buffer or typed array (Uint8Array or ArrayBuffer).

Read spreadsheet bytes from a local file and extract data

var workbook = XLSX.readFile(filename, opts);

The readFile method attempts to read a spreadsheet file at the supplied path. Browsers generally do not allow reading files in this way (it is deemed a security risk), and attempts to read files in this way will throw an error.

The second opts argument is optional. "Parsing Options" covers the supported properties and behaviors.

Examples

Here are a few common scenarios (click on each subtitle to see the code):

Local file in a NodeJS server (click to show)

readFile uses fs.readFileSync under the hood:

var XLSX = require("xlsx");

var workbook = XLSX.readFile("test.xlsx");

For Node ESM, the readFile helper is not enabled. Instead, fs.readFileSync should be used to read the file data as a Buffer for use with XLSX.read:

import { readFileSync } from "fs";
import { read } from "xlsx/xlsx.mjs";

const buf = readFileSync("test.xlsx");
/* buf is a Buffer */
const workbook = read(buf);

User-submitted file in a web page ("Drag-and-Drop") (click to show)

For modern websites targeting Chrome 76+, File#arrayBuffer is recommended:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

async function handleDropAsync(e) {
  e.stopPropagation(); e.preventDefault();
  const f = e.dataTransfer.files[0];
  /* f is a File */
  const data = await f.arrayBuffer();
  /* data is an ArrayBuffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
}
drop_dom_element.addEventListener("drop", handleDropAsync, false);

For maximal compatibility, the FileReader API should be used:

function handleDrop(e) {
  e.stopPropagation(); e.preventDefault();
  var f = e.dataTransfer.files[0];
  /* f is a File */
  var reader = new FileReader();
  reader.onload = function(e) {
    var data = e.target.result;
    /* reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file) -> data will be an ArrayBuffer */
    var workbook = XLSX.read(data);

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  };
  reader.readAsArrayBuffer(f);
}
drop_dom_element.addEventListener("drop", handleDrop, false);

https://oss.sheetjs.com/sheetjs/ demonstrates the FileReader technique.

User-submitted file with an HTML INPUT element (click to show)

Starting with an HTML INPUT element with type="file":

<input type="file" id="input_dom_element">

For modern websites targeting Chrome 76+, Blob#arrayBuffer is recommended:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

async function handleFileAsync(e) {
  const file = e.target.files[0];
  const data = await file.arrayBuffer();
  /* data is an ArrayBuffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
}
input_dom_element.addEventListener("change", handleFileAsync, false);

For broader support (including IE10+), the FileReader approach is recommended:

function handleFile(e) {
  var file = e.target.files[0];
  var reader = new FileReader();
  reader.onload = function(e) {
    var data = e.target.result;
    /* reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file) -> data will be an ArrayBuffer */
    var workbook = XLSX.read(e.target.result);

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  };
  reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file);
}
input_dom_element.addEventListener("change", handleFile, false);

The oldie demo shows an IE-compatible fallback scenario.

Fetching a file in the web browser ("Ajax") (click to show)

For modern websites targeting Chrome 42+, fetch is recommended:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

(async() => {
  const url = "http://oss.sheetjs.com/test_files/formula_stress_test.xlsx";
  const data = await (await fetch(url)).arrayBuffer();
  /* data is an ArrayBuffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
})();

For broader support, the XMLHttpRequest approach is recommended:

var url = "http://oss.sheetjs.com/test_files/formula_stress_test.xlsx";

/* set up async GET request */
var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
req.open("GET", url, true);
req.responseType = "arraybuffer";

req.onload = function(e) {
  var workbook = XLSX.read(req.response);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
};

req.send();

The xhr demo includes a longer discussion and more examples.

http://oss.sheetjs.com/sheetjs/ajax.html shows fallback approaches for IE6+.

Local file in a PhotoShop or InDesign plugin (click to show)

readFile wraps the File logic in Photoshop and other ExtendScript targets. The specified path should be an absolute path:

#include "xlsx.extendscript.js"

/* Read test.xlsx from the Documents folder */
var workbook = XLSX.readFile(Folder.myDocuments + "/test.xlsx");

The extendscript demo includes a more complex example.

Local file in an Electron app (click to show)

readFile can be used in the renderer process:

/* From the renderer process */
var XLSX = require("xlsx");

var workbook = XLSX.readFile(path);

Electron APIs have changed over time. The electron demo shows a complete example and details the required version-specific settings.

Local file in a mobile app with React Native (click to show)

The react demo includes a sample React Native app.

Since React Native does not provide a way to read files from the filesystem, a third-party library must be used. The following libraries have been tested:

The base64 encoding returns strings compatible with the base64 type:

import XLSX from "xlsx";
import { FileSystem } from "react-native-file-access";

const b64 = await FileSystem.readFile(path, "base64");
/* b64 is a base64 string */
const workbook = XLSX.read(b64, {type: "base64"});

The ascii encoding returns binary strings compatible with the binary type:

import XLSX from "xlsx";
import { readFile } from "react-native-fs";

const bstr = await readFile(path, "ascii");
/* bstr is a binary string */
const workbook = XLSX.read(bstr, {type: "binary"});

NodeJS Server File Uploads (click to show)

read can accept a NodeJS buffer. readFile can read files generated by a HTTP POST request body parser like formidable:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const http = require("http");
const formidable = require("formidable");

const server = http.createServer((req, res) => {
  const form = new formidable.IncomingForm();
  form.parse(req, (err, fields, files) => {
    /* grab the first file */
    const f = Object.entries(files)[0][1];
    const path = f.filepath;
    const workbook = XLSX.readFile(path);

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  });
}).listen(process.env.PORT || 7262);

The server demo has more advanced examples.

Download files in a NodeJS process (click to show)

Node 17.5 and 18.0 have native support for fetch:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");

const data = await (await fetch(url)).arrayBuffer();
/* data is an ArrayBuffer */
const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

For broader compatibility, third-party modules are recommended.

request requires a null encoding to yield Buffers:

var XLSX = require("xlsx");
var request = require("request");

request({url: url, encoding: null}, function(err, resp, body) {
  var workbook = XLSX.read(body);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
});

axios works the same way in browser and in NodeJS:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const axios = require("axios");

(async() => {
  const res = await axios.get(url, {responseType: "arraybuffer"});
  /* res.data is a Buffer */
  const workbook = XLSX.read(res.data);

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
})();

Download files in an Electron app (click to show)

The net module in the main process can make HTTP/HTTPS requests to external resources. Responses should be manually concatenated using Buffer.concat:

const XLSX = require("xlsx");
const { net } = require("electron");

const req = net.request(url);
req.on("response", (res) => {
  const bufs = []; // this array will collect all of the buffers
  res.on("data", (chunk) => { bufs.push(chunk); });
  res.on("end", () => {
    const workbook = XLSX.read(Buffer.concat(bufs));

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
  });
});
req.end();

Readable Streams in NodeJS (click to show)

When dealing with Readable Streams, the easiest approach is to buffer the stream and process the whole thing at the end:

var fs = require("fs");
var XLSX = require("xlsx");

function process_RS(stream, cb) {
  var buffers = [];
  stream.on("data", function(data) { buffers.push(data); });
  stream.on("end", function() {
    var buffer = Buffer.concat(buffers);
    var workbook = XLSX.read(buffer, {type:"buffer"});

    /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook IN THE CALLBACK */
    cb(workbook);
  });
}

ReadableStream in the browser (click to show)

When dealing with ReadableStream, the easiest approach is to buffer the stream and process the whole thing at the end:

// XLSX is a global from the standalone script

async function process_RS(stream) {
  /* collect data */
  const buffers = [];
  const reader = stream.getReader();
  for(;;) {
    const res = await reader.read();
    if(res.value) buffers.push(res.value);
    if(res.done) break;
  }

  /* concat */
  const out = new Uint8Array(buffers.reduce((acc, v) => acc + v.length, 0));

  let off = 0;
  for(const u8 of arr) {
    out.set(u8, off);
    off += u8.length;
  }

  return out;
}

const data = await process_RS(stream);
/* data is Uint8Array */
const workbook = XLSX.read(data);

More detailed examples are covered in the included demos

Processing JSON and JS Data

JSON and JS data tend to represent single worksheets. This section will use a few utility functions to generate workbooks:

Create a new Worksheet

var workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();

The book_new utility function creates an empty workbook with no worksheets.

Append a Worksheet to a Workbook

XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, sheet_name);

The book_append_sheet utility function appends a worksheet to the workbook. The third argument specifies the desired worksheet name. Multiple worksheets can be added to a workbook by calling the function multiple times.

API

Create a worksheet from an array of arrays of JS values

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet(aoa, opts);

The aoa_to_sheet utility function walks an "array of arrays" in row-major order, generating a worksheet object. The following snippet generates a sheet with cell A1 set to the string A1, cell B1 set to B2, etc:

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  ["A1", "B1", "C1"],
  ["A2", "B2", "C2"],
  ["A3", "B3", "C3"]
])

"Array of Arrays Input" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Create a worksheet from an array of JS objects

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet(jsa, opts);

The json_to_sheet utility function walks an array of JS objects in order, generating a worksheet object. By default, it will generate a header row and one row per object in the array. The optional opts argument has settings to control the column order and header output.

"Array of Objects Input" describes the function and the optional opts argument in more detail.

Examples

"Zen of SheetJS" contains a detailed example "Get Data from a JSON Endpoint and Generate a Workbook"

The database demo includes examples of working with databases and query results.

Processing HTML Tables

API

Create a worksheet by scraping an HTML TABLE in the page

var worksheet = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(dom_element, opts);

The table_to_sheet utility function takes a DOM TABLE element and iterates through the rows to generate a worksheet. The opts argument is optional. "HTML Table Input" describes the function in more detail.

Create a workbook by scraping an HTML TABLE in the page

var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(dom_element, opts);

The table_to_book utility function follows the same logic as table_to_sheet. After generating a worksheet, it creates a blank workbook and appends the spreadsheet.

The options argument supports the same options as table_to_sheet, with the addition of a sheet property to control the worksheet name. If the property is missing or no options are specified, the default name Sheet1 is used.

Examples

Here are a few common scenarios (click on each subtitle to see the code):

HTML TABLE element in a webpage (click to show)

<!-- include the standalone script and shim.  this uses the UNPKG CDN -->
<script src="https://unpkg.com/xlsx/dist/shim.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/xlsx/dist/xlsx.full.min.js"></script>

<!-- example table with id attribute -->
<table id="tableau">
  <tr><td>Sheet</td><td>JS</td></tr>
  <tr><td>12345</td><td>67</td></tr>
</table>

<!-- this block should appear after the table HTML and the standalone script -->
<script type="text/javascript">
  var workbook = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(document.getElementById("tableau"));

  /* DO SOMETHING WITH workbook HERE */
</script>

Multiple tables on a web page can be converted to individual worksheets:

/* create new workbook */
var workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();

/* convert table "table1" to worksheet named "Sheet1" */
var sheet1 = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(document.getElementById("table1"));
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheet1, "Sheet1");

/* convert table "table2" to worksheet named "Sheet2" */
var sheet2 = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(document.getElementById("table2"));
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, sheet2, "Sheet2");

/* workbook now has 2 worksheets */

Alternatively, the HTML code can be extracted and parsed:

var htmlstr = document.getElementById("tableau").outerHTML;
var workbook = XLSX.read(htmlstr, {type:"string"});

Chrome/Chromium Extension (click to show)

The chrome demo shows a complete example and details the required permissions and other settings.

In an extension, it is recommended to generate the workbook in a content script and pass the object back to the extension:

/* in the worker script */
chrome.runtime.onMessage.addListener(function(msg, sender, cb) {
  /* pass a message like { sheetjs: true } from the extension to scrape */
  if(!msg || !msg.sheetjs) return;
  /* create a new workbook */
  var workbook = XLSX.utils.book_new();
  /* loop through each table element */
  var tables = document.getElementsByTagName("table")
  for(var i = 0; i < tables.length; ++i) {
    var worksheet = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(tables[i]);
    XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(workbook, worksheet, "Table" + i);
  }
  /* pass back to the extension */
  return cb(workbook);
});

Working with the Workbook

The full object format is described later in this README.

Reading a specific cell (click to show)

This example extracts the value stored in cell A1 from the first worksheet:

var first_sheet_name = workbook.SheetNames[0];
var address_of_cell = 'A1';

/* Get worksheet */
var worksheet = workbook.Sheets[first_sheet_name];

/* Find desired cell */
var desired_cell = worksheet[address_of_cell];

/* Get the value */
var desired_value = (desired_cell ? desired_cell.v : undefined);

Adding a new worksheet to a workbook (click to show)

This example uses XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet to make a sheet and XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet to append the sheet to the workbook:

var ws_name = "SheetJS";

/* make worksheet */
var ws_data = [
  [ "S", "h", "e", "e", "t", "J", "S" ],
  [  1 ,  2 ,  3 ,  4 ,  5 ]
];
var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet(ws_data);

/* Add the worksheet to the workbook */
XLSX.utils.book_append_sheet(wb, ws, ws_name);

Creating a new workbook from scratch (click to show)

The workbook object contains a SheetNames array of names and a Sheets object mapping sheet names to sheet objects. The XLSX.utils.book_new utility function creates a new workbook object:

/* create a new blank workbook */
var wb = XLSX.utils.book_new();

The new workbook is blank and contains no worksheets. The write functions will error if the workbook is empty.

Parsing and Writing Examples

https://sheetjs.com/demos/modify.html read + modify + write files

https://github.com/SheetJS/sheetjs/blob/HEAD/bin/xlsx.njs node

The node version installs a command line tool xlsx which can read spreadsheet files and output the contents in various formats. The source is available at xlsx.njs in the bin directory.

Some helper functions in XLSX.utils generate different views of the sheets:

  • XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv generates CSV
  • XLSX.utils.sheet_to_txt generates UTF16 Formatted Text
  • XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html generates HTML
  • XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json generates an array of objects
  • XLSX.utils.sheet_to_formulae generates a list of formulae

Writing Workbooks

For writing, the first step is to generate output data. The helper functions write and writeFile will produce the data in various formats suitable for dissemination. The second step is to actual share the data with the end point. Assuming workbook is a workbook object:

nodejs write a file (click to show)

XLSX.writeFile uses fs.writeFileSync in server environments:

if(typeof require !== 'undefined') XLSX = require('xlsx');
/* output format determined by filename */
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, 'out.xlsb');
/* at this point, out.xlsb is a file that you can distribute */

Photoshop ExtendScript write a file (click to show)

writeFile wraps the File logic in Photoshop and other ExtendScript targets. The specified path should be an absolute path:

#include "xlsx.extendscript.js"
/* output format determined by filename */
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, 'out.xlsx');
/* at this point, out.xlsx is a file that you can distribute */

The extendscript demo includes a more complex example.

Browser add TABLE element to page (click to show)

The sheet_to_html utility function generates HTML code that can be added to any DOM element.

var worksheet = workbook.Sheets[workbook.SheetNames[0]];
var container = document.getElementById('tableau');
container.innerHTML = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(worksheet);

Browser upload file (ajax) (click to show)

A complete example using XHR is included in the XHR demo, along with examples for fetch and wrapper libraries. This example assumes the server can handle Base64-encoded files (see the demo for a basic nodejs server):

/* in this example, send a base64 string to the server */
var wopts = { bookType:'xlsx', bookSST:false, type:'base64' };

var wbout = XLSX.write(workbook,wopts);

var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
req.open("POST", "/upload", true);
var formdata = new FormData();
formdata.append('file', 'test.xlsx'); // <-- server expects `file` to hold name
formdata.append('data', wbout); // <-- `data` holds the base64-encoded data
req.send(formdata);

Browser save file (click to show)

XLSX.writeFile wraps a few techniques for triggering a file save:

  • URL browser API creates an object URL for the file, which the library uses by creating a link and forcing a click. It is supported in modern browsers.
  • msSaveBlob is an IE10+ API for triggering a file save.
  • IE_FileSave uses VBScript and ActiveX to write a file in IE6+ for Windows XP and Windows 7. The shim must be included in the containing HTML page.

There is no standard way to determine if the actual file has been downloaded.

/* output format determined by filename */
XLSX.writeFile(workbook, 'out.xlsb');
/* at this point, out.xlsb will have been downloaded */

Browser save file (compatibility) (click to show)

XLSX.writeFile techniques work for most modern browsers as well as older IE. For much older browsers, there are workarounds implemented by wrapper libraries.

FileSaver.js implements saveAs. Note: XLSX.writeFile will automatically call saveAs if available.

/* bookType can be any supported output type */
var wopts = { bookType:'xlsx', bookSST:false, type:'array' };

var wbout = XLSX.write(workbook,wopts);

/* the saveAs call downloads a file on the local machine */
saveAs(new Blob([wbout],{type:"application/octet-stream"}), "test.xlsx");

Downloadify uses a Flash SWF button to generate local files, suitable for environments where ActiveX is unavailable:

Downloadify.create(id,{
    /* other options are required! read the downloadify docs for more info */
    filename: "test.xlsx",
    data: function() { return XLSX.write(wb, {bookType:"xlsx", type:'base64'}); },
    append: false,
    dataType: 'base64'
});

The oldie demo shows an IE-compatible fallback scenario.

The included demos cover mobile apps and other special deployments.

Writing Examples

Streaming Write

The streaming write functions are available in the XLSX.stream object. They take the same arguments as the normal write functions but return a Readable Stream. They are only exposed in NodeJS.

  • XLSX.stream.to_csv is the streaming version of XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv.
  • XLSX.stream.to_html is the streaming version of XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html.
  • XLSX.stream.to_json is the streaming version of XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json.

nodejs convert to CSV and write file (click to show)

var output_file_name = "out.csv";
var stream = XLSX.stream.to_csv(worksheet);
stream.pipe(fs.createWriteStream(output_file_name));

nodejs write JSON stream to screen (click to show)

/* to_json returns an object-mode stream */
var stream = XLSX.stream.to_json(worksheet, {raw:true});

/* the following stream converts JS objects to text via JSON.stringify */
var conv = new Transform({writableObjectMode:true});
conv._transform = function(obj, e, cb){ cb(null, JSON.stringify(obj) + "\n"); };

stream.pipe(conv); conv.pipe(process.stdout);

https://github.com/sheetjs/sheetaki pipes write streams to nodejs response.

Interface

XLSX is the exposed variable in the browser and the exported node variable

XLSX.version is the version of the library (added by the build script).

XLSX.SSF is an embedded version of the format library.

Parsing functions

XLSX.read(data, read_opts) attempts to parse data.

XLSX.readFile(filename, read_opts) attempts to read filename and parse.

Parse options are described in the Parsing Options section.

Writing functions

XLSX.write(wb, write_opts) attempts to write the workbook wb

XLSX.writeFile(wb, filename, write_opts) attempts to write wb to filename. In browser-based environments, it will attempt to force a client-side download.

XLSX.writeFileAsync(wb, filename, o, cb) attempts to write wb to filename. If o is omitted, the writer will use the third argument as the callback.

XLSX.stream contains a set of streaming write functions.

Write options are described in the Writing Options section.

Utilities

Utilities are available in the XLSX.utils object and are described in the Utility Functions section:

Constructing:

  • book_new creates an empty workbook
  • book_append_sheet adds a worksheet to a workbook

Importing:

  • aoa_to_sheet converts an array of arrays of JS data to a worksheet.
  • json_to_sheet converts an array of JS objects to a worksheet.
  • table_to_sheet converts a DOM TABLE element to a worksheet.
  • sheet_add_aoa adds an array of arrays of JS data to an existing worksheet.
  • sheet_add_json adds an array of JS objects to an existing worksheet.

Exporting:

  • sheet_to_json converts a worksheet object to an array of JSON objects.
  • sheet_to_csv generates delimiter-separated-values output.
  • sheet_to_txt generates UTF16 formatted text.
  • sheet_to_html generates HTML output.
  • sheet_to_formulae generates a list of the formulae (with value fallbacks).

Cell and cell address manipulation:

  • format_cell generates the text value for a cell (using number formats).
  • encode_row / decode_row converts between 0-indexed rows and 1-indexed rows.
  • encode_col / decode_col converts between 0-indexed columns and column names.
  • encode_cell / decode_cell converts cell addresses.
  • encode_range / decode_range converts cell ranges.

Common Spreadsheet Format

SheetJS conforms to the Common Spreadsheet Format (CSF):

General Structures

Cell address objects are stored as {c:C, r:R} where C and R are 0-indexed column and row numbers, respectively. For example, the cell address B5 is represented by the object {c:1, r:4}.

Cell range objects are stored as {s:S, e:E} where S is the first cell and E is the last cell in the range. The ranges are inclusive. For example, the range A3:B7 is represented by the object {s:{c:0, r:2}, e:{c:1, r:6}}. Utility functions perform a row-major order walk traversal of a sheet range:

for(var R = range.s.r; R <= range.e.r; ++R) {
  for(var C = range.s.c; C <= range.e.c; ++C) {
    var cell_address = {c:C, r:R};
    /* if an A1-style address is needed, encode the address */
    var cell_ref = XLSX.utils.encode_cell(cell_address);
  }
}

Cell Object

Cell objects are plain JS objects with keys and values following the convention:

KeyDescription
vraw value (see Data Types section for more info)
wformatted text (if applicable)
ttype: b Boolean, e Error, n Number, d Date, s Text, z Stub
fcell formula encoded as an A1-style string (if applicable)
Frange of enclosing array if formula is array formula (if applicable)
rrich text encoding (if applicable)
hHTML rendering of the rich text (if applicable)
ccomments associated with the cell
znumber format string associated with the cell (if requested)
lcell hyperlink object (.Target holds link, .Tooltip is tooltip)
sthe style/theme of the cell (if applicable)

Built-in export utilities (such as the CSV exporter) will use the w text if it is available. To change a value, be sure to delete cell.w (or set it to undefined) before attempting to export. The utilities will regenerate the w text from the number format (cell.z) and the raw value if possible.

The actual array formula is stored in the f field of the first cell in the array range. Other cells in the range will omit the f field.

Data Types

The raw value is stored in the v value property, interpreted based on the t type property. This separation allows for representation of numbers as well as numeric text. There are 6 valid cell types:

TypeDescription
bBoolean: value interpreted as JS boolean
eError: value is a numeric code and w property stores common name **
nNumber: value is a JS number **
dDate: value is a JS Date object or string to be parsed as Date **
sText: value interpreted as JS string and written as text **
zStub: blank stub cell that is ignored by data processing utilities **

Error values and interpretation (click to show)

ValueError Meaning
0x00#NULL!
0x07#DIV/0!
0x0F#VALUE!
0x17#REF!
0x1D#NAME?
0x24#NUM!
0x2A#N/A
0x2B#GETTING_DATA

Type n is the Number type. This includes all forms of data that Excel stores as numbers, such as dates/times and Boolean fields. Excel exclusively uses data that can be fit in an IEEE754 floating point number, just like JS Number, so the v field holds the raw number. The w field holds formatted text. Dates are stored as numbers by default and converted with XLSX.SSF.parse_date_code.

Type d is the Date type, generated only when the option cellDates is passed. Since JSON does not have a natural Date type, parsers are generally expected to store ISO 8601 Date strings like you would get from date.toISOString(). On the other hand, writers and exporters should be able to handle date strings and JS Date objects. Note that Excel disregards timezone modifiers and treats all dates in the local timezone. The library does not correct for this error.

Type s is the String type. Values are explicitly stored as text. Excel will interpret these cells as "number stored as text". Generated Excel files automatically suppress that class of error, but other formats may elicit errors.

Type z represents blank stub cells. They are generated in cases where cells have no assigned value but hold comments or other metadata. They are ignored by the core library data processing utility functions. By default these cells are not generated; the parser sheetStubs option must be set to true.

Dates

Excel Date Code details (click to show)

By default, Excel stores dates as numbers with a format code that specifies date processing. For example, the date 19-Feb-17 is stored as the number 42785 with a number format of d-mmm-yy. The SSF module understands number formats and performs the appropriate conversion.

XLSX also supports a special date type d where the data is an ISO 8601 date string. The formatter converts the date back to a number.

The default behavior for all parsers is to generate number cells. Setting cellDates to true will force the generators to store dates.

Time Zones and Dates (click to show)

Excel has no native concept of universal time. All times are specified in the local time zone. Excel limitations prevent specifying true absolute dates.

Following Excel, this library treats all dates as relative to local time zone.

Epochs: 1900 and 1904 (click to show)

Excel supports two epochs (January 1 1900 and January 1 1904). The workbook's epoch can be determined by examining the workbook's wb.Workbook.WBProps.date1904 property:

!!(((wb.Workbook||{}).WBProps||{}).date1904)

Sheet Objects

Each key that does not start with ! maps to a cell (using A-1 notation)

sheet[address] returns the cell object for the specified address.

Special sheet keys (accessible as sheet[key], each starting with !):

sheet['!ref']: A-1 based range representing the sheet range. Functions that work with sheets should use this parameter to determine the range. Cells that are assigned outside of the range are not processed. In particular, when writing a sheet by hand, cells outside of the range are not included

Functions that handle sheets should test for the presence of !ref field. If the !ref is omitted or is not a valid range, functions are free to treat the sheet as empty or attempt to guess the range. The standard utilities that ship with this library treat sheets as empty (for example, the CSV output is empty string).

When reading a worksheet with the sheetRows property set, the ref parameter will use the restricted range. The original range is set at ws['!fullref']

sheet['!margins']: Object representing the page margins. The default values follow Excel's "normal" preset. Excel also has a "wide" and a "narrow" preset but they are stored as raw measurements. The main properties are listed below:

Page margin details (click to show)

keydescription"normal""wide""narrow"
leftleft margin (inches)0.71.00.25
rightright margin (inches)0.71.00.25
toptop margin (inches)0.751.00.75
bottombottom margin (inches)0.751.00.75
headerheader margin (inches)0.30.50.3
footerfooter margin (inches)0.30.50.3
/* Set worksheet sheet to "normal" */
ws["!margins"]={left:0.7, right:0.7, top:0.75,bottom:0.75,header:0.3,footer:0.3}
/* Set worksheet sheet to "wide" */
ws["!margins"]={left:1.0, right:1.0, top:1.0, bottom:1.0, header:0.5,footer:0.5}
/* Set worksheet sheet to "narrow" */
ws["!margins"]={left:0.25,right:0.25,top:0.75,bottom:0.75,header:0.3,footer:0.3}

Worksheet Object

In addition to the base sheet keys, worksheets also add:

ws['!cols']: array of column properties objects. Column widths are actually stored in files in a normalized manner, measured in terms of the "Maximum Digit Width" (the largest width of the rendered digits 0-9, in pixels). When parsed, the column objects store the pixel width in the wpx field, character width in the wch field, and the maximum digit width in the MDW field.

ws['!rows']: array of row properties objects as explained later in the docs. Each row object encodes properties including row height and visibility.

ws['!merges']: array of range objects corresponding to the merged cells in the worksheet. Plain text formats do not support merge cells. CSV export will write all cells in the merge range if they exist, so be sure that only the first cell (upper-left) in the range is set.

ws['!outline']: configure how outlines should behave. Options default to the default settings in Excel 2019:

keyExcel featuredefault
aboveUncheck "Summary rows below detail"false
leftUncheck "Summary rows to the right of detail"false
  • ws['!protect']: object of write sheet protection properties. The password key specifies the password for formats that support password-protected sheets (XLSX/XLSB/XLS). The writer uses the XOR obfuscation method. The following keys control the sheet protection -- set to false to enable a feature when sheet is locked or set to true to disable a feature:

Worksheet Protection Details (click to show)

keyfeature (true=disabled / false=enabled)default
selectLockedCellsSelect locked cellsenabled
selectUnlockedCellsSelect unlocked cellsenabled
formatCellsFormat cellsdisabled
formatColumnsFormat columnsdisabled
formatRowsFormat rowsdisabled
insertColumnsInsert columnsdisabled
insertRowsInsert rowsdisabled
insertHyperlinksInsert hyperlinksdisabled
deleteColumnsDelete columnsdisabled
deleteRowsDelete rowsdisabled
sortSortdisabled
autoFilterFilterdisabled
pivotTablesUse PivotTable reportsdisabled
objectsEdit objectsenabled
scenariosEdit scenariosenabled
  • ws['!autofilter']: AutoFilter object following the schema:
type AutoFilter = {
  ref:string; // A-1 based range representing the AutoFilter table range
}

Chartsheet Object

Chartsheets are represented as standard sheets. They are distinguished with the !type property set to "chart".

The underlying data and !ref refer to the cached data in the chartsheet. The first row of the chartsheet is the underlying header.

Macrosheet Object

Macrosheets are represented as standard sheets. They are distinguished with the !type property set to "macro".

Dialogsheet Object

Dialogsheets are represented as standard sheets. They are distinguished with the !type property set to "dialog".

Workbook Object

workbook.SheetNames is an ordered list of the sheets in the workbook

wb.Sheets[sheetname] returns an object representing the worksheet.

wb.Props is an object storing the standard properties. wb.Custprops stores custom properties. Since the XLS standard properties deviate from the XLSX standard, XLS parsing stores core properties in both places.

wb.Workbook stores workbook-level attributes.

Workbook File Properties

The various file formats use different internal names for file properties. The workbook Props object normalizes the names:

File Properties (click to show)

JS NameExcel Description
TitleSummary tab "Title"
SubjectSummary tab "Subject"
AuthorSummary tab "Author"
ManagerSummary tab "Manager"
CompanySummary tab "Company"
CategorySummary tab "Category"
KeywordsSummary tab "Keywords"
CommentsSummary tab "Comments"
LastAuthorStatistics tab "Last saved by"
CreatedDateStatistics tab "Created"

For example, to set the workbook title property:

if(!wb.Props) wb.Props = {};
wb.Props.Title = "Insert Title Here";

Custom properties are added in the workbook Custprops object:

if(!wb.Custprops) wb.Custprops = {};
wb.Custprops["Custom Property"] = "Custom Value";

Writers will process the Props key of the options object:

/* force the Author to be "SheetJS" */
XLSX.write(wb, {Props:{Author:"SheetJS"}});

Workbook-Level Attributes

wb.Workbook stores workbook-level attributes.

Defined Names

wb.Workbook.Names is an array of defined name objects which have the keys:

Defined Name Properties (click to show)

KeyDescription
SheetName scope. Sheet Index (0 = first sheet) or null (Workbook)
NameCase-sensitive name. Standard rules apply **
RefA1-style Reference ("Sheet1!$A$1:$D$20")
CommentComment (only applicable for XLS/XLSX/XLSB)

Excel allows two sheet-scoped defined names to share the same name. However, a sheet-scoped name cannot collide with a workbook-scope name. Workbook writers may not enforce this constraint.

Workbook Views

wb.Workbook.Views is an array of workbook view objects which have the keys:

KeyDescription
RTLIf true, display right-to-left

Miscellaneous Workbook Properties

wb.Workbook.WBProps holds other workbook properties:

KeyDescription
CodeNameVBA Project Workbook Code Name
date1904epoch: 0/false for 1900 system, 1/true for 1904
filterPrivacyWarn or strip personally identifying info on save

Document Features

Even for basic features like date storage, the official Excel formats store the same content in different ways. The parsers are expected to convert from the underlying file format representation to the Common Spreadsheet Format. Writers are expected to convert from CSF back to the underlying file format.

Formulae

The A1-style formula string is stored in the f field. Even though different file formats store the formulae in different ways, the formats are translated. Even though some formats store formulae with a leading equal sign, CSF formulae do not start with =.

Representation of A1=1, A2=2, A3=A1+A2 (click to show)

{
  "!ref": "A1:A3",
  A1: { t:'n', v:1 },
  A2: { t:'n', v:2 },
  A3: { t:'n', v:3, f:'A1+A2' }
}

Shared formulae are decompressed and each cell has the formula corresponding to its cell. Writers generally do not attempt to generate shared formulae.

Cells with formula entries but no value will be serialized in a way that Excel and other spreadsheet tools will recognize. This library will not automatically compute formula results! For example, to compute BESSELJ in a worksheet:

Formula without known value (click to show)

{
  "!ref": "A1:A3",
  A1: { t:'n', v:3.14159 },
  A2: { t:'n', v:2 },
  A3: { t:'n', f:'BESSELJ(A1,A2)' }
}

Array Formulae

Array formulae are stored in the top-left cell of the array block. All cells of an array formula have a F field corresponding to the range. A single-cell formula can be distinguished from a plain formula by the presence of F field.

Array Formula examples (click to show)

For example, setting the cell C1 to the array formula {=SUM(A1:A3*B1:B3)}:

worksheet['C1'] = { t:'n', f: "SUM(A1:A3*B1:B3)", F:"C1:C1" };

For a multi-cell array formula, every cell has the same array range but only the first cell specifies the formula. Consider D1:D3=A1:A3*B1:B3:

worksheet['D1'] = { t:'n', F:"D1:D3", f:"A1:A3*B1:B3" };
worksheet['D2'] = { t:'n', F:"D1:D3" };
worksheet['D3'] = { t:'n', F:"D1:D3" };

Utilities and writers are expected to check for the presence of a F field and ignore any possible formula element f in cells other than the starting cell. They are not expected to perform validation of the formulae!

Formula Output Utility Function (click to show)

The sheet_to_formulae method generates one line per formula or array formula. Array formulae are rendered in the form range=formula while plain cells are rendered in the form cell=formula or value. Note that string literals are prefixed with an apostrophe ', consistent with Excel's formula bar display.

Formulae File Format Details (click to show)

Storage RepresentationFormatsReadWrite
A1-style stringsXLSX
RC-style stringsXLML and plain text
BIFF Parsed formulaeXLSB and all XLS formats 
OpenFormula formulaeODS/FODS/UOS
Lotus Parsed formulaeAll Lotus WK_ formats 

Since Excel prohibits named cells from colliding with names of A1 or RC style cell references, a (not-so-simple) regex conversion is possible. BIFF Parsed formulae and Lotus Parsed formulae have to be explicitly unwound. OpenFormula formulae can be converted with regular expressions.

Row and Column Properties

Format Support (click to show)

Row Properties: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML, SYLK, DOM, ODS

Column Properties: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML, SYLK, DOM

Row and Column properties are not extracted by default when reading from a file and are not persisted by default when writing to a file. The option cellStyles: true must be passed to the relevant read or write function.

Column Properties

The !cols array in each worksheet, if present, is a collection of ColInfo objects which have the following properties:

type ColInfo = {
  /* visibility */
  hidden?: boolean; // if true, the column is hidden

  /* column width is specified in one of the following ways: */
  wpx?:    number;  // width in screen pixels
  width?:  number;  // width in Excel's "Max Digit Width", width*256 is integral
  wch?:    number;  // width in characters

  /* other fields for preserving features from files */
  level?:  number;  // 0-indexed outline / group level
  MDW?:    number;  // Excel's "Max Digit Width" unit, always integral
};

Row Properties

The !rows array in each worksheet, if present, is a collection of RowInfo objects which have the following properties:

type RowInfo = {
  /* visibility */
  hidden?: boolean; // if true, the row is hidden

  /* row height is specified in one of the following ways: */
  hpx?:    number;  // height in screen pixels
  hpt?:    number;  // height in points

  level?:  number;  // 0-indexed outline / group level
};

Outline / Group Levels Convention

The Excel UI displays the base outline level as 1 and the max level as 8. Following JS conventions, SheetJS uses 0-indexed outline levels wherein the base outline level is 0 and the max level is 7.

Why are there three width types? (click to show)

There are three different width types corresponding to the three different ways spreadsheets store column widths:

SYLK and other plain text formats use raw character count. Contemporaneous tools like Visicalc and Multiplan were character based. Since the characters had the same width, it sufficed to store a count. This tradition was continued into the BIFF formats.

SpreadsheetML (2003) tried to align with HTML by standardizing on screen pixel count throughout the file. Column widths, row heights, and other measures use pixels. When the pixel and character counts do not align, Excel rounds values.

XLSX internally stores column widths in a nebulous "Max Digit Width" form. The Max Digit Width is the width of the largest digit when rendered (generally the "0" character is the widest). The internal width must be an integer multiple of the the width divided by 256. ECMA-376 describes a formula for converting between pixels and the internal width. This represents a hybrid approach.

Read functions attempt to populate all three properties. Write functions will try to cycle specified values to the desired type. In order to avoid potential conflicts, manipulation should delete the other properties first. For example, when changing the pixel width, delete the wch and width properties.

Implementation details (click to show)

Row Heights

Excel internally stores row heights in points. The default resolution is 72 DPI or 96 PPI, so the pixel and point size should agree. For different resolutions they may not agree, so the library separates the concepts.

Even though all of the information is made available, writers are expected to follow the priority order:

  1. use hpx pixel height if available
  2. use hpt point height if available

Column Widths

Given the constraints, it is possible to determine the MDW without actually inspecting the font! The parsers guess the pixel width by converting from width to pixels and back, repeating for all possible MDW and selecting the MDW that minimizes the error. XLML actually stores the pixel width, so the guess works in the opposite direction.

Even though all of the information is made available, writers are expected to follow the priority order:

  1. use width field if available
  2. use wpx pixel width if available
  3. use wch character count if available

Number Formats

The cell.w formatted text for each cell is produced from cell.v and cell.z format. If the format is not specified, the Excel General format is used. The format can either be specified as a string or as an index into the format table. Parsers are expected to populate workbook.SSF with the number format table. Writers are expected to serialize the table.

Custom tools should ensure that the local table has each used format string somewhere in the table. Excel convention mandates that the custom formats start at index 164. The following example creates a custom format from scratch:

New worksheet with custom format (click to show)

var wb = {
  SheetNames: ["Sheet1"],
  Sheets: {
    Sheet1: {
      "!ref":"A1:C1",
      A1: { t:"n", v:10000 },                    // <-- General format
      B1: { t:"n", v:10000, z: "0%" },           // <-- Builtin format
      C1: { t:"n", v:10000, z: "\"T\"\ #0.00" }  // <-- Custom format
    }
  }
}

The rules are slightly different from how Excel displays custom number formats. In particular, literal characters must be wrapped in double quotes or preceded by a backslash. For more info, see the Excel documentation article Create or delete a custom number format or ECMA-376 18.8.31 (Number Formats)

Default Number Formats (click to show)

The default formats are listed in ECMA-376 18.8.30:

IDFormat
0General
10
20.00
3#,##0
4#,##0.00
90%
100.00%
110.00E+00
12# ?/?
13# ??/??
14m/d/yy (see below)
15d-mmm-yy
16d-mmm
17mmm-yy
18h:mm AM/PM
19h:mm:ss AM/PM
20h:mm
21h:mm:ss
22m/d/yy h:mm
37#,##0 ;(#,##0)
38#,##0 ;[Red](#,##0)
39#,##0.00;(#,##0.00)
40#,##0.00;[Red](#,##0.00)
45mm:ss
46[h]:mm:ss
47mmss.0
48##0.0E+0
49@

Format 14 (m/d/yy) is localized by Excel: even though the file specifies that number format, it will be drawn differently based on system settings. It makes sense when the producer and consumer of files are in the same locale, but that is not always the case over the Internet. To get around this ambiguity, parse functions accept the dateNF option to override the interpretation of that specific format string.

Hyperlinks

Format Support (click to show)

Cell Hyperlinks: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML, ODS

Tooltips: XLSX/M, XLSB, BIFF8 XLS, XLML

Hyperlinks are stored in the l key of cell objects. The Target field of the hyperlink object is the target of the link, including the URI fragment. Tooltips are stored in the Tooltip field and are displayed when you move your mouse over the text.

For example, the following snippet creates a link from cell A3 to https://sheetjs.com with the tip "Find us @ SheetJS.com!":

ws['A1'].l = { Target:"https://sheetjs.com", Tooltip:"Find us @ SheetJS.com!" };

Note that Excel does not automatically style hyperlinks -- they will generally be displayed as normal text.

Remote Links

HTTP / HTTPS links can be used directly:

ws['A2'].l = { Target:"https://docs.sheetjs.com/#hyperlinks" };
ws['A3'].l = { Target:"http://localhost:7262/yes_localhost_works" };

Excel also supports mailto email links with subject line:

ws['A4'].l = { Target:"mailto:ignored@dev.null" };
ws['A5'].l = { Target:"mailto:ignored@dev.null?subject=Test Subject" };

Local Links

Links to absolute paths should use the file:// URI scheme:

ws['B1'].l = { Target:"file:///SheetJS/t.xlsx" }; /* Link to /SheetJS/t.xlsx */
ws['B2'].l = { Target:"file:///c:/SheetJS.xlsx" }; /* Link to c:\SheetJS.xlsx */

Links to relative paths can be specified without a scheme:

ws['B3'].l = { Target:"SheetJS.xlsb" }; /* Link to SheetJS.xlsb */
ws['B4'].l = { Target:"../SheetJS.xlsm" }; /* Link to ../SheetJS.xlsm */

Relative Paths have undefined behavior in the SpreadsheetML 2003 format. Excel 2019 will treat a ..\ parent mark as two levels up.

Internal Links

Links where the target is a cell or range or defined name in the same workbook ("Internal Links") are marked with a leading hash character:

ws['C1'].l = { Target:"#E2" }; /* Link to cell E2 */
ws['C2'].l = { Target:"#Sheet2!E2" }; /* Link to cell E2 in sheet Sheet2 */
ws['C3'].l = { Target:"#SomeDefinedName" }; /* Link to Defined Name */

Cell Comments

Cell comments are objects stored in the c array of cell objects. The actual contents of the comment are split into blocks based on the comment author. The a field of each comment object is the author of the comment and the t field is the plain text representation.

For example, the following snippet appends a cell comment into cell A1:

if(!ws.A1.c) ws.A1.c = [];
ws.A1.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"I'm a little comment, short and stout!"});

Note: XLSB enforces a 54 character limit on the Author name. Names longer than 54 characters may cause issues with other formats.

To mark a comment as normally hidden, set the hidden property:

if(!ws.A1.c) ws.A1.c = [];
ws.A1.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"This comment is visible"});

if(!ws.A2.c) ws.A2.c = [];
ws.A2.c.hidden = true;
ws.A2.c.push({a:"SheetJS", t:"This comment will be hidden"});

Sheet Visibility

Excel enables hiding sheets in the lower tab bar. The sheet data is stored in the file but the UI does not readily make it available. Standard hidden sheets are revealed in the "Unhide" menu. Excel also has "very hidden" sheets which cannot be revealed in the menu. It is only accessible in the VB Editor!

The visibility setting is stored in the Hidden property of sheet props array.

More details (click to show)

ValueDefinition
0Visible
1Hidden
2Very Hidden

With https://rawgit.com/SheetJS/test_files/HEAD/sheet_visibility.xlsx:

> wb.Workbook.Sheets.map(function(x) { return [x.name, x.Hidden] })
[ [ 'Visible', 0 ], [ 'Hidden', 1 ], [ 'VeryHidden', 2 ] ]

Non-Excel formats do not support the Very Hidden state. The best way to test if a sheet is visible is to check if the Hidden property is logical truth:

> wb.Workbook.Sheets.map(function(x) { return [x.name, !x.Hidden] })
[ [ 'Visible', true ], [ 'Hidden', false ], [ 'VeryHidden', false ] ]

VBA and Macros

VBA Macros are stored in a special data blob that is exposed in the vbaraw property of the workbook object when the bookVBA option is true. They are supported in XLSM, XLSB, and BIFF8 XLS formats. The supported format writers automatically insert the data blobs if it is present in the workbook and associate with the worksheet names.

Custom Code Names (click to show)

The workbook code name is stored in wb.Workbook.WBProps.CodeName. By default, Excel will write ThisWorkbook or a translated phrase like DieseArbeitsmappe. Worksheet and Chartsheet code names are in the worksheet properties object at wb.Workbook.Sheets[i].CodeName. Macrosheets and Dialogsheets are ignored.

The readers and writers preserve the code names, but they have to be manually set when adding a VBA blob to a different workbook.

Macrosheets (click to show)

Older versions of Excel also supported a non-VBA "macrosheet" sheet type that stored automation commands. These are exposed in objects with the !type property set to "macro".

Detecting macros in workbooks (click to show)

The vbaraw field will only be set if macros are present, so testing is simple:

function wb_has_macro(wb/*:workbook*/)/*:boolean*/ {
    if(!!wb.vbaraw) return true;
    const sheets = wb.SheetNames.map((n) => wb.Sheets[n]);
    return sheets.some((ws) => !!ws && ws['!type']=='macro');
}

Parsing Options

The exported read and readFile functions accept an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
type Input data encoding (see Input Type below)
rawfalseIf true, plain text parsing will not parse values **
codepage If specified, use code page when appropriate **
cellFormulatrueSave formulae to the .f field
cellHTMLtrueParse rich text and save HTML to the .h field
cellNFfalseSave number format string to the .z field
cellStylesfalseSave style/theme info to the .s field
cellTexttrueGenerated formatted text to the .w field
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
dateNF If specified, use the string for date code 14 **
sheetStubsfalseCreate cell objects of type z for stub cells
sheetRows0If >0, read the first sheetRows rows **
bookDepsfalseIf true, parse calculation chains
bookFilesfalseIf true, add raw files to book object **
bookPropsfalseIf true, only parse enough to get book metadata **
bookSheetsfalseIf true, only parse enough to get the sheet names
bookVBAfalseIf true, copy VBA blob to vbaraw field **
password""If defined and file is encrypted, use password **
WTFfalseIf true, throw errors on unexpected file features **
sheets If specified, only parse specified sheets **
PRNfalseIf true, allow parsing of PRN files **
xlfnfalseIf true, preserve _xlfn. prefixes in formulae **
FS DSV Field Separator override
  • Even if cellNF is false, formatted text will be generated and saved to .w
  • In some cases, sheets may be parsed even if bookSheets is false.
  • Excel aggressively tries to interpret values from CSV and other plain text. This leads to surprising behavior! The raw option suppresses value parsing.
  • bookSheets and bookProps combine to give both sets of information
  • Deps will be an empty object if bookDeps is false
  • bookFiles behavior depends on file type:
    • keys array (paths in the ZIP) for ZIP-based formats
    • files hash (mapping paths to objects representing the files) for ZIP
    • cfb object for formats using CFB containers
  • sheetRows-1 rows will be generated when looking at the JSON object output (since the header row is counted as a row when parsing the data)
  • By default all worksheets are parsed. sheets restricts based on input type:
    • number: zero-based index of worksheet to parse (0 is first worksheet)
    • string: name of worksheet to parse (case insensitive)
    • array of numbers and strings to select multiple worksheets.
  • bookVBA merely exposes the raw VBA CFB object. It does not parse the data. XLSM and XLSB store the VBA CFB object in xl/vbaProject.bin. BIFF8 XLS mixes the VBA entries alongside the core Workbook entry, so the library generates a new XLSB-compatible blob from the XLS CFB container.
  • codepage is applied to BIFF2 - BIFF5 files without CodePage records and to CSV files without BOM in type:"binary". BIFF8 XLS always defaults to 1200.
  • PRN affects parsing of text files without a common delimiter character.
  • Currently only XOR encryption is supported. Unsupported error will be thrown for files employing other encryption methods.
  • Newer Excel functions are serialized with the _xlfn. prefix, hidden from the user. SheetJS will strip _xlfn. normally. The xlfn option preserves them.
  • WTF is mainly for development. By default, the parser will suppress read errors on single worksheets, allowing you to read from the worksheets that do parse properly. Setting WTF:true forces those errors to be thrown.

Input Type

Strings can be interpreted in multiple ways. The type parameter for read tells the library how to parse the data argument:

typeexpected input
"base64"string: Base64 encoding of the file
"binary"string: binary string (byte n is data.charCodeAt(n))
"string"string: JS string (characters interpreted as UTF8)
"buffer"nodejs Buffer
"array"array: array of 8-bit unsigned int (byte n is data[n])
"file"string: path of file that will be read (nodejs only)

Guessing File Type

Implementation Details (click to show)

Excel and other spreadsheet tools read the first few bytes and apply other heuristics to determine a file type. This enables file type punning: renaming files with the .xls extension will tell your computer to use Excel to open the file but Excel will know how to handle it. This library applies similar logic:

Byte 0Raw File TypeSpreadsheet Types
0xD0CFB ContainerBIFF 5/8 or protected XLSX/XLSB or WQ3/QPW or XLR
0x09BIFF StreamBIFF 2/3/4/5
0x3CXML/HTMLSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x50ZIP ArchiveXLSB or XLSX/M or ODS or UOS2 or NUMBERS or text
0x49Plain TextSYLK or plain text
0x54Plain TextDIF or plain text
0xEFUTF8 EncodedSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0xFFUTF16 EncodedSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x00Record StreamLotus WK* or Quattro Pro or plain text
0x7BPlain textRTF or plain text
0x0APlain textSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x0DPlain textSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text
0x20Plain textSpreadsheetML / Flat ODS / UOS1 / HTML / plain text

DBF files are detected based on the first byte as well as the third and fourth bytes (corresponding to month and day of the file date)

Works for Windows files are detected based on the BOF record with type 0xFF

Plain text format guessing follows the priority order:

FormatTest
XML<?xml appears in the first 1024 characters
HTMLstarts with < and HTML tags appear in the first 1024 characters *
XMLstarts with < and the first tag is valid
RTFstarts with {\rt
DSVstarts with /sep=.$/, separator is the specified character
DSVmore unquoted `
DSVmore unquoted ; chars than \t or , in the first 1024
TSVmore unquoted \t chars than , chars in the first 1024
CSVone of the first 1024 characters is a comma ","
ETHstarts with socialcalc:version:
PRNPRN option is set to true
CSV(fallback)
  • HTML tags include: html, table, head, meta, script, style, div

Why are random text files valid? (click to show)

Excel is extremely aggressive in reading files. Adding an XLS extension to any display text file (where the only characters are ANSI display chars) tricks Excel into thinking that the file is potentially a CSV or TSV file, even if it is only one column! This library attempts to replicate that behavior.

The best approach is to validate the desired worksheet and ensure it has the expected number of rows or columns. Extracting the range is extremely simple:

var range = XLSX.utils.decode_range(worksheet['!ref']);
var ncols = range.e.c - range.s.c + 1, nrows = range.e.r - range.s.r + 1;

Writing Options

The exported write and writeFile functions accept an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
type Output data encoding (see Output Type below)
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
bookSSTfalseGenerate Shared String Table **
bookType"xlsx"Type of Workbook (see below for supported formats)
sheet""Name of Worksheet for single-sheet formats **
compressionfalseUse ZIP compression for ZIP-based formats **
Props Override workbook properties when writing **
themeXLSX Override theme XML when writing XLSX/XLSB/XLSM **
ignoreECtrueSuppress "number as text" errors **
  • bookSST is slower and more memory intensive, but has better compatibility with older versions of iOS Numbers
  • The raw data is the only thing guaranteed to be saved. Features not described in this README may not be serialized.
  • cellDates only applies to XLSX output and is not guaranteed to work with third-party readers. Excel itself does not usually write cells with type d so non-Excel tools may ignore the data or error in the presence of dates.
  • Props is an object mirroring the workbook Props field. See the table from the Workbook File Properties section.
  • if specified, the string from themeXLSX will be saved as the primary theme for XLSX/XLSB/XLSM files (to xl/theme/theme1.xml in the ZIP)
  • Due to a bug in the program, some features like "Text to Columns" will crash Excel on worksheets where error conditions are ignored. The writer will mark files to ignore the error by default. Set ignoreEC to false to suppress.

Supported Output Formats

For broad compatibility with third-party tools, this library supports many output formats. The specific file type is controlled with bookType option:

bookTypefile extcontainersheetsDescription
xlsx.xlsxZIPmultiExcel 2007+ XML Format
xlsm.xlsmZIPmultiExcel 2007+ Macro XML Format
xlsb.xlsbZIPmultiExcel 2007+ Binary Format
biff8.xlsCFBmultiExcel 97-2004 Workbook Format
biff5.xlsCFBmultiExcel 5.0/95 Workbook Format
biff4.xlsnonesingleExcel 4.0 Worksheet Format
biff3.xlsnonesingleExcel 3.0 Worksheet Format
biff2.xlsnonesingleExcel 2.0 Worksheet Format
xlml.xlsnonemultiExcel 2003-2004 (SpreadsheetML)
ods.odsZIPmultiOpenDocument Spreadsheet
fods.fodsnonemultiFlat OpenDocument Spreadsheet
wk3.wk3nonesingleLotus Workbook (WK3)
csv.csvnonesingleComma Separated Values
txt.txtnonesingleUTF-16 Unicode Text (TXT)
sylk.sylknonesingleSymbolic Link (SYLK)
html.htmlnonesingleHTML Document
dif.difnonesingleData Interchange Format (DIF)
dbf.dbfnonesingledBASE II + VFP Extensions (DBF)
wk1.wk1nonesingleLotus Worksheet (WK1)
rtf.rtfnonesingleRich Text Format (RTF)
prn.prnnonesingleLotus Formatted Text
eth.ethnonesingleEthercalc Record Format (ETH)
  • compression only applies to formats with ZIP containers.
  • Formats that only support a single sheet require a sheet option specifying the worksheet. If the string is empty, the first worksheet is used.
  • writeFile will automatically guess the output file format based on the file extension if bookType is not specified. It will choose the first format in the aforementioned table that matches the extension.

Output Type

The type argument for write mirrors the type argument for read:

typeoutput
"base64"string: Base64 encoding of the file
"binary"string: binary string (byte n is data.charCodeAt(n))
"string"string: JS string (characters interpreted as UTF8)
"buffer"nodejs Buffer
"array"ArrayBuffer, fallback array of 8-bit unsigned int
"file"string: path of file that will be created (nodejs only)

Utility Functions

The sheet_to_* functions accept a worksheet and an optional options object.

The *_to_sheet functions accept a data object and an optional options object.

The examples are based on the following worksheet:

XXX| A | B | C | D | E | F | G |
---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1 | S | h | e | e | t | J | S |
 2 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 |
 3 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 |

Array of Arrays Input

XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet takes an array of arrays of JS values and returns a worksheet resembling the input data. Numbers, Booleans and Strings are stored as the corresponding styles. Dates are stored as date or numbers. Array holes and explicit undefined values are skipped. null values may be stubbed. All other values are stored as strings. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetStubsfalseCreate cell objects of type z for null values
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values

Examples (click to show)

To generate the example sheet:

var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([
  "SheetJS".split(""),
  [1,2,3,4,5,6,7],
  [2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
]);

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa takes an array of arrays of JS values and updates an existing worksheet object. It follows the same process as aoa_to_sheet and accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetStubsfalseCreate cell objects of type z for null values
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values
origin Use specified cell as starting point (see below)

origin is expected to be one of:

originDescription
(cell object)Use specified cell (cell object)
(string)Use specified cell (A1-style cell)
(number >= 0)Start from the first column at specified row (0-indexed)
-1Append to bottom of worksheet starting on first column
(default)Start from cell A1

Examples (click to show)

Consider the worksheet:

XXX| A | B | C | D | E | F | G |
---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1 | S | h | e | e | t | J | S |
 2 | 1 | 2 |   |   | 5 | 6 | 7 |
 3 | 2 | 3 |   |   | 6 | 7 | 8 |
 4 | 3 | 4 |   |   | 7 | 8 | 9 |
 5 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 0 |

This worksheet can be built up in the order A1:G1, A2:B4, E2:G4, A5:G5:

/* Initial row */
var ws = XLSX.utils.aoa_to_sheet([ "SheetJS".split("") ]);

/* Write data starting at A2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [[1,2], [2,3], [3,4]], {origin: "A2"});

/* Write data starting at E2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [[5,6,7], [6,7,8], [7,8,9]], {origin:{r:1, c:4}});

/* Append row */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_aoa(ws, [[4,5,6,7,8,9,0]], {origin: -1});

Array of Objects Input

XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet takes an array of objects and returns a worksheet with automatically-generated "headers" based on the keys of the objects. The default column order is determined by the first appearance of the field using Object.keys. The function accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
header Use specified field order (default Object.keys) **
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
skipHeaderfalseIf true, do not include header row in output
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values
  • All fields from each row will be written. If header is an array and it does not contain a particular field, the key will be appended to the array.
  • Cell types are deduced from the type of each value. For example, a Date object will generate a Date cell, while a string will generate a Text cell.
  • Null values will be skipped by default. If nullError is true, an error cell corresponding to #NULL! will be written to the worksheet.

Examples (click to show)

The original sheet cannot be reproduced using plain objects since JS object keys must be unique. After replacing the second e and S with e_1 and S_1:

var ws = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet([
  { S:1, h:2, e:3, e_1:4, t:5, J:6, S_1:7 },
  { S:2, h:3, e:4, e_1:5, t:6, J:7, S_1:8 }
], {header:["S","h","e","e_1","t","J","S_1"]});

Alternatively, the header row can be skipped:

var ws = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet([
  { A:"S", B:"h", C:"e", D:"e", E:"t", F:"J", G:"S" },
  { A: 1,  B: 2,  C: 3,  D: 4,  E: 5,  F: 6,  G: 7  },
  { A: 2,  B: 3,  C: 4,  D: 5,  E: 6,  F: 7,  G: 8  }
], {header:["A","B","C","D","E","F","G"], skipHeader:true});

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json takes an array of objects and updates an existing worksheet object. It follows the same process as json_to_sheet and accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
header Use specified column order (default Object.keys)
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
skipHeaderfalseIf true, do not include header row in output
nullErrorfalseIf true, emit #NULL! error cells for null values
origin Use specified cell as starting point (see below)

origin is expected to be one of:

originDescription
(cell object)Use specified cell (cell object)
(string)Use specified cell (A1-style cell)
(number >= 0)Start from the first column at specified row (0-indexed)
-1Append to bottom of worksheet starting on first column
(default)Start from cell A1

Examples (click to show)

Consider the worksheet:

XXX| A | B | C | D | E | F | G |
---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1 | S | h | e | e | t | J | S |
 2 | 1 | 2 |   |   | 5 | 6 | 7 |
 3 | 2 | 3 |   |   | 6 | 7 | 8 |
 4 | 3 | 4 |   |   | 7 | 8 | 9 |
 5 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 0 |

This worksheet can be built up in the order A1:G1, A2:B4, E2:G4, A5:G5:

/* Initial row */
var ws = XLSX.utils.json_to_sheet([
  { A: "S", B: "h", C: "e", D: "e", E: "t", F: "J", G: "S" }
], {header: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"], skipHeader: true});

/* Write data starting at A2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json(ws, [
  { A: 1, B: 2 }, { A: 2, B: 3 }, { A: 3, B: 4 }
], {skipHeader: true, origin: "A2"});

/* Write data starting at E2 */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json(ws, [
  { A: 5, B: 6, C: 7 }, { A: 6, B: 7, C: 8 }, { A: 7, B: 8, C: 9 }
], {skipHeader: true, origin: { r: 1, c: 4 }, header: [ "A", "B", "C" ]});

/* Append row */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_json(ws, [
  { A: 4, B: 5, C: 6, D: 7, E: 8, F: 9, G: 0 }
], {header: ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G"], skipHeader: true, origin: -1});

HTML Table Input

XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet takes a table DOM element and returns a worksheet resembling the input table. Numbers are parsed. All other data will be stored as strings.

XLSX.utils.table_to_book produces a minimal workbook based on the worksheet.

Both functions accept options arguments:

Option NameDefaultDescription
raw If true, every cell will hold raw strings
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetRows0If >0, read the first sheetRows rows of the table
displayfalseIf true, hidden rows and cells will not be parsed

Examples (click to show)

To generate the example sheet, start with the HTML table:

<table id="sheetjs">
<tr><td>S</td><td>h</td><td>e</td><td>e</td><td>t</td><td>J</td><td>S</td></tr>
<tr><td>1</td><td>2</td><td>3</td><td>4</td><td>5</td><td>6</td><td>7</td></tr>
<tr><td>2</td><td>3</td><td>4</td><td>5</td><td>6</td><td>7</td><td>8</td></tr>
</table>

To process the table:

var tbl = document.getElementById('sheetjs');
var wb = XLSX.utils.table_to_book(tbl);

Note: XLSX.read can handle HTML represented as strings.

XLSX.utils.sheet_add_dom takes a table DOM element and updates an existing worksheet object. It follows the same process as table_to_sheet and accepts an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
raw If true, every cell will hold raw strings
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
cellDatesfalseStore dates as type d (default is n)
sheetRows0If >0, read the first sheetRows rows of the table
displayfalseIf true, hidden rows and cells will not be parsed

origin is expected to be one of:

originDescription
(cell object)Use specified cell (cell object)
(string)Use specified cell (A1-style cell)
(number >= 0)Start from the first column at specified row (0-indexed)
-1Append to bottom of worksheet starting on first column
(default)Start from cell A1

Examples (click to show)

A small helper function can create gap rows between tables:

function create_gap_rows(ws, nrows) {
  var ref = XLSX.utils.decode_range(ws["!ref"]);       // get original range
  ref.e.r += nrows;                                    // add to ending row
  ws["!ref"] = XLSX.utils.encode_range(ref);           // reassign row
}

/* first table */
var ws = XLSX.utils.table_to_sheet(document.getElementById('table1'));
create_gap_rows(ws, 1); // one row gap after first table

/* second table */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_dom(ws, document.getElementById('table2'), {origin: -1});
create_gap_rows(ws, 3); // three rows gap after second table

/* third table */
XLSX.utils.sheet_add_dom(ws, document.getElementById('table3'), {origin: -1});

Formulae Output

XLSX.utils.sheet_to_formulae generates an array of commands that represent how a person would enter data into an application. Each entry is of the form A1-cell-address=formula-or-value. String literals are prefixed with a ' in accordance with Excel.

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> var o = XLSX.utils.sheet_to_formulae(ws);
> [o[0], o[5], o[10], o[15], o[20]];
[ 'A1=\'S', 'F1=\'J', 'D2=4', 'B3=3', 'G3=8' ]

Delimiter-Separated Output

As an alternative to the writeFile CSV type, XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv also produces CSV output. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
FS",""Field Separator" delimiter between fields
RS"\n""Record Separator" delimiter between rows
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
stripfalseRemove trailing field separators in each record **
blankrowstrueInclude blank lines in the CSV output
skipHiddenfalseSkips hidden rows/columns in the CSV output
forceQuotesfalseForce quotes around fields
  • strip will remove trailing commas from each line under default FS/RS
  • blankrows must be set to false to skip blank lines.
  • Fields containing the record or field separator will automatically be wrapped in double quotes; forceQuotes forces all cells to be wrapped in quotes.

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(ws));
S,h,e,e,t,J,S
1,2,3,4,5,6,7
2,3,4,5,6,7,8
> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(ws, {FS:"\t"}));
S    h    e    e    t    J    S
1    2    3    4    5    6    7
2    3    4    5    6    7    8
> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_csv(ws,{FS:":",RS:"|"}));
S:h:e:e:t:J:S|1:2:3:4:5:6:7|2:3:4:5:6:7:8|

UTF-16 Unicode Text

The txt output type uses the tab character as the field separator. If the codepage library is available (included in full distribution but not core), the output will be encoded in CP1200 and the BOM will be prepended.

XLSX.utils.sheet_to_txt takes the same arguments as sheet_to_csv.

HTML Output

As an alternative to the writeFile HTML type, XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html also produces HTML output. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
id Specify the id attribute for the TABLE element
editablefalseIf true, set contenteditable="true" for every TD
header Override header (default html body)
footer Override footer (default /body /html)

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> console.log(XLSX.utils.sheet_to_html(ws));
// ...

JSON

XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json generates different types of JS objects. The function takes an options argument:

Option NameDefaultDescription
rawtrueUse raw values (true) or formatted strings (false)
rangefrom WSOverride Range (see table below)
header Control output format (see table below)
dateNFFMT 14Use specified date format in string output
defval Use specified value in place of null or undefined
blankrows**Include blank lines in the output **
  • raw only affects cells which have a format code (.z) field or a formatted text (.w) field.
  • If header is specified, the first row is considered a data row; if header is not specified, the first row is the header row and not considered data.
  • When header is not specified, the conversion will automatically disambiguate header entries by affixing _ and a count starting at 1. For example, if three columns have header foo the output fields are foo, foo_1, foo_2
  • null values are returned when raw is true but are skipped when false.
  • If defval is not specified, null and undefined values are skipped normally. If specified, all null and undefined points will be filled with defval
  • When header is 1, the default is to generate blank rows. blankrows must be set to false to skip blank rows.
  • When header is not 1, the default is to skip blank rows. blankrows must be true to generate blank rows

range is expected to be one of:

rangeDescription
(number)Use worksheet range but set starting row to the value
(string)Use specified range (A1-style bounded range string)
(default)Use worksheet range (ws['!ref'])

header is expected to be one of:

headerDescription
1Generate an array of arrays ("2D Array")
"A"Row object keys are literal column labels
array of stringsUse specified strings as keys in row objects
(default)Read and disambiguate first row as keys

If header is not 1, the row object will contain the non-enumerable property __rowNum__ that represents the row of the sheet corresponding to the entry.

Examples (click to show)

For the example sheet:

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws);
[ { S: 1, h: 2, e: 3, e_1: 4, t: 5, J: 6, S_1: 7 },
  { S: 2, h: 3, e: 4, e_1: 5, t: 6, J: 7, S_1: 8 } ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:"A"});
[ { A: 'S', B: 'h', C: 'e', D: 'e', E: 't', F: 'J', G: 'S' },
  { A: '1', B: '2', C: '3', D: '4', E: '5', F: '6', G: '7' },
  { A: '2', B: '3', C: '4', D: '5', E: '6', F: '7', G: '8' } ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:["A","E","I","O","U","6","9"]});
[ { '6': 'J', '9': 'S', A: 'S', E: 'h', I: 'e', O: 'e', U: 't' },
  { '6': '6', '9': '7', A: '1', E: '2', I: '3', O: '4', U: '5' },
  { '6': '7', '9': '8', A: '2', E: '3', I: '4', O: '5', U: '6' } ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:1});
[ [ 'S', 'h', 'e', 'e', 't', 'J', 'S' ],
  [ '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7' ],
  [ '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8' ] ]

Example showing the effect of raw:

> ws['A2'].w = "3";                          // set A2 formatted string value

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:1, raw:false});
[ [ 'S', 'h', 'e', 'e', 't', 'J', 'S' ],
  [ '3', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7' ],     // <-- A2 uses the formatted string
  [ '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8' ] ]

> XLSX.utils.sheet_to_json(ws, {header:1});
[ [ 'S', 'h', 'e', 'e', 't', 'J', 'S' ],
  [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ],                   // <-- A2 uses the raw value
  [ 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ] ]

File Formats

Despite the library name xlsx, it supports numerous spreadsheet file formats:

FormatReadWrite
Excel Worksheet/Workbook Formats:-----::-----:
Excel 2007+ XML Formats (XLSX/XLSM)
Excel 2007+ Binary Format (XLSB BIFF12)
Excel 2003-2004 XML Format (XML "SpreadsheetML")
Excel 97-2004 (XLS BIFF8)
Excel 5.0/95 (XLS BIFF5)
Excel 4.0 (XLS/XLW BIFF4)
Excel 3.0 (XLS BIFF3)
Excel 2.0/2.1 (XLS BIFF2)
Excel Supported Text Formats:-----::-----:
Delimiter-Separated Values (CSV/TXT)
Data Interchange Format (DIF)
Symbolic Link (SYLK/SLK)
Lotus Formatted Text (PRN)
UTF-16 Unicode Text (TXT)
Other Workbook/Worksheet Formats:-----::-----:
Numbers 3.0+ / iWork 2013+ Spreadsheet (NUMBERS) 
OpenDocument Spreadsheet (ODS)
Flat XML ODF Spreadsheet (FODS)
Uniform Office Format Spreadsheet (标文通 UOS1/UOS2) 
dBASE II/III/IV / Visual FoxPro (DBF)
Lotus 1-2-3 (WK1/WK3)
Lotus 1-2-3 (WKS/WK2/WK4/123) 
Quattro Pro Spreadsheet (WQ1/WQ2/WB1/WB2/WB3/QPW) 
Works 1.x-3.x DOS / 2.x-5.x Windows Spreadsheet (WKS) 
Works 6.x-9.x Spreadsheet (XLR) 
Other Common Spreadsheet Output Formats:-----::-----:
HTML Tables
Rich Text Format tables (RTF) 
Ethercalc Record Format (ETH)

Features not supported by a given file format will not be written. Formats with range limits will be silently truncated:

FormatLast CellMax ColsMax Rows
Excel 2007+ XML Formats (XLSX/XLSM)XFD1048576163841048576
Excel 2007+ Binary Format (XLSB BIFF12)XFD1048576163841048576
Excel 97-2004 (XLS BIFF8)IV6553625665536
Excel 5.0/95 (XLS BIFF5)IV1638425616384
Excel 4.0 (XLS BIFF4)IV1638425616384
Excel 3.0 (XLS BIFF3)IV1638425616384
Excel 2.0/2.1 (XLS BIFF2)IV1638425616384
Lotus 1-2-3 R2 - R5 (WK1/WK3/WK4)IV81922568192
Lotus 1-2-3 R1 (WKS)IV20482562048

Excel 2003 SpreadsheetML range limits are governed by the version of Excel and are not enforced by the writer.

File Format Details (click to show)

Core Spreadsheet Formats

  • Excel 2007+ XML (XLSX/XLSM)

XLSX and XLSM files are ZIP containers containing a series of XML files in accordance with the Open Packaging Conventions (OPC). The XLSM format, almost identical to XLSX, is used for files containing macros.

The format is standardized in ECMA-376 and later in ISO/IEC 29500. Excel does not follow the specification, and there are additional documents discussing how Excel deviates from the specification.

  • Excel 2.0-95 (BIFF2/BIFF3/BIFF4/BIFF5)

BIFF 2/3 XLS are single-sheet streams of binary records. Excel 4 introduced the concept of a workbook (XLW files) but also had single-sheet XLS format. The structure is largely similar to the Lotus 1-2-3 file formats. BIFF5/8/12 extended the format in various ways but largely stuck to the same record format.

There is no official specification for any of these formats. Excel 95 can write files in these formats, so record lengths and fields were determined by writing in all of the supported formats and comparing files. Excel 2016 can generate BIFF5 files, enabling a full suite of file tests starting from XLSX or BIFF2.

  • Excel 97-2004 Binary (BIFF8)

BIFF8 exclusively uses the Compound File Binary container format, splitting some content into streams within the file. At its core, it still uses an extended version of the binary record format from older versions of BIFF.

The MS-XLS specification covers the basics of the file format, and other specifications expand on serialization of features like properties.

  • Excel 2003-2004 (SpreadsheetML)

Predating XLSX, SpreadsheetML files are simple XML files. There is no official and comprehensive specification, although MS has released documentation on the format. Since Excel 2016 can generate SpreadsheetML files, mapping features is pretty straightforward.

  • Excel 2007+ Binary (XLSB, BIFF12)

Introduced in parallel with XLSX, the XLSB format combines the BIFF architecture with the content separation and ZIP container of XLSX. For the most part nodes in an XLSX sub-file can be mapped to XLSB records in a corresponding sub-file.

The MS-XLSB specification covers the basics of the file format, and other specifications expand on serialization of features like properties.

  • Delimiter-Separated Values (CSV/TXT)

Excel CSV deviates from RFC4180 in a number of important ways. The generated CSV files should generally work in Excel although they may not work in RFC4180 compatible readers. The parser should generally understand Excel CSV. The writer proactively generates cells for formulae if values are unavailable.

Excel TXT uses tab as the delimiter and code page 1200.

Like in Excel, files starting with 0x49 0x44 ("ID") are treated as Symbolic Link files. Unlike Excel, if the file does not have a valid SYLK header, it will be proactively reinterpreted as CSV. There are some files with semicolon delimiter that align with a valid SYLK file. For the broadest compatibility, all cells with the value of ID are automatically wrapped in double-quotes.

Miscellaneous Workbook Formats

Support for other formats is generally far behind XLS/XLSB/XLSX support, due in part to a lack of publicly available documentation. Test files were produced in the respective apps and compared to their XLS exports to determine structure. The main focus is data extraction.

  • Lotus 1-2-3 (WKS/WK1/WK2/WK3/WK4/123)

The Lotus formats consist of binary records similar to the BIFF structure. Lotus did release a specification decades ago covering the original WK1 format. Other features were deduced by producing files and comparing to Excel support.

Generated WK1 worksheets are compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 R2 and Excel 5.0.

Generated WK3 workbooks are compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 R9 and Excel 5.0.

  • Quattro Pro (WQ1/WQ2/WB1/WB2/WB3/QPW)

The Quattro Pro formats use binary records in the same way as BIFF and Lotus. Some of the newer formats (namely WB3 and QPW) use a CFB enclosure just like BIFF8 XLS.

  • Works for DOS / Windows Spreadsheet (WKS/XLR)

All versions of Works were limited to a single worksheet.

Works for DOS 1.x - 3.x and Works for Windows 2.x extends the Lotus WKS format with additional record types.

Works for Windows 3.x - 5.x uses the same format and WKS extension. The BOF record has type FF

Works for Windows 6.x - 9.x use the XLR format. XLR is nearly identical to BIFF8 XLS: it uses the CFB container with a Workbook stream. Works 9 saves the exact Workbook stream for the XLR and the 97-2003 XLS export. Works 6 XLS includes two empty worksheets but the main worksheet has an identical encoding. XLR also includes a WksSSWorkBook stream similar to Lotus FM3/FMT files.

  • Numbers 3.0+ / iWork 2013+ Spreadsheet (NUMBERS)

iWork 2013 (Numbers 3.0 / Pages 5.0 / Keynote 6.0) switched from a proprietary XML-based format to the current file format based on the iWork Archive (IWA). This format has been used up through the current release (Numbers 11.2).

The parser focuses on extracting raw data from tables. Numbers technically supports multiple tables in a logical worksheet, including custom titles. This parser will generate one worksheet per Numbers table.

  • OpenDocument Spreadsheet (ODS/FODS)

ODS is an XML-in-ZIP format akin to XLSX while FODS is an XML format akin to SpreadsheetML. Both are detailed in the OASIS standard, but tools like LO/OO add undocumented extensions. The parsers and writers do not implement the full standard, instead focusing on parts necessary to extract and store raw data.

  • Uniform Office Spreadsheet (UOS1/2)

UOS is a very similar format, and it comes in 2 varieties corresponding to ODS and FODS respectively. For the most part, the difference between the formats is in the names of tags and attributes.

Miscellaneous Worksheet Formats

Many older formats supported only one worksheet:

  • dBASE and Visual FoxPro (DBF)

DBF is really a typed table format: each column can only hold one data type and each record omits type information. The parser generates a header row and inserts records starting at the second row of the worksheet. The writer makes files compatible with Visual FoxPro extensions.

Multi-file extensions like external memos and tables are currently unsupported, limited by the general ability to read arbitrary files in the web browser. The reader understands DBF Level 7 extensions like DATETIME.

  • Symbolic Link (SYLK)

There is no real documentation. All knowledge was gathered by saving files in various versions of Excel to deduce the meaning of fields. Notes:

Plain formulae are stored in the RC form.

Column widths are rounded to integral characters.

Lotus Formatted Text (PRN)

There is no real documentation, and in fact Excel treats PRN as an output-only file format. Nevertheless we can guess the column widths and reverse-engineer the original layout. Excel's 240 character width limitation is not enforced.

  • Data Interchange Format (DIF)

There is no unified definition. Visicalc DIF differs from Lotus DIF, and both differ from Excel DIF. Where ambiguous, the parser/writer follows the expected behavior from Excel. In particular, Excel extends DIF in incompatible ways:

Since Excel automatically converts numbers-as-strings to numbers, numeric string constants are converted to formulae: "0.3" -> "=""0.3""

DIF technically expects numeric cells to hold the raw numeric data, but Excel permits formatted numbers (including dates)

DIF technically has no support for formulae, but Excel will automatically convert plain formulae. Array formulae are not preserved.

HTML

Excel HTML worksheets include special metadata encoded in styles. For example, mso-number-format is a localized string containing the number format. Despite the metadata the output is valid HTML, although it does accept bare & symbols.

The writer adds type metadata to the TD elements via the t tag. The parser looks for those tags and overrides the default interpretation. For example, text like <td>12345</td> will be parsed as numbers but <td t="s">12345</td> will be parsed as text.

  • Rich Text Format (RTF)

Excel RTF worksheets are stored in clipboard when copying cells or ranges from a worksheet. The supported codes are a subset of the Word RTF support.

  • Ethercalc Record Format (ETH)

Ethercalc is an open source web spreadsheet powered by a record format reminiscent of SYLK wrapped in a MIME multi-part message.

Testing

Node

(click to show)

make test will run the node-based tests. By default it runs tests on files in every supported format. To test a specific file type, set FMTS to the format you want to test. Feature-specific tests are available with make test_misc

$ make test_misc   # run core tests
$ make test        # run full tests
$ make test_xls    # only use the XLS test files
$ make test_xlsx   # only use the XLSX test files
$ make test_xlsb   # only use the XLSB test files
$ make test_xml    # only use the XML test files
$ make test_ods    # only use the ODS test files

To enable all errors, set the environment variable WTF=1:

$ make test        # run full tests
$ WTF=1 make test  # enable all error messages

flow and eslint checks are available:

$ make lint        # eslint checks
$ make flow        # make lint + Flow checking
$ make tslint      # check TS definitions

Browser

(click to show)

The core in-browser tests are available at tests/index.html within this repo. Start a local server and navigate to that directory to run the tests. make ctestserv will start a server on port 8000.

make ctest will generate the browser fixtures. To add more files, edit the tests/fixtures.lst file and add the paths.

To run the full in-browser tests, clone the repo for oss.sheetjs.com and replace the xlsx.js file (then open a browser window and go to stress.html):

$ cp xlsx.js ../SheetJS.github.io
$ cd ../SheetJS.github.io
$ simplehttpserver # or "python -mSimpleHTTPServer" or "serve"
$ open -a Chromium.app http://localhost:8000/stress.html

Tested Environments

(click to show)

  • NodeJS 0.8, 0.10, 0.12, 4.x, 5.x, 6.x, 7.x, 8.x
  • IE 6/7/8/9/10/11 (IE 6-9 require shims)
  • Chrome 24+ (including Android 4.0+)
  • Safari 6+ (iOS and Desktop)
  • Edge 13+, FF 18+, and Opera 12+

Tests utilize the mocha testing framework.

The test suite also includes tests for various time zones. To change the timezone locally, set the TZ environment variable:

$ env TZ="Asia/Kolkata" WTF=1 make test_misc

Test Files

Test files are housed in another repo.

Running make init will refresh the test_files submodule and get the files. Note that this requires svn, git, hg and other commands that may not be available. If make init fails, please download the latest version of the test files snapshot from the repo

Latest Snapshot (click to show)

Latest test files snapshot: http://github.com/SheetJS/test_files/releases/download/20170409/test_files.zip

(download and unzip to the test_files subdirectory)

Contributing

Due to the precarious nature of the Open Specifications Promise, it is very important to ensure code is cleanroom. Contribution Notes

File organization (click to show)

At a high level, the final script is a concatenation of the individual files in the bits folder. Running make should reproduce the final output on all platforms. The README is similarly split into bits in the docbits folder.

Folders:

foldercontents
bitsraw source files that make up the final script
docbitsraw markdown files that make up README.md
binserver-side bin scripts (xlsx.njs)
distdist files for web browsers and nonstandard JS environments
demosdemo projects for platforms like ExtendScript and Webpack
testsbrowser tests (run make ctest to rebuild)
typestypescript definitions and tests
miscmiscellaneous supporting scripts
test_filestest files (pulled from the test files repository)

After cloning the repo, running make help will display a list of commands.

OSX/Linux

(click to show)

The xlsx.js file is constructed from the files in the bits subdirectory. The build script (run make) will concatenate the individual bits to produce the script. Before submitting a contribution, ensure that running make will produce the xlsx.js file exactly. The simplest way to test is to add the script:

$ git add xlsx.js
$ make clean
$ make
$ git diff xlsx.js

To produce the dist files, run make dist. The dist files are updated in each version release and should not be committed between versions.

Windows

(click to show)

The included make.cmd script will build xlsx.js from the bits directory. Building is as simple as:

> make

To prepare development environment:

> make init

The full list of commands available in Windows are displayed in make help:

make init -- install deps and global modules
make lint -- run eslint linter
make test -- run mocha test suite
make misc -- run smaller test suite
make book -- rebuild README and summary
make help -- display this message

As explained in Test Files, on Windows the release ZIP file must be downloaded and extracted. If Bash on Windows is available, it is possible to run the OSX/Linux workflow. The following steps prepares the environment:

# Install support programs for the build and test commands
sudo apt-get install make git subversion mercurial

# Install nodejs and NPM within the WSL
wget -qO- https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_8.x | sudo bash
sudo apt-get install nodejs

# Install dev dependencies
sudo npm install -g mocha voc blanket xlsjs

Tests

(click to show)

The test_misc target (make test_misc on Linux/OSX / make misc on Windows) runs the targeted feature tests. It should take 5-10 seconds to perform feature tests without testing against the entire test battery. New features should be accompanied with tests for the relevant file formats and features.

For tests involving the read side, an appropriate feature test would involve reading an existing file and checking the resulting workbook object. If a parameter is involved, files should be read with different values to verify that the feature is working as expected.

For tests involving a new write feature which can already be parsed, appropriate feature tests would involve writing a workbook with the feature and then opening and verifying that the feature is preserved.

For tests involving a new write feature without an existing read ability, please add a feature test to the kitchen sink tests/write.js.

References

OSP-covered Specifications (click to show)

  • MS-CFB: Compound File Binary File Format
  • MS-CTXLS: Excel Custom Toolbar Binary File Format
  • MS-EXSPXML3: Excel Calculation Version 2 Web Service XML Schema
  • MS-ODATA: Open Data Protocol (OData)
  • MS-ODRAW: Office Drawing Binary File Format
  • MS-ODRAWXML: Office Drawing Extensions to Office Open XML Structure
  • MS-OE376: Office Implementation Information for ECMA-376 Standards Support
  • MS-OFFCRYPTO: Office Document Cryptography Structure
  • MS-OI29500: Office Implementation Information for ISO/IEC 29500 Standards Support
  • MS-OLEDS: Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) Data Structures
  • MS-OLEPS: Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) Property Set Data Structures
  • MS-OODF3: Office Implementation Information for ODF 1.2 Standards Support
  • MS-OSHARED: Office Common Data Types and Objects Structures
  • MS-OVBA: Office VBA File Format Structure
  • MS-XLDM: Spreadsheet Data Model File Format
  • MS-XLS: Excel Binary File Format (.xls) Structure Specification
  • MS-XLSB: Excel (.xlsb) Binary File Format
  • MS-XLSX: Excel (.xlsx) Extensions to the Office Open XML SpreadsheetML File Format
  • XLS: Microsoft Office Excel 97-2007 Binary File Format Specification
  • RTF: Rich Text Format
  • ISO/IEC 29500:2012(E) "Information technology — Document description and processing languages — Office Open XML File Formats"
  • Open Document Format for Office Applications Version 1.2 (29 September 2011)
  • Worksheet File Format (From Lotus) December 1984

Author: SheetJS
Source Code: https://github.com/SheetJS/sheetjs 
License: Apache-2.0 License

#nodejs #javascript #html #ios