Edna  Bernhard

Edna Bernhard

1595490840

Road the Ultimate Testing Setup With Jest and Headless Chrome Browser

**In this article, we will **go in detail through creating a testing setup which:

  1. Operates on “clean slate” every time, but still works fast by running tests in parallel.
  2. Tests the app by simulating user’s actions, instead of testing the output of individual functions and methods with mock data.
  3. Is powerful enough to test every corner of the app, including parts that require login.
  4. Is expandable, but concise enough for easy maintenance or onboarding of new developers.

As well as:

  1. Write wrapper class and factory functions, taking DRY principle seriously.
  2. Explore the legit real-life use case for ES6 Proxy/Reflect.
  3. Create easy bulk route testing that will run in parallel with Promise.all

Packages used:

  • jest — as a testing library to run tests suites.
  • puppeteer — as a way to run a headless chrome browser.
  • Keygrip — to sign some cookies.

The app that we are testing:

  • “Private blog” — MERN stack app made with Mongo/Mongoose, Express, React, Node.
  • Passport and google OAuth as a means to handle authentication/authorization.

Full working app can be found on my GutHub.

#react #javascript #puppeteer #jest #testing

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

 Road the Ultimate Testing Setup With Jest and Headless Chrome Browser

Ethen Ellen

1619858914

AOL Emails Not Loading Problems (+1-888-857-5157) in Chrome Browser

This is image title
AOL Mail is one of the free email services that includes calendar management and task management. If your AOL Emails Not Loading Problems in Chrome Browser, try these troubleshooting steps which is mention below. In this post, we are trying to describe the reason behind AOL email not loading and how to resolve AOL mail loading issues.

3 Reason Behind AOL Emails Not Loading Problems

Reason #1. Whenever you are unable to receive the new emails into your computer. You should log into your AOL mail account and go to the settings and click on filter settings. Now check the account settings, if you find any filter. you need to click on delete. After deleting the settings, you should send a mail to yourself. Let’s see if you are receiving it now or not.

Reason #2. If you do not find any filters into your emails, you should check the block list settings, maybe you have blocked the new emails from senders. That’s why you are not receiving any new emails. so, you should immediately go ahead and check it.

Reason #3. If you are unable to receive the new emails into your phone or computer. I would like to suggest you to check the server settings. Most of the time, people are facing such kind of problem due to the incorrect server settings. So, you should check them properly and if you find something wrong over there. You need to remove the account from your computer or phone and then reconfigure it. It will start working fine.

How to Resolve AOL Emails Not Loading Problems in Chrome Browser

If Your AOL Emails Not Loading Problems in Chrome Browser then you can go and find a help to resolve this issue. To get through this problem, follow the instructions below:

Solution 1: Clear browsing data on Chrome

  • On your computer, launch the Google Chrome browser after assuring that you have a stable Internet connection.
  • Close all the browser tabs (if any) and open a new blank tab.
  • Click the Customize and control Google Chrome icon at the top-right corner and select the More tools option from the drop-down list.
  • In the pop-up window, navigate to the top-left corner and click the clear browsing data tab beneath History.
  • When you are asked to choose the time limit, choose the Time
  • After choosing all the data, click the Clear data button to remove all your Chrome browsing data.
  • Once you have removed all the browsing data, sign in to your AOL Mail.
  • If your AOL Mail is still not loading on Chrome, move on to the next solution.

Solution 2: Reset web settings

  • On your Chrome browser, stop all the running tabs and start a blank tab.
  • Navigate to the top-right corner of the tab and click the Customize and control Google Chrome icon (three vertical dots).
  • Click on Settings from the drop-down list.
  • Navigate to the bottom of the Settings page and click Advanced.
  • Click the Reset Settings tab twice underneath Reset and clean up.
  • Now, your Chrome browser will be restored to factory defaults.
  • Restart your Chrome browser and navigate to the official AOL site.
  • Enter the correct login credentials in the essential field and try signing in to your AOL email account.
    If AOL Mail is still not loading on Chrome, contact our technical support team by clicking the Call button available on this page for remote assistance.
    After this, if you are unable to resolve AOL emails loading problems in chrome browser, don’t be panic. Email Expert 24*7 team is here to resolve all AOL mail issues as soon as possible. Just Dial Customer Care Toll-Free Number: +1-888-857-5157 and get instant help. Our technical team’s services are available- 24x7.

Source: https://email-expert247.blogspot.com/2021/01/aol-emails-not-loading-problems-1-888.html

#aol mail not loading problems in chrome browser #aol email not loading problems in chrome browser #aol not loading problems in chrome browser #aol mail not loading issues in chrome browser #aol email not loading issues in chrome browser

Edna  Bernhard

Edna Bernhard

1595490840

Road the Ultimate Testing Setup With Jest and Headless Chrome Browser

**In this article, we will **go in detail through creating a testing setup which:

  1. Operates on “clean slate” every time, but still works fast by running tests in parallel.
  2. Tests the app by simulating user’s actions, instead of testing the output of individual functions and methods with mock data.
  3. Is powerful enough to test every corner of the app, including parts that require login.
  4. Is expandable, but concise enough for easy maintenance or onboarding of new developers.

As well as:

  1. Write wrapper class and factory functions, taking DRY principle seriously.
  2. Explore the legit real-life use case for ES6 Proxy/Reflect.
  3. Create easy bulk route testing that will run in parallel with Promise.all

Packages used:

  • jest — as a testing library to run tests suites.
  • puppeteer — as a way to run a headless chrome browser.
  • Keygrip — to sign some cookies.

The app that we are testing:

  • “Private blog” — MERN stack app made with Mongo/Mongoose, Express, React, Node.
  • Passport and google OAuth as a means to handle authentication/authorization.

Full working app can be found on my GutHub.

#react #javascript #puppeteer #jest #testing

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1596804900

Guide To Cross Browser Testing On Older Browser Versions

“How do I perform website testing on older browser versions? Is it even necessary?”

Have you ever wondered about these questions? If you did, you’re not the only one. At some point, every web tester or web developer ponders on these. And it is logical to do so. After all, new browser versions are released every month. Which makes it difficult for testers & developers to maintain a record of emerging & deprecated features. Not to forget, the never-ending release requirements are constantly squeezing your bandwidth.

It can be an overwhelming task to ensure a cross-browser compatible website, that works seamlessly even on older browsers. Which is why some of our clients have also enquired if it is important for them to test on older browser versions? If so, which browsers should they consider for cross-browser testing? And I am going to help you get answers to these questions in this article.

Why Is It Important To Test On Older Browser Versions?

The past decade has witnessed an immense rise in internet usage. The internet traffic at a global level continues to rise significantly with each passing day. There was a time when surfing the internet meant double-clicking on the IE icon on your desktops.

But over the years we have been introduced to a wide array of browsers including, but not limited to Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge. As per StatCounter, Google Chrome and Safari dominate the browser market with a share of 65% and 17% each from June 2019 — June 2020.

Image for post

But did you notice something else here?

Internet Explorer & Edge legacy browsers are still having enough browser market share to have themselves listed among the top 10 most used browsers worldwide in the last year. And you might be surprised to realize that Internet Explorer has been deprecated in 2015 and hasn’t received any update since then.

The emergence of modern browsers led IE to its deathbed. A majority of us weren’t bothered by the death of IE because deep down the notorious IE has caused all of us a fair share of troubles. Remember those good old days when IE was used as a default browser? 🙂

Image for post

However, it is intriguing to notice that the IE community still exists. Even after Chris Jackson, Microsoft Security Chief insisted people to stop using IE.

Well, we have considered an example of the fallen king IE but what about the reigning king Google Chrome?

Earlier, we realized the browser market share. Now, let’s dig deeper and look into the browser version market share.

#manual-testing #browser-testing #browsers #testing

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1603450800

Chrome 86 Aims to Bar Abusive Notification Content

Google has added a new feature to Chrome 86 that aims to stomp out abusive notification content.

Web notifications are utilized for a variety of applications – such as prompting site visitors to sign up for newsletters. However, they can also be misused for phishing, malware or fake messages that imitate system notifications for the purpose of generating user interactions. Google has taken steps to battle this issue by automatically blocking the web notifications that display abusive or misleading content.

When visitors encounter a webpage with malicious notification content, the webpage will be blocked and a Chrome alert on the upper navigation bar will warn them that the website might be trying to trick them into displaying intrusive notifications. It will ask them to “Continue Blocking” or “Allow” – the latter option will let users continue on to the webpage.

“Abusive notification prompts are one of the top user complaints we receive about Chrome,” according to PJ McLachlan, product manager with Google, on Wednesday. “Our goal with these changes is to improve the experience for Chrome users and to reduce the incentive for abusive sites to misuse the web-notifications feature.”

In order to detect sites that send abusive notification content, Google will first subscribe occasionally to website push notifications (if the push permission is requested) via its automated web crawling service.

Notifications that are sent to the automated Chrome instances will be evaluated for abusive content, and sites sending abusive notifications will be flagged for enforcement if the issue is unresolved, said Google.

When a site is found to be in “failing” status for any type of notification abuse, Google will send a warning email to the registered owners of the site 30 days before cracking down. During this time, websites can address the issue and request another review.

Google first implemented controls that went against abusive notifications with Chrome 80, when it introduced a “quiet notification permission UI [user interface]” feature. Then, in Chrome 84, it announced auto-enrollment in quiet notification UI for websites with abusive-notification permission requests, such as sites that use deceptive patterns to request notification permissions.

However, the new enforcement in Chrome 86 takes it a step further by focusing “on notification content and is triggered by sites that have a history of sending messages containing abusive content,” said Google. “This treatment applies to sites that try to trick users into accepting the notification permission for malicious purposes, for example sites that use web notifications to send malware or to mimic system messages to obtain user login credentials.”

In an upcoming release, Chrome will revert the notification permission status from “granted” to “default” for abusive origins, preventing further notifications unless the user returns to the abusive origin and re-enables them. That’s because “prior to the release of Chrome’s abusive notifications protections, many users have already unintentionally allowed notifications from websites engaging in abusive activity,” it said.

Google this week also warned of an update to its Chrome browser that patches a zero-day vulnerability in the software’s FreeType font rendering library that was actively being exploited in the wild.

#web security #abusive content #abusive notifications #blocking #browser #browser notifications #chrome 80 #chrome 84 #chrome 86 #google #google chrome #malicious notification #safe browsing #web security