Garry Taylor

Garry Taylor

1656302389

Playwright: A Framework for Web Testing and Automation

🎭 Playwright

Playwright is a framework for Web Testing and Automation. It allows testing Chromium, Firefox and WebKit with a single API. Playwright is built to enable cross-browser web automation that is ever-green, capable, reliable and fast.

Headless execution is supported for all the browsers on all platforms. Check out system requirements for details.

Looking for Playwright for Python, .NET, or Java?

Installation

Playwright has its own test runner for end-to-end tests, we call it Playwright Test.

Using init command

The easiest way to get started with Playwright Test is to run the init command.

# Run from your project's root directory
npm init playwright@latest
# Or create a new project
npm init playwright@latest new-project

This will create a configuration file, optionally add examples, a GitHub Action workflow and a first test example.spec.ts. You can now jump directly to writing assertions section.

Manually

Add dependency and install browsers.

npm i -D @playwright/test
# install supported browsers
npx playwright install

You can optionally install only selected browsers, see install browsers for more details. Or you can install no browsers at all and use existing browser channels.

Capabilities

Resilient • No flaky tests

Auto-wait. Playwright waits for elements to be actionable prior to performing actions. It also has rich set of introspection events. The combination of the two eliminate the need for artificial timeouts - primary cause of flaky tests.

Web-first assertions. Playwright assertions are created specifically for the dynamic web. Checks are automatically retried until the necessary conditions are met.

Tracing. Configure test retry strategy, capture execution trace, videos, screenshots to eliminate flakes.

No trade-offs • No limits

Browsers run web content belonging to different origins in different processes. Playwright is aligned with the modern browsers architecture and runs tests out-of-process. This makes Playwright free of the typical in-process test runner limitations.

Multiple everything. Test scenarios that span multiple tabs, multiple origins and multiple users. Create scenarios with different contexts for different users and run them against your server, all in one test.

Trusted events. Hover elements, interact with dynamic controls, produce trusted events. Playwright uses real browser input pipeline indistinguishable from the real user.

Test frames, pierce Shadow DOM. Playwright selectors pierce shadow DOM and allow entering frames seamlessly.

Full isolation • Fast execution

Browser contexts. Playwright creates a browser context for each test. Browser context is equivalent to a brand new browser profile. This delivers full test isolation with zero overhead. Creating a new browser context only takes a handful of milliseconds.

Log in once. Save the authentication state of the context and reuse it in all the tests. This bypasses repetitive log-in operations in each test, yet delivers full isolation of independent tests.

Powerful Tooling

Codegen. Generate tests by recording your actions. Save them into any language.

Playwright inspector. Inspect page, generate selectors, step through the test execution, see click points, explore execution logs.

Trace Viewer. Capture all the information to investigate the test failure. Playwright trace contains test execution screencast, live DOM snapshots, action explorer, test source and many more.

Looking for Playwright for TypeScript, JavaScript, Python, .NET, or Java?

Examples

To learn how to run these Playwright Test examples, check out our getting started docs.

Page screenshot

This code snippet navigates to whatsmyuseragent.org and saves a screenshot.

import { test } from '@playwright/test';

test('Page Screenshot', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('http://whatsmyuseragent.org/');
  await page.screenshot({ path: `example.png` });
});

Mobile and geolocation

This snippet emulates Mobile Safari on a device at a given geolocation, navigates to maps.google.com, performs action and takes a screenshot.

import { test, devices } from '@playwright/test';

test.use({
  ...devices['iPhone 13 Pro'],
  locale: 'en-US',
  geolocation: { longitude: 12.492507, latitude: 41.889938 },
  permissions: ['geolocation'],
})

test('Mobile and geolocation', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('https://maps.google.com');
  await page.locator('text="Your location"').click();
  await page.waitForRequest(/.*preview\/pwa/);
  await page.screenshot({ path: 'colosseum-iphone.png' });
});

Evaluate in browser context

This code snippet navigates to example.com, and executes a script in the page context.

import { test } from '@playwright/test';

test('Evaluate in browser context', async ({ page }) => {
  await page.goto('https://www.example.com/');
  const dimensions = await page.evaluate(() => {
    return {
      width: document.documentElement.clientWidth,
      height: document.documentElement.clientHeight,
      deviceScaleFactor: window.devicePixelRatio
    }
  });
  console.log(dimensions);
});

Intercept network requests

This code snippet sets up request routing for a page to log all network requests.

import { test } from '@playwright/test';

test('Intercept network requests', async ({ page }) => {
  // Log and continue all network requests
  await page.route('**', route => {
    console.log(route.request().url());
    route.continue();
  });
  await page.goto('http://todomvc.com');
});

Resources

Documentation | API reference

Download Details: 
Author: Microsoft
Source Code: https://github.com/Microsoft/playwright 
License: Apache-2.0 license
#playwright #test #testing 

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Playwright: A Framework for Web Testing and Automation
Aurelie  Block

Aurelie Block

1598916060

Top 10 Automation Testing Tools: 2020 Edition

The demand for delivering quality software faster — or “Quality at Speed” — requires organizations to search for solutions in Agile, continuous integration (CI), and DevOps methodologies. Test automation is an essential part of these aspects. The latest World Quality Report 2018–2019 suggests that test automation is the biggest bottleneck to deliver “Quality at Speed,” as it is an enabler of successful Agile and DevOps adoption.

Test automation cannot be realized without good tools; as they determine how automation is performed and whether the benefits of automation can be delivered. Test automation tools is a crucial component in the DevOps toolchain. The current test automation trends have increased in applying artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) to offer advanced capabilities for test optimization, intelligent test generation, execution, and reporting. It will be worthwhile to understand which tools are best poised to take advantage of these trends.****

#automation-testing #automation-testing-tools #testing #testing-tools #selenium #open-source #test-automation #automated-testing

Joseph  Murray

Joseph Murray

1621492530

7 Test Frameworks To Follow in 2021 for Java/Fullstack Developers

It is time to learn new test frameworks in 2021 to improve your code quality and decrease the time of your testing phase. Let’s explore 6 options for devs.

It is time to learn new test frameworks to improve your code quality and decrease the time of your testing phase. I have selected six testing frameworks that sound promising. Some have existed for quite a long time but I have not heard about them before.

At the end of the article, please tell me what you think about them and what your favorite ones are.

Robot Framework

Robot Framework is a generic open-source automation framework. It can be used for test automation and robotic process automation (RPA).

Robot Framework is open and extensible and can be integrated with virtually any other tool to create powerful and flexible automation solutions. Being open-source also means that Robot Framework is free to use without licensing costs.

The RoboFramework is a framework** to write test cases and automation processes.** It means that it may replace** your classic combo Selenium + Cucumber + Gherkins**. To be more precise, the Cucumber Gherkins custom implementation you wrote will be handled by RoboFramework and Selenium invoked below.

For the Java developers, this framework can be executed with Maven or Gradle (but less mature for the latter solution).

#java #testing #test #java framework #java frameworks #testing and developing #java testing #robot framework #test framework #2021

Lindsey  Koepp

Lindsey Koepp

1598948520

Top 10 Test Automation Frameworks in 2020

We are moving toward a future where everything is going to be autonomous, fast, and highly efficient. To match the pace of this fast-moving ecosystem, application delivery times will have to be accelerated, but not at the cost of quality. Achieving quality at speed is imperative and therefore quality assurance gets a lot of attention. To fulfill the demands for exceptional quality and faster time to market, automation testing will assume priority. It is becoming necessary for micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to automate their testing processes. But the most crucial aspect is to choose the right test automation framework. So let’s understand what a test automation framework is.

What Is a Test Automation Framework?

A test automation framework is the scaffolding that is laid to provide an execution environment for the automation test scripts. The framework provides the user with various benefits that help them to develop, execute, and report the automation test scripts efficiently. It is more like a system that was created specifically to automate our tests. In a very simple language, we can say that a framework is a constructive blend of various guidelines, coding standards, concepts, processes, practices, project hierarchies, modularity, reporting mechanism, test data injections, etc. to pillar automation testing. Thus, the user can follow these guidelines while automating applications to take advantage of various productive results.

The advantages can be in different forms like the ease of scripting, scalability, modularity, understandability, process definition, re-usability, cost, maintenance, etc. Thus, to be able to grab these benefits, developers are advised to use one or more of the Test Automation Framework. Moreover, the need for a single and standard Test Automation Framework arises when you have a bunch of developers working on the different modules of the same application and when we want to avoid situations where each of the developers implements his/her approach towards automation. So let’s have a look at different types of test automation frameworks.

Types of Automated Testing Frameworks

Now that we have a basic idea about Automation Frameworks, let’s check out the various types of Test Automation Frameworks available in the marketplace. There is a divergent range of Automation Frameworks available nowadays. These frameworks may differ from each other based on their support to different key factors to do automation like reusability, ease of maintenance, etc.

Types of Test Automation Frameworks:

  1. Module Based Testing Framework
  2. Library Architecture Testing Framework
  3. Data-Driven Testing Framework
  4. Keyword Driven Testing Framework
  5. Hybrid Testing Framework
  6. Behavior Driven Development Framework

Benefits of a Test Automation Framework

Apart from the minimal manual intervention required in automation testing, there are many advantages of using a test automation framework. Some of them are listed below:

  1. Faster time-to-market: Using a good test automation framework helps reduce the time-to-market of an application by allowing constant execution of test cases. Once automated, the test library execution is faster and runs longer than manual testing.
  2. Earlier detection of defects: The documentation of software defects becomes considerably easier for the testing teams. It increases the overall development speed while ensuring correct functionality across areas. The earlier a defect is identified, the more cost-effective it is to resolve the issue.
  3. Improved Testing efficiency: Testing takes up a significant portion of the overall development lifecycle. Even the slightest improvement of the overall efficiency can make an enormous difference to the entire timeframe of the project. Although the setup time takes longer initially, automated tests eventually take up a significantly lesser amount of time. They can be run virtually unattended, leaving the results to be monitored toward the end of the process.
  4. Better ROI: while the initial investment may be on the higher side, automated testing saves organizations many a lot of money. This is due to the drop in the amount of time required to run tests, which leads to a higher quality of work. This in turn decreases the necessity for fixing glitches after release, thereby reducing project costs.
  5. Higher test coverage: In test automation, a higher number of tests can be executed about an application. This leads to higher test coverage, which is a manual testing approach that would imply a massive team, limited heavily with their amount of time. An increased test coverage leads to testing more features and a better quality of the application.
  6. Reusability of automated tests: The repetitive nature of test cases in test automation helps software developers to assess program reaction, in addition to the relatively easy configuration of their setup. Automated test cases can be utilized through different approaches as they are reusable.

#devops #testing #software testing #framework #automation testing #mobile app testing #test framework

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1595344320

Wondering how to upgrade your skills in the pandemic? Here's a simple way you can do it.

Corona Virus Pandemic has brought the world to a standstill.

Countries are on a major lockdown. Schools, colleges, theatres, gym, clubs, and all other public places are shut down, the country’s economy is suffering, human health is on stake, people are losing their jobs and nobody knows how worse it can get.

Since most of the places are on lockdown, and you are working from home or have enough time to nourish your skills, then you should use this time wisely! We always complain that we want some ‘time’ to learn and upgrade our knowledge but don’t get it due to our ‘busy schedules’. So, now is the time to make a ‘list of skills’ and learn and upgrade your skills at home!

And for the technology-loving people like us, Knoldus Techhub has already helped us a lot in doing it in a short span of time!

If you are still not aware of it, don’t worry as Georgia Byng has well said,

“No time is better than the present”

– Georgia Byng, a British children’s writer, illustrator, actress and film producer.

No matter if you are a developer (be it front-end or back-end) or a data scientisttester, or a DevOps person, or, a learner who has a keen interest in technology, Knoldus Techhub has brought it all for you under one common roof.

From technologies like Scala, spark, elastic-search to angular, go, machine learning, it has a total of 20 technologies with some recently added ones i.e. DAML, test automation, snowflake, and ionic.

How to upgrade your skills?

Every technology in Tech-hub has n number of templates. Once you click on any specific technology you’ll be able to see all the templates of that technology. Since these templates are downloadable, you need to provide your email to get the template downloadable link in your mail.

These templates helps you learn the practical implementation of a topic with so much of ease. Using these templates you can learn and kick-start your development in no time.

Apart from your learning, there are some out of the box templates, that can help provide the solution to your business problem that has all the basic dependencies/ implementations already plugged in. Tech hub names these templates as xlr8rs (pronounced as accelerators).

xlr8rs make your development real fast by just adding your core business logic to the template.

If you are looking for a template that’s not available, you can also request a template may be for learning or requesting for a solution to your business problem and tech-hub will connect with you to provide you the solution. Isn’t this helpful 🙂

Confused with which technology to start with?

To keep you updated, the Knoldus tech hub provides you with the information on the most trending technology and the most downloaded templates at present. This you’ll be informed and learn the one that’s most trending.

Since we believe:

“There’s always a scope of improvement“

If you still feel like it isn’t helping you in learning and development, you can provide your feedback in the feedback section in the bottom right corner of the website.

#ai #akka #akka-http #akka-streams #amazon ec2 #angular 6 #angular 9 #angular material #apache flink #apache kafka #apache spark #api testing #artificial intelligence #aws #aws services #big data and fast data #blockchain #css #daml #devops #elasticsearch #flink #functional programming #future #grpc #html #hybrid application development #ionic framework #java #java11 #kubernetes #lagom #microservices #ml # ai and data engineering #mlflow #mlops #mobile development #mongodb #non-blocking #nosql #play #play 2.4.x #play framework #python #react #reactive application #reactive architecture #reactive programming #rust #scala #scalatest #slick #software #spark #spring boot #sql #streaming #tech blogs #testing #user interface (ui) #web #web application #web designing #angular #coronavirus #daml #development #devops #elasticsearch #golang #ionic #java #kafka #knoldus #lagom #learn #machine learning #ml #pandemic #play framework #scala #skills #snowflake #spark streaming #techhub #technology #test automation #time management #upgrade

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1596793726

Where To Learn Test Programming — July 2020 Edition

What do you do when you have lots of free time on your hands? Why not learn test programming strategies and approaches?

When you’re looking for places to learn test programming, Test Automation University has you covered. From API testing through visual validation, you can hone your skills and learn new approaches on TAU.

We introduced five new TAU courses from April through June, and each of them can help you expand your knowledge, learn a new approach, and improve your craft as a test automation engineer. They are:

These courses add to the other three courses we introduced in January through March 2020:

  • IntelliJ for Test Automation Engineers (3 hrs 41 min)
  • Cucumber with JavaScript (1 hr 22 min)
  • Python Programming (2 hrs)

Each of these courses can give you a new set of skills.

Let’s look at each in a little detail.

Mobile Automation With Appium in JavaScript

Orane Findley teaches Mobile Automation with Appium in JavaScript. Orane walks through all the basics of Appium, starting with what it is and where it runs.

javascript

“Appium is an open-source tool for automating native, web, and hybrid applications on different platforms.”

In the introduction, Orane describes the course parts:

  • Setup and Dependencies — installing Appium and setting up your first project
  • Working with elements by finding them, sending values, clicking, and submitting
  • Creating sessions, changing screen orientations, and taking screenshots
  • Timing, including TimeOuts and Implicit Waits
  • Collecting attributes and data from an element
  • Selecting and using element states
  • Reviewing everything to make it all make sense

The first chapter, broken into five parts, gets your system ready for the rest of the course. You’ll download and install a Java Developer Kit, a stable version of Node.js, Android Studio and Emulator (for a mobile device emulator), Visual Studio Code for an IDE, Appium Server, and a sample Appium Android Package Kit. If you get into trouble, you can use the Test Automation University Slack channel to get help from Orane. Each subchapter contains the links to get to the proper software. Finally, Orane has you customize your configuration for the course project.

Chapter 2 deals with elements and screen interactions for your app. You can find elements on the page, interact with those elements, and scroll the page to make other elements visible. Orane breaks the chapter into three distinct subchapters so you can become competent with each part of finding, scrolling, and interacting with the app. The quiz comes at the end of the third subchapter.

The remaining chapters each deal with specific bullets listed above: sessions and screen capture, timing, element attributes, and using element states. The final summary chapter ensures you have internalized the key takeaways from the course. Each of these chapters includes its quiz.

When you complete this course successfully, you will have both a certificate of completion and the code infrastructure available on your system to start testing mobile apps using Appium.

Selenium WebDriver With Python

Andrew Knight, who blogs as The Automation Panda, teaches the course on Selenium WebDriver with Python. As Andrew points out, Python has become a popular language for test automation. If you don’t know Python at all, he points you to Jess Ingrassellino’s great course, Python for Test Programming, also on Test Automation University.

Se

In the first chapter, Andrew has you write your first test. Not in Python, but Gherkin. If you have never used Gherkin syntax, it helps you structure your tests in pseudocode that you can translate into any language of your choice. Andrew points out that it’s important to write your test steps before you write test code — and Gherkin makes this process straightforward.

first test case

The second chapter goes through setting up a pytest, the test framework Andrew uses. He assumes you already have Python 3.8 installed. Depending on your machine, you may need to do some work (Macs come with Python 2.7.16 installed, which is old and won’t work. Andrew also goes through the pip package manager to install pipenv. He gives you a GitHub link to his test code for the project. And, finally, he creates a test using the Gherkin codes as comments to show you how a test runs in pytest.

In the third chapter, you set up Selenium Webdriver to work with specific browsers, then create your test fixture in the pytest. Andrew reminds you to download the appropriate browser driver for the browser you want to test — for example, chromedriver to drive Chrome and geckodriver to drive Firefox. Once you use pipenv to install Selenium, you begin your test fixture. One thing to remember is to call an explicit quit for your webdriver after a test.

Chapter 4 goes through page objects, and how you abstract page object details to simplify your test structure. Chapter 5 goes through element locator structures and how to use these in Python. And, in Chapter 6, Andrew goes through some common webdriver calls and how to use them in your tests. These first six chapters cover the basics of testing with Python and Selenium.

Now that you have the basics down, the final three chapters review some advanced ideas: testing with multiple browsers, handling race conditions, and running your tests in parallel. This course gives you specific skills around Python and Selenium on top of what you can get from the Python for Test Programming course.

#tutorial #performance #testing #automation #test automation #automated testing #visual testing #visual testing best practices #testing tutorial