How to Write a Screenplay: Step-by-Step | Simpliv

How to Write a Screenplay: Step-by-Step | Simpliv

How to Write a Screenplay: Step-by-Step

Behind-the-Scenes Secrets to Publishing Screenplays

Whether you’ve got a completed script, or need help off the starting-blocks, getting a Screenplay formatted correctly to catch the eye of producers is no easy task. A little, professional advice goes a long way, and How to Write a Screenplay delivers large, for those with big screen aspirations!

Top Writing Tricks You Didn’t Know - for TV & Film

When writing for the movies, TV, video or computer games, there are essential elements you must get right to show professional competence, and avoid looking like an amateur. Jones not only provides the answers but presents them in an easy to understand way that can be read in under a day to bring game-changing results fast.

By explaining the best formatting requirements for each genre, Jones unveils the blueprints that experts use for Feature film and Television dramas & sitcoms. She examines the best ways to edit-on-a-budget and the 6 Tips for Success that can turn your script into must-have property.

Slugs, Thugs & the Theory of Illumination

Even if you know your slugs from your thugs, the Theory of Illumination is just one of the many methods Noah describes for writing believable, compelling characters that have edge-of-the-seat dialogue.

How to Write a Screenplay gets you in the frame for success and makes sure you won’t fade out of view. From creating beat sheets, to helping you write your first draft, Jones looks over your shoulder and breaks everything down line-by-line, to help you style your writing in a properly formatted and accepted way.

Subjects Covered Include:

Physical Formatting
Screenplay Formats
Action Elements
Writing Dialogue
Parenthetical Information
Transition Elements
Types of Drama & How to Format for Them
Number of Pages Expected for Each Act
Narrative Structure
Example formatting for Multicamera Sitcoms
Top 5 Tips for Writing Stronger Characters
Creating a Rough Draft
Editing a Screenplay
Expert Tips for Success
One Click Away from Amazing Screenplay!

A must-have course for those who have no access to professional help and want something quick so that they can progress with their writing. Submit your scripts with confidence! Click Enroll Now to see your screenplay story come to life fast!

Basic knowledge
All you need is a desire to write great scripts!
What will you learn
Subjects Covered Include:

Physical Formatting
Screenplay Formats
Action Elements
Writing Dialogue
Parenthetical Information
Transition Elements
Types of Drama & How to Format for Them
Number of Pages Expected for Each Act
Narrative Structure
Example formatting for Multicamera Sitcoms
Top 5 Tips for Writing Stronger Characters

Angular 9 Tutorial: Learn to Build a CRUD Angular App Quickly

What's new in Bootstrap 5 and when Bootstrap 5 release date?

What’s new in HTML6

How to Build Progressive Web Apps (PWA) using Angular 9

What is new features in Javascript ES2020 ECMAScript 2020

Teach yourself SQL Step by Step | Simpliv

Teach yourself SQL Step by Step | Simpliv

Teach yourself SQL Step by Step

Description
Structured Query Language (SQL) is a special purpose language for interacting with relational databases. In this course, Teach yourself SQL Step by Step, you will learn the basics of Structured Query Language. First, you will learn how to query data and shape results. Next, you will focus on creating and modifying data in your tables. Finally, you will touch on how to set relations with tables and extract matching data. By the end of this course, you'll understand the basics of how to create and use a relational database.

Basic knowledge
No prior computer knowledge required, all you need is a computer with SQL server installed
What will you learn
Understanding Database Concepts
Installation of SQL server
Connection and Disconnection
Difference between Admin Login and User Login
SQL commands for creating
displaying and deleting database
SQL commands for creating
displaying and deleting tables
Commands for exploring tables
Organizing data
Setting relations and understanding joins
To continue:

How to Write a Novel: Step-by-Step | Simpliv

How to Write a Novel: Step-by-Step | Simpliv

How to Write a Novel: Step-by-Step

This course unlocks the secrets of novel writing in simple-to-follow ways that will bring significant results fast!

Struggling as an Author?

Do you have an amazing story in mind, but you can’t get it down on paper? You’ve got the idea and the characters but soon run out of steam? Perhaps you are a beginner and need help putting it all together.

Whatever your reason, this course helps to unlock the secrets of novel writing in simple-to-follow ways that will bring significant results fast.

Tips to Write Engrossing Page-Turners

”How to Write a Novel: Step-by-Step” provides a breakdown of essential aspects of writing Romance, Fantasy and Mystery novels and unveils crucial tips and tricks that will help flesh-out the characters in your book. Noah assists in creating compelling plots and weaving stories that your readers will be fully immersed in.

A course that quickly gets to the heart of the matter in a clear and concise way. New and experienced authors will rapidly find answers to what they need.

A Much-Needed Breath of Fresh Air

Noah reminds us that readers are not expecting a perfect book, just an engaging one. She highlights how our own ideals can stand in the way of a great book being written.

At a time when self-publishing and using Print on Demand is gaining mainstream popularity, Noah’s succinct book will prove to be the go-to guide for many a struggling author.

One Click Away from Getting Amazing Results Fast!

A must-have course for those who have no access to professional help and want something quick so that they can progress with writing.

No author need face a blank page with fear any longer!

Click Enroll Now to see your story come to life fast!

Basic knowledge
You want to learn how to write a novel step by step
Keen to learn the essentials of how to write a novel
Probably have an outline in mind to write novels and need to learn how to write it
You have previous creative writing experience
What will you learn
THE OUTLINE – how to refine major schemes & subplots that make sense to the reader & also your protagonist
THE SETTING – the art of crafting a sense of place & how to work with multiple locations & time-periods
POINT OF VIEW – helping you to form the best character perspectives for your story
CHARACTERS – the best way to choose your central character to drive the story forward & one in whom your audience will discover a gripping read
CONFLICT – how & when to use struggle to keep the reader engaged
ADDITIONAL TIPS – A final section that motivates the author to think differently to engage emotion & lose the reader in the heart of the story. Marsh helps an author to think outside of the box when faced with over-used clichés, and to deal with the pressures of deadlines and expectations

Step by Step guide to Write your own WordPress Template

Step by Step guide to Write your own WordPress Template

Step by Step guide to Write your own WordPress Template - Writing your own WordPress template from scratch is fairly simple. If you are into Web Development industry, you might’ve already heard what “WordPress” is...

Step by Step guide to Write your own WordPress Template - Writing your own WordPress template from scratch is fairly simple. If you are into Web Development industry, you might’ve already heard what “WordPress” is...

Maybe a client has mentioned, but you’re not familiar with it. Maybe you’ve already worked with it before, but don’t know how to make a theme from scratch. Or maybe you’re a complete newbie. Whatever is the case, this post is for you.

**Prerequisites: **Before we begin, you’ll need to fulfill the following set of requirements.
You need to have a fully fledged WordPress setup, either on localhost or live hosting. If you want to learn more about starting with WordPress, refer to this article.A conceptual design, either as PSD or HTML CSS to follow throughout the development process.A little introduction to PHP programming. However, it’s not a necessity for this particular post but still recommended.## Scope

Designing a WordPress theme is a long, tedious, never ending but a great programming challenge. The development process depends entirely on how you want your theme to look like. This post is just a tutorial and does not cover all the bits and pieces required for a standard WordPress theme. After going through this article, you have to heavily rely on WordPress Codex and WordPress StackExchange for your further queries.

Getting Started

With the prerequisites in mind, let’s get started. The very first thing you need to know is the fact that almost everything you do in WordPress is inside the wp-content directory. Everything else is the WordPress CMS itself and you don’t want to mess with that.When you’ll open wp-content -> theme directory, you’ll find default WordPress themes, like twentyfifteen, twentyfourteen, twentythirteen, etc. To start with one of your own, create a directory with whatever name you prefer. For this post, we’ll call it wpstart.

*A WordPress theme atleast needs two files to exist – style.css and *index.php
So go into wpstart folder and create these two files. In style.css, insert the following comment. This tells the WordPress dashboard about the theme details and meta information.

/* 
Theme Name: WP Start 
Author: FedUser 
Description: A bare bone WordPress theme 
Version: 0.0.1 
*/

Now switch to your WordPress dashboard, and click on Appearance > Themes. You’ll find WP Start in your theme collection.

Go ahead and activate this theme, and then visit the site. And Voila! You’ve technically created a custom theme, all by yourself. Of course, it doesn’t do anything except it has a blank white screen. This is where index.php comes into action.

Open index.php in text editor and write in the following code.

<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
<body> 
<h1>This is a sample WordPress theme.</h1> 
</body> 
</html> 

Visit the site once again and get your first WordPress template up and running.

Divide and Conquer

To develop a standard WordPress theme, you need to divide all your work into sections. This is not necessary, as you can do everything in index.php, but a good programming practice involves modularity. For this particular post, we will divide our entire work into four sections, viz. header, footer, sidebar and content. Corresponding to these sections, we will create four different files, namely header.php, footer.php, sidebar.php and content.php.header.php: For this particular example, this file will do the following;Define all the meta and link tags inside <head> for HTML.Display site branding like name and description.Provide navigation to different pages.With these points in mind, let’s code our theme header.

<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
<head> 
<meta charset="utf-8" /> 
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1" /> 

<title>WP Start</title> 

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css"
		integrity="sha384-BVYiiSIFeK1dGmJRAkycuHAHRg32OmUcww7on3RYdg4Va+PmSTsz/K68vbdEjh4u"
		crossorigin="anonymous" /> 
</head> 

<body> 

<nav></nav> 

Now there is one thing I want to bring your attention to. You can see how “hard-coded” our site title is. Meaning, the title is going to remain the same “WP Start”, no matter what site you apply this theme on. If the author has to change it, he has to manually edit the code to do so. In order to avoid these manual tweaking of templates, WordPress provides various function calls to deal with these situations dynamically. In this particular case, I want the title to be the name of the site/blog. For this, I’ll replace

<title>WP Start<title>

with

<title> <?php echo get_bloginfo( "name" ); ?> </title>

This is called embedding small php excerpt into HTML. (Technically, we are writing HTML in php file. So we’re embedding HTML in php code).

So the header.php, with some additional code, becomes;

<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
<head> 
<meta charset="utf-8" /> 
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1" /> 


<title> <?php echo get_bloginfo( "name" ); ?> </title> 


<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css"
		integrity="sha384-BVYiiSIFeK1dGmJRAkycuHAHRg32OmUcww7on3RYdg4Va+PmSTsz/K68vbdEjh4u"
		crossorigin="anonymous" /> 


<link rel="stylesheet" href="<?php echo get_bloginfo( 'template_directory' ); ?>/style.css" /> 
<?php wp_head(); ?> 
</head> 


<body> 


<nav class="navbar navbar-default"> 
	<div class="container"> 
	<div class="navbar-header"> 
		<a class="navbar-brand" href="<?php echo esc_url( home_url() ); ?>"> 
		<h3 class="site-branding"> <?php echo get_bloginfo( "name" ); ?> </h3> 
		</a> 
	</div> 


	<ul class="nav navbar-nav navbar-right"> 
		<li class="active"><a href="#">Home</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">Contact</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">About</a></li> 
	</ul> 
	</div> 
</nav> 


Additional php excerpts used in this code are;

<?php echo get_bloginfo( 'template_directory' ); ?>

This is to get the directory of the template, so that addition resources like CSS, JS, fonts, etc. can be located.

<?php echo esc_url( home_url() ); ?>

This will echo the homepage url of the site.

footer.php: This is the file where we will add whatever we want in the site footer, like custom footer, script tags, etc. Also, the HTML tags that started in header.php are closed in this file.

<footer class="site-footer"> 
	<div class="container"> 
	<div class="row row-30"> 
		<div class="col-md-4 col-xl-5"> 
		<div class="pr-xl-4"> 
			<h3> 
			<a href="<?php echo esc_url( home_url() ); ?>"> 
				<?php echo get_bloginfo( "name" ); ?> 
			</a> 
			</h3> 
			<p><?php echo get_bloginfo( "description" ); ?></p> 
			<p>© 2018 FedUser. All Rights Reserved.</p> 
		</div> 
		</div> 


		<div class="col-md-4"> 
		<h5>Contacts</h5> 
		<dl class="contact-list"> 
			<dt>Address:</dt> 
			<dd>798 ABC Nagar, JKL, Rajasthan</dd> 
		</dl> 
		<dl class="contact-list"> 
			<dt>e-Mail:</dt> 
			<dd><a href="mailto:#">[email protected]</a></dd> 
		</dl> 
		<dl class="contact-list"> 
			<dt>Phone No.:</dt> 
			<dd><a href="tel:#">+91 1234567890</a> 
			</dd> 
		</dl> 
		</div> 


		<div class="col-md-4 col-xl-3"> 
		<h5>Links</h5> 
		<ul class="nav-list"> 
			<li><a href="#">About</a></li> 
			<li><a href="#">Projects</a></li> 
			<li><a href="#">Blog</a></li> 
			<li><a href="#">Contacts</a></li> 
			<li><a href="#">Pricing</a></li> 
		</ul> 
		</div> 
	</div> 
	</div> 
</footer> 


<script src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.12.4.min.js"
	integrity="sha256-ZosEbRLbNQzLpnKIkEdrPv7lOy9C27hHQ+Xp8a4MxAQ="
	crossorigin="anonymous"> 
</script> 


<script src="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/js/bootstrap.min.js"
	integrity="sha384-Tc5IQib027qvyjSMfHjOMaLkfuWVxZxUPnCJA7l2mCWNIpG9mGCD8wGNIcPD7Txa"
	crossorigin="anonymous"> 
</script> 


</body> 
</html> 


The additional php excerpt used in this file is;

<?php echo get_bloginfo( "description" ); ?>

This will fetch and place the site description.Another thing to mention here is that I have used “hard-coded” sub-sections like “Contacts” and “Links” in the footer.php file. Instead, you can use WordPress Widgets to automate and make them modifiable directly via Customizer. This, however, is beyond the scope of this post and we’ll discuss it any time in the future articles.sidebar.php: Most of the websites have a sidebar, so do ours. Often sidebars display archive links, recent posts, social media accounts, advertisements, etc. In our case, we’ll go with archive links and social media links. Again, a WordPress widget is way better than the “hard-coded” junk! But for the sake of clarity, we’ll stick to the latter.

<div class="sidebar"> 
<div class="widget"> 
	<h3 class="widget-title">Archives</h3> 
	<div class="widget-content"> 
	<ul> 
		<li><a href="#">October 2018</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">November 2018</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">December 2018</a></li> 
	</ul> 
	</div> 
</div> 


<div class="widget"> 
	<h3 class="widget-title">Social</h3> 
	<div class="widget-content"> 
	<ul> 
		<li><a href="#">Facebook</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">Twitter</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">LinkedIn</a></li> 
		<li><a href="#">Github</a></li> 
	</ul> 
	</div> 
</div> 
</div> 


content.php: Now that header, footer and sidebar are all set up, we’ll move towards the main content of the site. For the moment, we will stick to some dummy content inside this file.

<div class="main-content"> 
<h3>Sample Title</h3> 
<p>Sample text goes here.......</p> 
</div> 


Integration

Now let’s move back to the index.php where we will integrate all the above sections into one. As this file is an entry point for our theme, we can cleverly choose to put these sections. Here’s how I’ve done it.

<?php get_header(); ?> 


<div class="container"> 
<div class="row"> 
	<div class="col-md-9"> 
	<?php get_template_part( 'content', get_post_format() ); ?> 
	</div> 
	<div class="col-md-3"> 
	<?php get_sidebar(); ?> 
	</div> 
</div> 
</div> 


<?php get_footer(); ?> 


The php excerpts used here are self explanatory. get<em>header(), get</em>sidebar() and get_footer() are predefined functions used for embedding corresponding sections. For a custom section like content.php, embedding is done by the following code;

<?php get_template_part( 'content', get_post_format() ); ?>

style.css: Now that we have updated our index.php file, let’s add some charm with CSS.

/* 
Theme Name: WP Start 
Author: FedUser 
Description: A bare bone WordPress theme 
Version: 0.0.1 
*/


nav.navbar .navbar-brand .site-branding { 
margin: 0; 
} 


footer.site-footer { 
background-color: #502550; 
color: #fff; 
padding: 40px 0 20px 0; 
} 


footer.site-footer a { 
color: #fff; 
} 


And Voila! The first look of your custom WordPress theme is ready.

The Loop

This is the most exciting part of the entire WordPress theme development where you have control of all the posts. The Loop is a functionality with which you can dynamically insert content into your theme. Our aim in this tutorial is to present all the blog posts as a user-friendly list so that the reader can choose any one of them. Let’s see how we do it.The loop itself is self-explanatory.

<?php if ( have_posts() ) : while ( have_posts() ) : the_post(); ?> 


<!-- contents of the loop --> 


<?php endwhile; endif; ?> 


IF there are any posts, WHILE there are none left, DISPLAY them. Anything inside this loop will be repeated, till the page runs out of all the posts. We can use this concept to display our list. Here’s how I have done it.

<div class="panel panel-default blog-post"> 
<div class="panel-heading"> 
	<h3 class="panel-title post-title"> 


	<?php if( !is_single() ): ?> 


		<a href="<?php echo esc_url( get_permalink() ); ?>"> 
		<?php the_title(); ?> 
		</a> 


	<?php else: 
		the_title(); 
	endif; ?> 


	</h3> 


	<p class="post-meta"> 
	<?php the_date(); ?> 
	by <a href="#"> 
		<?php the_author(); ?> 
		</a> 
	</p> 
</div> 


<div class="panel-body"> 


	<?php if( !is_single() ): 
	the_excerpt(); 
	else: 
	the_content(); 
	endif; ?> 


</div> 
</div> 


And changed the index.php to this.

<?php get_header(); ?> 


<div class="container"> 
<div class="row"> 
	<div class="col-md-9 blog-main"> 
	<?php if( have_posts() ): 
			while( have_posts() ): 


				the_post(); 
				get_template_part( 'content', get_post_format() ); 


			endwhile; 
			endif; 
	?> 
	</div> 
	<div class="col-md-3"> 
	<?php get_sidebar(); ?> 
	</div> 
</div> 
</div> 


<?php get_footer(); ?> 


Let’s look at what just happened!

The Loop in index.php is calling the content.php everytime the page has a post. Inside content.php, I’ve checked if the current post is_single(). This condition will hold true if the current page contains only a single post to loop through. When it is not single, I wanted a link to that post via its title. So I used get_permalink() to get the url of that particular post. However, if the page is single, there is no need of a link and therefore, I’ve used only the_title() function.

Moving on to the meta info of the post. I’ve displayed the_date() on which the article was published and its the_author().

Finally, I’ve used the same concept of is_single() to either display the_excerpt() or the_content() of the post.

See, it was that easy and fun. Now with a little charm of CSS, I got the following result.

Conclusion:
We’re ending this post on this very point but you need to know that there is still a lot to learn about WordPress. It was just an example drill but a standard theme would be much complex. Still, we hope that you’ve learnt something new.If there was something that you didn’t understand, do mention it in the comments. If there is something that needs to be corrected, please let us know! If you’ve any feedback or suggestions for further improvements, we would highly appreciate that as well.We would love to see what you’ve learnt through this post. So do share links to your first WordPress themes. Your first steps can cheer up the new-comers.