Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for. The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image. This is an experimenta

docker manifest – An experimental feature !

The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image.

This is an experimental feature. To enable this feature in the Docker CLI, one can edit the config.json file found in ~/.docker/config.json like :

{
        "auths": {
                "https://index.docker.io/v1/": {
                        "auth": "XXXXXXX"
                }
        },
        "HttpHeaders": {
                "User-Agent": "Docker-Client/19.03.8 (linux)"
        },
        "experimental": "enabled",
        "debug": true
}

What is ‘docker manifest’ ?

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for.

A single manifest comprises of information about an image, it’s size, the layers and digest.

A manifest list is a list of image layers (manifests) that are, created by specifying one or more image names. It can then be used in the same way as an image name in docker pull and docker run commands.

Commands to get started with :

After enabling this feature, one would be able to access the following command :

docker-manifest-enter image description here

These commands are easy to use. It basically avoids the need for pulling and running and then testing the images locally, from a docker registry.

Next, to inspect an image manifest, follow this syntax,

 docker manifest inspect image-name

enter image description here

.

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