Rstudio Markdown to Markua: A Leanpub Tale of Markdown Flavors

The Story

I wrote a markdown book on Programming and Digital Humanities. I learned how to use Rstudio and Rbookdown on the way, they made it super easy to write the book. So I ended up with an R Markdown file (.Rmd).

GitHub was the first choice to share it. It renders Markdown directly, but not .Rmd — Yuhui has a wonderful post on why .Rmd is not rendered as .md on GitHub. So I changed it to standard Markdown (.md). People can preview the book, something may get lost in translation, but having the stuff out was already cool.

I also thought that if you really really really want the book you can clone it, renamed as .Rmd as R build it.

Still, the book was not so user friendly for people in academia and humanities. Plus, it would be cool to have a tool to make the GitHub book an ebook that compiles on all formats. (I know more people that read ebooks than those that can clone and process .Rmd bookdown.)

Leanpub proves to be such a tool, but before reaching the goal there are more struggles with markdown flavors.

So here I am, transitioning the book into a new Markdown flavor, Markua.

Introducing Markua

Leanpub has its own version of markdown called Markua which works for courses and books you may display on their website. Specs are here in book format and here in their latest version.

When moving content across formats its good to know what features you are using, how they are supported in the current format, and how they are implemented in the target format. Basically, that was my path:

  1. find out what you need to render the book;
  2. find out how that’s done in Markua;
  3. if Markua’s way is different from Rmd, write a script to fix it for you;
  4. and be sure to test the stuff.

(If you are interested in further moving to Markua experience, here’s another take on that.)

#markua #leanpub #markdown #digital-humanities #python

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Rstudio Markdown to Markua: A Leanpub Tale of Markdown Flavors

Rstudio Markdown to Markua: A Leanpub Tale of Markdown Flavors

The Story

I wrote a markdown book on Programming and Digital Humanities. I learned how to use Rstudio and Rbookdown on the way, they made it super easy to write the book. So I ended up with an R Markdown file (.Rmd).

GitHub was the first choice to share it. It renders Markdown directly, but not .Rmd — Yuhui has a wonderful post on why .Rmd is not rendered as .md on GitHub. So I changed it to standard Markdown (.md). People can preview the book, something may get lost in translation, but having the stuff out was already cool.

I also thought that if you really really really want the book you can clone it, renamed as .Rmd as R build it.

Still, the book was not so user friendly for people in academia and humanities. Plus, it would be cool to have a tool to make the GitHub book an ebook that compiles on all formats. (I know more people that read ebooks than those that can clone and process .Rmd bookdown.)

Leanpub proves to be such a tool, but before reaching the goal there are more struggles with markdown flavors.

So here I am, transitioning the book into a new Markdown flavor, Markua.

Introducing Markua

Leanpub has its own version of markdown called Markua which works for courses and books you may display on their website. Specs are here in book format and here in their latest version.

When moving content across formats its good to know what features you are using, how they are supported in the current format, and how they are implemented in the target format. Basically, that was my path:

  1. find out what you need to render the book;
  2. find out how that’s done in Markua;
  3. if Markua’s way is different from Rmd, write a script to fix it for you;
  4. and be sure to test the stuff.

(If you are interested in further moving to Markua experience, here’s another take on that.)

#markua #leanpub #markdown #digital-humanities #python

Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1597853340

Using RStudio With An iPad

I love my iPad. It’s not exactly new: it’s a 12.9 inch model from three years ago. But even so, it’s light and convenient and fast enough not to be painful.

What I like about it:

  • easy to write with (I have this keyboard)
  • drawing with a pencil is almost as immediate, with almost the same control, as pen and paper
  • it’s easy on the eyes when it comes to reading
  • the split-screen mode is great for taking notes while reading
  • the games are great – I’m fond of iPad re-imaginings of things like Baldur’s Gate
  • when I’m traveling, I can buy mobile data and it mostly just works

I can perform plenty of my engineering and scrum masterly duties with it:

  • I can manage and interrogate the AWS and Google Cloud web consoles
  • I can use Google Drive, Docs, Sheets etc.
  • I have access to my iCloud file storage as well

I do have trouble with some things though:

  • Although I can ssh into things and do some scripting full-on development is rather tricky
  • I like to dabble with data science ideas from time to time, for which I usually use RStudio

I realise there are several web-based data science platforms, Jupyter notebook services of various types, but I still prefer RStudio. Besides which, my other blog is managed via blogdown, which is easy to deal with RStudio. How can I work with this tool on the iPad?

#rstudio-server #google-cloud-platform #ipad #rstudio #cloud

Marcus  Flatley

Marcus Flatley

1594399440

Getting Started with R Markdown — Guide and Cheatsheet

In this blog post, we’ll look at how to use R Markdown. By the end, you’ll have the skills you need to produce a document or presentation using R Mardown, from scratch!

We’ll show you how to convert the default R Markdown document into a useful reference guide of your own. We encourage you to follow along by building out your own R Markdown guide, but if you prefer to just read along, that works, too!

R Markdown is an open-source tool for producing reproducible reports in R. It enables you to keep all of your code, results, plots, and writing in one place. R Markdown is particularly useful when you are producing a document for an audience that is interested in the results from your analysis, but not your code.

R Markdown is powerful because it can be used for data analysis and data science, collaborating with others, and communicating results to decision makers. With R Markdown, you have the option to export your work to numerous formats including PDF, Microsoft Word, a slideshow, or an HTML document for use in a website.

r markdown tips, tricks, and shortcuts

Turn your data analysis into pretty documents with R Markdown.

We’ll use the RStudio integrated development environment (IDE) to produce our R Markdown reference guide. If you’d like to learn more about RStudio, check out our list of 23 awesome RStudio tips and tricks!

Here at Dataquest, we love using R Markdown for coding in R and authoring content. In fact, we wrote this blog post in R Markdown! Also, learners on the Dataquest platform use R Markdown for completing their R projects.

We included fully-reproducible code examples in this blog post. When you’ve mastered the content in this post, check out our other blog post on R Markdown tips, tricks, and shortcuts.

Okay, let’s get started with building our very own R Markdown reference document!

R Markdown Guide and Cheatsheet: Quick Navigation

1. Install R Markdown

R Markdown is a free, open source tool that is installed like any other R package. Use the following command to install R Markdown:

install.packages("rmarkdown")

Now that R Markdown is installed, open a new R Markdown file in RStudio by navigating to File > New File > R Markdown…. R Markdown files have the file extension “.Rmd”.

2. Default Output Format

When you open a new R Markdown file in RStudio, a pop-up window appears that prompts you to select output format to use for the document.

New Document

The default output format is HTML. With HTML, you can easily view it in a web browser.

We recommend selecting the default HTML setting for now — it can save you time! Why? Because compiling an HTML document is generally faster than generating a PDF or other format. When you near a finished product, you change the output to the format of your choosing and then make the final touches.

One final thing to note is that the title you give your document in the pop-up above is not the file name! Navigate to File > Save As.. to name, and save, the document.

#data science tutorials #beginner #r #r markdown #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #rstudio #tutorial #tutorials

Nat  Kutch

Nat Kutch

1596458160

Markdown Cheatsheet: What is Markdown?

What is Markdown?

Markdown is a way to style text on the web. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters thrown in, like # or *.

Markdown is very popular to write README’s on Github. So, I’ve given you a tutorial of the markdown.

Syntax guide

You can find documantation and a complete explanation of Markdown’s syntex here.

Contents

  • Headings
  • Emphasis
  • Bold
  • Italic
  • Strikethrough
  • Images
  • Links
  • Paragraphs
  • BlockQuotes
  • Lists
  • Ordered Lists
  • Unordered Lists
  • Code
  • Syntax highlighting or Multiline code
  • Tables
  • Horizontal Rules

Headings

You can create headings by prefixing with a # (hash mark).

Heading 1

Syntex: 
    # Heading 1
        or
    =====

Heading 2

Syntex:
    ## Heading 2
        or
    ----

Heading 3

Syntex:
    ### Heading 3

Heading 4

Syntex:
    #### Heading 4

Heading 5

Syntex:
    ##### Heading 5

Heading 6

Syntex:
    ###### Heading 6

Emphasis

Bold

You can make any text bold by adding double asterisks (*) or double underscores(_).

Syntex:

    **Bold**

    __Bold__

Italic

You can make any text italic by adding asterisk (*) or underscore(_).

Syntex:

    *Italic*
    _Italic_

Bold and Italic

Even you can combine both them.

Syntex:
    You **can** combine them_

Strikethrough

Markdown supports strikethrough by wrapping text in ~~:

Syntex:
    ~~This text is strikethrough.~~

#markdown #readme #learning #programming #beginners-guide #deep learning

Rusty  Shanahan

Rusty Shanahan

1594318320

R Notebook for dummies: save and share results easily

Prologue

I have confessed my love for R in my previous posts, so I won’t repeat the same here. It is absolutely the best tool for performing statistical analysis of data, but as it is a programming language, it can do so much more. It may not be as complete or powerful as Python, but people in academia love it for the myriad of packages available, and new ones are being developed daily. R also has a fantastic integrated development environment (IDE) called RStudio. Beginners should definitely take advantage of the user-friendly interface to get used to the language faster, but the IDE is equally useful to advanced users. I have tried other IDEs and code editors, but I always come back to using RStudio. One of the primary reason behind this is R notebook.

Markdown

R Notebook, is essentially, a form of markdown. If you have no idea what markdown is, take a look at the GIF below:

Image for post

Example of Markdown formatting (Recorded in Visual Studio Code)

Basically markdown is a way of typesetting documents. In the GIF, you see text being typed in the left pane, while the preview of the final render being shown in the right pane. Markdown is a very easy way to format text with minimal commands, and is much easier to use compared to selecting, clicking and formatting of text in word processors. Markdown also lets you export the document in various formats such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MS Word etc. To know more about markdown, visit this link; and to know more about the various commands and formatting tools available in markdown, visit this one.

R Notebook

You can write markdown in RStudio — but that’s just not it. RStudio markdown interface — known as R notebook, is a fantastic way of saving and sharing results of data analysis. You type your R code inside the notebook, and running the code displays your results inside the notebook, and finally you can export code and results together in a single file. It makes it easy for anyone to understand and reproduce the analysis you have done. Take a look at the GIF below:

Image for post
Example of working with R Notebook in RStudio

After you create a R Notebook file, you insert code chunks in the file — where you write your code. Running the code chunk (as shown in the GIF) gives you the output inside the notebook.

Using R Notebook

I will describe the basics of using R notebook here, along with basic markdown syntaxes that you will need. For a more detailed tutorial, visit this link.

To open a R notebook, either click on the File menu and select R Notebook under New File section; or easier — click on the small arrow beside the small green plus icon and choose R Notebook. A new notebook will open with some example code. You can delete the example code, just do not delete the YAML metadata, which are the instructions written at the beginning between two --- . These two lines contain instructions for the title of the notebook, and the format the notebook will be rendered to. The title can be changed to whatever you like. The format, by default, will be set to HTML, but you can change it to PDF or Word document by clicking on the small arrow beside the Preview button and selecting “Knit to PDF” or “Knit to Word document”.

#rstudio #markdown #r #r-notebook #data-analysis #data analysis