Building a WebAssembly Module from Rust

Building a WebAssembly Module from Rust

In this article, you'll learn how to generate & build a WebAssembly module from Rust and import it into a React project

WebAssembly, the future of the web?

WebAssembly is being billed as the future technology of the web, with the ability to run code in the browser at near native speeds. WebAssembly (often shortened to wasm) is a compact binary format that is compiled from languages like C and C++, as well as Rust — the language we will be demonstrating in this article.

Rust, being a relatively new language itself, has already built up a lot of support for developing, compiling and publishing modules in WebAssembly, mostly led by the Mozilla Foundation. Development of both Rust and WebAssembly are ongoing, albeit Rust being in a more mature state. Nonetheless, we can expect the APIs talked about in this article to be changed over time, which we’ll attempt to keep up to date as releases are rolled out.

AssemblyScript, a strict subset of Typescript, is another interesting language aimed at Javascript developers to start adopting Wasm, having a smaller learning curve for front-end developers than Rust or C++. This is a good example of innovation happening in the WebAssembly ecosystem.

In this piece we will publish a wasm module that makes a fetch request to Github, and return the resulting JSON. This compiled wasm function will then be called from Javascript in a Create React App project.

The full project that coincides with this piece can be found here on Github.

The Rust WebAssembly tools

To build a wasm module with Rust, we’ll utilise two frameworks to package up the module and get the compiled WebAssembly to interact with the browser:

  • wasm-pack (Github): The “one-stop shop” for compiling Rust based WebAssembly for the web. wasm-pack is a CLI tool that can build, test and publish WebAssembly modules
  • wasm-bindgen (Github): A Rust library and CLI tool for facilitating interactions with Javascript and the DOM. In fact, the underlying APIs of wasm-bindgen provide bindings for all the Web APIs, making it possible to manipulate the DOM, listen to events, call fetch requests, websockets, and more — all with Rust compiled wasm

It is important to stress that WebAssembly cannot directly access the DOM — yet. This will undoubtedly be different in 1–2 years, where various proposals being developed now will resolve features like multi-threading and direct DOM manipulation, two major bottlenecks of WebAssembly adoption currently existing.

For now, wasm-bindgen acts as the bridge to interact with Javascript APIs, all of which have Rust bindings within the library. This is done with two underlying dependencies of wasm-bindgen: the js-sys crate and web-sys crate, exposing the entire Javascript standard library and Web API library respectively, to Rust and WebAssembly.

To summarise this introductory, what we can most likely expect in the near term is:

  • wasm-bindgen to dramatically speed up as more WebAssembly proposals are implemented and support rolled out in browsers. We can also expect smaller module sizes as boilerplate code becomes unnecessary
  • wasm-bindgen will attempt to maintain their top level APIs as features are rolled out, but the underlying web-sys will undoubtedly undergo major changes as direct DOM manipulation rolls out
  • js-sys will still be around for the purpose of interacting with Javascript standard library and Javascript modules, where the two languages will be working hand in hand

This last point will most likely be the main use case of WebAssembly in the short term. Where libraries of modules (and entire web apps) have already been established in Javascript, there will be little incentive to re-build entire projects into WebAssembly.

However, what we can expect is WebAssembly based modules, that do specific things very well, to be wrapped up in NPM modules and imported into a Javascript project. Modules like:

  • Computationally expensive things like crunching numbers, rendering 3D objects, or running machine learning algorithms. These tasks in wasm will be running an order of magnitude faster than their Javascript counterparts
  • Blockchain light clients and distributed network protocols. With blockchain clients, particularly Parity’s Ethereum and Substrate frameworks, it will become apparent that compiling their existing source code into WebAssembly will make total sense, having client clients run in the browser as an imported module. These will also leverage speed and efficiency, while modularising protocol level APIs from your UX code
  • With Rust’s built in memory safety and strict typing, we can also expect mission critical tools such as security features and live chat / real-time web environments to be implemented as WebAssembly modules, with a focus on stability
Javascript is not going anywhere

What does all this mean in terms of Javascript? At this point it is hard to see a future without Javascript being the dominant language of the web. Javascript is not going anywhere, and WebAssembly will more than likely be a compliment to Javascript, rather than a replacement, speeding up certain parts of applications and providing more ways for codebases from other languages to run in the browser.

With this understanding, let’s now jump into a real-world example. We’ll be slightly modifying the fetch request example from the wasm-bindgen examples hosted on Github.

We’ll then import this module asynchronously into a Create React App project and call our wasm function within a React component, providing webpack the means to recognise wasm based modules in the process without ejecting the project.

Installing Wasm Pack

For the sake of this talk we will clone the git repository coinciding with this piece, that contains a wasm-pack generated Rust project with the fetch request code therein. We’ll also cover some basic setup steps.

A note on VS Code

Visual Studio code has great support for Rust with the RLS extension. In addition, the WebAssembly extension is also available to have wasm syntax highlighting and the ability to easily preview wasm binaries.

The following instructions assume that you already have Rust installed on your system. If not, head over to the Rust Installation page and download rustup.

Let’s firstly install the required CLI tools for our wasm endeavours, starting with wasm-pack. The latest installation instructions will be on their installation page, but installing the package only requires one curl request:

# install wasm-pack

curl https://rustwasm.github.io/wasm-pack/installer/init.sh -sSf | sh

A wasm-pack binary will be installed in your ~/.cargo/bin directory. The program contains the new, build, test and publish commands, the documentation of which can be found here.

Getting familiar with wasm-bindgen

Also recommended is to clone the entire wasm-bindgen repository, and have all the example code present on your system to test:

# clone wasm-bindgen

git clone https://github.com/rustwasm/wasm-bindgen

The examples/ folder contains a range of projects, albeit not configured to be built as a module. Each example can be viewed online and is accompanied with a dedicated documentation page. Refer to each example’s README.md file to get links to the live demo and documentation.

The simplest wasm-bindgen example is the console_log project, showcasing how to bind the console.log() Javascript function to a Rust function — the simplest implementation of which being the following:

#[wasm_bindgen]

extern "C" {   #[wasm_bindgen(js_namespace = console)]

   fn log(s: &str);

}

We must annotate all wasm blocks and functions with #[wasm_bindgen] to let the compiler know this block of code is to be compiled into WebAssembly. This is a type of Conditional Compilation, and wasm_bindgen is termed an attribute.

Note: You may see some WebAssembly examples wrapped in extern {}, while others are wrapped in extern “C” {}. There is currently no significance between the two. One concerned developer opened an issue for the discrepancy, that appears to stem from an auto-formatting feature of rustfmt.

Visiting conditional compilation

Rust has a range of conditional compilation attributes built in, such as the #cfg attribute to determine whether blocks of code should be compiled based on variables, some built in, such as the platform your program is being compiled to. Here are a couple of examples taken from the documentation:

// This function is only compiled when compiling for macOS

#[cfg(target_os = "macos")]

fn macos_only() {  

   // ...

}// This function is only compiled when either foo or bar is defined #[cfg(any(foo, bar))]

fn needs_foo_or_bar() {  

   // ...

}

In the first example, target_os is one of a few set configuration options, that determines which platform we’re compiling to. We can even define platform specific dependencies within Cargo.toml; if I wanted to support macOS core libraries only on that platform, I could do the following in Cargo.toml:

# Cargo.toml[target.'cfg(target_os = "macos")'.dependencies]

cocoa = "0.18.4"

core-foundation = "0.6"

core-graphics = "0.17.3"

...

You may also have noticed the #[test] attribute in your Rust projects too — preventing code annotated with #[test] from being compiled, and to be run in conjunction with cargo test.

So #[wasm] and #[wasm-bindgen] are custom annotations specifically for compiling into WebAssembly. Revisiting the console.log example, we are also using attribute arguments to specify the Javascript namespace to bind our function to:

#[wasm_bindgen(js_namespace = console)]

fn log(s: &str);

...

In the above example, we’re aiming to bind the log() function to the console.log() Javascript function.

On the subject of conditional compilation, WebAssembly projects also commonly use a feature cfg parameter, further filtering what is compiled based on features we define in Cargo.toml:

[features]

default = ["super_mode"]

These features can then be used within #[cfg]:

#[cfg(feature = "super_mode")]

fn super_execute(s: &str;) {

   ...

}

Attributes can be fun to work with, adding flexibility to your code while accommodating edge cases you may run into — e.g. custom builds for specific clients. Both wasm-pack and wasm-bindgen rely heavily on the feature for custom compilation into wasm. Read more about Attributes in Rust here.

Back to the console.log demo, the demo also documents how console.log() is polymorphic, and can accept multiple arguments. Because of this, we can also bind multiple signatures while ensuring the console.log() function is still being called, with the js_name attribute parameter:

# a log function that takes a unsigned integar#[wasm_bindgen(js_namespace = console, js_name = log)]   

fn log_u32(a: u32);

This is a great example of how Rust can bind to Javascript, being the opposite of what we are attempting with our fetch example, aiming to call Rust compiled wasm from the Javascript side.

Beyond running these examples from the repository, it is also good practice to copy functionality from them into your own wasm-pack projects, remembering to include the required dependencies from Cargo.toml to coincide with the functions.

With some Rust understanding cemented, let’s now move onto our wasm fetch demo.

Wasm Fetch Project Structure

Clone the following repository to fetch the example demo we’ll walk through next, that hosts both the Rust module and React app client:

git clone https://github.com/rossbulat/wasm-fetch-example

The wasm-module directory contains the Rust project, whereas the client directory contains the React client.

I have packaged both projects into a single repository for convenience purposes. It is recommended to separate them into separate repositories and have each project’s config files at the top level (Cargo.toml, package.json, etc).

Inside wasm-module

wasm-pack new has been run to generate the project structure, and the fetch functionality has been plugged into our lib.rs.

Upon calling the call_fetch() function (that we’ll do in Javascript), a fetch request is called to the Github wasm-bindgen repository, fetching the latest commits from the repo. The resulting JSON is returned, which will then be available to deconstruct on the Javascript side.

The folder structure is simple, with our Rust source files within the src/ directory, and Cargo.toml outlining the project dependencies (in the form of Cargo crates), and some initial configuration:

# Rust project structuresrc/

   fetch.rs

   lib.rs

   utils.rs.gitignore

Cargo.toml

...

These are the files we are interested in. Let’s drill down what this project consists of:

  • The src/ folder contains our Rust code to be compiled. The meat of the project is in lib.rs, with the call_fetch() as the function we wish to call in Javascript. This file contains a range of use statements to bring various libraries into scope, including the required wasm_bindgen Javascript bindings, and types, required
  • src/fetch.rs simply contains some structs that will be used to store returned fetch data. In the original wasm-bindgen fetch example, these structs were also defined within lib.rs, along with the rest of the example code. For the sake of readability, I have opted to separate them from the main execution
  • Cargo.toml is a key file to understand, defining the dependencies and “features” to be used in the project. We will visit how these work further down

The execution flow within call_fetch() calls a Javascript fetch request from the wasm-bindgen bindings, before converting the returned Promise into a Rust Future — the Rust equivalent of a JS promise. Once a response is received from Github, it is persisted and formatted via the structs defined in fetch.rs.

This is the full execution flow:

# fetch request execution flow-> JS calls call_fetch()-> Fetch request is called via wasm-bindgen bindings, returns promise-> JS Promise converted into Rust Future-> Await Github response and store via provided structs-> Rust Future converted back to JS Promise-> Return response for use in JS

As we explored earlier, this process will become more simplified as the WebAssembly specification becomes more capable.

Building the module with wasm-pack build

When running wasm-pack build, the compiled result will be output to a pkg/ directory in your project folder. We can in fact do this now to examine the result:

# build projectcd wasm-fetch-example

wasm-pack build> [INFO]: 🎯  Checking for the Wasm target...

> [INFO]: 🌀  Compiling to Wasm...

> Compiling proc-macro2 v0.4.30

  ...

The project build time will depend on your system. The resulting pkg/ folder will contain our compiled module:

# pkg contents pkg/

   README.md  

   wasm_fetch_example.d.ts 

   wasm_fetch_example_bg.d.ts

   package.json 

   wasm_fetch_example.js 

   wasm_fetch_example_bg.wasm

We can see that wasm-pack does not simply output a .wasm binary for us:

  • A package.json has been generated, treating this directory as a module itself, ready to be published to NPM or another directory (we’ll briefly cover publishing the module to a private registry further down)
  • Type definition files .d.ts have been generated for your module and surrounding binding functions in the event you are importing the module into a Typescript based project. These files contains types for every export of our wasm module — these could be constants, functions classes etc
  • wasm_fetch_example.js contains Javascript bindings to the wasm module itself
  • Your README.md will be copied to the package also, to provide documentation about the module

wasm-pack has done the work of formatting the project ready to be published as a module, and supports both Javascript and its Typescript superset. Upon compiling, you may see this warning in the console:

> Optional fields missing from Cargo.toml: 'description', 'repository', and 'license'. These are not necessary, but recommended

wasm-pack will attempt to take this information from Cargo.toml to populate package.json. You could indeed slot in this information in Cargo.toml under the [package] section:

# Cargo.toml[package]

description = "An example Rust based WebAssembly project implementing a fetch request via wasm-bindgen."

license = "MIT"

repository = "<your_repo_url>",

...

Note: Subsequent builds are a lot quicker, only re-compiling the changes you have made.

Publishing wasm modules

In the event you wish to publicly publish your WebAssembly module, you can indeed do so with the pack and publish commands wasm-pack provides:

  • wasm-pack pack creates a tarball from the pkg/ directory
  • wasm-pack publish creates a tarball from the pkg/ directory, and then publishes it to the public NPM registry

The publish command is simply a pointer to the npm publish command, the official means of publishing to an NPM registry. So all the flags available to npm publish are also available to wasm-pack publish.

# publishing to public npm registry

wasm-pack build

It is likely that you’ll want to publish your module privately to a private registry. I have published an article on exactly how to set up such a registry, using the private proxy registry Verdaccio.

Once you have a private registry set up, simply provide the URL with the --registry flag:

# publish to a private registry

wasm-pack publish --registry "http://<your_registry_ip_or_domain>"

This provides a means of testing WebAssembly libraries internally — a more realistic scenario for organisations that are iteratively developing WebAssembly modules as the specification evolves.

wasm-pack has now played its part, its role stops after the publishing process, with our module ready to be added to projects as a dependency. Let’s now explore how to use wasm modules in a React project.

Importing wasm modules

To test the fetch functionality, I have included a base Create React App project in the accompanying repository of this piece.

To save the reader from publishing the wasm module themselves for use with this project, I have included it in within node_modules, ignoring the entire directory apart from this module:

// .gitignoreclient/node_modules/*

!/client/node_modules/wasm-fetch-example

...

Amending Create React App to support wasm modules

Create React App does not currently support WebAssembly based modules in its Webpack configuration.

Note: ECMA Script module integration is currently an active WebAssembly proposal — we can expect a more streamlined integration process once these features are finalised and rolled out.

This again is most likely a short term issue, and will be resolved as WebAssembly gains more adoption — but there is a solution.

In order to support our newly published module, we need to amend the Webpack configuration of Create React App, adding a wasm loader. We can indeed do this, without ejecting CRA, with a package called react-app-rewired, along with wasm-loader, adding WebAssembly support to Webpack.

These have been installed as dev dependencies:

yarn add react-app-rewired wasm-loader --dev

A config-overrides.js script has been defined in the client’s root directory, that plugs in support for wasm based modules.

The last amendment here is in package.json, where we are calling react-app-rewired instead of react-scripts when compiling and running the app:

// package.json"script": {

   "start": "react-app-rewired start",

   "build": "react-app-rewired build",

   "test": "react-app-rewired test",

   ...

}

Asynchronously importing a wasm module

App.tsx demonstrates how we can asynchronously import a wasm module and load it into a component’s state.

Here is the full solution:

import React from 'react';
import logo from './logo.svg';
import './App.css';

const App: React.FC = () => {

// wasm module will be stored in state once loaded
const [wasmModule, setWasmModule] = React.useState();

// asynchronous function to fetch module and load into state
const loadWasm = async () => {
try {
const wasm = await import('wasm-fetch-example');
setWasmModule({ wasm });
console.log('wasm set');
} catch (err) {
console.error(Unexpected error in loadWasm. [Message: ${err.message}]);
}
};

// takes our module and calls the call_fetch() function
const callFetch = async ({ wasm }: { wasm: any }) => {
console.log('calling fetch');
const res = await wasm.call_fetch();
console.log(res);
}

// load wasm asynchronously if not yet defined
wasmModule === undefined && loadWasm();

// call fetch once module has imported
if (wasmModule !== undefined) {
callFetch(wasmModule);
}

return (
<div className="App">
</div>
)
}

export default App;

In Summary

This article has aimed to introduce the process of building a WebAsssembly module from Rust, with wasm-pack as our means of generating and compiling the final module. We have ascertained:

  • That wasm-bindgen provides us with bindings to the Javascript standard library and standard Web API library, giving us access to call Javascript, manipulate the DOM, get window and event data, etc — all from our Rust wasm module
  • wasm-pack is a useful tool for generating a bare-bones Rust based WebAssembly project, and automates the process of compiling wasm and preparing the resulting package to be published as a module
  • Create React App by default does not currently support .wasm module extensions in its Webpack config. To get WebAssembly into your components, the react-app-rewired package can be used to plug a wasm-loader into the Webpack configuration, extending that of CRA’s configuration, without the need to eject the project
  • Importing wasm modules asynchronously via Promises will not interrupt the flow of your app. Loading indicators or prompts can be used to let the user know your module is being loaded into state

Thanks for reading

If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!

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Further reading

Why you should move from Node.js to Rust in 2019

The Rust Programming Language

Rust Vs. Haskell: Which Language is Best for API Design?

7 reasons why you should learn Rust programming language in 2019

An introduction to Web Development with Rust for Node.js Developers

The Rust developers should Know top 8 Rust IDE & text Editors

WebAssembly: The Future of JS and a Multi-Language Web

Using WebAssembly With Node.js

Get started with WebAssembly using JavaScript

Angular 8 Pagination Example and Tutorial

Angular 8 Pagination Example and Tutorial

Pagination is the best way to show huge number of records in series for any application. Also showing/fetching thousands of record at one go will affect the performance of the application.

Pagination is the best way to show huge number of records in series for any application. Also showing/fetching thousands of record at one go will affect the performance of the application.

For example, when you search something that returns a large number of records which cannot be shown on a single web page therefore, those records are part into number of pages that can be accessed through links via pagination structure.

So today in this demo we will discuss the simple pagination in Angular 8.

Step 1: Create a basic app with angular cli
ng new angular8-simple-pagination-example

By typing the above command we will see a basic angular app created on the current folder. So move to the created folder by typing **cd angular8-simple-pagination-example/. **You can check the newly created app by typing http://localhost:4200 on the browser.

Step 2: install ngx-pagination pagination dependency from terminal

So run the below command over terminal

npm install ngx-pagination --save

Step 3: Create dummy records for pagination

Now we will create static data to show the pagination. So lets have a look on the code under file **app.component.ts **

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import {NgxPaginationModule} from 'ngx-pagination';
@Component({
   selector: 'app-root',
   templateUrl: './app.component.html',
   styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})
export class AppComponent {
   title = 'simple pagination demo';
   collection = [];
   constructor(){
     for(let i=1;i<=100;i++){
       let Obj = {'name': `Employee Name ${i}`,'code': `EMP00 ${i}`}
       this.collection.push(Obj);
     }
   }
}

In the above file, we can see that inside constructor we have created a loop for created dummy record for 100 employees having employee name & code for showing pagination.

Step 4: Import dependency in app.module.ts

Now let's have a look on the code inside **app.module.ts **where the ngx-pagination module has been imported

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
 
import { NgxPaginationModule } from 'ngx-pagination';
import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
 
@NgModule({
declarations: [
AppComponent
],
imports: [
BrowserModule,
NgxPaginationModule
],
providers: [],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

Step 5: Update view from app.component.html

Now one last step needed to do is, add the below code anywhere inside app.component.html

*  Emp Name | Emp code
 {{item.name}} | {{item.code}} 


Now, we are done with all the needed steps for the pagination in our angular application.

Step 6: Run the app

Run the app over the terminal with npm start and check the app after typing the url http://localhost:4200/.** **A page will open like below:

Conclusion

By following these easy steps we can easily achieve the client side pagination in Angular 8 application. If you want to impliment server side pagination in angular8 Server Side Pagination in Angular Example and Tutorial . You can also find other demos of Angular Sample Application here to start working on enterprise level application. Click here to view more about the pagination package over npm.

Introduction New Features in TypeScript 3.7 and How to Use Them

Introduction New Features in TypeScript 3.7 and How to Use Them

The TypeScript 3.7 release is coming soon, and it's going to be a big one.

The target release date is November 5th, and there are some seriously exciting headline features included:

  • Assert signatures.
  • Recursive type aliases.
  • Top-level await.
  • Null coalescing.
  • Optional chaining.

Personally, I'm super excited about this, they're going to whisk away all sorts of annoyances that I've been fighting in TypeScript while building HTTP Toolkit.

If you haven't been paying close attention to the TypeScript development process though, it's probably not clear what half of these mean, or why you should care. Let's talk through all of them.

Assert Signatures

This is a brand-new and little-known TypeScript feature, which allows you to write functions that act like type guards as a side-effect, rather than explicitly returning their boolean result.

It's easiest to demonstrate this with a JavaScript example:

function assertString(input) { 
  if (typeof input === 'string') 
    return; 
  else 
    throw new Error('Input must be a string!'); 
} 
function doSomething(input) { 
  assertString(input); 
  // ... Use input, confident that it's a string 
} 
doSomething('abc'); 
// All good doSomething(123); // Throws an error

This pattern is neat and useful, and you can't use it in TypeScript today.

TypeScript can't know that you've guaranteed the type of input after it's run assertString. Typically, people just make the argument input: string to avoid this, and that's good. But, it also just pushes the type checking problem somewhere else, and in cases where you just want to fail hard, it's useful to have this option available.

Fortunately, soon we will:

// With TS 3.7 
function assertString(input: any): 
	asserts input is string { 
      // <-- the magic 
      if (typeof input === 'string') 
        return; 
      else 
        throw new Error('Input must be a string!'); 
    } 
function doSomething(input: string | number) { 
  assertString(input); 
  // input's type is just 'string' here }

Here assert input is string means that if this function ever returns, TypeScript can narrow the type of input to string, just as if it was inside an if block with a type guard.

To make this safe, that means if the assert statement isn't true then your assert function must either throw an error or not return at all (kill the process, infinite loop, you name it).

That's the basics, but this actually lets you pull some really neat tricks:

// With TS 3.7 
// Asserts that input is truthy, throwing immediately if not: 
function assert(input: any): 
	asserts input { // <-- not a typo 
      if (!input) 
        throw new Error('Not a truthy value'); 
    } 
declare const x: number | string | undefined; 
assert(x); // Narrows x to number | string 
// Also usable with type guarding expressions! 
assert(typeof x === 'string'); 
// Narrows x to string // -- Or use assert in your tests: -- 
const a: Result | Error = doSomethingTestable(); 
expect(a).is.instanceOf(result); 
// 'instanceOf' could 'asserts a is Result' 
expect(a.resultValue).to.equal(123); 
// a.resultValue is now legal // -- Use as a safer ! that throws immediately if 
// you're wrong -- 
function assertDefined<T>(obj: T): 
	asserts obj is NonNullable<T> { 
      if (obj === undefined || obj === null) { 
        throw new Error('Must not be a nullable value'); 
      } 
    } 
declare const x: string | undefined; 
// Gives y just 'string' as a type, could throw elsewhere later: 
const y = x!; 
// Gives y 'string' as a type, or throws immediately if you're wrong: 
assertDefined(x); const z = x; 
// -- Or even update types to track a function's side-effects -- 
type X<T extends string | {}> = { value: T }; 
// Use asserts to narrow types according to side effects: 
function setX<T extends string | {}>(x: X<any>, v: T): 
	asserts x is X<T> { 
      x.value = v; 
    } 
	declare let x: X<any>; 
// x is now { value: any }; 
setX(x, 123); 
// x is now { value: number };

This is still in flux, so don't take it as the definite result, and keep an eye on the pull request if you want the final details.

There's even a discussion there about allowing functions to assert something and return a type, which would let you extend the final example above to track a much wider variety of side effects, but we'll have to wait and see how that plays out.

Top-Level Await

Async/await is amazing and makes promises dramatically cleaner to use.

Unfortunately, though, you can't use them at the top level. This might not be something you care about much in a TS library or application, but if you're writing a runnable script or using TypeScript in a REPL, then this gets super annoying.

It's even worse if you're used to frontend development, since top-level await has been working nicely in the Chrome and Firefox console for a couple of years now.

Fortunately though, a fix is coming. This is actually a general stage-3 JS proposal, so it'll be everywhere else eventually too, but for TS devs 3.7 is where the magic happens.

This one's simple, but let's have another quick demo anyway:


// Your only solution right now for a script that does something async: 
async function doEverything() { 
  ... 
  const response = await fetch('http://example.com'); 
  ... 
} 
  
doEverything(); // <- eugh (could use an IIFE instead, but even more eugh)

With top-level await:

// With TS 3.7: 
// Your script: ... 
const response = await fetch('http://example.com'); 
// ...

There's a notable gotcha here: if you're not writing a script, or using a REPL, don't write this at the top level, unless you really know what you're doing!

It's totally possible to use this to write modules that do blocking async steps when imported. That can be useful for some niche cases, but people tend to assume that their import statement is a synchronous, reliable, and fairly quick operation, and you could easily hose your codebase's startup time if you start blocking imports for complex async processes (even worse, processes that can fail).

This is somewhat mitigated by the semantics of imports of async modules: they're imported and run in parallel, so the importing module effectively waits for Promise.all(importedModules) before being executed.

Rich Harris wrote an excellent piece on a previous version of this spec before that change when imports ran sequentially and this problem was much worse), which makes for good background reading on the risks here if you're interested.

It's also worth noting that this is only useful for module systems that support asynchronous imports. There isn't yet a formal spec for how TS will handle this, but that likely means that a very recent target configuration, and, either ES Modules or Webpack v5 (whose alphas have experimental support), will be used at runtime.

Recursive Type Aliases

If you're ever tried to define a recursive type in TypeScript, you may have run into StackOverflow questions like this: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/47842266/recursive-types-in-typescript.

Right now, you can't. Interfaces can be recursive, but there are limitations to their expressiveness, and type aliases can't. That means right now, you need to combine the two: define a type alias and extract the recursive parts of the type into interfaces. It works, but it's messy, and we can do better.

As a concrete example, this is the suggested type definition for JSON data:

type JSONValue = | string | number | boolean | JSONObject | JSONArray; 
interface JSONObject { [x: string]: JSONValue; } 
interface JSONArray extends Array<JSONValue> { }

That works, but the extra interfaces are only there because they're required to get around the recursion limitation.

Fixing this requires no new syntax; it just removes that restriction, so the below compiles:

// With TS 3.7: 
type JSONValue = | string | number | boolean | { [x: string]: JSONValue } | Array<JSONValue>;

Right now, that fails to compile with Type alias 'JSONValue' circularly references itself. Soon though, soon...

Null Coalescing

Aside from being difficult to spell, this one is quite simple and easy. It's based on a JavaScript stage-3 proposal, which means it'll also be coming to your favorite vanilla JavaScript environment soon (if it hasn't already).

In JavaScript, there's a common pattern for handling default values, and falling back to the first valid result of a defined group. It looks something like this:

// Use the first of firstResult/secondResult which is truthy: 
const result = firstResult || secondResult; 
// Use configValue from provided options if truthy, or 'default' if not: 
this.configValue = options.configValue || 'default';

This is useful in a host of cases, but due to some interesting quirks in JavaScript, it can catch you out. If firstResult or options.configValue can meaningfully be set to false, an empty string or 0, then this code has a bug. If those values are set, then when considered as booleans they're falsy, so the fallback value (secondResult / 'default') is used anyway.

Null coalescing fixes this. Instead of the above, you'll be able to write:

// With TS 3.7: 
// Use the first of firstResult/secondResult which is *defined*: 
const result = firstResult ?? secondResult; 
// Use configSetting from provided options if *defined*, or 'default' if not: 
this.configValue = options.configValue ?? 'default';

?? differs from || in that it falls through to the next value only if the first argument is null or undefined, not falsy. That fixes our bug. If you pass false as firstResult, that will be used instead of secondResult because, while it's falsy, it is still defined, and that's all that's required.

It's simple but super-useful, as it takes away a whole class of bugs.

Optional Chaining

Last but not least, optional chaining is another stage-3 proposal that is making its way into TypeScript.

This is designed to solve an issue faced by developers in every language: how do you get data out of a data structure when some or all of it might not be present?

Right now, you might do something like this:

// To get data.key1.key2, if any level could be null/undefined: 
let result = data ? (data.key1 ? data.key1.key2 : undefined) : undefined; 
// Another equivalent alternative: 
let result = ((data || {}).key1 || {}).key2;

Nasty! This gets much much worse if you need to go deeper, and although the second example works at runtime, it won't even compile in TypeScript, since the first step could be {}, in which case key1 isn't a valid key at all.

This gets still more complicated if you're trying to get into an array, or there's a function call somewhere in this process.

There's a host of other approaches to this, but they're all noisy, messy & error-prone. With optional chaining, you can do this:

// With TS 3.7: 
// Returns the value is it's all defined & non-null, or undefined if not. 
let result = data?.key1?.key2; 
// The same, through an array index or property, if possible: 
array?.[0]?.['key']; 
// Call a method, but only if it's defined: 
obj.method?.(); 
// Get a property, or return 'default' if any step is not defined: 
let result = data?.key1?.key2 ?? 'default';

The last case shows how neatly some of these dovetails together: null coalescing + optional chaining is a match made in heaven.

One gotcha: this will return undefined for missing values, even if they were null, e.g. in cases like (null)?.key (returns undefined). A small point, but one to watch out for if you have a lot of null in your data structures.

That's the lot! That should outline all the essentials for these features, but there are lots of smaller improvements, fixes, and editor support improvements coming too, so take a look at the official roadmap if you want to get into the nitty-gritty.

Create Simple Login Page using Angular 8 and HTTP Authentication

Create Simple Login Page using Angular 8 and HTTP Authentication

In this article, you'll learn how to setup a simple login page using Angular 8 and Basic HTTP authentication

In this article, you'll learn how to setup a simple login page using Angular 8 and Basic HTTP authentication

Tutorial built with Angular 8.0.2 and the Angular CLI

Angular CLI was used to generate the base project structure with the ng new command, the CLI is also used to build and serve the application. For more info about the Angular CLI see https://angular.io/cli.

Styling of the example app is all done with Bootstrap 4.3, for more info about Bootstrap see https://getbootstrap.com/docs/4.3/getting-started/introduction/.

Running the Angular 8 Basic Authentication Tutorial Example Locally
  1. Install NodeJS and NPM from https://nodejs.org/en/download/.
  2. Download or clone the tutorial project source code from https://github.com/cornflourblue/angular-8-basic-authentication-example
  3. Install all required npm packages by running npm install from the command line in the project root folder (where the package.json is located).
  4. Start the application by running npm start from the
  5. command line in the project root folder, this will build the application
  6. and automatically launch it in the browser on the URL
  7. http://localhost:4200.

NOTE: You can also run the app directly using the Angular CLI command ng serve --open. To do this first install the Angular CLI globally on your system with the command npm install -g @angular/cli.

Running the Tutorial Example with a Real Backend API

The Angular 8 basic authentication example app uses a fake / mock backend by default so it can run in the browser without a real api, to switch to a real backend api you just have to remove or comment out the line below the comment // provider used to create fake backend located in the /src/app/app.module.ts file.

Angular 8 Tutorial Project Structure

The app and code structure of the tutorial mostly follows the best practice recommendations in the official Angular Style Guide, with a few of my own tweaks here and there.

Each feature has it's own folder (home & login), other shared/common code such as services, models, helpers etc are placed in folders prefixed with an underscore _ to easily differentiate them and group them together at the top of the folder structure.

The index.ts files in each folder are barrel files that group the exported modules from a folder together so they can be imported using the folder path instead of the full module path and to enable importing multiple modules in a single import (e.g. import { AuthenticationService, UserService } from '../_services').

Path aliases @app and @environments have been configured in tsconfig.json that map to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

Here are the main project files that contain the application logic, I left out some files that were generated by Angular CLI ng new command that I didn't change.

  • src
  • app
  • _helpers
  • auth.guard.ts
  • basic-auth.interceptor.ts
  • error.interceptor.ts
  • fake-backend.ts
  • index.ts
  • _models
  • user.ts
  • index.ts
  • _services
  • authentication.service.ts
  • user.service.ts
  • index.ts
  • home
  • home.component.html
  • home.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • login
  • login.component.html
  • login.component.ts
  • index.ts
  • app.component.html
  • app.component.ts
  • app.module.ts
  • app.routing.ts
  • environments
  • environment.prod.ts
  • environment.ts
  • index.html
  • main.ts
  • polyfills.ts
  • styles.less
  • package.json
  • tsconfig.json
Auth Guard

Path: /src/app/_helpers/auth.guard.ts

The auth guard is an angular route guard that's used to prevent unauthenticated users from accessing restricted routes, it does this by implementing the CanActivate interface which allows the guard to decide if a route can be activated with the canActivate() method. If the method returns true the route is activated (allowed to proceed), otherwise if the method returns false the route is blocked.

The auth guard uses the authentication service to check if the user is logged in, if they are logged in it returns true from the canActivate() method, otherwise it returns false and redirects the user to the login page.

Angular route guards are attached to routes in the router config, this auth guard is used in app.routing.ts to protect the home page route.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, CanActivate, ActivatedRouteSnapshot, RouterStateSnapshot } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthGuard implements CanActivate {
    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { }

    canActivate(route: ActivatedRouteSnapshot, state: RouterStateSnapshot) {
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser) {
            // logged in so return true
            return true;
        }

        // not logged in so redirect to login page with the return url
        this.router.navigate(['/login'], { queryParams: { returnUrl: state.url } });
        return false;
    }
}
Basic Authentication Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/basic-auth.interceptor.ts

The Basic Authentication Interceptor intercepts http requests from the application to add basic authentication credentials to the Authorization header if the user is logged in.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to modify http requests before they get sent to the server.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the _app.module.ts_ file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class BasicAuthInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        // add authorization header with basic auth credentials if available
        const currentUser = this.authenticationService.currentUserValue;
        if (currentUser && currentUser.authdata) {
            request = request.clone({
                setHeaders: { 
                    Authorization: `Basic ${currentUser.authdata}`
                }
            });
        }

        return next.handle(request);
    }
}
Http Error Interceptor

Path: /src/app/_helpers/error.interceptor.ts

The Error Interceptor intercepts http responses from the api to check if there were any errors. If there is a 401 Unauthorized response the user is automatically logged out of the application, all other errors are re-thrown up to the calling service so an alert with the error can be displayed on the screen.

It's implemented using the HttpInterceptor class included in the HttpClientModule, by extending the HttpInterceptor class you can create a custom interceptor to catch all error responses from the server in a single location.

Http interceptors are added to the request pipeline in the providers section of the app.module.ts file.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { catchError } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Injectable()
export class ErrorInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    constructor(private authenticationService: AuthenticationService) { }

    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        return next.handle(request).pipe(catchError(err => {
            if (err.status === 401) {
                // auto logout if 401 response returned from api
                this.authenticationService.logout();
                location.reload(true);
            }

            const error = err.error.message || err.statusText;
            return throwError(error);
        }))
    }
}
Fake Backend Provider

Path: /src/app/_helpers/fake-backend.ts

In order to run and test the Angular application without a real backend API, the example uses a fake backend that intercepts the HTTP requests from the Angular app and send back "fake" responses. This is done by a class that implements the Angular HttpInterceptor interface, for more information on Angular HTTP Interceptors see https://angular.io/api/common/http/HttpInterceptor

The fake backend contains a handleRoute function that checks if the request matches one of the faked routes in the switch statement, at the moment this includes POST requests to the /users/authenticate route for handling authentication, and GET requests to the /users route for getting all users.

Requests to the authenticate route are handled by the authenticate() function which checks the username and password against an array of hardcoded users. If the username and password are correct then an ok response is returned with the user details, otherwise an error response is returned.

Requests to the get users route are handled by the getUsers() function which checks if the user is logged in by calling the new isLoggedIn() helper function. If the user is logged in an ok() response with the whole users array is returned, otherwise a 401 Unauthorized response is returned by calling the new unauthorized() helper function.

If the request doesn't match any of the faked routes it is passed through as a real HTTP request to the backend API.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpRequest, HttpResponse, HttpHandler, HttpEvent, HttpInterceptor, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Observable, of, throwError } from 'rxjs';
import { delay, mergeMap, materialize, dematerialize } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';

const users: User[] = [{ id: 1, username: 'test', password: 'test', firstName: 'Test', lastName: 'User' }];

@Injectable()
export class FakeBackendInterceptor implements HttpInterceptor {
    intercept(request: HttpRequest, next: HttpHandler): Observable> {
        const { url, method, headers, body } = request;

        // wrap in delayed observable to simulate server api call
        return of(null)
            .pipe(mergeMap(handleRoute))
            .pipe(materialize()) // call materialize and dematerialize to ensure delay even if an error is thrown (https://github.com/Reactive-Extensions/RxJS/issues/648)
            .pipe(delay(500))
            .pipe(dematerialize());

        function handleRoute() {
            switch (true) {
                case url.endsWith('/users/authenticate') && method === 'POST':
                    return authenticate();
                case url.endsWith('/users') && method === 'GET':
                    return getUsers();
                default:
                    // pass through any requests not handled above
                    return next.handle(request);
            }    
        }

        // route functions

        function authenticate() {
            const { username, password } = body;
            const user = users.find(x => x.username === username && x.password === password);
            if (!user) return error('Username or password is incorrect');
            return ok({
                id: user.id,
                username: user.username,
                firstName: user.firstName,
                lastName: user.lastName
            })
        }

        function getUsers() {
            if (!isLoggedIn()) return unauthorized();
            return ok(users);
        }

        // helper functions

        function ok(body?) {
            return of(new HttpResponse({ status: 200, body }))
        }

        function error(message) {
            return throwError({ error: { message } });
        }

        function unauthorized() {
            return throwError({ status: 401, error: { message: 'Unauthorised' } });
        }

        function isLoggedIn() {
            return headers.get('Authorization') === `Basic ${window.btoa('test:test')}`;
        }
    }
}

export let fakeBackendProvider = {
    // use fake backend in place of Http service for backend-less development
    provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS,
    useClass: FakeBackendInterceptor,
    multi: true
};
User Model

Path: /src/app/_models/user.ts

The user model is a small class that defines the properties of a user.

export class User {
    id: number;
    username: string;
    password: string;
    firstName: string;
    lastName: string;
    authdata?: string;
}
Authentication Service

Path: /src/app/_services/authentication.service.ts

The authentication service is used to login & logout of the Angular app, it notifies other components when the user logs in & out, and allows access the currently logged in user.

RxJS Subjects and Observables are used to store the current user object and notify other components when the user logs in and out of the app. Angular components can subscribe() to the public currentUser: Observable property to be notified of changes, and notifications are sent when the this.currentUserSubject.next() method is called in the login() and logout() methods, passing the argument to each subscriber. The RxJS BehaviorSubject is a special type of Subject that keeps hold of the current value and emits it to any new subscribers as soon as they subscribe, while regular Subjects don't store the current value and only emit values that are published after a subscription is created.

The login() method sends the user credentials to the API via an HTTP POST request for authentication. If successful the user's basic authentication data (base64 encoded username and password) is added to the user object and stored in localStorage to keep the user logged in between page refreshes. The user object is then published to all subscribers with the call to this.currentUserSubject.next(user);.

The basic auth data is used by the basic authentication interceptor above to set the authorization header of http requests made to secure api endpoints.

The constructor() of the service initialises the currentUserSubject with the currentUser object from localStorage which enables the user to stay logged in between page refreshes or after the browser is closed. The public currentUser property is then set to this.currentUserSubject.asObservable(); which allows other components to subscribe to the currentUser Observable but doesn't allow them to publish to the currentUserSubject, this is so logging in and out of the app can only be done via the authentication service.

The currentUserValue getter allows other components an easy way to get the value of the currently logged in user without having to subscribe to the currentUser Observable.

The logout() method removes the current user object from local storage and publishes null to the currentUserSubject to notify all subscribers that the user has logged out.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';
import { BehaviorSubject, Observable } from 'rxjs';
import { map } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class AuthenticationService {
    private currentUserSubject: BehaviorSubject;
    public currentUser: Observable;

    constructor(private http: HttpClient) {
        this.currentUserSubject = new BehaviorSubject(JSON.parse(localStorage.getItem('currentUser')));
        this.currentUser = this.currentUserSubject.asObservable();
    }

    public get currentUserValue(): User {
        return this.currentUserSubject.value;
    }

    login(username: string, password: string) {
        return this.http.post(`${environment.apiUrl}/users/authenticate`, { username, password })
            .pipe(map(user => {
                // store user details and basic auth credentials in local storage to keep user logged in between page refreshes
                user.authdata = window.btoa(username + ':' + password);
                localStorage.setItem('currentUser', JSON.stringify(user));
                this.currentUserSubject.next(user);
                return user;
            }));
    }

    logout() {
        // remove user from local storage to log user out
        localStorage.removeItem('currentUser');
        this.currentUserSubject.next(null);
    }
}
User Service

Path: /src/app/_services/user.service.ts

The user service contains a method for getting all users from the api, I included it to demonstrate accessing a secure api endpoint with the http authorization header set after logging in to the application, the auth header is automatically set with basic authentication credentials by the basic authentication interceptor. The secure endpoint in the example is a fake one implemented in the fake backend provider.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { HttpClient } from '@angular/common/http';

import { environment } from '@environments/environment';
import { User } from '@app/_models';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class UserService {
    constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

    getAll() {
        return this.http.get(`${environment.apiUrl}/users`);
    }
}
Home Component Template

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.html

The home component template contains html and angular 8 template syntax for displaying a simple welcome message and a list of users from a secure api endpoint.


    #### You're logged in with Angular 8 & Basic HTTP Authentication!!

    
        ###### Users from secure api end point

        

        
            {{user.firstName}} {{user.lastName}}
        
    

Home Component

Path: /src/app/home/home.component.ts

The home component defines an angular 8 component that gets all users from the user service and makes them available to the template via a users array property.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { User } from '@app/_models';
import { UserService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'home.component.html' })
export class HomeComponent {
    loading = false;
    users: User[];

    constructor(private userService: UserService) { }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loading = true;
        this.userService.getAll().pipe(first()).subscribe(users => {
            this.loading = false;
            this.users = users;
        });
    }
}
Login Component Template

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.html

The login component template contains a login form with username and password fields. It displays validation messages for invalid fields when the submit button is clicked. The form submit event is bound to the onSubmit() method of the login component.


    
        Username: test

        Password: test
    
    
        #### Angular 8 Basic Auth Login Example

        
            
                
                    Username
                    
                    
                        Username is required

                    
                
                
                    Password
                    
                    
                        Password is required

                    
                
                
                    
                    Login
                
                {{error}}

            
        
    

Login Component

Path: /src/app/login/login.component.ts

The login component uses the authentication service to login to the application. If the user is already logged in they are automatically redirected to the home page.

The loginForm: FormGroup object defines the form controls and validators, and is used to access data entered into the form. The FormGroup is part of the Angular Reactive Forms module and is bound to the login template above with the [formGroup]="loginForm" directive.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';
import { Router, ActivatedRoute } from '@angular/router';
import { FormBuilder, FormGroup, Validators } from '@angular/forms';
import { first } from 'rxjs/operators';

import { AuthenticationService } from '@app/_services';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'login.component.html' })
export class LoginComponent implements OnInit {
    loginForm: FormGroup;
    loading = false;
    submitted = false;
    returnUrl: string;
    error = '';

    constructor(
        private formBuilder: FormBuilder,
        private route: ActivatedRoute,
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) { 
        // redirect to home if already logged in
        if (this.authenticationService.currentUserValue) { 
            this.router.navigate(['/']);
        }
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.loginForm = this.formBuilder.group({
            username: ['', Validators.required],
            password: ['', Validators.required]
        });

        // get return url from route parameters or default to '/'
        this.returnUrl = this.route.snapshot.queryParams['returnUrl'] || '/';
    }

    // convenience getter for easy access to form fields
    get f() { return this.loginForm.controls; }

    onSubmit() {
        this.submitted = true;

        // stop here if form is invalid
        if (this.loginForm.invalid) {
            return;
        }

        this.loading = true;
        this.authenticationService.login(this.f.username.value, this.f.password.value)
            .pipe(first())
            .subscribe(
                data => {
                    this.router.navigate([this.returnUrl]);
                },
                error => {
                    this.error = error;
                    this.loading = false;
                });
    }
}
App Component Template

Path: /src/app/app.component.html

The app component template is the root component template of the application, it contains the main nav bar which is only displayed for authenticated users, and a router-outlet directive for displaying the contents of each view based on the current route / path.



    
        Home
        Logout
    




    

App Component

Path: /src/app/app.component.ts

The app component is the root component of the application, it defines the root tag of the app as `` with the selector property of the @Component() decorator.

It subscribes to the currentUser observable in the authentication service so it can reactively show/hide the main navigation bar when the user logs in/out of the application. I didn't worry about unsubscribing from the observable here because it's the root component of the application, the only time the component will be destroyed is when the application is closed which would destroy any subscriptions as well.

The app component contains a logout() method which is called from the logout link in the main nav bar above to log the user out and redirect them to the login page.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';

import { AuthenticationService } from './_services';
import { User } from './_models';

@Component({ selector: 'app', templateUrl: 'app.component.html' })
export class AppComponent {
    currentUser: User;

    constructor(
        private router: Router,
        private authenticationService: AuthenticationService
    ) {
        this.authenticationService.currentUser.subscribe(x => this.currentUser = x);
    }

    logout() {
        this.authenticationService.logout();
        this.router.navigate(['/login']);
    }
}
App Module

Path: /src/app/app.module.ts

The app module defines the root module of the application along with metadata about the module. For more info about angular 8 modules check out this page on the official docs site.

This is where the fake backend provider is added to the application, to switch to a real backend simply remove the providers located below the comment // provider used to create fake backend.

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { ReactiveFormsModule } from '@angular/forms';
import { HttpClientModule, HTTP_INTERCEPTORS } from '@angular/common/http';

// used to create fake backend
import { fakeBackendProvider } from './_helpers';

import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
import { appRoutingModule } from './app.routing';

import { BasicAuthInterceptor, ErrorInterceptor } from './_helpers';
import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';

@NgModule({
    imports: [
        BrowserModule,
        ReactiveFormsModule,
        HttpClientModule,
        appRoutingModule
    ],
    declarations: [
        AppComponent,
        HomeComponent,
        LoginComponent
    ],
    providers: [
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: BasicAuthInterceptor, multi: true },
        { provide: HTTP_INTERCEPTORS, useClass: ErrorInterceptor, multi: true },

        // provider used to create fake backend
        fakeBackendProvider
    ],
    bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }
App Routing Module

Path: /src/app/app.routing.ts

Routing for the Angular app is configured as an array of Routes, each component is mapped to a path so the Angular Router knows which component to display based on the URL in the browser address bar. The home route is secured by passing the AuthGuard to the canActivate property of the route.

The Routes array is passed to the RouterModule.forRoot() method which creates a routing module with all of the app routes configured, and also includes all of the Angular Router providers and directives such as the `` directive. For more information on Angular Routing and Navigation see https://angular.io/guide/router.

import { Routes, RouterModule } from '@angular/router';

import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { LoginComponent } from './login';
import { AuthGuard } from './_helpers';

const routes: Routes = [
    { path: '', component: HomeComponent, canActivate: [AuthGuard] },
    { path: 'login', component: LoginComponent },

    // otherwise redirect to home
    { path: '**', redirectTo: '' }
];

export const appRoutingModule = RouterModule.forRoot(routes);
Production Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.prod.ts

The production environment config contains variables required to run the application in production. This enables you to build the application with a different configuration for each different environment (e.g. production & development) without updating the app code.

When you build the application for production with the command ng build --prod, the output environment.ts is replaced with environment.prod.ts.

export const environment = {
    production: true,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Development Environment Config

Path: /src/environments/environment.ts

The development environment config contains variables required to run the application in development.

Environment config is accessed by importing the environment object into any Angular service of component with the line import { environment } from '@environments/environment' and accessing properties on the environment object, see the user service for an example.

export const environment = {
    production: false,
    apiUrl: 'http://localhost:4000'
};
Main Index Html File

Path: /src/index.html

The main index.html file is the initial page loaded by the browser that kicks everything off. The Angular CLI (with Webpack under the hood) bundles all of the compiled javascript files together and injects them into the body of the index.html page so the scripts can be loaded and executed by the browser.




    
    Angular 8 - Basic HTTP Authentication Tutorial & Example
    

    
    


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Main (Bootstrap) File

Path: /src/main.ts

The main file is the entry point used by angular to launch and bootstrap the application.

import { enableProdMode } from '@angular/core';
import { platformBrowserDynamic } from '@angular/platform-browser-dynamic';

import { AppModule } from './app/app.module';
import { environment } from './environments/environment';

if (environment.production) {
    enableProdMode();
}

platformBrowserDynamic().bootstrapModule(AppModule)
    .catch(err => console.error(err));
Polyfills

Path: /src/polyfills.ts

Some features used by Angular 8 are not yet supported natively by all major browsers, polyfills are used to add support for features where necessary so your Angular 8 application works across all major browsers.

This file is generated by the Angular CLI when creating a new project with the ng new command, I've excluded the comments in the file for brevity.

import 'zone.js/dist/zone';
Global LESS/CSS Styles

Path: /src/styles.less

The global styles file contains LESS/CSS styles that are applied globally throughout the application.

/* You can add global styles to this file, and also import other style files */
a { cursor: pointer }
npm package.json

Path: /package.json

The package.json file contains project configuration information including package dependencies which get installed when you run npm install. Full documentation is available on the npm docs website.

{
    "name": "angular-8-basic-authentication-example",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "scripts": {
        "ng": "ng",
        "start": "ng serve --open",
        "build": "ng build",
        "test": "ng test",
        "lint": "ng lint",
        "e2e": "ng e2e"
    },
    "private": true,
    "dependencies": {
        "@angular/animations": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/common": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/compiler": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/core": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/forms": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/router": "~8.0.1",
        "rxjs": "~6.4.0",
        "tslib": "^1.9.0",
        "zone.js": "~0.9.1"
    },
    "devDependencies": {
        "@angular-devkit/build-angular": "~0.800.0",
        "@angular/cli": "~8.0.3",
        "@angular/compiler-cli": "~8.0.1",
        "@angular/language-service": "~8.0.1",
        "@types/node": "~8.9.4",
        "@types/jasmine": "~3.3.8",
        "@types/jasminewd2": "~2.0.3",
        "codelyzer": "^5.0.0",
        "jasmine-core": "~3.4.0",
        "jasmine-spec-reporter": "~4.2.1",
        "karma": "~4.1.0",
        "karma-chrome-launcher": "~2.2.0",
        "karma-coverage-istanbul-reporter": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine": "~2.0.1",
        "karma-jasmine-html-reporter": "^1.4.0",
        "protractor": "~5.4.0",
        "ts-node": "~7.0.0",
        "tslint": "~5.15.0",
        "typescript": "~3.4.3"
    }
}
TypeScript tsconfig.json

Path: /tsconfig.json

The tsconfig.json file configures how the TypeScript compiler will convert TypeScript into JavaScript that is understood by the browser. More information is available on the TypeScript docs.

Most of the file is unchanged from when it was generated by the Angular CLI, only the paths property has been added to map @app and @environments to the /src/app and /src/environments directories. This allows imports to be relative to the app and environments folders by prefixing import paths with aliases instead of having to use long relative paths (e.g. import MyComponent from '../../../MyComponent').

{
    "compileOnSave": false,
    "compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": "./",
        "outDir": "./dist/out-tsc",
        "sourceMap": true,
        "declaration": false,
        "downlevelIteration": true,
        "emitDecoratorMetadata": true,
        "experimentalDecorators": true,
        "module": "esnext",
        "moduleResolution": "node",
        "importHelpers": true,
        "target": "es2015",
        "typeRoots": [
            "node_modules/@types"
        ],
        "lib": [
            "es2018",
            "dom"
        ],
        "paths": {
            "@app/*": ["src/app/*"],
            "@environments/*": ["src/environments/*"]
        }
    }
}

The tutorial code is available on GitHub

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - How to build user roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 App

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial - How to build user roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 App

In this article, you'll learn how to user build roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 Application. You can do it acl in Laravel 5.8 using spatie composer package. I will explain how to implement User Roles and Permissions(ACL) using spatie/laravel-permission composer package.

In this article, you'll learn how to user build roles and permissions on Laravel 5.8 Application. You can do it acl in Laravel 5.8 using spatie composer package. I will explain how to implement User Roles and Permissions(ACL) using spatie/laravel-permission composer package.

Spatie role permission composer package provide way to create acl in Laravel 5.8. They provide how to assign role to user, how to assign permission to user and how to assign permission assign to roles. I will write step by step creating roles and permissions in Laravel 5.8 application.

Roles and Permissions through you can create several types of users with different role and permission, i mean some user have only see listing of items module, some user can also edit items modules, for delete and etc.

In this examples i created three modules as listed bellow:

  • User Management
  • Role Management
  • Product Management

After register user, you don't have any roles, so you can edit your details and assign admin role to you from User Management. After that you can create your own role with permission like role-list, role-create, role-edit, role-delete, product-list, product-create, product-edit, product-delete. You can check with assign new user and check that.

Step 1: Laravel 5.8 Installation

We are going from scratch so, If you haven't installed Laravel in your system then you can run bellow command and get fresh Laravel project.

composer create-project --prefer-dist laravel/laravel blog

Step 2: Install Composer Packages

Now we require to install Spatie package for ACL, that way we can use it's method. Also we will install form collection package. So Open your terminal and run bellow command.

composer require spatie/laravel-permission
  
composer require laravelcollective/html

Now open config/app.php file and add service provider and aliase.

config/app.php

'providers' => [
	....
	Spatie\Permission\PermissionServiceProvider::class,
	Collective\Html\HtmlServiceProvider::class,
],
'aliases' => [
	....
	'Form' => Collective\Html\FormFacade::class,
	'Html' => Collective\Html\HtmlFacade::class,
],

We can also custom changes on Spatie package, so if you also want to changes then you can fire bellow command and get config file in config/permission.php.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Spatie\Permission\PermissionServiceProvider" --tag="config"

Step 3: Create Migrations

In this step we have to create three migrations for as listed bellow tables:

  1. users

  2. products

  3. roles

  4. permissions

  5. model_has_permissions

  6. model_has_roles

  7. role_has_permissions

So, if you install fresh project then you have already users table migration but if you don't have products table, so can create manually and other table can create using Spatie package command, so run bellow command and check migration file also.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Spatie\Permission\PermissionServiceProvider" --tag="migrations"
php artisan make:migration create_products_table

users table:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreateUsersTable extends Migration
{
    /**
     * Run the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function up()
    {
        Schema::create('users', function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->bigIncrements('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('email');
            $table->string('password');
            $table->rememberToken();
            $table->timestamps();
        });
    }

    /**
     * Reverse the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function down()
    {
        Schema::dropIfExists('users');
    }
}

products table:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreateProductsTable extends Migration
{
    /**
     * Run the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function up()
    {
        Schema::create('products', function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->bigIncrements('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->text('detail');
            $table->timestamps();
        });
    }

    /**
     * Reverse the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function down()
    {
        Schema::dropIfExists('products');
    }
}

Spatie tables:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreatePermissionTables extends Migration
{
    /**
     * Run the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function up()
    {
        $tableNames = config('permission.table_names');

        Schema::create($tableNames['permissions'], function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->increments('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('guard_name');
            $table->timestamps();
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['roles'], function (Blueprint $table) {
            $table->increments('id');
            $table->string('name');
            $table->string('guard_name');
            $table->timestamps();
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['model_has_permissions'], function (Blueprint $table) use ($tableNames) {
            $table->integer('permission_id')->unsigned();
            $table->morphs('model');

            $table->foreign('permission_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['permissions'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->primary(['permission_id', 'model_id', 'model_type']);
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['model_has_roles'], function (Blueprint $table) use ($tableNames) {
            $table->integer('role_id')->unsigned();
            $table->morphs('model');

            $table->foreign('role_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['roles'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->primary(['role_id', 'model_id', 'model_type']);
        });

        Schema::create($tableNames['role_has_permissions'], function (Blueprint $table) use ($tableNames) {
            $table->integer('permission_id')->unsigned();
            $table->integer('role_id')->unsigned();

            $table->foreign('permission_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['permissions'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->foreign('role_id')
                ->references('id')
                ->on($tableNames['roles'])
                ->onDelete('cascade');

            $table->primary(['permission_id', 'role_id']);

            app('cache')->forget('spatie.permission.cache');
        });
    }

    /**
     * Reverse the migrations.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function down()
    {
        $tableNames = config('permission.table_names');

        Schema::drop($tableNames['role_has_permissions']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['model_has_roles']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['model_has_permissions']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['roles']);
        Schema::drop($tableNames['permissions']);
    }
}

Now run migration:

php artisan migrate

Step 4: Create Models

In this step we have to create model for User and Product table, so if you get fresh project then you have User Model have so just replace code and other you should create.

app/User.php

<?php
  
namespace App;
  
use Illuminate\Notifications\Notifiable;
use Illuminate\Contracts\Auth\MustVerifyEmail;
use Illuminate\Foundation\Auth\User as Authenticatable;
use Spatie\Permission\Traits\HasRoles;
  
class User extends Authenticatable
{
    use Notifiable;
    use HasRoles;
  
    /**
     * The attributes that are mass assignable.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $fillable = [
        'name', 'email', 'password',
    ];
  
    /**
     * The attributes that should be hidden for arrays.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $hidden = [
        'password', 'remember_token',
    ];
  
    /**
     * The attributes that should be cast to native types.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $casts = [
        'email_verified_at' => 'datetime',
    ];
}

app/Product.php

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Product extends Model
{
    /**
     * The attributes that are mass assignable.
     *	
     * @var array
     */
    protected $fillable = [
        'name', 'detail'
    ];
}

Step 5: Add Middleware

Spatie package provide it's in-built middleware that way we can use it simply and that is display as bellow:

role

permission

So, we have to add middleware in Kernel.php file this way :

app/Http/Kernel.php

....
protected $routeMiddleware = [
	....
	'role' => \Spatie\Permission\Middlewares\RoleMiddleware::class,
	'permission' => \Spatie\Permission\Middlewares\PermissionMiddleware::class,
]
....

Step 6: Create Authentication

In this step we require to create authentication of Laravel 5.8, so laravel provide artisan command to create authentication that way we don't require to create route and controller for login and registration. so run bellow command:

php artisan make:auth

Step 7: Create Routes

We require to add number of route for users module, products module and roles module. In this this route i also use middleware with permission for roles and products route, so add route this way:

routes/web.php

Auth::routes();

Route::get('/home', '[email protected]')->name('home');

Route::group(['middleware' => ['auth']], function() {
    Route::resource('roles','RoleController');
    Route::resource('users','UserController');
    Route::resource('products','ProductController');
});

Step 8: Add Controllers

In this step we have add three controller for users module, products module and roles module so you can create three controller like as bellow:

app/Http/Controllers/UserController.php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use App\Http\Controllers\Controller;
use App\User;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use DB;
use Hash;

class UserController extends Controller
{
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index(Request $request)
    {
        $data = User::orderBy('id','DESC')->paginate(5);
        return view('users.index',compact('data'))
            ->with('i', ($request->input('page', 1) - 1) * 5);
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for creating a new resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function create()
    {
        $roles = Role::pluck('name','name')->all();
        return view('users.create',compact('roles'));
    }

    /**
     * Store a newly created resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function store(Request $request)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required',
            'email' => 'required|email|unique:users,email',
            'password' => 'required|same:confirm-password',
            'roles' => 'required'
        ]);

        $input = $request->all();
        $input['password'] = Hash::make($input['password']);

        $user = User::create($input);
        $user->assignRole($request->input('roles'));

        return redirect()->route('users.index')
                        ->with('success','User created successfully');
    }

    /**
     * Display the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function show($id)
    {
        $user = User::find($id);
        return view('users.show',compact('user'));
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function edit($id)
    {
        $user = User::find($id);
        $roles = Role::pluck('name','name')->all();
        $userRole = $user->roles->pluck('name','name')->all();

        return view('users.edit',compact('user','roles','userRole'));
    }

    /**
     * Update the specified resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function update(Request $request, $id)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required',
            'email' => 'required|email|unique:users,email,'.$id,
            'password' => 'same:confirm-password',
            'roles' => 'required'
        ]);

        $input = $request->all();
        if(!empty($input['password'])){ 
            $input['password'] = Hash::make($input['password']);
        }else{
            $input = array_except($input,array('password'));    
        }

        $user = User::find($id);
        $user->update($input);
        DB::table('model_has_roles')->where('model_id',$id)->delete();

        $user->assignRole($request->input('roles'));

        return redirect()->route('users.index')
                        ->with('success','User updated successfully');
    }

    /**
     * Remove the specified resource from storage.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function destroy($id)
    {
        User::find($id)->delete();
        return redirect()->route('users.index')
                        ->with('success','User deleted successfully');
    }
}

app/Http/Controllers/ProductController.php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use App\Product;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;

class ProductController extends Controller
{ 
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    function __construct()
    {
         $this->middleware('permission:product-list|product-create|product-edit|product-delete', ['only' => ['index','show']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:product-create', ['only' => ['create','store']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:product-edit', ['only' => ['edit','update']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:product-delete', ['only' => ['destroy']]);
    }
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index()
    {
        $products = Product::latest()->paginate(5);
        return view('products.index',compact('products'))
            ->with('i', (request()->input('page', 1) - 1) * 5);
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for creating a new resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function create()
    {
        return view('products.create');
    }

    /**
     * Store a newly created resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function store(Request $request)
    {
        request()->validate([
            'name' => 'required',
            'detail' => 'required',
        ]);

        Product::create($request->all());

        return redirect()->route('products.index')
                        ->with('success','Product created successfully.');
    }

    /**
     * Display the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function show(Product $product)
    {
        return view('products.show',compact('product'));
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function edit(Product $product)
    {
        return view('products.edit',compact('product'));
    }

    /**
     * Update the specified resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function update(Request $request, Product $product)
    {
         request()->validate([
            'name' => 'required',
            'detail' => 'required',
        ]);

        $product->update($request->all());

        return redirect()->route('products.index')
                        ->with('success','Product updated successfully');
    }

    /**
     * Remove the specified resource from storage.
     *
     * @param  \App\Product  $product
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function destroy(Product $product)
    {
        $product->delete();

        return redirect()->route('products.index')
                        ->with('success','Product deleted successfully');
    }
}

app/Http/Controllers/RoleController.php

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use App\Http\Controllers\Controller;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;
use DB;

class RoleController extends Controller
{
    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    function __construct()
    {
         $this->middleware('permission:role-list|role-create|role-edit|role-delete', ['only' => ['index','store']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:role-create', ['only' => ['create','store']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:role-edit', ['only' => ['edit','update']]);
         $this->middleware('permission:role-delete', ['only' => ['destroy']]);
    }

    /**
     * Display a listing of the resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function index(Request $request)
    {
        $roles = Role::orderBy('id','DESC')->paginate(5);
        return view('roles.index',compact('roles'))
            ->with('i', ($request->input('page', 1) - 1) * 5);
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for creating a new resource.
     *
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function create()
    {
        $permission = Permission::get();
        return view('roles.create',compact('permission'));
    }

    /**
     * Store a newly created resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function store(Request $request)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required|unique:roles,name',
            'permission' => 'required',
        ]);

        $role = Role::create(['name' => $request->input('name')]);
        $role->syncPermissions($request->input('permission'));

        return redirect()->route('roles.index')
                        ->with('success','Role created successfully');
    }
    /**
     * Display the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function show($id)
    {
        $role = Role::find($id);
        $rolePermissions = Permission::join("role_has_permissions","role_has_permissions.permission_id","=","permissions.id")
            ->where("role_has_permissions.role_id",$id)
            ->get();

        return view('roles.show',compact('role','rolePermissions'));
    }

    /**
     * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function edit($id)
    {
        $role = Role::find($id);
        $permission = Permission::get();
        $rolePermissions = DB::table("role_has_permissions")->where("role_has_permissions.role_id",$id)
            ->pluck('role_has_permissions.permission_id','role_has_permissions.permission_id')
            ->all();

        return view('roles.edit',compact('role','permission','rolePermissions'));
    }

    /**
     * Update the specified resource in storage.
     *
     * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function update(Request $request, $id)
    {
        $this->validate($request, [
            'name' => 'required',
            'permission' => 'required',
        ]);

        $role = Role::find($id);
        $role->name = $request->input('name');
        $role->save();

        $role->syncPermissions($request->input('permission'));

        return redirect()->route('roles.index')
                        ->with('success','Role updated successfully');
    }
    /**
     * Remove the specified resource from storage.
     *
     * @param  int  $id
     * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
     */
    public function destroy($id)
    {
        DB::table("roles")->where('id',$id)->delete();
        return redirect()->route('roles.index')
                        ->with('success','Role deleted successfully');
    }
}

Step 9: Add Blade Files

This is last step we have to add numbers view for layouts, users module, roles module, products modules and errors page, so create number of view like as bellow:

resources/views/layouts/app.blade.php

<html lang="{{ app()->getLocale() }}">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge">
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <!-- CSRF Token -->
    <meta name="csrf-token" content="{{ csrf_token() }}">
    <title>{{ config('app.name', 'Laravel 5.8 User Roles and Permissions Tutorial') }}</title>
    <!-- Scripts -->
    <script src="{{ asset('js/app.js') }}" defer></script>
    <!-- Fonts -->
    <link rel="dns-prefetch" href="https://fonts.gstatic.com">
    <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Raleway:300,400,600" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
    <!-- Styles -->
    <link href="{{ asset('css/app.css') }}" rel="stylesheet">
</head>
<body>
    <div id="app">
        <nav class="navbar navbar-expand-md navbar-light navbar-laravel">
            <div class="container">
                <a class="navbar-brand" href="{{ url('/') }}">
                    Laravel 5.8 User Roles and Permissions - ItSolutionStuff.com
                </a>
                <button class="navbar-toggler" type="button" data-toggle="collapse" data-target="#navbarSupportedContent" aria-controls="navbarSupportedContent" aria-expanded="false" aria-label="Toggle navigation">
                    <span class="navbar-toggler-icon"></span>
                </button>

                <div class="collapse navbar-collapse" id="navbarSupportedContent">
                    <!-- Left Side Of Navbar -->
                    <ul class="navbar-nav mr-auto"></ul>

                    <!-- Right Side Of Navbar -->
                    <ul class="navbar-nav ml-auto">
                        <!-- Authentication Links -->
                        @guest
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('login') }}">{{ __('Login') }}</a></li>
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('register') }}">{{ __('Register') }}</a></li>
                        @else
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('users.index') }}">Manage Users</a></li>
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}">Manage Role</a></li>
                            <li><a class="nav-link" href="{{ route('products.index') }}">Manage Product</a></li>
                            <li class="nav-item dropdown">
                                <a id="navbarDropdown" class="nav-link dropdown-toggle" href="#" role="button" data-toggle="dropdown" aria-haspopup="true" aria-expanded="false" v-pre>
                                    {{ Auth::user()->name }} <span class="caret"></span>
                                </a>

                                <div class="dropdown-menu" aria-labelledby="navbarDropdown">
                                    <a class="dropdown-item" href="{{ route('logout') }}"
                                       onclick="event.preventDefault();
                                                     document.getElementById('logout-form').submit();">
                                        {{ __('Logout') }}
                                    </a>

                                    <form id="logout-form" action="{{ route('logout') }}" method="POST" style="display: none;">
                                        @csrf
                                    </form>
                                </div>
                            </li>
                        @endguest
                    </ul>
                </div>
            </div>
        </nav>

        <main class="py-4">
            <div class="container">
            @yield('content')
            </div>
        </main>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

resources/views/users/index.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Users Management</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-success" href="{{ route('users.create') }}"> Create New User</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if ($message = Session::get('success'))
<div class="alert alert-success">
  <p>{{ $message }}</p>
</div>
@endif

<table class="table table-bordered">
 <tr>
   <th>No</th>
   <th>Name</th>
   <th>Email</th>
   <th>Roles</th>
   <th width="280px">Action</th>
 </tr>
 @foreach ($data as $key => $user)
  <tr>
    <td>{{ ++$i }}</td>
    <td>{{ $user->name }}</td>
    <td>{{ $user->email }}</td>
    <td>
      @if(!empty($user->getRoleNames()))
        @foreach($user->getRoleNames() as $v)
           <label class="badge badge-success">{{ $v }}</label>
        @endforeach
      @endif
    </td>
    <td>
       <a class="btn btn-info" href="{{ route('users.show',$user->id) }}">Show</a>
       <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.edit',$user->id) }}">Edit</a>
        {!! Form::open(['method' => 'DELETE','route' => ['users.destroy', $user->id],'style'=>'display:inline']) !!}
            {!! Form::submit('Delete', ['class' => 'btn btn-danger']) !!}
        {!! Form::close() !!}
    </td>
  </tr>
 @endforeach
</table>

{!! $data->render() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/users/create.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Create New User</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
  <div class="alert alert-danger">
    <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
    <ul>
       @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
         <li>{{ $error }}</li>
       @endforeach
    </ul>
  </div>
@endif


{!! Form::open(array('route' => 'users.store','method'=>'POST')) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Email:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('email', null, array('placeholder' => 'Email','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('password', array('placeholder' => 'Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Confirm Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('confirm-password', array('placeholder' => 'Confirm Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Role:</strong>
            {!! Form::select('roles[]', $roles,[], array('class' => 'form-control','multiple')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/users/edit.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Edit New User</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
  <div class="alert alert-danger">
    <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
    <ul>
       @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
         <li>{{ $error }}</li>
       @endforeach
    </ul>
  </div>
@endif

{!! Form::model($user, ['method' => 'PATCH','route' => ['users.update', $user->id]]) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Email:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('email', null, array('placeholder' => 'Email','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('password', array('placeholder' => 'Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Confirm Password:</strong>
            {!! Form::password('confirm-password', array('placeholder' => 'Confirm Password','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Role:</strong>
            {!! Form::select('roles[]', $roles,$userRole, array('class' => 'form-control','multiple')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/users/show.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2> Show User</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('users.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {{ $user->name }}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Email:</strong>
            {{ $user->email }}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Roles:</strong>
            @if(!empty($user->getRoleNames()))
                @foreach($user->getRoleNames() as $v)
                    <label class="badge badge-success">{{ $v }}</label>
                @endforeach
            @endif
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
@endsection

resources/views/roles/index.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Role Management</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
        @can('role-create')
            <a class="btn btn-success" href="{{ route('roles.create') }}"> Create New Role</a>
            @endcan
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if ($message = Session::get('success'))
    <div class="alert alert-success">
        <p>{{ $message }}</p>
    </div>
@endif

<table class="table table-bordered">
  <tr>
     <th>No</th>
     <th>Name</th>
     <th width="280px">Action</th>
  </tr>
    @foreach ($roles as $key => $role)
    <tr>
        <td>{{ ++$i }}</td>
        <td>{{ $role->name }}</td>
        <td>
            <a class="btn btn-info" href="{{ route('roles.show',$role->id) }}">Show</a>
            @can('role-edit')
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.edit',$role->id) }}">Edit</a>
            @endcan
            @can('role-delete')
                {!! Form::open(['method' => 'DELETE','route' => ['roles.destroy', $role->id],'style'=>'display:inline']) !!}
                    {!! Form::submit('Delete', ['class' => 'btn btn-danger']) !!}
                {!! Form::close() !!}
            @endcan
        </td>
    </tr>
    @endforeach
</table>

{!! $roles->render() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/roles/create.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Create New Role</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
    <div class="alert alert-danger">
        <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
        <ul>
        @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
            <li>{{ $error }}</li>
        @endforeach
        </ul>
    </div>
@endif

{!! Form::open(array('route' => 'roles.store','method'=>'POST')) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Permission:</strong>
            <br/>
            @foreach($permission as $value)
                <label>{{ Form::checkbox('permission[]', $value->id, false, array('class' => 'name')) }}
                {{ $value->name }}</label>
            <br/>
            @endforeach
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/roles/edit.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2>Edit Role</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

@if (count($errors) > 0)
    <div class="alert alert-danger">
        <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
        <ul>
        @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
            <li>{{ $error }}</li>
        @endforeach
        </ul>
    </div>
@endif

{!! Form::model($role, ['method' => 'PATCH','route' => ['roles.update', $role->id]]) !!}
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {!! Form::text('name', null, array('placeholder' => 'Name','class' => 'form-control')) !!}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Permission:</strong>
            <br/>
            @foreach($permission as $value)
                <label>{{ Form::checkbox('permission[]', $value->id, in_array($value->id, $rolePermissions) ? true : false, array('class' => 'name')) }}
                {{ $value->name }}</label>
            <br/>
            @endforeach
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
        <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
    </div>
</div>
{!! Form::close() !!}

@endsection
<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>

resources/views/roles/show.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
<div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
        <div class="pull-left">
            <h2> Show Role</h2>
        </div>
        <div class="pull-right">
            <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('roles.index') }}"> Back</a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Name:</strong>
            {{ $role->name }}
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
        <div class="form-group">
            <strong>Permissions:</strong>
            @if(!empty($rolePermissions))
                @foreach($rolePermissions as $v)
                    <label class="label label-success">{{ $v->name }},</label>
                @endforeach
            @endif
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
@endsection

resources/views/products/index.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2>Products</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                @can('product-create')
                <a class="btn btn-success" href="{{ route('products.create') }}"> Create New Product</a>
                @endcan
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    @if ($message = Session::get('success'))
        <div class="alert alert-success">
            <p>{{ $message }}</p>
        </div>
    @endif

    <table class="table table-bordered">
        <tr>
            <th>No</th>
            <th>Name</th>
            <th>Details</th>
            <th width="280px">Action</th>
        </tr>
	    @foreach ($products as $product)
	    <tr>
	        <td>{{ ++$i }}</td>
	        <td>{{ $product->name }}</td>
	        <td>{{ $product->detail }}</td>
	        <td>
                <form action="{{ route('products.destroy',$product->id) }}" method="POST">
                    <a class="btn btn-info" href="{{ route('products.show',$product->id) }}">Show</a>
                    @can('product-edit')
                    <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.edit',$product->id) }}">Edit</a>
                    @endcan

                    @csrf
                    @method('DELETE')
                    @can('product-delete')
                    <button type="submit" class="btn btn-danger">Delete</button>
                    @endcan
                </form>
	        </td>
	    </tr>
	    @endforeach
    </table>

    {!! $products->links() !!}

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/products/create.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2>Add New Product</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.index') }}"> Back</a>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    @if ($errors->any())
        <div class="alert alert-danger">
            <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
            <ul>
                @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
                    <li>{{ $error }}</li>
                @endforeach
            </ul>
        </div>
    @endif

    <form action="{{ route('products.store') }}" method="POST">
    	@csrf

         <div class="row">
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Name:</strong>
		            <input type="text" name="name" class="form-control" placeholder="Name">
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Detail:</strong>
		            <textarea class="form-control" style="height:150px" name="detail" placeholder="Detail"></textarea>
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
		            <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
		    </div>
		</div>

    </form>

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/products/edit.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2>Edit Product</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.index') }}"> Back</a>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    @if ($errors->any())
        <div class="alert alert-danger">
            <strong>Whoops!</strong> There were some problems with your input.<br><br>
            <ul>
                @foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
                    <li>{{ $error }}</li>
                @endforeach
            </ul>
        </div>
    @endif

    <form action="{{ route('products.update',$product->id) }}" method="POST">
    	@csrf
        @method('PUT')

         <div class="row">
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Name:</strong>
		            <input type="text" name="name" value="{{ $product->name }}" class="form-control" placeholder="Name">
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
		        <div class="form-group">
		            <strong>Detail:</strong>
		            <textarea class="form-control" style="height:150px" name="detail" placeholder="Detail">{{ $product->detail }}</textarea>
		        </div>
		    </div>
		    <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12 text-center">
		      <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>
		    </div>
		</div>

    </form>

<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>
@endsection

resources/views/products/show.blade.php

@extends('layouts.app')

@section('content')
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-12 margin-tb">
            <div class="pull-left">
                <h2> Show Product</h2>
            </div>
            <div class="pull-right">
                <a class="btn btn-primary" href="{{ route('products.index') }}"> Back</a>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
            <div class="form-group">
                <strong>Name:</strong>
                {{ $product->name }}
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-12 col-md-12">
            <div class="form-group">
                <strong>Details:</strong>
                {{ $product->detail }}
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
@endsection
<p class="text-center text-primary"><small>Tutorial by ItSolutionStuff.com</small></p>

Step 10: Handle Exertion Error

Now, in this step we will handle exertion. if you don't have a permission and try to access that page using browser url then you can give message as like bellow:

add/Exceptions/Handler.php

......
public function render($request, Exception $exception)
{
    if ($exception instanceof \Spatie\Permission\Exceptions\UnauthorizedException) {
        return response()->json(['User have not permission for this page access.']);
    }
 
    return parent::render($request, $exception);
}
....

Step 11: Create Seeder For Permissions and AdminUser

In this step we will create seeder for permissions, Right now we have fixed permission so we create using seeder as listed bellow, but if you can add more permission as you want:

1.role-list

2.role-create

3.role-edit

4.role-delete

5.product-list

6.product-create

7.product-edit

8.product-delete

So, first create seeder using bellow command:

php artisan make:seeder PermissionTableSeeder

And put bellow code in PermissionTableSeeder seeder this way:

database/seeds/PermissionTableSeeder.php

<?php

use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;

class PermissionTableSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
       $permissions = [
           'role-list',
           'role-create',
           'role-edit',
           'role-delete',
           'product-list',
           'product-create',
           'product-edit',
           'product-delete'
        ];

        foreach ($permissions as $permission) {
             Permission::create(['name' => $permission]);
        }
    }
}

After this we have to run bellow command for run PermissionTableSeeder seeder:

php artisan db:seed --class=PermissionTableSeeder

Now let's create new seeder for creating admin user.

php artisan make:seeder CreateAdminUserSeeder

database/seeds/PermissionTableSeeder.php

<?php
  
use Illuminate\Database\Seeder;
use App\User;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Role;
use Spatie\Permission\Models\Permission;
  
class CreateAdminUserSeeder extends Seeder
{
    /**
     * Run the database seeds.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function run()
    {
        $user = User::create([
        	'name' => 'Hardik Savani', 
        	'email' => '[email protected]',
        	'password' => bcrypt('123456')
        ]);
  
        $role = Role::create(['name' => 'Admin']);
   
        $permissions = Permission::pluck('id','id')->all();
  
        $role->syncPermissions($permissions);
   
        $user->assignRole([$role->id]);
    }
}
php artisan db:seed --class=CreateAdminUserSeeder

Now we are ready to to run full example of ACL. so let's run our example so run bellow command for quick run:

php artisan serve

Access By

http://localhost:8000/

Now you can login with following credential:

Email: [email protected]
Password: 123456

You can see bellow screenshots:

You can download code from GitHub

Creating a Modal Dialog in Angular 8 with TypeScript

Creating a Modal Dialog in Angular 8 with TypeScript

In this tutorial we'll cover how to implement modal windows (dialog boxes) in Angular 8 with TypeScript. The example is a custom modal without the need for any 3rd party libraries.

There are plenty of plugins and libraries out there that include modal windows, in the past I used them myself when I needed to add a modal to a new project. The main issue I have with 3rd party plugins is that they usually contain a lot of features I don't need which adds unnecessary bloat to my Angular app, so a while ago I took some time to implement a custom modal window to see how difficult it would be and also to remove the magic & mystery I had in my mind about exactly how modals work.

When I finished I was pleasantly surprised at the relatively small amount of code required to implement a custom modal window, most of the modal 'magic' is done with a handful of CSS styles (see modal.component.less) while Angular / TypeScript is just used for showing and hiding the modal windows.

Running the Angular 8 Modal Dialog Locally
  1. Install NodeJS and NPM from https://nodejs.org/en/download/.
  2. Download or clone the project source code from https://github.com/cornflourblue/angular-8-custom-modal
  3. Install all required npm packages by running npm install from the command line in the project root folder (where the package.json is located).
  4. Start the application by running npm start from the command line in the project root folder.

NOTE: You can also run the app directly using the Angular CLI command ng serve --open. To do this first install the Angular CLI globally on your system with the command npm install -g @angular/cli.

Adding Custom Modals to Your Angular 8 App

To add modals to your Angular 8 application you'll need to copy the /src/app/_modal folder and contents from the example project, the folder contains the modal module and associated files, including:

  • modal.model.less - LESS/CSS styles for displaying modal dialogs, this is where the modal "magic" happens.
  • modal.component.html - modal component template that contains the wrapper html for displaying modal dialogs.
  • modal.component.ts - modal component with the logic for displaying modal dialogs.
  • modal.module.ts - modal module that encapsulates the modal component so it can be imported by the app module.
  • modal.service.ts - modal service that can be used by any angular component to open and close modal dialogs.
  • index.ts - barrel file that re-exports the modal module and service so they can be imported using only the folder path instead of the full path to each file, and also enables importing from multiple files with a single import.

Import the Modal Module into your App Module

To make the modal component available to your Angular 8 application you need to add the ModalModule to the imports array of your App Module (app.module.ts). See the app module from the example app below, the modal module is imported on line 5 and added to the imports array of the app module on line 16.

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { FormsModule } from '@angular/forms';

import { ModalModule } from './_modal';
import { appRoutingModule } from './app.routing';

import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
import { HomeComponent } from './home';
import { TestPageComponent } from './test-page';

@NgModule({
    imports: [
        BrowserModule,
        FormsModule,
        ModalModule,
        appRoutingModule
    ],
    declarations: [
        AppComponent,
        HomeComponent,
        TestPageComponent
    ],
    bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})

export class AppModule { }

Add the tag to pages where you want to display modals

To add a modal dialog to any page simply add the <jw-modal id="[insert unique id]"></jw-modal> tag along with the content for the modal. You can put any content you like inside the <jw-modal> element. You can also update the modal LESS/CSS if you want to change the styles of the modals, e.g to make them smaller or add CSS animation transitions.

IMPORTANT: A unique id is required for each modal on a page, it can be any string e.g. 'custom-modal-1'. The id string is used by the modal service to keep track of each active modal in the angular app, so the service knows which modal to open/close based on the id passed to the modalService.open() and modalService.close() methods e.g. modalService.open('custom-modal-1').

Here is the home component template from the example app (/src/app/home/home.component.html) that contains two modals, each is opened by a button click, and the first modal contains an input text field that allows you to edit the bodyText displayed in the template.

<div>
    <h1>Home</h1>
    <p>{{bodyText}}</p>
    <button (click)="openModal('custom-modal-1')">Open Modal 1</button>
    <button (click)="openModal('custom-modal-2')">Open Modal 2</button>
</div>

<jw-modal id="custom-modal-1">
    <h1>A Custom Modal!</h1>
    <p>Home page text: <input type="text" [(ngModel)]="bodyText" /></p>
    <button (click)="closeModal('custom-modal-1');">Close</button>
</jw-modal>

<jw-modal id="custom-modal-2">
    <h1 style="height:1000px">A Tall Custom Modal!</h1>
    <button (click)="closeModal('custom-modal-2');">Close</button>
</jw-modal>	

Opening & Closing Angular 8 Modal Dialogs

To open a modal call the modalService.open() method with the id of the modal you want to open, e.g. modalService.open('custom-modal-1'). To close a modal call the modalService.close() method with the id of the modal you want to close, e.g. modalService.close('custom-modal-1').

By default modals are closed on background click, to disable this remove the chunk of code in the modal component (/src/app/_modal/modal.component.ts) located directly below the comment // close modal on background click.

Here is the home component from the example app (/src/app/home/home.component.ts), it contains methods for opening and closing modals (openModal() and closeModal()) that call the corresponding methods of the modal service.

import { Component, OnInit } from '@angular/core';

import { ModalService } from '../_modal';

@Component({ templateUrl: 'home.component.html' })
export class HomeComponent implements OnInit {
    bodyText: string;

    constructor(private modalService: ModalService) { }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.bodyText = 'This text can be updated in modal 1';
    }

    openModal(id: string) {
        this.modalService.open(id);
    }

    closeModal(id: string) {
        this.modalService.close(id);
    }
}	
Breakdown of the Angular 8 Custom Modal Code

Below is a breakdown of the pieces of code used to implement custom modal dialogs in Angular 8 & TypeScript, you don't need to know the details of how it all works to use the modals in your project, it's only if you're interested in the nuts and bolts or if you want to modify the underlying code or behaviour.

LESS/CSS Styles for Angular 8 Modal Dialogs

These are the styles applied to the custom modal dialogs in this example, they could also be used in non-angular projects as it's just pure LESS/CSS.

I prefixed the modal element and classes with jw- to prevent conflicts with 3rd party css libraries such as Bootstrap.

/* MODAL STYLES
-------------------------------*/
jw-modal {
    /* modals are hidden by default */
    display: none;

    .jw-modal {
        /* modal container fixed across whole screen */
        position: fixed;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        bottom: 0;
        left: 0;

        /* z-index must be higher than .jw-modal-background */
        z-index: 1000;
        
        /* enables scrolling for tall modals */
        overflow: auto;

        .jw-modal-body {
            padding: 20px;
            background: #fff;

            /* margin exposes part of the modal background */
            margin: 40px;
        }
    }

    .jw-modal-background {
        /* modal background fixed across whole screen */
        position: fixed;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        bottom: 0;
        left: 0;

        /* semi-transparent black  */
        background-color: #000;
        opacity: 0.75;
        
        /* z-index must be below .jw-modal and above everything else  */
        z-index: 900;
    }
}

body.jw-modal-open {
    /* body overflow is hidden to hide main scrollbar when modal window is open */
    overflow: hidden;
}	
Angular 8 Modal Service

The Angular 8 modal service manages the communication that's required between page components and modal components. It maintains a list of available modals on the page and exposes methods for interacting with those modals.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';

@Injectable({ providedIn: 'root' })
export class ModalService {
    private modals: any[] = [];

    add(modal: any) {
        // add modal to array of active modals
        this.modals.push(modal);
    }

    remove(id: string) {
        // remove modal from array of active modals
        this.modals = this.modals.filter(x => x.id !== id);
    }

    open(id: string) {
        // open modal specified by id
        const modal = this.modals.find(x => x.id === id);
        modal.open();
    }

    close(id: string) {
        // close modal specified by id
        const modal = this.modals.find(x => x.id === id);
        modal.close();
    }
}	
Angular 8 Modal Component

The custom modal component is used to add modal windows anywhere in your angular application by using the <jw-modal> tag. Each modal instance adds itself to the modal service when it loads by calling modalService.add(this) from the ngOnInit Angular lifecycle method, and removes itself from the modal service when it is destroyed by calling modalService.remove(this.id) from the ngOnDestroy Angular lifecycle method.

import { Component, ViewEncapsulation, ElementRef, Input, OnInit, OnDestroy } from '@angular/core';

import { ModalService } from './modal.service';

@Component({ 
    selector: 'jw-modal', 
    templateUrl: 'modal.component.html', 
    styleUrls: ['modal.component.less'],
    encapsulation: ViewEncapsulation.None
})
export class ModalComponent implements OnInit, OnDestroy {
    @Input() id: string;
    private element: any;

    constructor(private modalService: ModalService, private el: ElementRef) {
        this.element = el.nativeElement;
    }

    ngOnInit(): void {
        // ensure id attribute exists
        if (!this.id) {
            console.error('modal must have an id');
            return;
        }

        // move element to bottom of page (just before </body>) so it can be displayed above everything else
        document.body.appendChild(this.element);

        // close modal on background click
        this.element.addEventListener('click', el => {
            if (el.target.className === 'jw-modal') {
                this.close();
            }
        });

        // add self (this modal instance) to the modal service so it's accessible from controllers
        this.modalService.add(this);
    }

    // remove self from modal service when component is destroyed
    ngOnDestroy(): void {
        this.modalService.remove(this.id);
        this.element.remove();
    }

    // open modal
    open(): void {
        this.element.style.display = 'block';
        document.body.classList.add('jw-modal-open');
    }

    // close modal
    close(): void {
        this.element.style.display = 'none';
        document.body.classList.remove('jw-modal-open');
    }
}	
Angular 8 Modal Component Template

The modal component template contains just a couple of wrapper divs for the modal content and a div for the modal background. The <ng-content> element is replaced by Angular with the contents you set inside the <jw-modal> element, this is called Angular content projection.

<div class="jw-modal">
    <div class="jw-modal-body">
        <ng-content></ng-content>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="jw-modal-background"></div>	

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Further reading about AngularJS

Angular 8 (formerly Angular 2) - The Complete Guide

Angular & NodeJS - The MEAN Stack Guide

The Complete Node.js Developer Course (3rd Edition)

The Web Developer Bootcamp

Best 50 Angular Interview Questions for Frontend Developers in 2019

MEAN Stack Angular 8 CRUD Web Application

Angular 8 Tutorial - User Registration and Login Example

How to build a CRUD Web App with Angular 8.0

Building CRUD Mobile App using Ionic 4, Angular 8

Angular 8 Material Design Tutorial & Example