Rodney Vg

Rodney Vg

1596252840

Vue UI components with configurable classes ready for TailwindCSS

Vue-Tailwind

For more info check the official site: https://vue-tailwind.com/

VueTailwind is a set of Vue components created to be customized to adapt to the unique design of your application.

Built to be customized

When you work on a real-world application, you usually need different variants for every component your app uses; you may need (besides of default style of your text input) a specific style for a search input inside a navbar and another one for the contact form, and we are not talking yet about the different states that your input could have.

All VueTailwind components were designed to be customized with custom CSS classes and unlimited variants defined when you import the library or when you use the component.

This means that when you use this library, you are not attached to any style defined by us like it happens when you use a typical library of components like Bootstrap. Instead, you can determine your theme based on your application’s needs.

This library makes special sense when you work with utility-first frameworks like TailwindCss, which is the default framework used in this library.

Installation

1. Install the dependencies

npm install vue-tailwind --save

Or:

yarn add vue-tailwind

2. Configure your project to use vue-tailwind

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'

const theme = {
  //...
}

Vue.use(VueTailwind, theme)
Apply your own theme:

Let’s say, for example, that for the specific needs of your project the text inputs should have a blue two width border, the buttons should have rounded borders and you need a secondary button that should be purple.

Considering those needs define objects with the desired classes for every component, a good approach is to create a file where you define the template:

const TInput = {
  classes: 'border-2 block w-full rounded text-gray-800',
  // Optional variants
  variants: {
    // ...
  },
  // Optional fixedClasses
  // fixedClasses: '',
}

const TButton = {
  classes: 'rounded-lg border block inline-flex items-center justify-center',
  variants: {
    secondary: 'rounded-lg border block inline-flex items-center justify-center bg-purple-500 border-purple-500 hover:bg-purple-600 hover:border-purple-600',
  },
  // Optional fixedClasses
  // fixedClasses: 'transform ease-in-out duration-100',
}

const MyOwnTheme = {
  TInput,
  TButton,
}

export default MyOwnTheme

Then you can import your theme and add it as a parameter when you install VueTailwind:

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'
import MyOwnTheme from './myOwnTheme.js'

Vue.use(VueTailwind, MyOwnTheme)

Or just define the settings directly:

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'

const TInput = {
  classes: 'border-2 border-blue-500 block w-full rounded',
}
// Or create a separate file like `src/themes/default/TInput.js` and import it
// import TInput from './myOwnTInput'
Vue.use(VueTailwind, {
  TInput
})

// Or why not? define the settings inline:
Vue.use(VueTailwind, {
  TInput: {
    classes: 'border-2 border-blue-500 block w-full rounded',
  }
})

Quick start

Here is a small example of how the classes and variants are defined when you import this library:

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'

const theme = {
  TInput: {
    classes: 'form-input border-2 text-gray-700',
    variants: {
      error: 'form-input border-2 border-red-300 bg-red-100',
      // ... Infinite variants
    }
  },
  TAlert: {
    classes: {
      wrapper: 'rounded bg-blue-100 p-4 flex text-sm border-l-4 border-blue-500',
      body: 'flex-grow text-blue-700',
      close: 'text-blue-700 hover:text-blue-500 hover:bg-blue-200 ml-4 rounded',
      closeIcon: 'h-5 w-5 fill-current'
    },
    variants: {
      danger: {
        wrapper: 'rounded bg-red-100 p-4 flex text-sm border-l-4 border-red-500',
        body: 'flex-grow text-red-700',
        close: 'text-red-700 hover:text-red-500 hover:bg-red-200 ml-4 rounded'
      },
      // ... Infinite variants
    }
  },
  // ... The rest of the components
}

Vue.use(VueTailwind, theme)

The default classes and variants can also be defined in the component props:

<t-input
  :classes="form-input border-2 text-gray-700"
  :variants="{
    error: 'form-input border-2 border-red-300 bg-red-100',
    success: 'form-input border-2 border-green-300 bg-green-100'
  }"
/>

To apply an specific variant you just need to use the variant prop:

<t-input variant="error" />

The variant prop also accepts an object that takes the first attribute with a truthy value

<t-input
  :variant="{
    error: inputIsNotValid,
    success: inputIsValid,
  }"
/>

Whats new in version 1.x

  • Rebuilt from scratch in Typescript
  • Small bundle size and less dependencies
  • A better way to import only selected components
  • Unlimited variants and a easy way to configure them

Whats next?

  • Im working in a datepicker that is the most requested component, after that im planning to create a swal like dialog component.
  • Already started to work in a react version of this package called react-tailwind.
  • Im making some final changes to the Community themes features that should be released soon.

Contribute

Is this project helpful for you? Consider sponsoring me https://github.com/sponsors/alfonsobries.

Of course, any other kind help is welcome, even if you notice some grammar mistakes (English is not my primary language) see contribute page for details.

Changelog

Please see CHANGELOG for more information what has changed recently.

Security

If you discover any security related issues, please email alfonso@vexilo.com instead of using the issue tracker.

Credits

Download Details:

Author: alfonsobries

Live Demo: https://www.vue-tailwind.com/

GitHub: https://github.com/alfonsobries/vue-tailwind

#vuejs #vue #javascript #vue-js

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Vue UI components with configurable classes ready for TailwindCSS
Lawrence  Lesch

Lawrence Lesch

1662107520

Superdom: Better and Simpler ES6 DOM Manipulation

Superdom

You have dom. It has all the DOM virtually within it. Use that power:

// Fetch all the page links
let links = dom.a.href;

// Links open in a new tab
dom.a.target = '_blank';

Only for modern browsers

Getting started

Simply use the CDN via unpkg.com:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/superdom@1"></script>

Or use npm or bower:

npm|bower install superdom --save

Select

It always returns an array with the matched elements. Get all the elements that match the selector:

// Simple element selector into an array
let allLinks = dom.a;

// Loop straight on the selection
dom.a.forEach(link => { ... });

// Combined selector
let importantLinks = dom['a.important'];

There are also some predetermined elements, such as id, class and attr:

// Select HTML Elements by id:
let main = dom.id.main;

// by class:
let buttons = dom.class.button;

// or by attribute:
let targeted = dom.attr.target;
let targeted = dom.attr['target="_blank"'];

Generate

Use it as a function or a tagged template literal to generate DOM fragments:

// Not a typo; tagged template literals
let link = dom`<a href="https://google.com/">Google</a>`;

// It is the same as
let link = dom('<a href="https://google.com/">Google</a>');

Delete elements

Delete a piece of the DOM

// Delete all of the elements with the class .google
delete dom.class.google;   // Is this an ad-block rule?

Attributes

You can easily manipulate attributes right from the dom node. There are some aliases that share the syntax of the attributes such as html and text (aliases for innerHTML and textContent). There are others that travel through the dom such as parent (alias for parentNode) and children. Finally, class behaves differently as explained below.

Get attributes

The fetching will always return an array with the element for each of the matched nodes (or undefined if not there):

// Retrieve all the urls from the page
let urls = dom.a.href;     // #attr-list
  // ['https://google.com', 'https://facebook.com/', ...]

// Get an array of the h2 contents (alias of innerHTML)
let h2s = dom.h2.html;     // #attr-alias
  // ['Level 2 header', 'Another level 2 header', ...]

// Get whether any of the attributes has the value "_blank"
let hasBlank = dom.class.cta.target._blank;    // #attr-value
  // true/false

You also use these:

  • html (alias of innerHTML): retrieve a list of the htmls
  • text (alias of textContent): retrieve a list of the htmls
  • parent (alias of parentNode): travel up one level
  • children: travel down one level

Set attributes

// Set target="_blank" to all links
dom.a.target = '_blank';     // #attr-set
dom.class.tableofcontents.html = `
  <ul class="tableofcontents">
    ${dom.h2.map(h2 => `
      <li>
        <a href="#${h2.id}">
          ${h2.innerHTML}
        </a>
      </li>
    `).join('')}
  </ul>
`;

Remove an attribute

To delete an attribute use the delete keyword:

// Remove all urls from the page
delete dom.a.href;

// Remove all ids
delete dom.a.id;

Classes

It provides an easy way to manipulate the classes.

Get classes

To retrieve whether a particular class is present or not:

// Get an array with true/false for a single class
let isTest = dom.a.class.test;     // #class-one

For a general method to retrieve all classes you can do:

// Get a list of the classes of each matched element
let arrays = dom.a.class;     // #class-arrays
  // [['important'], ['button', 'cta'], ...]

// If you want a plain list with all of the classes:
let flatten = dom.a.class._flat;     // #class-flat
  // ['important', 'button', 'cta', ...]

// And if you just want an string with space-separated classes:
let text = dom.a.class._text;     // #class-text
  // 'important button cta ...'

Add a class

// Add the class 'test' (different ways)
dom.a.class.test = true;    // #class-make-true
dom.a.class = 'test';       // #class-push

Remove a class

// Remove the class 'test'
dom.a.class.test = false;    // #class-make-false

Manipulate

Did we say it returns a simple array?

dom.a.forEach(link => link.innerHTML = 'I am a link');

But what an interesting array it is; indeed we are also proxy'ing it so you can manipulate its sub-elements straight from the selector:

// Replace all of the link's html with 'I am a link'
dom.a.html = 'I am a link';

Of course we might want to manipulate them dynamically depending on the current value. Just pass it a function:

// Append ' ^_^' to all of the links in the page
dom.a.html = html => html + ' ^_^';

// Same as this:
dom.a.forEach(link => link.innerHTML = link.innerHTML + ' ^_^');

Note: this won't work dom.a.html += ' ^_^'; for more than 1 match (for reasons)

Or get into genetics to manipulate the attributes:

dom.a.attr.target = '_blank';

// Only to external sites:
let isOwnPage = el => /^https?\:\/\/mypage\.com/.test(el.getAttribute('href'));
dom.a.attr.target = (prev, i, element) => isOwnPage(element) ? '' : '_blank';

Events

You can also handle and trigger events:

// Handle click events for all <a>
dom.a.on.click = e => ...;

// Trigger click event for all <a>
dom.a.trigger.click;

Testing

We are using Jest as a Grunt task for testing. Install Jest and run in the terminal:

grunt watch

Download Details:

Author: franciscop
Source Code: https://github.com/franciscop/superdom 
License: MIT license

#javascript #es6 #dom 

Luna  Mosciski

Luna Mosciski

1600583123

8 Popular Websites That Use The Vue.JS Framework

In this article, we are going to list out the most popular websites using Vue JS as their frontend framework.

Vue JS is one of those elite progressive JavaScript frameworks that has huge demand in the web development industry. Many popular websites are developed using Vue in their frontend development because of its imperative features.

This framework was created by Evan You and still it is maintained by his private team members. Vue is of course an open-source framework which is based on MVVM concept (Model-view view-Model) and used extensively in building sublime user-interfaces and also considered a prime choice for developing single-page heavy applications.

Released in February 2014, Vue JS has gained 64,828 stars on Github, making it very popular in recent times.

Evan used Angular JS on many operations while working for Google and integrated many features in Vue to cover the flaws of Angular.

“I figured, what if I could just extract the part that I really liked about Angular and build something really lightweight." - Evan You

#vuejs #vue #vue-with-laravel #vue-top-story #vue-3 #build-vue-frontend #vue-in-laravel #vue.js

Background Fetch for React Native Apps

react-native-background-fetch

Background Fetch is a very simple plugin which attempts to awaken an app in the background about every 15 minutes, providing a short period of background running-time. This plugin will execute your provided callbackFn whenever a background-fetch event occurs.

There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently or if an iOS user disables background refresh they may not happen at all.

:new: Background Fetch now provides a scheduleTask method for scheduling arbitrary "one-shot" or periodic tasks.

iOS

  • There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently.
  • scheduleTask seems only to fire when the device is plugged into power.
  • ⚠️ When your app is terminated, iOS no longer fires events — There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
  • iOS can take days before Apple's machine-learning algorithm settles in and begins regularly firing events. Do not sit staring at your logs waiting for an event to fire. If your simulated events work, that's all you need to know that everything is correctly configured.
  • If the user doesn't open your iOS app for long periods of time, iOS will stop firing events.

Android

Installing the plugin

⚠️ If you have a previous version of react-native-background-fetch < 2.7.0 installed into react-native >= 0.60, you should first unlink your previous version as react-native link is no longer required.

$ react-native unlink react-native-background-fetch

With yarn

$ yarn add react-native-background-fetch

With npm

$ npm install --save react-native-background-fetch

Setup Guides

iOS Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Android Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Example

ℹ️ This repo contains its own Example App. See /example

import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  StyleSheet,
  ScrollView,
  View,
  Text,
  FlatList,
  StatusBar,
} from 'react-native';

import {
  Header,
  Colors
} from 'react-native/Libraries/NewAppScreen';

import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      events: []
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    // Initialize BackgroundFetch ONLY ONCE when component mounts.
    this.initBackgroundFetch();
  }

  async initBackgroundFetch() {
    // BackgroundFetch event handler.
    const onEvent = async (taskId) => {
      console.log('[BackgroundFetch] task: ', taskId);
      // Do your background work...
      await this.addEvent(taskId);
      // IMPORTANT:  You must signal to the OS that your task is complete.
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Timeout callback is executed when your Task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId)
    const onTimeout = async (taskId) => {
      console.warn('[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT task: ', taskId);
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Initialize BackgroundFetch only once when component mounts.
    let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({minimumFetchInterval: 15}, onEvent, onTimeout);

    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] configure status: ', status);
  }

  // Add a BackgroundFetch event to <FlatList>
  addEvent(taskId) {
    // Simulate a possibly long-running asynchronous task with a Promise.
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      this.setState(state => ({
        events: [...state.events, {
          taskId: taskId,
          timestamp: (new Date()).toString()
        }]
      }));
      resolve();
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <>
        <StatusBar barStyle="dark-content" />
        <SafeAreaView>
          <ScrollView
            contentInsetAdjustmentBehavior="automatic"
            style={styles.scrollView}>
            <Header />

            <View style={styles.body}>
              <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
                <Text style={styles.sectionTitle}>BackgroundFetch Demo</Text>
              </View>
            </View>
          </ScrollView>
          <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
            <FlatList
              data={this.state.events}
              renderItem={({item}) => (<Text>[{item.taskId}]: {item.timestamp}</Text>)}
              keyExtractor={item => item.timestamp}
            />
          </View>
        </SafeAreaView>
      </>
    );
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  scrollView: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.lighter,
  },
  body: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.white,
  },
  sectionContainer: {
    marginTop: 32,
    paddingHorizontal: 24,
  },
  sectionTitle: {
    fontSize: 24,
    fontWeight: '600',
    color: Colors.black,
  },
  sectionDescription: {
    marginTop: 8,
    fontSize: 18,
    fontWeight: '400',
    color: Colors.dark,
  },
});

export default App;

Executing Custom Tasks

In addition to the default background-fetch task defined by BackgroundFetch.configure, you may also execute your own arbitrary "oneshot" or periodic tasks (iOS requires additional Setup Instructions). However, all events will be fired into the Callback provided to BackgroundFetch#configure:

⚠️ iOS:

  • scheduleTask on iOS seems only to run when the device is plugged into power.
  • scheduleTask on iOS are designed for low-priority tasks, such as purging cache files — they tend to be unreliable for mission-critical tasks. scheduleTask will never run as frequently as you want.
  • The default fetch event is much more reliable and fires far more often.
  • scheduleTask on iOS stop when the user terminates the app. There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
// Step 1:  Configure BackgroundFetch as usual.
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  // This is the fetch-event callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);

  // Use a switch statement to route task-handling.
  switch (taskId) {
    case 'com.foo.customtask':
      print("Received custom task");
      break;
    default:
      print("Default fetch task");
  }
  // Finish, providing received taskId.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});

// Step 2:  Schedule a custom "oneshot" task "com.foo.customtask" to execute 5000ms from now.
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: "com.foo.customtask",
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  delay: 5000  // <-- milliseconds
});

API Documentation

Config

Common Options

@param {Integer} minimumFetchInterval [15]

The minimum interval in minutes to execute background fetch events. Defaults to 15 minutes. Note: Background-fetch events will never occur at a frequency higher than every 15 minutes. Apple uses a secret algorithm to adjust the frequency of fetch events, presumably based upon usage patterns of the app. Fetch events can occur less often than your configured minimumFetchInterval.

@param {Integer} delay (milliseconds)

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. The minimum number of milliseconds in future that task should execute.

@param {Boolean} periodic [false]

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. Defaults to false. Set true to execute the task repeatedly. When false, the task will execute just once.

Android Options

@config {Boolean} stopOnTerminate [true]

Set false to continue background-fetch events after user terminates the app. Default to true.

@config {Boolean} startOnBoot [false]

Set true to initiate background-fetch events when the device is rebooted. Defaults to false.

NOTE: startOnBoot requires stopOnTerminate: false.

@config {Boolean} forceAlarmManager [false]

By default, the plugin will use Android's JobScheduler when possible. The JobScheduler API prioritizes for battery-life, throttling task-execution based upon device usage and battery level.

Configuring forceAlarmManager: true will bypass JobScheduler to use Android's older AlarmManager API, resulting in more accurate task-execution at the cost of higher battery usage.

let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15,
  forceAlarmManager: true
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
.
.
.
// And with with #scheduleTask
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: 'com.foo.customtask',
  delay: 5000,       // milliseconds
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  periodic: false
});

@config {Boolean} enableHeadless [false]

Set true to enable React Native's Headless JS mechanism, for handling fetch events after app termination.

  • 📂 index.js (MUST BE IN index.js):
import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

let MyHeadlessTask = async (event) => {
  // Get task id from event {}:
  let taskId = event.taskId;
  let isTimeout = event.timeout;  // <-- true when your background-time has expired.
  if (isTimeout) {
    // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately finish(taskId)
    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] Headless TIMEOUT:', taskId);
    BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    return;
  }
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] start: ', taskId);

  // Perform an example HTTP request.
  // Important:  await asychronous tasks when using HeadlessJS.
  let response = await fetch('https://reactnative.dev/movies.json');
  let responseJson = await response.json();
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] response: ', responseJson);

  // Required:  Signal to native code that your task is complete.
  // If you don't do this, your app could be terminated and/or assigned
  // battery-blame for consuming too much time in background.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}

// Register your BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask
BackgroundFetch.registerHeadlessTask(MyHeadlessTask);

@config {integer} requiredNetworkType [BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE]

Set basic description of the kind of network your job requires.

If your job doesn't need a network connection, you don't need to use this option as the default value is BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE.

NetworkTypeDescription
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONEThis job doesn't care about network constraints, either any or none.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_ANYThis job requires network connectivity.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_CELLULARThis job requires network connectivity that is a cellular network.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_UNMETEREDThis job requires network connectivity that is unmetered. Most WiFi networks are unmetered, as in "you can upload as much as you like".
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NOT_ROAMINGThis job requires network connectivity that is not roaming (being outside the country of origin)

@config {Boolean} requiresBatteryNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's battery level must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the battery level is not low, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low battery" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresStorageNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's available storage must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the device is not in a low storage state, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low storage" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresCharging [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device must be charging (or be a non-battery-powered device connected to permanent power, such as Android TV devices). This defaults to false.

@config {Boolean} requiresDeviceIdle [false]

When set true, ensure that this job will not run if the device is in active use.

The default state is false: that is, the for the job to be runnable even when someone is interacting with the device.

This state is a loose definition provided by the system. In general, it means that the device is not currently being used interactively, and has not been in use for some time. As such, it is a good time to perform resource heavy jobs. Bear in mind that battery usage will still be attributed to your application, and shown to the user in battery stats.


Methods

Method NameArgumentsReturnsNotes
configure{FetchConfig}, callbackFn, timeoutFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Configures the plugin's callbackFn and timeoutFn. This callback will fire each time a background-fetch event occurs in addition to events from #scheduleTask. The timeoutFn will be called when the OS reports your task is nearing the end of its allowed background-time.
scheduleTask{TaskConfig}Promise<boolean>Executes a custom task. The task will be executed in the same Callback function provided to #configure.
statuscallbackFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Your callback will be executed with the current status (Integer) 0: Restricted, 1: Denied, 2: Available. These constants are defined as BackgroundFetch.STATUS_RESTRICTED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_DENIED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_AVAILABLE (NOTE: Android will always return STATUS_AVAILABLE)
finishString taskIdVoidYou MUST call this method in your callbackFn provided to #configure in order to signal to the OS that your task is complete. iOS provides only 30s of background-time for a fetch-event -- if you exceed this 30s, iOS will kill your app.
startnonePromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Start the background-fetch API. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will be executed each time a background-fetch event occurs. NOTE the #configure method automatically calls #start. You do not have to call this method after you #configure the plugin
stop[taskId:String]Promise<boolean>Stop the background-fetch API and all #scheduleTask from firing events. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will no longer be executed. If you provide an optional taskId, only that #scheduleTask will be stopped.

Debugging

iOS

🆕 BGTaskScheduler API for iOS 13+

  • ⚠️ At the time of writing, the new task simulator does not yet work in Simulator; Only real devices.
  • See Apple docs Starting and Terminating Tasks During Development
  • After running your app in XCode, Click the [||] button to initiate a Breakpoint.
  • In the console (lldb), paste the following command (Note: use cursor up/down keys to cycle through previously run commands):
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateLaunchForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]
  • Click the [ > ] button to continue. The task will execute and the Callback function provided to BackgroundFetch.configure will receive the event.

Simulating task-timeout events

  • Only the new BGTaskScheduler api supports simulated task-timeout events. To simulate a task-timeout, your fetchCallback must not call BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId):
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback.
  // This is the task callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId", taskId);
  //BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId); // <-- Disable .finish(taskId) when simulating an iOS task timeout
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  print("[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT taskId:", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
  • Now simulate an iOS task timeout as follows, in the same manner as simulating an event above:
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateExpirationForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]

Old BackgroundFetch API

  • Simulate background fetch events in XCode using Debug->Simulate Background Fetch
  • iOS can take some hours or even days to start a consistently scheduling background-fetch events since iOS schedules fetch events based upon the user's patterns of activity. If Simulate Background Fetch works, your can be sure that everything is working fine. You just need to wait.

Android

  • Observe plugin logs in $ adb logcat:
$ adb logcat *:S ReactNative:V ReactNativeJS:V TSBackgroundFetch:V
  • Simulate a background-fetch event on a device (insert <your.application.id>) (only works for sdk 21+:
$ adb shell cmd jobscheduler run -f <your.application.id> 999
  • For devices with sdk <21, simulate a "Headless JS" event with (insert <your.application.id>)
$ adb shell am broadcast -a <your.application.id>.event.BACKGROUND_FETCH

Download Details:
Author: transistorsoft
Source Code: https://github.com/transistorsoft/react-native-background-fetch
License: MIT license

#react  #reactnative  #mobileapp  #javascript 

Rodney Vg

Rodney Vg

1596252840

Vue UI components with configurable classes ready for TailwindCSS

Vue-Tailwind

For more info check the official site: https://vue-tailwind.com/

VueTailwind is a set of Vue components created to be customized to adapt to the unique design of your application.

Built to be customized

When you work on a real-world application, you usually need different variants for every component your app uses; you may need (besides of default style of your text input) a specific style for a search input inside a navbar and another one for the contact form, and we are not talking yet about the different states that your input could have.

All VueTailwind components were designed to be customized with custom CSS classes and unlimited variants defined when you import the library or when you use the component.

This means that when you use this library, you are not attached to any style defined by us like it happens when you use a typical library of components like Bootstrap. Instead, you can determine your theme based on your application’s needs.

This library makes special sense when you work with utility-first frameworks like TailwindCss, which is the default framework used in this library.

Installation

1. Install the dependencies

npm install vue-tailwind --save

Or:

yarn add vue-tailwind

2. Configure your project to use vue-tailwind

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'

const theme = {
  //...
}

Vue.use(VueTailwind, theme)
Apply your own theme:

Let’s say, for example, that for the specific needs of your project the text inputs should have a blue two width border, the buttons should have rounded borders and you need a secondary button that should be purple.

Considering those needs define objects with the desired classes for every component, a good approach is to create a file where you define the template:

const TInput = {
  classes: 'border-2 block w-full rounded text-gray-800',
  // Optional variants
  variants: {
    // ...
  },
  // Optional fixedClasses
  // fixedClasses: '',
}

const TButton = {
  classes: 'rounded-lg border block inline-flex items-center justify-center',
  variants: {
    secondary: 'rounded-lg border block inline-flex items-center justify-center bg-purple-500 border-purple-500 hover:bg-purple-600 hover:border-purple-600',
  },
  // Optional fixedClasses
  // fixedClasses: 'transform ease-in-out duration-100',
}

const MyOwnTheme = {
  TInput,
  TButton,
}

export default MyOwnTheme

Then you can import your theme and add it as a parameter when you install VueTailwind:

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'
import MyOwnTheme from './myOwnTheme.js'

Vue.use(VueTailwind, MyOwnTheme)

Or just define the settings directly:

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'

const TInput = {
  classes: 'border-2 border-blue-500 block w-full rounded',
}
// Or create a separate file like `src/themes/default/TInput.js` and import it
// import TInput from './myOwnTInput'
Vue.use(VueTailwind, {
  TInput
})

// Or why not? define the settings inline:
Vue.use(VueTailwind, {
  TInput: {
    classes: 'border-2 border-blue-500 block w-full rounded',
  }
})

Quick start

Here is a small example of how the classes and variants are defined when you import this library:

import Vue from 'vue'
import VueTailwind from 'vue-tailwind'

const theme = {
  TInput: {
    classes: 'form-input border-2 text-gray-700',
    variants: {
      error: 'form-input border-2 border-red-300 bg-red-100',
      // ... Infinite variants
    }
  },
  TAlert: {
    classes: {
      wrapper: 'rounded bg-blue-100 p-4 flex text-sm border-l-4 border-blue-500',
      body: 'flex-grow text-blue-700',
      close: 'text-blue-700 hover:text-blue-500 hover:bg-blue-200 ml-4 rounded',
      closeIcon: 'h-5 w-5 fill-current'
    },
    variants: {
      danger: {
        wrapper: 'rounded bg-red-100 p-4 flex text-sm border-l-4 border-red-500',
        body: 'flex-grow text-red-700',
        close: 'text-red-700 hover:text-red-500 hover:bg-red-200 ml-4 rounded'
      },
      // ... Infinite variants
    }
  },
  // ... The rest of the components
}

Vue.use(VueTailwind, theme)

The default classes and variants can also be defined in the component props:

<t-input
  :classes="form-input border-2 text-gray-700"
  :variants="{
    error: 'form-input border-2 border-red-300 bg-red-100',
    success: 'form-input border-2 border-green-300 bg-green-100'
  }"
/>

To apply an specific variant you just need to use the variant prop:

<t-input variant="error" />

The variant prop also accepts an object that takes the first attribute with a truthy value

<t-input
  :variant="{
    error: inputIsNotValid,
    success: inputIsValid,
  }"
/>

Whats new in version 1.x

  • Rebuilt from scratch in Typescript
  • Small bundle size and less dependencies
  • A better way to import only selected components
  • Unlimited variants and a easy way to configure them

Whats next?

  • Im working in a datepicker that is the most requested component, after that im planning to create a swal like dialog component.
  • Already started to work in a react version of this package called react-tailwind.
  • Im making some final changes to the Community themes features that should be released soon.

Contribute

Is this project helpful for you? Consider sponsoring me https://github.com/sponsors/alfonsobries.

Of course, any other kind help is welcome, even if you notice some grammar mistakes (English is not my primary language) see contribute page for details.

Changelog

Please see CHANGELOG for more information what has changed recently.

Security

If you discover any security related issues, please email alfonso@vexilo.com instead of using the issue tracker.

Credits

Download Details:

Author: alfonsobries

Live Demo: https://www.vue-tailwind.com/

GitHub: https://github.com/alfonsobries/vue-tailwind

#vuejs #vue #javascript #vue-js

UX designer ? UI designer ? UI Developer ?

The UX designer is someone who thinks about what should the user flow be like, which page should lead to which page, when should a confirm popup appear or not appear, should there be a listing page before or after a create-new page, should there be an address field in the page or geolocation is enough to serve the purpose? After brainstorming through each of these and several other questions, the UX designer comes up with something known as wireframes, which in simple terms is just a blueprint of the website/app.
This is image title

To get in-Depth knowledge on UI Design you can enroll for a live demo on UI online training

The UI designer then takes the wireframes and makes them beautiful, also ensuring that the workflow of the product is communicated well to the user. He will add the pixel level details to the wireframes. What should be the font used, what should be the background image, do we need a background image, what should be the foreground color, how big should be the submit button, does it make more sense to have the menu at the bottom of the screen, what should the logo look like? The job of a UI designer is answering all these and thereafter delivering static mockups, using may be Photoshop, Invision and many other design tools.

The UI developer is the one who puts these static mockups in “real code”. They might need skills like HTML CSS , precompilers(like sass or less) , UI frameworks (like bootstrap or foundation), or xml layouts( in case of android UI) or a combined knowledge of all of them with Javascript (in case of react, react native). The result is a beautiful set of screens/pages which can be actually rendered in a browser or a mobile device.Learn more from ui design course

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