Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1617182000

Nx is Modern Angular

In order for the Angular community to thrive, it has to remain up-to-date with the broader JavaScript community. The Angular community has to consider what else is going on, and adopt the best tools and ideas.

Regardless of how good the Angular core is, if developers have to use Karma, Protractor, and TSLint (no one’s first choices at this point), Angular will feel outdated.

As I mentioned in my blog post “Angular is an Onion”the team at Google is well-positioned to design core APIs and capabilities and is at a disadvantage compared to the Angular community when it comes to higher-level API and integrating tools into the CLI.

Angular CLI Dropping Support For Legacy Tools

The Angular team has made the decision to drop Angular CLI support for legacy tools and will no longer be shipping the Angular CLI with TSLint, which has been deprecated in 2019.

I strongly support the Angular team no longer shipping TSLint with Angular CLI. At this point, it’s better to have no linter built-in than to have TSLint. Having a deprecated tool as part of the CLI made Angular look outdated and not well maintained. It also made it harder for the community to provide a good alternative: removing the built-in linter and installing a better one is extra work most folks don’t want to do.

It’s a right decision.

I think the Angular team should go further and remove or replace Protractor and perhaps Karma as well.

#nx #angular #web-development #programming #developer

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Nx is Modern Angular
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1598940617

Install Angular - Angular Environment Setup Process

Angular is a TypeScript based framework that works in synchronization with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. To work with angular, domain knowledge of these 3 is required.

  1. Installing Node.js and npm
  2. Installing Angular CLI
  3. Creating workspace
  4. Deploying your First App

In this article, you will get to know about the Angular Environment setup process. After reading this article, you will be able to install, setup, create, and launch your own application in Angular. So let’s start!!!

Angular environment setup

Install Angular in Easy Steps

For Installing Angular on your Machine, there are 2 prerequisites:

  • Node.js
  • npm Package Manager
Node.js

First you need to have Node.js installed as Angular require current, active LTS or maintenance LTS version of Node.js

Download and Install Node.js version suitable for your machine’s operating system.

Npm Package Manager

Angular, Angular CLI and Angular applications are dependent on npm packages. By installing Node.js, you have automatically installed the npm Package manager which will be the base for installing angular in your system. To check the presence of npm client and Angular version check of npm client, run this command:

  1. npm -v

Installing Angular CLI

  • Open Terminal/Command Prompt
  • To install Angular CLI, run the below command:
  1. npm install -g @angular/cli

installing angular CLI

· After executing the command, Angular CLI will get installed within some time. You can check it using the following command

  1. ng --version

Workspace Creation

Now as your Angular CLI is installed, you need to create a workspace to work upon your application. Methods for it are:

  • Using CLI
  • Using Visual Studio Code
1. Using CLI

To create a workspace:

  • Navigate to the desired directory where you want to create your workspace using cd command in the Terminal/Command prompt
  • Then in the directory write this command on your terminal and provide the name of the app which you want to create. In my case I have mentioned DataFlair:
  1. Ng new YourAppName

create angular workspace

  • After running this command, it will prompt you to select from various options about the CSS and other functionalities.

angular CSS options

  • To leave everything to default, simply press the Enter or the Return key.

angular setup

#angular tutorials #angular cli install #angular environment setup #angular version check #download angular #install angular #install angular cli

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1593061105

Tutorial: Nx-style monorepo workspace with Angular CLI: Part 2

In Part 1 of this tutorial, we set up the booking desktop application project, a project for its end-to-end test suite, and the booking feature shell workspace library.

In this part, we’ll set up our custom generate project tool to automate the steps we did manually in Part 1. We’ll use it to create the shared and booking data acess libraries with NgRx Store, NgRx Effects, NgRx Schematics, and NgRx Store DevTools.

To configure the data access libraries while keeping the flow of dependencies correct, we’ll extract a shared environments library. Data access will be hooked up to the booking feature shell library.

#angular #angular-cli #angular-workspace #monorepo #nx #series-angular-architectural-patterns #ngrx

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1595337024

Tutorial: Nx-style monorepo workspace with Angular CLI: Part 3

In Part 3 of this tutorial, we create the passenger info and flight search feature libraries. We use the generate project tool to create the mobile booking application and its test project. Finally, we create a mobile version of the flight search component template.

This tutorial is part of the Angular Architectural Patterns series.

In Part 2 of this tutorial, we used the generate project tool to generate the booking data access and shared data access workspace libraries with NgRx Store and Effects. We extracted a shared environments library and hooked everything up to the booking feature shell library.

In this part of the tutorial, we’re going to create the passenger info and flight search feature libraries, each with a routed component. After that, we’ll create the mobile booking application project and its end-to-end test project. Finally, we’ll use builder file replacement to create a mobile version of the flight search component template.

THIS AD MAKES CONTENT FREE. HIDE

Passenger info feature library#

Let’s create our first feature library, the passenger info feature which is part of the booking domain.

npm run generate-project -- library feature feature-passenger-info --scope=booking --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines
# or
yarn generate-project library feature feature-passenger-info --scope=booking --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines
<>

Generate passenger info feature library.

After generating the project using the previous commands and parameters, we get this file and folder structure.

libs/booking/feature-passenger-info
├── src
│   ├── lib
│   │   ├── passenger-info
│   │   │   ├── passenger-info.component.css
│   │   │   ├── passenger-info.component.html
│   │   │   ├── passenger-info.component.spec.ts
│   │   │   └── passenger-info.component.ts
│   │   ├── booking-feature-passenger-info.module.spec.ts
│   │   └── booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts
│   ├── index.ts
│   └── test.ts
├── README.md
├── karma.conf.js
├── tsconfig.lib.json
├── tsconfig.spec.json
└── tslint.json
<>

The file and folder structure of the booking passenger info feature library.

This looks a little different from a feature shell library and a data access library.

After the generate project tool has created the workspace library with an entry point Angular module, it runs the commands in the next listing.

The generate project tool also removed the --no-common-module flag from the ng generate module command we saw earlier, since this Angular module will be declaring components.

ng generate component passenger-info --project=booking-feature-passenger-info --module=booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts --display-block
<>

Generate component command run when generating a feature library.

Let’s look at the Angular module our tool has generated.

// booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';

import {
  PassengerInfoComponent,
} from './passenger-info/passenger-info.component';

@NgModule({
  declarations: [PassengerInfoComponent],
  imports: [
    CommonModule,
  ],
})
export class BookingFeaturePassengerInfoModule {}
<>

Initial entry point Angular module in the passenger info feature library.

The entry point Angular module shown in the previous listing is a good starting point. We need to set up the feature routing for our component though. This is done in the next listing.

// booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { RouterModule, Routes } from '@angular/router';

import {
  PassengerInfoComponent,
} from './passenger-info/passenger-info.component';

const routes: Routes = [
  {
    path: '',
    pathMatch: 'full',
    component: PassengerInfoComponent,
  },
];

@NgModule({
  declarations: [PassengerInfoComponent],
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forChild(routes),
    CommonModule,
  ],
})
export class BookingFeaturePassengerInfoModule {}
<>

Passenger info feature Angular module with route configuration for its entry point component.

Nice! Now we’ve prepared our feature library to be hooked up to the feature shell library’s routing configuration.

The generated component is what you’d expect. What it’d display in a real booking application is not really important for the purpose of this article.

Let’s hook up this feature to the booking application’s routing by adding a route configuration to the booking feature shell Angular module as seen here.

#angular #angular-cli #angular-workspace #monorepo #nx #series-angular-architectural-patterns

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1595333359

Tutorial: Nx-style monorepo workspace with Angular CLI: Part 5

In the final part of this tutorial, we create the seatmap data access, seat listing feature, shared buttons UI, and shared formatting utilities library. Finally, we compare our approach with the full Nx toolchain.

This tutorial is part of the Angular Architectural Patterns series.

In Part 4 of this tutorial, we used our generate project tool to create the check-in data access library, the check-in feature shell library, the check-in desktop application, and the mobile check-in application. We hooked everything up and reviewed how much was automated by our tool.

In this part of the tutorial, we’re going to create the seatmap data access library with NgRx feature state. We then created the seat listing feature library and hooked it up to all applications with routing. Finally, we created the shared buttons UI library and the shared formatting utilities library which we used in the seat listing component.

THIS AD MAKES CONTENT FREE. HIDE

Seatmap data access library#

The shared seatmap feature has its own data access library. This is where we would add data services and application state management specific to the seatmap domain.

npm run generate-project -- library data-access --scope=seatmap --grouping-folder=shared/seatmap --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines --with-state
# or
yarn generate-project library data-access --scope=seatmap --grouping-folder=shared/seatmap --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines --with-state
<>

Generate the seatmap data access library.

For now, we’ll put the feature store and effects in place by using the --with-stateparameter of the generate project tool. Note that we use the nested grouping folder shared/seatmap.

// seatmap-data-access.module.ts
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { EffectsModule } from '@ngrx/effects';
import { StoreModule } from '@ngrx/store';

import { SeatmapEffects } from './+state/seatmap.effects';
import * as fromSeatmap from './+state/seatmap.reducer';

@NgModule({
  imports: [
    StoreModule.forFeature(fromSeatmap.seatmapFeatureKey, fromSeatmap.reducer),
    EffectsModule.forFeature([SeatmapEffects]),
  ],
})
export class SeatmapDataAccessModule {}
<>

The seatmap data access module.

The seatmap data access Angular module gives us an overview of what’s configured in the seatmap data access library. This is a good starting point.

ng run seatmap-data-access:lint

ng run seatmap-data-access:test --watch=false
<>

Lint and test the seatmap data access library.

Everything looks ready to go!

Seat listing feature library#

It’s time to add the first feature of the seatmap domain which is used in both the check-in and booking applications.

npm run generate-project -- library feature feature-seat-listing --scope=seatmap --grouping-folder=shared/seatmap --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines
# or
yarn generate-project library feature feature-seat-listing --scope=seatmap --grouping-folder=shared/seatmap --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines
<>

Generate the seatmap seat listing feature library.

Our tool generates an Angular module and a component for us.

To add this feature to our applications, we add a route to each feature shell module.

// check-in-feature-shell.module.ts
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { RouterModule, Routes } from '@angular/router';
import { CheckInDataAccessModule } from '@nrwl-airlines/check-in/data-access';
import { SharedDataAccessModule } from '@nrwl-airlines/shared/data-access';

import { ShellComponent } from './shell/shell.component';

const routes: Routes = [
  {
    path: '',
    component: ShellComponent,
    children: [
      {
        path: '',
        pathMatch: 'full',
        redirectTo: 'seatmap', // 👈
      },
      {
        path: 'seatmap', // 👈
        loadChildren: () =>
          import('@nrwl-airlines/seatmap/feature-seat-listing')
            .then(esModule => esModule.SeatmapFeatureSeatListingModule),
      },
    ],
  },
];

@NgModule({
  declarations: [ShellComponent],
  exports: [RouterModule],
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forRoot(routes),
    SharedDataAccessModule,
    CheckInDataAccessModule,
    CommonModule,
  ],
})
export class CheckInFeatureShellModule {}

#angular #angular-cli #angular-workspace #monorepo #nx #series-angular-architectural-patterns #ngrx

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1593184320

Basics of Angular: Part-1

What is Angular? What it does? How we implement it in a project? So, here are some basics of angular to let you learn more about angular.

Angular is a Typescript-based open-source front-end web application platform. The Angular Team at Google and a community of individuals and corporations lead it. Angular lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your apps’ components clearly. The angular resolves challenges while developing a single page and cross-platform applications. So, here the meaning of the single-page applications in angular is that the index.html file serves the app. And, the index.html file links other files to it.

We build angular applications with basic concepts which are NgModules. It provides a compilation context for components. At the beginning of an angular project, the command-line interface provides a built-in component which is the root component. But, NgModule can add a number of additional components. These can be created through a template or loaded from a router. This is what a compilation context about.

What is a Component in Angular?

Components are key features in Angular. It controls a patch of the screen called a view. A couple of components that we create on our own helps to build a whole application. In the end, the root component or the app component holds our entire application. The component has its business logic that it does to support the view inside the class. The class interacts with the view through an API of properties and methods. All the components added by us in the application are not linked to the index.html. But, they link to the app.component.html through the selectors. A component can be a component and not only a typescript class by adding a decorator @Component. Then, for further access, a class can import it. The decorator contains some metadata like selector, template, and style. Here’s an example of how a component decorator looks like:

@Component({
    selector: 'app-root',
    templateUrl: 'app.component.html',
    styleUrls: ['app.component.scss']
})

Role of App Module

Modules are the package of functionalities of our app. It gives Angular the information about which features does my app has and what feature it uses. It is an empty Typescript class, but we transform it by adding a decorator @NgModule. So, we have four properties that we set up on the object pass to @NgModule. The four properties are declarations, imports, providers, and bootstrap. All the built-in new components add up to the declarations array in @NgModule.

@NgModule({
declarations: [
  AppComponent,
],
imports: [
  BrowserModule,
  HttpClientModule,
  AppRoutingModule,
  FormsModule
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})

What is Data Binding?

Data Binding is the communication between the Typescript code of the component and the template. So, we have different kinds of data binding given below:

  • When there is a requirement to output data from our Typescript code in the HTML template. String interpolation handles this purpose like {{data}} in HTML file. Property Binding is also used for this purpose like [property] = “data”.
  • When we want to trigger any event like clicking a button. Event Binding works while we react to user events like (event) = “expression”.
  • When we can react to user events and output something at the same time. Two-way Binding is used like [(ngModel)] = “data”.

image for understanding data binding

#angular #javascript #tech blogs #user interface (ui) #angular #angular fundamentals #angular tutorial #basics of angular