Wanda  Huel

Wanda Huel

1603177200

‘Plug-and-Play’ Control Brain Computer Interfaces Have Arrived

Physicist Stephen Hawking suffered from a disease that progressively impaired his ability to move. This disease, called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, kills off the specific neuronal cells that help coordinate movement. For decades he depended on caregivers, a computer for communication and his wheelchair.

In the face of these circumstances, he persisted and continued contributing to our knowledge and understanding of physics. Imagine if Hawking, and others like him, had access to technology that allowed for seamless communication with a computer.

Every year, millions of people suffer motor impairments as a result of accidents, strokes, or neurodegenerative disorders. There is a tremendous mental health impact as these people struggle with a lack of independence and difficulty with every-day tasks. Unfortunately, we lack disease-modifying treatments for many of these disorders. There’s an enormous burden on the affected individual as well as their family and caregivers.

Researchers who are interested in neuroprosthetics look towards augmenting these impairments. Even a small incremental improvement could immensely benefit millions of people. By mapping our brain activity, we could connect other technology and control it with our thoughts. These brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are entering the very early stages of development. Early-stage clinical trials aim to augment motor ability and rehabilitation.

It’s no surprise that medical-device companies developing these interfaces, like Neuralink and Cortera Neurotechnology, capture interest from the general public as well as investors.

By 2027, the market size for BCIs is estimated to reach $3.85 billion. Scientists from the Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) demonstrated a plug-and-play interface that allowed a paralyzed (tetraplegic) individual to control a computer cursor on a computer screen. They published their findings in Nature Biotechnology on September 7th, 2020.

To fully appreciate the impact of this technology, let’s look at how we initiate movement.

#medicine #neuroscience #technology #data-science

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Buddha Community

‘Plug-and-Play’ Control Brain Computer Interfaces Have Arrived
Wanda  Huel

Wanda Huel

1603177200

‘Plug-and-Play’ Control Brain Computer Interfaces Have Arrived

Physicist Stephen Hawking suffered from a disease that progressively impaired his ability to move. This disease, called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, kills off the specific neuronal cells that help coordinate movement. For decades he depended on caregivers, a computer for communication and his wheelchair.

In the face of these circumstances, he persisted and continued contributing to our knowledge and understanding of physics. Imagine if Hawking, and others like him, had access to technology that allowed for seamless communication with a computer.

Every year, millions of people suffer motor impairments as a result of accidents, strokes, or neurodegenerative disorders. There is a tremendous mental health impact as these people struggle with a lack of independence and difficulty with every-day tasks. Unfortunately, we lack disease-modifying treatments for many of these disorders. There’s an enormous burden on the affected individual as well as their family and caregivers.

Researchers who are interested in neuroprosthetics look towards augmenting these impairments. Even a small incremental improvement could immensely benefit millions of people. By mapping our brain activity, we could connect other technology and control it with our thoughts. These brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are entering the very early stages of development. Early-stage clinical trials aim to augment motor ability and rehabilitation.

It’s no surprise that medical-device companies developing these interfaces, like Neuralink and Cortera Neurotechnology, capture interest from the general public as well as investors.

By 2027, the market size for BCIs is estimated to reach $3.85 billion. Scientists from the Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) demonstrated a plug-and-play interface that allowed a paralyzed (tetraplegic) individual to control a computer cursor on a computer screen. They published their findings in Nature Biotechnology on September 7th, 2020.

To fully appreciate the impact of this technology, let’s look at how we initiate movement.

#medicine #neuroscience #technology #data-science

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1595344320

Wondering how to upgrade your skills in the pandemic? Here's a simple way you can do it.

Corona Virus Pandemic has brought the world to a standstill.

Countries are on a major lockdown. Schools, colleges, theatres, gym, clubs, and all other public places are shut down, the country’s economy is suffering, human health is on stake, people are losing their jobs and nobody knows how worse it can get.

Since most of the places are on lockdown, and you are working from home or have enough time to nourish your skills, then you should use this time wisely! We always complain that we want some ‘time’ to learn and upgrade our knowledge but don’t get it due to our ‘busy schedules’. So, now is the time to make a ‘list of skills’ and learn and upgrade your skills at home!

And for the technology-loving people like us, Knoldus Techhub has already helped us a lot in doing it in a short span of time!

If you are still not aware of it, don’t worry as Georgia Byng has well said,

“No time is better than the present”

– Georgia Byng, a British children’s writer, illustrator, actress and film producer.

No matter if you are a developer (be it front-end or back-end) or a data scientisttester, or a DevOps person, or, a learner who has a keen interest in technology, Knoldus Techhub has brought it all for you under one common roof.

From technologies like Scala, spark, elastic-search to angular, go, machine learning, it has a total of 20 technologies with some recently added ones i.e. DAML, test automation, snowflake, and ionic.

How to upgrade your skills?

Every technology in Tech-hub has n number of templates. Once you click on any specific technology you’ll be able to see all the templates of that technology. Since these templates are downloadable, you need to provide your email to get the template downloadable link in your mail.

These templates helps you learn the practical implementation of a topic with so much of ease. Using these templates you can learn and kick-start your development in no time.

Apart from your learning, there are some out of the box templates, that can help provide the solution to your business problem that has all the basic dependencies/ implementations already plugged in. Tech hub names these templates as xlr8rs (pronounced as accelerators).

xlr8rs make your development real fast by just adding your core business logic to the template.

If you are looking for a template that’s not available, you can also request a template may be for learning or requesting for a solution to your business problem and tech-hub will connect with you to provide you the solution. Isn’t this helpful 🙂

Confused with which technology to start with?

To keep you updated, the Knoldus tech hub provides you with the information on the most trending technology and the most downloaded templates at present. This you’ll be informed and learn the one that’s most trending.

Since we believe:

“There’s always a scope of improvement“

If you still feel like it isn’t helping you in learning and development, you can provide your feedback in the feedback section in the bottom right corner of the website.

#ai #akka #akka-http #akka-streams #amazon ec2 #angular 6 #angular 9 #angular material #apache flink #apache kafka #apache spark #api testing #artificial intelligence #aws #aws services #big data and fast data #blockchain #css #daml #devops #elasticsearch #flink #functional programming #future #grpc #html #hybrid application development #ionic framework #java #java11 #kubernetes #lagom #microservices #ml # ai and data engineering #mlflow #mlops #mobile development #mongodb #non-blocking #nosql #play #play 2.4.x #play framework #python #react #reactive application #reactive architecture #reactive programming #rust #scala #scalatest #slick #software #spark #spring boot #sql #streaming #tech blogs #testing #user interface (ui) #web #web application #web designing #angular #coronavirus #daml #development #devops #elasticsearch #golang #ionic #java #kafka #knoldus #lagom #learn #machine learning #ml #pandemic #play framework #scala #skills #snowflake #spark streaming #techhub #technology #test automation #time management #upgrade

Meggie  Flatley

Meggie Flatley

1595146380

Brain Computer Interfaces: The essential role of science fiction

The brain is the final frontier of human anatomy. That isn’t to say that we understand all that is happening in every other part of our body. But for the most part I can tell you how the muscles in my arm work and what my stomach does when I eat a burrito. We can build an artificial kidney, a robotic arm, or even grow a new heart, but this is not true of the brain. The brain is an incredibly complex organ. Each of its 100 billion cells connect to thousands of others, creating over 100 trillion connections. This complex web depends on precise timings and electro-chemical processes that we barely understand the basic science behind. It’s no wonder that we haven’t yet grasped it all.

This article covers the history of brain computer interfaces in science fiction and compares it to the science of the time, showing the interactions between the two.

Early Medicine

Naturally, humans have always been fascinated by the brain, at least as since we have understood its importance. Early Egyptians regarded the brain as ‘cranial stuffing’. It was something that could become problematic and cause headaches but not worth any other thought. It is similar to how we think about the appendix now. Instead, the idea at the time was that the heart was responsible for our thoughts and feelings.

It wasn’t until a bit later (162 AD) that the physician and anatomist Galen looked at the soldiers coming in for treatment and thought, “All these people getting hit in the head with swords aren’t thinking straight. Maybe the brain is responsible for our thoughts.” He was, of course, banned from pursuing that line of thinking.

Later in the 1500’s, Vesalius published De Humani Corporis Fabrica (The Fabrics of the Human Body). This book was considered the foundation of modern anatomy. In it he proposed that the brain was responsible for sensation and movement. He proposed that it acted through the network of nerves that stretched from the brain and throughout the human body. This was a monumental milestone in the development of neuroscience.

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Early Machines and Stories About Them

Humans have been thinking about thinking for a long time, but we have been captivated by machines even longer. In fact, the use of tools stretches so far back into human history it technically predates homo sapiens as a species. But what do humans do to the things we love? We personify them. From the beginning of history, we see men making machines in their own image. Throughout history, we see the creation of puppets and complex statues that use mechanics to mimic human movement or sound. We also get fantastical descriptions of mechanical beings, or automatons, that mimic people.

#history-of-technology #science-fiction #future #science #brain-computer-interface

Thurman  Mills

Thurman Mills

1620874140

Cloud Computing Vs Grid Computing

The similarity between cloud computing and grid computing is uncanny. The underlying concepts that make these two inherently different are actually so similar to one and another, which is responsible for creating a lot of confusion. Both cloud and grid computing aims to provide a similar kind of services to a large user base by sharing assets among an enormous pool of clients.

Both of these technologies are obviously network-based and are capable enough to sport multitasking. The availability of multitasking allows the users of either of the two services to use multiple applications at the same time. You are also not limited to the kind of applications that you can use. You are free to choose any number of applications that can accomplish any tasks that you want. Learn more about cloud computing applications.

#cloud computing #cloud computing vs grid computing #grid computing #cloud

Navigating the Complex World of Advanced Brain-Machine Interfaces

In 2018, I wrote extensively about the emerging opportunities and challenges around augmentation technologies in the book Films from the Future — including the advances being promised by Elon Musk’s company Neuralink.

As Neuralink gears up to demonstrate their latest advances in cutting edge brain-machine interface technology, I thought it worth posting a few relevant excerpts from the book here. These are from the chapter that is inspired by the 1995 Anime movie Ghost in the Shell, and focuses on the opportunities and challenges surrounding human augmentation.

Through a Glass Darkly

On June 4, 2016, Elon Musk tweeted: “Creating a neural lace is the thing that really matters for humanity to achieve symbiosis with machines.”

This might just have been a bit of entrepreneurial frippery, inspired by the science fiction writer Iain M. Banks, who wrote extensively about “neural lace” technology in his _Culture _novels. But Musk, it seems, was serious, and in 2017 he launched a new company to develop ultra-high-speed speed brain-machine interfaces.

Musk’s company, Neuralink, set out to disrupt conventional thinking and transform what is possible with human-machine interfaces, starting with a talent-recruitment campaign that boldly stated, “No neuroscience experience is required.” Admittedly, it’s a little scary to think that a bunch of computer engineers and information technology specialists could be developing advanced systems to augment the human brain. But it’s a sign of the interesting times we live in that, as entrepreneurs and technologists become ever more focused on fixing what they see as the limitations of our biological selves, the boundaries between biology, machines, and cyberspace are becoming increasingly blurred.

Plugged In, Hacked Out

In Western culture, we deeply associate our brains with our identity. They are the repository of the memories and the experiences that define us. But they also represent the inscrutable neural circuits that guide and determine our perspectives, our biases, our hopes and dreams, our loves, our beliefs, and our fears. Our brain is where our cognitive abilities reside (“gut” instinct not withstanding); it’s what enables us to form bonds and connections with others, and it’s what determines our capacity to be a functioning and valuable part of society — or so our brains lead us to believe. To many people, these are essential components of the cornucopia of attributes that define them, and to lose them, or have them altered, would be to lose part of themselves.

This is, admittedly, a somewhat skewed perspective. Modern psychology and neurology are increasingly revealing the complexities and subtleties of the human brain and the broader biological systems it’s intimately intertwined with. Yet despite this, for many of us, our internal identity — how we perceive and understand ourselves, and who we believe we are—is so precious that anything that threatens it is perceived as a major risk. This is why neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s can be so distressing, and personality changes resulting from head traumas so disturbing. It’s also why it can be so unsettling when we see people we know undergoing changes in their personality or beliefs. These changes force us to realize that our own identity is malleable, and that we in turn could change. And, as a result, we face the realization that the one thing we often rely on as being a fixed certainty, isn’t.

Over millennia, we’ve learned as a species to cope with the fragility of self-identity. But this fragility doesn’t sit comfortably with us. Rather, it can be extremely distressing, as we recognize that disease, injuries, or persuasive influences can change us. As a society, we succeed most of the time in absorbing this reality, and even in some cases embracing it. But neural enhancements bring with them a brand new set of threats to self-identity, and ones that I’m not sure we’re fully equipped to address yet, including vulnerability to outside manipulation.

#augmentation #elon-musk #brain #neuralink #brain-machine-interfaces