Joel Kelly

Joel Kelly

1603761964

TensorFlow Tutorial - Text Classification - NLP Tutorial

Implement a Sentiment Classification algorithm in TensorFlow and analyze Twitter data! Learn how to use NLP (Natural Language Processing) techniques like a Tokenizer and Word Embeddings to preprocess text data, and then create a RNN model with keras to classify the tweets.

#tensorflow #machine-learning #deep-learning #data-science #developer

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TensorFlow Tutorial - Text Classification - NLP Tutorial

Navigating Between DOM Nodes in JavaScript

In the previous chapters you've learnt how to select individual elements on a web page. But there are many occasions where you need to access a child, parent or ancestor element. See the JavaScript DOM nodes chapter to understand the logical relationships between the nodes in a DOM tree.

DOM node provides several properties and methods that allow you to navigate or traverse through the tree structure of the DOM and make changes very easily. In the following section we will learn how to navigate up, down, and sideways in the DOM tree using JavaScript.

Accessing the Child Nodes

You can use the firstChild and lastChild properties of the DOM node to access the first and last direct child node of a node, respectively. If the node doesn't have any child element, it returns null.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
console.log(main.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: #text

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
console.log(hint.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: SPAN
</script>

Note: The nodeName is a read-only property that returns the name of the current node as a string. For example, it returns the tag name for element node, #text for text node, #comment for comment node, #document for document node, and so on.

If you notice the above example, the nodeName of the first-child node of the main DIV element returns #text instead of H1. Because, whitespace such as spaces, tabs, newlines, etc. are valid characters and they form #text nodes and become a part of the DOM tree. Therefore, since the <div> tag contains a newline before the <h1> tag, so it will create a #text node.

To avoid the issue with firstChild and lastChild returning #text or #comment nodes, you could alternatively use the firstElementChild and lastElementChild properties to return only the first and last element node, respectively. But, it will not work in IE 9 and earlier.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
alert(main.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: H1
main.firstElementChild.style.color = "red";

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
alert(hint.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: SPAN
hint.firstElementChild.style.color = "blue";
</script>

Similarly, you can use the childNodes property to access all child nodes of a given element, where the first child node is assigned index 0. Here's an example:

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.childNodes;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

The childNodes returns all child nodes, including non-element nodes like text and comment nodes. To get a collection of only elements, use children property instead.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.children;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

#javascript 

Noah  Rowe

Noah Rowe

1596681180

Multi Class Text Classification With Deep Learning Using BERT

Most of the researchers submit their research papers to academic conference because its a faster way of making the results available. Finding and selecting a suitable conference has always been challenging especially for young researchers.

However, based on the previous conferences proceeding data, the researchers can increase their chances of paper acceptance and publication. We will try to solve this text classification problem with deep learning using BERT.

Almost all the code were taken from this tutorial, the only difference is the data.

The Data

The dataset contains 2,507 research paper titles, and have been manually classified into 5 categories (i.e. conferences) that can be downloaded from here.

Explore and Preprocess

import torch
	from tqdm.notebook import tqdm

	from transformers import BertTokenizer
	from torch.utils.data import TensorDataset

	from transformers import BertForSequenceClassification

	df = pd.read_csv('data/title_conference.csv')
	df.head()
view raw
conf_explore.py hosted with ❤ by GitHub

conf_explore.py

Image for post

Table 1

df['Conference'].value_counts()

Image for post

Figure 1

You may have noticed that our classes are imbalanced, and we will address this later on.

#machine-learning #nlp #document-classification #nlp-tutorial #text-classification #deep learning

8 Open-Source Tools To Start Your NLP Journey

Teaching machines to understand human context can be a daunting task. With the current evolving landscape, Natural Language Processing (NLP) has turned out to be an extraordinary breakthrough with its advancements in semantic and linguistic knowledge. NLP is vastly leveraged by businesses to build customised chatbots and voice assistants using its optical character and speed recognition techniques along with text simplification.

To address the current requirements of NLP, there are many open-source NLP tools, which are free and flexible enough for developers to customise it according to their needs. Not only these tools will help businesses analyse the required information from the unstructured text but also help in dealing with text analysis problems like classification, word ambiguity, sentiment analysis etc.

Here are eight NLP toolkits, in no particular order, that can help any enthusiast start their journey with Natural language Processing.


Also Read: Deep Learning-Based Text Analysis Tools NLP Enthusiasts Can Use To Parse Text

1| Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK)

About: Natural Language Toolkit aka NLTK is an open-source platform primarily used for Python programming which analyses human language. The platform has been trained on more than 50 corpora and lexical resources, including multilingual WordNet. Along with that, NLTK also includes many text processing libraries which can be used for text classification tokenisation, parsing, and semantic reasoning, to name a few. The platform is vastly used by students, linguists, educators as well as researchers to analyse text and make meaning out of it.


#developers corner #learning nlp #natural language processing #natural language processing tools #nlp #nlp career #nlp tools #open source nlp tools #opensource nlp tools

Mia  Marquardt

Mia Marquardt

1622878440

Custom Text Classification on Android using TensorFlow Lite

A lot of social media platforms have been using AI these days to classify vulgar and offensive posts and automatically take them down. I thought why not try doing something similar; and so, I’ve come up with this end-to-end tutorial that will help you build your own corpus for training a text classification model, and later export and deploy it on an Android app for you to use. All this, absolutely on a custom dataset of your choice.

So, are you excited to build your own text classifier app? If yes, let’s begin the show.

Now, before we begin, let me tell you that we’ll be doing all the model’s hyperparameter configuration and training on Google Colab. To build the Android app, we’ll need to have Android Studio. If you haven’t installed it yet, find it here.

#nlp #machine-learning #android #tensorflow-lite #text-classification

Daron  Moore

Daron Moore

1598404620

Hands-on Guide to Pattern - A Python Tool for Effective Text Processing and Data Mining

Text Processing mainly requires Natural Language Processing( NLP), which is processing the data in a useful way so that the machine can understand the Human Language with the help of an application or product. Using NLP we can derive some information from the textual data such as sentiment, polarity, etc. which are useful in creating text processing based applications.

Python provides different open-source libraries or modules which are built on top of NLTK and helps in text processing using NLP functions. Different libraries have different functionalities that are used on data to gain meaningful results. One such Library is Pattern.

Pattern is an open-source python library and performs different NLP tasks. It is mostly used for text processing due to various functionalities it provides. Other than text processing Pattern is used for Data Mining i.e we can extract data from various sources such as Twitter, Google, etc. using the data mining functions provided by Pattern.

In this article, we will try and cover the following points:

  • NLP Functionalities of Pattern
  • Data Mining Using Pattern

#developers corner #data mining #text analysis #text analytics #text classification #text dataset #text-based algorithm