Archie  Clayton

Archie Clayton

1547866847

Symfony 3 application running on OSX

My Symfony 3.4 application is running super slow on DEV environment - it is taking about 35 seconds when using Docker and 20 seconds when running with Symfony's server.

Profiler shows my controller takes too much time to compile.

Symfony Profiler

What I noticed is Symfony Profiler does not shows performance metrics when I run it using Docker - it does when I run using it's own server.

Any idea where I can look at? I already tried lots of workarounds without zero success.

Thanks

#symfony #docker

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Zak Dyer

1547880994

You probably run Symfony in prod mode on Docker. You need to make sure to run it in the environment dev so the profiler is active. Depending on your setup you need to use web/app_dev.php instead of web/app.php or set the environment variable APP_ENV=dev in case you have a public/index.php.

Veronica  Roob

Veronica Roob

1653475560

A Pure PHP Implementation Of The MessagePack Serialization Format

msgpack.php

A pure PHP implementation of the MessagePack serialization format.

Features

Installation

The recommended way to install the library is through Composer:

composer require rybakit/msgpack

Usage

Packing

To pack values you can either use an instance of a Packer:

$packer = new Packer();
$packed = $packer->pack($value);

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$packed = MessagePack::pack($value);

In the examples above, the method pack automatically packs a value depending on its type. However, not all PHP types can be uniquely translated to MessagePack types. For example, the MessagePack format defines map and array types, which are represented by a single array type in PHP. By default, the packer will pack a PHP array as a MessagePack array if it has sequential numeric keys, starting from 0 and as a MessagePack map otherwise:

$mpArr1 = $packer->pack([1, 2]);               // MP array [1, 2]
$mpArr2 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 1 => 2]);     // MP array [1, 2]
$mpMap1 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {0: 1, 2: 3}
$mpMap2 = $packer->pack([1 => 2, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {1: 2, 2: 3}
$mpMap3 = $packer->pack(['a' => 1, 'b' => 2]); // MP map {a: 1, b: 2}

However, sometimes you need to pack a sequential array as a MessagePack map. To do this, use the packMap method:

$mpMap = $packer->packMap([1, 2]); // {0: 1, 1: 2}

Here is a list of type-specific packing methods:

$packer->packNil();           // MP nil
$packer->packBool(true);      // MP bool
$packer->packInt(42);         // MP int
$packer->packFloat(M_PI);     // MP float (32 or 64)
$packer->packFloat32(M_PI);   // MP float 32
$packer->packFloat64(M_PI);   // MP float 64
$packer->packStr('foo');      // MP str
$packer->packBin("\x80");     // MP bin
$packer->packArray([1, 2]);   // MP array
$packer->packMap(['a' => 1]); // MP map
$packer->packExt(1, "\xaa");  // MP ext

Check the "Custom types" section below on how to pack custom types.

Packing options

The Packer object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the packing process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
FORCE_STRForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack UTF-8 strings
FORCE_BINForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack binary data
DETECT_STR_BINDetects MessagePack str/bin type automatically
  
FORCE_ARRForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack arrays
FORCE_MAPForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack maps
DETECT_ARR_MAPDetects MessagePack array/map type automatically
  
FORCE_FLOAT32Forces PHP floats to be packed as 32-bits MessagePack floats
FORCE_FLOAT64Forces PHP floats to be packed as 64-bits MessagePack floats

The type detection mode (DETECT_STR_BIN/DETECT_ARR_MAP) adds some overhead which can be noticed when you pack large (16- and 32-bit) arrays or strings. However, if you know the value type in advance (for example, you only work with UTF-8 strings or/and associative arrays), you can eliminate this overhead by forcing the packer to use the appropriate type, which will save it from running the auto-detection routine. Another option is to explicitly specify the value type. The library provides 2 auxiliary classes for this, Map and Bin. Check the "Custom types" section below for details.

Examples:

// detect str/bin type and pack PHP 64-bit floats (doubles) to MP 32-bit floats
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::DETECT_STR_BIN | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32);

// these will throw MessagePack\Exception\InvalidOptionException
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_STR | PackOptions::FORCE_BIN);
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32 | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT64);

Unpacking

To unpack data you can either use an instance of a BufferUnpacker:

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();

$unpacker->reset($packed);
$value = $unpacker->unpack();

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$value = MessagePack::unpack($packed);

If the packed data is received in chunks (e.g. when reading from a stream), use the tryUnpack method, which attempts to unpack data and returns an array of unpacked messages (if any) instead of throwing an InsufficientDataException:

while ($chunk = ...) {
    $unpacker->append($chunk);
    if ($messages = $unpacker->tryUnpack()) {
        return $messages;
    }
}

If you want to unpack from a specific position in a buffer, use seek:

$unpacker->seek(42); // set position equal to 42 bytes
$unpacker->seek(-8); // set position to 8 bytes before the end of the buffer

To skip bytes from the current position, use skip:

$unpacker->skip(10); // set position to 10 bytes ahead of the current position

To get the number of remaining (unread) bytes in the buffer:

$unreadBytesCount = $unpacker->getRemainingCount();

To check whether the buffer has unread data:

$hasUnreadBytes = $unpacker->hasRemaining();

If needed, you can remove already read data from the buffer by calling:

$releasedBytesCount = $unpacker->release();

With the read method you can read raw (packed) data:

$packedData = $unpacker->read(2); // read 2 bytes

Besides the above methods BufferUnpacker provides type-specific unpacking methods, namely:

$unpacker->unpackNil();   // PHP null
$unpacker->unpackBool();  // PHP bool
$unpacker->unpackInt();   // PHP int
$unpacker->unpackFloat(); // PHP float
$unpacker->unpackStr();   // PHP UTF-8 string
$unpacker->unpackBin();   // PHP binary string
$unpacker->unpackArray(); // PHP sequential array
$unpacker->unpackMap();   // PHP associative array
$unpacker->unpackExt();   // PHP MessagePack\Type\Ext object

Unpacking options

The BufferUnpacker object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the unpacking process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
BIGINT_AS_STRConverts overflowed integers to strings [1]
BIGINT_AS_GMPConverts overflowed integers to GMP objects [2]
BIGINT_AS_DECConverts overflowed integers to Decimal\Decimal objects [3]

1. The binary MessagePack format has unsigned 64-bit as its largest integer data type, but PHP does not support such integers, which means that an overflow can occur during unpacking.

2. Make sure the GMP extension is enabled.

3. Make sure the Decimal extension is enabled.

Examples:

$packedUint64 = "\xcf"."\xff\xff\xff\xff"."\xff\xff\xff\xff";

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // string(20) "18446744073709551615"

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_GMP);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(GMP) {...}

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_DEC);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(Decimal\Decimal) {...}

Custom types

In addition to the basic types, the library provides functionality to serialize and deserialize arbitrary types. This can be done in several ways, depending on your use case. Let's take a look at them.

Type objects

If you need to serialize an instance of one of your classes into one of the basic MessagePack types, the best way to do this is to implement the CanBePacked interface in the class. A good example of such a class is the Map type class that comes with the library. This type is useful when you want to explicitly specify that a given PHP array should be packed as a MessagePack map without triggering an automatic type detection routine:

$packer = new Packer();

$packedMap = $packer->pack(new Map([1, 2, 3]));
$packedArray = $packer->pack([1, 2, 3]);

More type examples can be found in the src/Type directory.

Type transformers

As with type objects, type transformers are only responsible for serializing values. They should be used when you need to serialize a value that does not implement the CanBePacked interface. Examples of such values could be instances of built-in or third-party classes that you don't own, or non-objects such as resources.

A transformer class must implement the CanPack interface. To use a transformer, it must first be registered in the packer. Here is an example of how to serialize PHP streams into the MessagePack bin format type using one of the supplied transformers, StreamTransformer:

$packer = new Packer(null, [new StreamTransformer()]);

$packedBin = $packer->pack(fopen('/path/to/file', 'r+'));

More type transformer examples can be found in the src/TypeTransformer directory.

Extensions

In contrast to the cases described above, extensions are intended to handle extension types and are responsible for both serialization and deserialization of values (types).

An extension class must implement the Extension interface. To use an extension, it must first be registered in the packer and the unpacker.

The MessagePack specification divides extension types into two groups: predefined and application-specific. Currently, there is only one predefined type in the specification, Timestamp.

Timestamp

The Timestamp extension type is a predefined type. Support for this type in the library is done through the TimestampExtension class. This class is responsible for handling Timestamp objects, which represent the number of seconds and optional adjustment in nanoseconds:

$timestampExtension = new TimestampExtension();

$packer = new Packer();
$packer = $packer->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();
$unpacker = $unpacker->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$packedTimestamp = $packer->pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = $unpacker->reset($packedTimestamp)->unpack();

$seconds = $timestamp->getSeconds();
$nanoseconds = $timestamp->getNanoseconds();

When using the MessagePack class, the Timestamp extension is already registered:

$packedTimestamp = MessagePack::pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = MessagePack::unpack($packedTimestamp);

Application-specific extensions

In addition, the format can be extended with your own types. For example, to make the built-in PHP DateTime objects first-class citizens in your code, you can create a corresponding extension, as shown in the example. Please note, that custom extensions have to be registered with a unique extension ID (an integer from 0 to 127).

More extension examples can be found in the examples/MessagePack directory.

To learn more about how extension types can be useful, check out this article.

Exceptions

If an error occurs during packing/unpacking, a PackingFailedException or an UnpackingFailedException will be thrown, respectively. In addition, an InsufficientDataException can be thrown during unpacking.

An InvalidOptionException will be thrown in case an invalid option (or a combination of mutually exclusive options) is used.

Tests

Run tests as follows:

vendor/bin/phpunit

Also, if you already have Docker installed, you can run the tests in a docker container. First, create a container:

./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

The command above will create a container named msgpack with PHP 8.1 runtime. You may change the default runtime by defining the PHP_IMAGE environment variable:

PHP_IMAGE='php:8.0-cli' ./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

See a list of various images here.

Then run the unit tests:

docker run --rm -v $PWD:/msgpack -w /msgpack msgpack

Fuzzing

To ensure that the unpacking works correctly with malformed/semi-malformed data, you can use a testing technique called Fuzzing. The library ships with a help file (target) for PHP-Fuzzer and can be used as follows:

php-fuzzer fuzz tests/fuzz_buffer_unpacker.php

Performance

To check performance, run:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0030 ........ 0.0139
false ................ 0.0037 ........ 0.0144
true ................. 0.0040 ........ 0.0137
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0052 ........ 0.0120
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0059 ........ 0.0114
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0119
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0126
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0064 ........ 0.0132
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0135
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0078 ........ 0.0200
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0212
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0203
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0111 ........ 0.0271
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0115 ........ 0.0260
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0103 ........ 0.0273
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0116 ........ 0.0326
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0118 ........ 0.0332
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0325
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0140 ........ 0.0277
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0294
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0086 ........ 0.0241
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0089 ........ 0.0225
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0085 ........ 0.0229
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0280
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0121 ........ 0.0270
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0109 ........ 0.0274
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0128 ........ 0.0346
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0339
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0135 ........ 0.0368
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0138 ........ 0.0276
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0132 ........ 0.0286
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0274
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0180 ........ 0.0285
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0284
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0275
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0283
fix string #1 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0133
fix string #2 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0216
fix string #3 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0222
fix string #4 ........ 0.0091 ........ 0.0241
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0122 ........ 0.0301
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0118 ........ 0.0304
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0119 ........ 0.0315
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0150 ........ 0.0388
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1545 ........ 0.1665
32-bit string ........ 0.1570 ........ 0.1756
wide char string #1 .. 0.0091 ........ 0.0236
wide char string #2 .. 0.0122 ........ 0.0313
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0100 ........ 0.0302
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0123 ........ 0.0324
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0327
16-bit binary ........ 0.0168 ........ 0.0372
32-bit binary ........ 0.1588 ........ 0.1754
fix array #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0131
fix array #2 ......... 0.0294 ........ 0.0367
fix array #3 ......... 0.0412 ........ 0.0472
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1378 ........ 0.1596
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.1865 ........ 0.2283
fix map #1 ........... 0.0725 ........ 0.1048
fix map #2 ........... 0.0319 ........ 0.0405
fix map #3 ........... 0.0356 ........ 0.0665
fix map #4 ........... 0.0465 ........ 0.0497
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2540 ........ 0.3028
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2372 ........ 0.2710
fixext 1 ............. 0.0283 ........ 0.0358
fixext 2 ............. 0.0291 ........ 0.0371
fixext 4 ............. 0.0302 ........ 0.0355
fixext 8 ............. 0.0288 ........ 0.0384
fixext 16 ............ 0.0293 ........ 0.0359
8-bit ext ............ 0.0302 ........ 0.0439
16-bit ext ........... 0.0334 ........ 0.0499
32-bit ext ........... 0.1845 ........ 0.1888
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0337 ........ 0.0547
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0335 ........ 0.0560
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0371 ........ 0.0575
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0374 ........ 0.0542
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0356 ........ 0.0533
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0362 ........ 0.0699
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0381 ........ 0.0701
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0367 ........ 0.0687
=============================================
Total                  2.7618          4.0820
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

With JIT:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0005 ........ 0.0054
false ................ 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
true ................. 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0047
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0025 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0023 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0024 ........ 0.0045
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0081
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0079
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0041 ........ 0.0080
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0095
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0091
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0094
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0114
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0122
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0120
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0159
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0157
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0158
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0081
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0095
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0090
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0056 ........ 0.0085
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0107
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0106
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0104
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0162
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0073 ........ 0.0174
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0164
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0161
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0135
fix string #1 ....... -0.0002 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0067
fix string #3 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0077
fix string #4 ........ 0.0033 ........ 0.0078
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0110
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0121
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0124
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0099 ........ 0.0146
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1522 ........ 0.1474
32-bit string ........ 0.1511 ........ 0.1483
wide char string #1 .. 0.0039 ........ 0.0084
wide char string #2 .. 0.0073 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0112
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0077 ........ 0.0129
16-bit binary ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0145
32-bit binary ........ 0.1535 ........ 0.1479
fix array #1 ......... 0.0008 ........ 0.0061
fix array #2 ......... 0.0121 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0193 ........ 0.0222
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0607 ........ 0.0479
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.0749 ........ 0.0824
fix map #1 ........... 0.0329 ........ 0.0431
fix map #2 ........... 0.0161 ........ 0.0189
fix map #3 ........... 0.0205 ........ 0.0262
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0205
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1016 ........ 0.0927
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1096 ........ 0.1030
fixext 1 ............. 0.0157 ........ 0.0161
fixext 2 ............. 0.0175 ........ 0.0183
fixext 4 ............. 0.0156 ........ 0.0185
fixext 8 ............. 0.0163 ........ 0.0184
fixext 16 ............ 0.0164 ........ 0.0182
8-bit ext ............ 0.0158 ........ 0.0207
16-bit ext ........... 0.0203 ........ 0.0219
32-bit ext ........... 0.1614 ........ 0.1539
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0195 ........ 0.0249
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0188 ........ 0.0260
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0281
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0212 ........ 0.0291
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0295
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0222 ........ 0.0358
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0228 ........ 0.0353
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0210 ........ 0.0319
=============================================
Total                  1.6432          1.9674
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

You may change default benchmark settings by defining the following environment variables:

NameDefault
MP_BENCH_TARGETSpure_p,pure_u, see a list of available targets
MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS100_000
MP_BENCH_DURATIONnot set
MP_BENCH_ROUNDS3
MP_BENCH_TESTS-@slow, see a list of available tests

For example:

export MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p
export MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS=1000000
export MP_BENCH_ROUNDS=5
# a comma separated list of test names
export MP_BENCH_TESTS='complex array, complex map'
# or a group name
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='-@slow' // @pecl_comp
# or a regexp
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='/complex (array|map)/'

Another example, benchmarking both the library and the PECL extension:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0031 ........ 0.0141 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0064
false ................ 0.0039 ........ 0.0154 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0053
true ................. 0.0038 ........ 0.0139 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0110 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0029
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0045 ........ 0.0025
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0047 ........ 0.0103 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0046 ........ 0.0102 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0023
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0174 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0031
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0167 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0029
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0168 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0092 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0049 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0227 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0046
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0123 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0051
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0136 ........ 0.0331 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0130 ........ 0.0336 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0329 ...... 0.0051 ........ 0.0048
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0126 ........ 0.0268 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0135 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0046
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0131 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0077 ........ 0.0236 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0087 ........ 0.0244 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0048
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0084 ........ 0.0241 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0112 ........ 0.0271 ...... 0.0048 ........ 0.0045
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0124 ........ 0.0292 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0270 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0050
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0051
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0133 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0049
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0129 ........ 0.0350 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0048
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0145 ........ 0.0254 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0214 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0287 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0050
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0143 ........ 0.0277 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0052
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0141 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0144 ........ 0.0282 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
fix string #1 ........ 0.0036 ........ 0.0143 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0053
fix string #2 ........ 0.0107 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0068
fix string #3 ........ 0.0116 ........ 0.0245 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0069
fix string #4 ........ 0.0105 ........ 0.0253 ...... 0.0083 ........ 0.0077
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0318 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0088
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0121 ........ 0.0295 ...... 0.0076 ........ 0.0086
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0293 ...... 0.0130 ........ 0.0093
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0159 ........ 0.0368 ...... 0.0117 ........ 0.0086
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1547 ........ 0.1686 ...... 0.1516 ........ 0.1373
32-bit string ........ 0.1558 ........ 0.1729 ...... 0.1511 ........ 0.1396
wide char string #1 .. 0.0098 ........ 0.0237 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0065
wide char string #2 .. 0.0128 ........ 0.0291 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0082
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0040 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0120 ........ 0.0058
fix array #2 ......... 0.0279 ........ 0.0390 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0415 ........ 0.0463 ...... 0.0162 ........ 0.0187
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1349 ........ 0.1628 ...... 0.0334 ........ 0.0341
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0345 ........ 0.0391 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0168
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0459 ........ 0.0473 ...... 0.0151 ........ 0.0163
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2518 ........ 0.2962 ...... 0.0400 ........ 0.0490
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2380 ........ 0.2682 ...... 0.0545 ........ 0.0579
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  1.5625          2.3866        0.7735          0.7243
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

With JIT:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0001 ........ 0.0052 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0042
false ................ 0.0007 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0043
true ................. 0.0008 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0021 ........ 0.0043 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0022 ........ 0.0044 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0030 ........ 0.0048 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0032 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0050
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0044
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0082 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0095 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0047
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0088 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0039
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0118 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0097 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0095 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0047
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0053 ........ 0.0083 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0089 ........ 0.0097 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0046
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0093 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0122 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0087 ........ 0.0120 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0121 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0149 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0045
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0160 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0046
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0152 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0045
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0044
fix string #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0045 ...... 0.0071 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0075 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0060
fix string #3 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0086 ...... 0.0068 ........ 0.0060
fix string #4 ........ 0.0050 ........ 0.0088 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0059
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0081 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0062
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0128 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0065
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0126 ...... 0.0115 ........ 0.0065
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0105 ........ 0.0137 ...... 0.0128 ........ 0.0068
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1510 ........ 0.1486 ...... 0.1526 ........ 0.1391
32-bit string ........ 0.1517 ........ 0.1475 ...... 0.1504 ........ 0.1370
wide char string #1 .. 0.0044 ........ 0.0085 ...... 0.0067 ........ 0.0057
wide char string #2 .. 0.0081 ........ 0.0125 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0063
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0014 ........ 0.0059 ...... 0.0132 ........ 0.0055
fix array #2 ......... 0.0146 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0155 ........ 0.0148
fix array #3 ......... 0.0211 ........ 0.0229 ...... 0.0179 ........ 0.0180
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0673 ........ 0.0498 ...... 0.0343 ........ 0.0388
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0148 ........ 0.0180 ...... 0.0156 ........ 0.0179
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0201 ...... 0.0214 ........ 0.0167
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1027 ........ 0.0836 ...... 0.0388 ........ 0.0510
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1104 ........ 0.1010 ...... 0.0556 ........ 0.0602
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  0.9642          1.0909        0.8224          0.7213
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

Note that the msgpack extension (v2.1.2) doesn't support ext, bin and UTF-8 str types.

License

The library is released under the MIT License. See the bundled LICENSE file for details.

Author: rybakit
Source Code: https://github.com/rybakit/msgpack.php
License: MIT License

#php 

A Wrapper for Sembast and SQFlite to Enable Easy

FHIR_DB

This is really just a wrapper around Sembast_SQFLite - so all of the heavy lifting was done by Alex Tekartik. I highly recommend that if you have any questions about working with this package that you take a look at Sembast. He's also just a super nice guy, and even answered a question for me when I was deciding which sembast version to use. As usual, ResoCoder also has a good tutorial.

I have an interest in low-resource settings and thus a specific reason to be able to store data offline. To encourage this use, there are a number of other packages I have created based around the data format FHIR. FHIR® is the registered trademark of HL7 and is used with the permission of HL7. Use of the FHIR trademark does not constitute endorsement of this product by HL7.

Using the Db

So, while not absolutely necessary, I highly recommend that you use some sort of interface class. This adds the benefit of more easily handling errors, plus if you change to a different database in the future, you don't have to change the rest of your app, just the interface.

I've used something like this in my projects:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  Future<Either<DbFailure, Resource>> save(Resource resource) async {
    Resource resultResource;
    try {
      resultResource = await resourceDao.save(resource);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToSave(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultResource);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> returnListOfSingleResourceType(
      String resourceType) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.getAllSortedById(resourceType: resourceType);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }
}

I like this because in case there's an i/o error or something, it won't crash your app. Then, you can call this interface in your app like the following:

final patient = Patient(
    resourceType: 'Patient',
    name: [HumanName(text: 'New Patient Name')],
    birthDate: Date(DateTime.now()),
);

final saveResult = await IFhirDb().save(patient);

This will save your newly created patient to the locally embedded database.

IMPORTANT: this database will expect that all previously created resources have an id. When you save a resource, it will check to see if that resource type has already been stored. (Each resource type is saved in it's own store in the database). It will then check if there is an ID. If there's no ID, it will create a new one for that resource (along with metadata on version number and creation time). It will save it, and return the resource. If it already has an ID, it will copy the the old version of the resource into a _history store. It will then update the metadata of the new resource and save that version into the appropriate store for that resource. If, for instance, we have a previously created patient:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "1",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:41:28.054369Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Patient"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

And we update the last name to 'Provider'. The above version of the patient will be kept in _history, while in the 'Patient' store in the db, we will have the updated version:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "2",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:45:07.316698Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Provider"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

This way we can keep track of all previous version of all resources (which is obviously important in medicine).

For most of the interactions (saving, deleting, etc), they work the way you'd expect. The only difference is search. Because Sembast is NoSQL, we can search on any of the fields in a resource. If in our interface class, we have the following function:

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

You can search for all immunizations of a certain patient:

searchFunction(
        'Immunization', 'patient.reference', 'Patient/$patientId');

This function will search through all entries in the 'Immunization' store. It will look at all 'patient.reference' fields, and return any that match 'Patient/$patientId'.

The last thing I'll mention is that this is a password protected db, using AES-256 encryption (although it can also use Salsa20). Anytime you use the db, you have the option of using a password for encryption/decryption. Remember, if you setup the database using encryption, you will only be able to access it using that same password. When you're ready to change the password, you will need to call the update password function. If we again assume we created a change password method in our interface, it might look something like this:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();
  ...
    Future<Either<DbFailure, Unit>> updatePassword(String oldPassword, String newPassword) async {
    try {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(oldPassword, newPassword);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToUpdatePassword(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(Unit);
  }

You don't have to use a password, and in that case, it will save the db file as plain text. If you want to add a password later, it will encrypt it at that time.

General Store

After using this for a while in an app, I've realized that it needs to be able to store data apart from just FHIR resources, at least on occasion. For this, I've added a second class for all versions of the database called GeneralDao. This is similar to the ResourceDao, but fewer options. So, in order to save something, it would look like this:

await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'});
await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'}, 'key');

The difference between these two options is that the first one will generate a key for the map being stored, while the second will store the map using the key provided. Both will return the key after successfully storing the map.

Other functions available include:

// deletes everything in the general store
await GeneralDao().deleteAllGeneral('password'); 

// delete specific entry
await GeneralDao().delete('password','key'); 

// returns map with that key
await GeneralDao().find('password', 'key'); 

FHIR® is a registered trademark of Health Level Seven International (HL7) and its use does not constitute an endorsement of products by HL7®

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add fhir_db

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  fhir_db: ^0.4.3

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/aes.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/salsa.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/resource_dao.dart'; 

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:fhir/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:test/test.dart';

Future<void> main() async {
  WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();

  final resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  // await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
  await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

  group('Playing with passwords', () {
    test('Playing with Passwords', () async {
      final patient = Patient(id: Id('1'));

      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final search1 = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search1[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', 'newerPw');
      final search2 = await resourceDao.find('newerPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search2[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newerPw', null);
      final search3 = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search3[0]);

      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);
    });
  });

  final id = Id('12345');
  group('Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          null, null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 0);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Password - Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          'newPw', null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources('newPw');

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 0);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
    });
  });
} 

Download Details:

Author: MayJuun

Source Code: https://github.com/MayJuun/fhir/tree/main/fhir_db

#sqflite  #dart  #flutter 

ERIC  MACUS

ERIC MACUS

1647540000

Substrate Knowledge Map For Hackathon Participants

Substrate Knowledge Map for Hackathon Participants

The Substrate Knowledge Map provides information that you—as a Substrate hackathon participant—need to know to develop a non-trivial application for your hackathon submission.

The map covers 6 main sections:

  1. Introduction
  2. Basics
  3. Preliminaries
  4. Runtime Development
  5. Polkadot JS API
  6. Smart Contracts

Each section contains basic information on each topic, with links to additional documentation for you to dig deeper. Within each section, you'll find a mix of quizzes and labs to test your knowledge as your progress through the map. The goal of the labs and quizzes is to help you consolidate what you've learned and put it to practice with some hands-on activities.

Introduction

One question we often get is why learn the Substrate framework when we can write smart contracts to build decentralized applications?

The short answer is that using the Substrate framework and writing smart contracts are two different approaches.

Smart contract development

Traditional smart contract platforms allow users to publish additional logic on top of some core blockchain logic. Since smart contract logic can be published by anyone, including malicious actors and inexperienced developers, there are a number of intentional safeguards and restrictions built around these public smart contract platforms. For example:

Fees: Smart contract developers must ensure that contract users are charged for the computation and storage they impose on the computers running their contract. With fees, block creators are protected from abuse of the network.

Sandboxed: A contract is not able to modify core blockchain storage or storage items of other contracts directly. Its power is limited to only modifying its own state, and the ability to make outside calls to other contracts or runtime functions.

Reversion: Contracts can be prone to undesirable situations that lead to logical errors when wanting to revert or upgrade them. Developers need to learn additional patterns such as splitting their contract's logic and data to ensure seamless upgrades.

These safeguards and restrictions make running smart contracts slower and more costly. However, it's important to consider the different developer audiences for contract development versus Substrate runtime development.

Building decentralized applications with smart contracts allows your community to extend and develop on top of your runtime logic without worrying about proposals, runtime upgrades, and so on. You can also use smart contracts as a testing ground for future runtime changes, but done in an isolated way that protects your network from any errors the changes might introduce.

In summary, smart contract development:

  • Is inherently safer to the network.
  • Provides economic incentives and transaction fee mechanisms that can't be directly controlled by the smart contract author.
  • Provides computational overhead to support graceful logical failures.
  • Has a low barrier to entry for developers and enables a faster pace of community interaction.

Substrate runtime development

Unlike traditional smart contract development, Substrate runtime development offers none of the network protections or safeguards. Instead, as a runtime developer, you have total control over how the blockchain behaves. However, this level of control also means that there is a higher barrier to entry.

Substrate is a framework for building blockchains, which almost makes comparing it to smart contract development like comparing apples and oranges. With the Substrate framework, developers can build smart contracts but that is only a fraction of using Substrate to its full potential.

With Substrate, you have full control over the underlying logic that your network's nodes will run. You also have full access for modifying and controlling each and every storage item across your runtime modules. As you progress through this map, you'll discover concepts and techniques that will help you to unlock the potential of the Substrate framework, giving you the freedom to build the blockchain that best suits the needs of your application.

You'll also discover how you can upgrade the Substrate runtime with a single transaction instead of having to organize a community hard-fork. Upgradeability is one of the primary design features of the Substrate framework.

In summary, runtime development:

  • Provides low level access to your entire blockchain.
  • Removes the overhead of built-in safety for performance.
  • Has a higher barrier of entry for developers.
  • Provides flexibility to customize full-stack application logic.

To learn more about using smart contracts within Substrate, refer to the Smart Contract - Overview page as well as the Polkadot Builders Guide.

Navigating the documentation

If you need any community support, please join the following channels based on the area where you need help:

Alternatively, also look for support on Stackoverflow where questions are tagged with "substrate" or on the Parity Subport repo.

Use the following links to explore the sites and resources available on each:

Substrate Developer Hub has the most comprehensive all-round coverage about Substrate, from a "big picture" explanation of architecture to specific technical concepts. The site also provides tutorials to guide you as your learn the Substrate framework and the API reference documentation. You should check this site first if you want to look up information about Substrate runtime development. The site consists of:

Knowledge Base: Explaining the foundational concepts of building blockchain runtimes using Substrate.

Tutorials: Hand-on tutorials for developers to follow. The first SIX tutorials show the fundamentals in Substrate and are recommended for every Substrate learner to go through.

How-to Guides: These resources are like the O'Reilly cookbook series written in a task-oriented way for readers to get the job done. Some examples of the topics overed include:

  • Setting up proper weight functions for extrinsic calls.
  • Using off-chain workers to fetch HTTP requests.
  • Writing tests for your pallets It can also be read from

API docs: Substrate API reference documentation.

Substrate Node Template provides a light weight, minimal Substrate blockchain node that you can set up as a local development environment.

Substrate Front-end template provides a front-end interface built with React using Polkadot-JS API to connect to any Substrate node. Developers are encouraged to start new Substrate projects based on these templates.

If you face any technical difficulties and need support, feel free to join the Substrate Technical matrix channel and ask your questions there.

Additional resources

Polkadot Wiki documents the specific behavior and mechanisms of the Polkadot network. The Polkadot network allows multiple blockchains to connect and pass messages to each other. On the wiki, you can learn about how Polkadot—built using Substrate—is customized to support inter-blockchain message passing.

Polkadot JS API doc: documents how to use the Polkadot-JS API. This JavaScript-based API allows developers to build custom front-ends for their blockchains and applications. Polkadot JS API provides a way to connect to Substrate-based blockchains to query runtime metadata and send transactions.

Quiz #1

👉 Submit your answers to Quiz #1

Basics

Set up your local development environment

Here you will set up your local machine to install the Rust compiler—ensuring that you have both stable and nightly versions installed. Both stable and nightly versions are required because currently a Substrate runtime is compiled to a native binary using the stable Rust compiler, then compiled to a WebAssembly (WASM) binary, which only the nightly Rust compiler can do.

Also refer to:

Lab #1

👉 Complete Lab #1: Run a Substrate node

Interact with a Substrate network using Polkadot-JS apps

Polkadot JS Apps is the canonical front-end to interact with any Substrate-based chain.

You can configure whichever endpoint you want it to connected to, even to your localhost running node. Refer to the following two diagrams.

  1. Click on the top left side showing your currently connected network:

assets/01-polkadot-app-endpoint.png

  1. Scroll to the bottom of the menu, open DEVELOPMENT, and choose either Local Node or Custom to specify your own endpoint.

assets/02-polkadot-app-select-endpoint.png

Quiz #2

👉 Complete Quiz #2

Lab #2

👉 Complete Lab #2: Using Polkadot-JS Apps

Notes: If you are connecting Apps to a custom chain (or your locally-running node), you may need to specify your chain's custom data types in JSON under Settings > Developer.

Polkadot-JS Apps only receives a series of bytes from the blockchain. It is up to the developer to tell it how to decode and interpret these custom data type. To learn more on this, refer to:

You will also need to create an account. To do so, follow these steps on account generation. You'll learn that you can also use the Polkadot-JS Browser Plugin (a Metamask-like browser extension to manage your Substrate accounts) and it will automatically be imported into Polkadot-JS Apps.

Notes: When you run a Substrate chain in development mode (with the --dev flag), well-known accounts (Alice, Bob, Charlie, etc.) are always created for you.

Lab #3

👉 Complete Lab #3: Create an Account

Preliminaries

You need to know some Rust programming concepts and have a good understanding on how blockchain technology works in order to make the most of developing with Substrate. The following resources will help you brush up in these areas.

Rust

You will need familiarize yourself with Rust to understand how Substrate is built and how to make the most of its capabilities.

If you are new to Rust, or need a brush up on your Rust knowledge, please refer to The Rust Book. You could still continue learning about Substrate without knowing Rust, but we recommend you come back to this section whenever in doubt about what any of the Rust syntax you're looking at means. Here are the parts of the Rust book we recommend you familiarize yourself with:

  • ch 1 - 10: These chapters cover the foundational knowledge of programming in Rust
  • ch 13: On iterators and closures
  • ch 18 - 19: On advanced traits and advanced types. Learn a bit about macros as well. You will not necessarily be writing your own macros, but you'll be using a lot of Substrate and FRAME's built-in macros to write your blockchain runtime.

How blockchains work

Given that you'll be writing a blockchain runtime, you need to know what a blockchain is, and how it works. The **Web3 Blockchain Fundamental MOOC Youtube video series provides a good basis for understanding key blockchain concepts and how blockchains work.

The lectures we recommend you watch are: lectures 1 - 7 and lecture 10. That's 8 lectures, or about 4 hours of video.

Quiz #3

👉 Complete Quiz #3

Substrate runtime development

High level architecture

To know more about the high level architecture of Substrate, please go through the Knowledge Base articles on Getting Started: Overview and Getting Started: Architecture.

In this document, we assume you will develop a Substrate runtime with FRAME (v2). This is what a Substrate node consists of.

assets/03-substrate-architecture.png

Each node has many components that manage things like the transaction queue, communicating over a P2P network, reaching consensus on the state of the blockchain, and the chain's actual runtime logic (aka the blockchain runtime). Each aspect of the node is interesting in its own right, and the runtime is particularly interesting because it contains the business logic (aka "state transition function") that codifies the chain's functionality. The runtime contains a collection of pallets that are configured to work together.

On the node level, Substrate leverages libp2p for the p2p networking layer and puts the transaction pool, consensus mechanism, and underlying data storage (a key-value database) on the node level. These components all work "under the hood", and in this knowledge map we won't cover them in detail except for mentioning their existence.

Quiz #4

👉 Complete Quiz #4

Runtime development topics

In our Developer Hub, we have a thorough coverage on various subjects you need to know to develop with Substrate. So here we just list out the key topics and reference back to Developer Hub. Please go through the following key concepts and the directed resources to know the fundamentals of runtime development.

Key Concept: Runtime, this is where the blockchain state transition function (the blockchain application-specific logic) is defined. It is about composing multiple pallets (can be understood as Rust modules) together in the runtime and hooking them up together.

Runtime Development: Execution, this article describes how a block is produced, and how transactions are selected and executed to reach the next "stage" in the blockchain.

Runtime Develpment: Pallets, this article describes what the basic structure of a Substrate pallet is consists of.

Runtime Development: FRAME, this article gives a high level overview of the system pallets Substrate already implements to help you quickly develop as a runtime engineer. Have a quick skim so you have a basic idea of the different pallets Substrate is made of.

Lab #4

👉 Complete Lab #4: Adding a Pallet into a Runtime

Runtime Development: Storage, this article describes how data is stored on-chain and how you could access them.

Runtime Development: Events & Errors, this page describe how external parties know what has happened in the blockchain, via the emitted events and errors when executing transactions.

Notes: All of the above concepts we leverage on the #[pallet::*] macro to define them in the code. If you are interested to learn more about what other types of pallet macros exist go to the FRAME macro API documentation and this doc on some frequently used Substrate macros.

Lab #5

👉 Complete Lab #5: Building a Proof-of-Existence dApp

Lab #6

👉 Complete Lab #6: Building a Substrate Kitties dApp

Quiz #5

👉 Complete Quiz #5

Polkadot JS API

Polkadot JS API is the javascript API for Substrate. By using it you can build a javascript front end or utility and interact with any Substrate-based blockchain.

The Substrate Front-end Template is an example of using Polkadot JS API in a React front-end.

  • Runtime Development: Metadata, this article describes the API allowing external parties to query what API is open for the chain. Polkadot JS API makes use of a chain's metadata to know what queries and functions are available from a chain to call.

Lab #7

👉 Complete Lab #7: Using Polkadot-JS API

Quiz #6

👉 Complete Quiz #6: Using Polkadot-JS API

Smart contracts

Learn about the difference between smart contract development vs Substrate runtime development, and when to use each here.

In Substrate, you can program smart contracts using ink!.

Quiz #7

👉 Complete Quiz #7: Using ink!

What we do not cover

A lot 😄

On-chain runtime upgrades. We have a tutorial on On-chain (forkless) Runtime Upgrade. This tutorial introduces how to perform and schedule a runtime upgrade as an on-chain transaction.

About transaction weight and fee, and benchmarking your runtime to determine the proper transaction cost.

Off-chain Features

There are certain limits to on-chain logic. For instance, computation cannot be too intensive that it affects the block output time, and computation must be deterministic. This means that computation that relies on external data fetching cannot be done on-chain. In Substrate, developers can run these types of computation off-chain and have the result sent back on-chain via extrinsics.

Tightly- and Loosely-coupled pallets, calling one pallet's functions from another pallet via trait specification.

Blockchain Consensus Mechansim, and a guide on customizing it to proof-of-work here.

Parachains: one key feature of Substrate is the capability of becoming a parachain for relay chains like Polkadot. You can develop your own application-specific logic in your chain and rely on the validator community of the relay chain to secure your network, instead of building another validator community yourself. Learn more with the following resources:

Terms clarification

  • Substrate: the blockchain development framework built for writing highly customized, domain-specific blockchains.
  • Polkadot: Polkadot is the relay chain blockchain, built with Substrate.
  • Kusama: Kusama is Polkadot's canary network, used to launch features before these features are launched on Polkadot. You could view it as a beta-network with real economic value where the state of the blockchain is never reset.
  • Web 3.0: is the decentralized internet ecosystem that, instead of apps being centrally stored in a few servers and managed by a sovereign party, it is an open, trustless, and permissionless network when apps are not controlled by a centralized entity.
  • Web3 Foundation: A foundation setup to support the development of decentralized web software protocols. Learn more about what they do on thier website.

Others


Author: substrate-developer-hub
Source Code: https://github.com/substrate-developer-hub/hackathon-knowledge-map
License: 

#blockchain #substrate 

Let Developers Just Need to Grasp only One Button Component

 From then on, developers only need to master one Button component, which is enough.

Support corners, borders, icons, special effects, loading mode, high-quality Neumorphism style.

Author:Newton(coorchice.cb@alibaba-inc.com)

✨ Features

Rich corner effect

Exquisite border decoration

Gradient effect

Flexible icon support

Intimate Loading mode

Cool interaction Special effects

More sense of space Shadow

High-quality Neumorphism style

🛠 Guide

⚙️ Parameters

🔩 Basic parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
onPressedVoidCallbacktruenullClick callback. If null, FButton will enter an unavailable state
onPressedDownVoidCallbackfalsenullCallback when pressed
onPressedUpVoidCallbackfalsenullCallback when lifted
onPressedCancelVoidCallbackfalsenullCallback when cancel is pressed
heightdoublefalsenullheight
widthdoublefalsenullwidth
styleTextStylefalsenulltext style
disableStyleTextStylefalsenullUnavailable text style
alignmentAlignmentfalsenullalignment
textStringfalsenullbutton text
colorColorfalsenullButton color
disabledColorColorfalsenullColor when FButton is unavailable
paddingEdgeInsetsGeometryfalsenullFButton internal spacing
cornerFCornerfalsenullConfigure corners of Widget
cornerStyleFCornerStylefalseFCornerStyle.roundConfigure the corner style of Widget. round-rounded corners, bevel-beveled
strokeColorColorfalseColors.blackBorder color
strokeWidthdoublefalse0Border width. The border will appear when strokeWidth > 0
gradientGradientfalsenullConfigure gradient colors. Will override the color
activeMaskColorColorColors.transparentThe color of the mask when pressed
surfaceStyleFSurfacefalseFSurface.FlatSurface style. Default [FSurface.Flat]. See [FSurface] for details

💫 Effect parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
clickEffectboolfalsefalseWhether to enable click effects
hoverColorColorfalsenullFButton color when hovering
onHoverValueChangedfalsenullCallback when the mouse enters/exits the component range
highlightColorColorfalsenullThe color of the FButton when touched. effect:true required

🔳 Shadow parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
shadowColorColorfalseColors.greyShadow color
shadowOffsetOffsetfalseOffset.zeroShadow offset
shadowBlurdoublefalse1.0Shadow blur degree, the larger the value, the larger the shadow range

🖼 Icon & Loading parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
imageWidgetfalsenullAn icon can be configured for FButton
imageMargindoublefalse6.0Spacing between icon and text
imageAlignmentImageAlignmentfalseImageAlignment.leftRelative position of icon and text
loadingboolfalsefalseWhether to enter the Loading state
loadingWidgetWidgetfalsenullLoading widget in loading state. Will override the default Loading effect
clickLoadingboolfalsefalseWhether to enter Loading state after clicking FButton
loadingColorColorfalsenullLoading colors
loadingStrokeWidthdoublefalse4.0Loading width
hideTextOnLoadingboolfalsefalseWhether to hide text in the loading state
loadingTextStringfalsenullLoading text
loadingSizedoublefalse12Loading size

🍭 Neumorphism Style

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
isSupportNeumorphismboolfalsefalseWhether to support the Neumorphism style. Open this item [highlightColor] will be invalid
lightOrientationFLightOrientationfalseFLightOrientation.LeftTopValid when [isSupportNeumorphism] is true. The direction of the light source is divided into four directions: upper left, lower left, upper right, and lower right. Used to control the illumination direction of the light source, which will affect the highlight direction and shadow direction
highlightShadowColorColorfalsenullAfter the Neumorphism style is turned on, the bright shadow color

📺 Demo

🔩 Basic Demo

// FButton #1
FButton(
  height: 40,
  alignment: Alignment.center,
  text: "FButton #1",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffffab91),
  onPressed: () {},
)

// FButton #2
FButton(
  padding: const EdgeInsets.fromLTRB(12, 8, 12, 8),
  text: "FButton #2",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffffab91),
  corner: FCorner.all(6.0),
)

// FButton #3
FButton(
  padding: const EdgeInsets.fromLTRB(12, 8, 12, 8),
  text: "FButton #3",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  disableStyle: TextStyle(color: Colors.black38),
  color: Color(0xffF8AD36),

  /// set disable Color
  disabledColor: Colors.grey[300],
  corner: FCorner.all(6.0),
)

By simply configuring text andonPressed, you can construct an available FButton.

If onPressed is not set, FButton will be automatically recognized as not unavailable. At this time, ** FButton ** will have a default unavailable status style.

You can also freely configure the style of FButton when it is not available via the disabledXXX attribute.

🎈 Corner & Stroke

// #1
FButton(
  width: 130,
  text: "FButton #1",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFF7043),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  
  /// 配置边角大小
  ///
  /// set corner size
  corner: FCorner.all(25),
),

// #2
FButton(
  width: 130,
  text: "FButton #2",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFFA726),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(
    leftBottomCorner: 40,
    leftTopCorner: 6,
    rightTopCorner: 40,
    rightBottomCorner: 6,
  ),
),

// #3
FButton(
  width: 130,
  text: "FButton #3",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFFc900),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(leftTopCorner: 10),
  
  /// 设置边角风格
  ///
  /// set corner style
  cornerStyle: FCornerStyle.bevel,
  strokeWidth: 0.5,
  strokeColor: Color(0xffF9A825),
),

// #4
FButton(
  width: 130,
  padding: EdgeInsets.fromLTRB(6, 16, 30, 16),
  text: "FButton #4",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xff00B0FF),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(
      rightTopCorner: 25,
      rightBottomCorner: 25),
  cornerStyle: FCornerStyle.bevel,
  strokeWidth: 0.5,
  strokeColor: Color(0xff000000),
),

You can add rounded corners to FButton via the corner property. You can even control each fillet individually。

By default, the corners of FButton are rounded. By setting cornerStyle: FCornerStyle.bevel, you can get a bevel effect.

FButton supports control borders, provided that strokeWidth> 0 can get the effect 🥳.

🌈 Gradient


FButton(
  width: 100,
  height: 60,
  text: "#1",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFFc900),
  
  /// 配置渐变色
  ///
  /// set gradient
  gradient: LinearGradient(colors: [
    Color(0xff00B0FF),
    Color(0xffFFc900),
  ]),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner.all(8),
)

Through the gradient attribute, you can build FButton with gradient colors. You can freely build many types of gradient colors.

🍭 Icon

FButton(
  width: 88,
  height: 38,
  padding: EdgeInsets.all(0),
  text: "Back",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () {
    toast(context, "Back!");
  },
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(
    leftTopCorner: 25,
    leftBottomCorner: 25,),
  
  /// 配置图标
  /// 
  /// set icon
  image: Icon(
    Icons.arrow_back_ios,
    color: Colors.white,
    size: 12,
  ),

  /// 配置图标与文字的间距
  ///
  /// Configure the spacing between icon and text
  imageMargin: 8,
),

FButton(
  onPressed: () {},
  image: Icon(
    Icons.print,
    color: Colors.grey,
  ),
  imageMargin: 8,

  /// 配置图标与文字相对位置
  ///
  /// Configure the relative position of icons and text
  imageAlignment: ImageAlignment.top,
  text: "Print",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Colors.transparent,
),

The image property can set an image for FButton and you can adjust the position of the image relative to the text, throughimageAlignment.

If the button does not need a background, just set color: Colors.transparent.

🔥 Effect


FButton(
  width: 200,
  text: "Try Me!",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner.all(9),
  
  /// 配置按下时颜色
  ///
  /// set pressed color
  highlightColor: Color(0xffE65100).withOpacity(0.20),
  
  /// 配置 hover 状态时颜色
  ///
  /// set hover color
  hoverColor: Colors.redAccent.withOpacity(0.16),
),

The highlight color of FButton can be configured through the highlightColor property。

hoverColor can configure the color when the mouse moves to the range of FButton, which will be used during Web development.

🔆 Loading

FButton(
  text: "Click top loading",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  ...

  /// 配置 loading 大小
  /// 
  /// set loading size
  loadingSize: 15,

  /// 配置 loading 与文本的间距
  ///
  // Configure the spacing between loading and text
  imageMargin: 6,
  
  /// 配置 loading 的宽
  ///
  /// set loading width
  loadingStrokeWidth: 2,

  /// 是否支持点击自动开始 loading
  /// 
  /// Whether to support automatic loading by clicking
  clickLoading: true,

  /// 配置 loading 的颜色
  ///
  /// set loading color
  loadingColor: Colors.white,

  /// 配置 loading 状态时的文本
  /// 
  /// set loading text
  loadingText: "Loading...",

  /// 配置 loading 与文本的相对位置
  ///
  /// Configure the relative position of loading and text
  imageAlignment: ImageAlignment.top,
),

// #2
FButton(
  width: 170,
  height: 70,
  text: "Click to loading",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () { },
  ...
  imageMargin: 8,
  loadingSize: 15,
  loadingStrokeWidth: 2,
  clickLoading: true,
  loadingColor: Colors.white,
  loadingText: "Loading...",

  /// loading 时隐藏文本
  ///
  /// Hide text when loading
  hideTextOnLoading: true,
)


FButton(
  width: 170,
  height: 70,
  alignment: Alignment.center,
  text: "Click to loading",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xff90caf9),
  ...
  imageMargin: 8,
  clickLoading: true,
  hideTextOnLoading: true,

  /// 配置自定义 loading 样式
  ///
  /// Configure custom loading style
  loadingWidget: CupertinoActivityIndicator(),
),

Through the loading attribute, you can configure Loading effects for ** FButton **.

When FButton is in Loading state, FButton will enter an unavailable state, onPress will no longer be triggered, and unavailable styles will also be applied.

At the same time loadingText will overwritetext if it is not null.

The click start Loading effect can be achieved through the clickLoading attribute.

The position of loading will be affected by theimageAlignment attribute.

When hideTextOnLoading: true, if FButton is inloading state, its text will be hidden.

Through loadingWidget, developers can set completely customized loading styles.

Shadow


FButton(
  width: 200,
  text: "Shadow",
  textColor: Colors.white,
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner.all(28),
  
  /// 配置阴影颜色
  ///
  /// set shadow color
  shadowColor: Colors.black87,

  /// 设置组件高斯与阴影形状卷积的标准偏差。
  /// 
  /// Sets the standard deviation of the component's Gaussian convolution with the shadow shape.
  shadowBlur: _shadowBlur,
),

FButton allows you to configure the color, size, and position of the shadow.

🍭 Neumorphism Style

FButton(

  /// 开启 Neumorphism 支持
  ///
  /// Turn on Neumorphism support
  isSupportNeumorphism: true,

  /// 配置光源方向
  ///
  /// Configure light source direction
  lightOrientation: lightOrientation,

  /// 配置亮部阴影
  ///
  /// Configure highlight shadow
  highlightShadowColor: Colors.white,

  /// 配置暗部阴影
  ///
  /// Configure dark shadows
  shadowColor: mainShadowColor,
  strokeColor: mainBackgroundColor,
  strokeWidth: 3.0,
  width: 190,
  height: 60,
  text: "FWidget",
  style: TextStyle(
      color: mainTextTitleColor, fontSize: neumorphismSize_2_2),
  alignment: Alignment.center,
  color: mainBackgroundColor,
  ...
)

FButton brings an incredible, ultra-high texture Neumorphism style to developers.

Developers only need to configure the isSupportNeumorphism parameter to enable and disable the Neumorphism style.

If you want to adjust the style of Neumorphism, you can make subtle adjustments through several attributes related to Shadow, among which:

shadowColor: configure the shadow of the shadow

highlightShadowColor: configure highlight shadow

FButton also provides lightOrientation parameters, and even allows developers to adjust the care angle, and has obtained different Neumorphism effects.

😃 How to use?

Add dependencies in the project pubspec.yaml file:

🌐 pub dependency

dependencies:
  fbutton: ^<version number>

⚠️ Attention,please go to [pub] (https://pub.dev/packages/fbutton) to get the latest version number of FButton

🖥 git dependencies

dependencies:
  fbutton:
    git:
      url: 'git@github.com:Fliggy-Mobile/fbutton.git'
      ref: '<Branch number or tag number>'

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add fbutton_nullsafety

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  fbutton_nullsafety: ^5.0.0

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:fbutton_nullsafety/fbutton_nullsafety.dart';

Download Details:

Author: Fliggy-Mobile

Source Code: https://github.com/Fliggy-Mobile/fbutton

#button  #flutter 

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1640622240

Automatically Tag A Branch with The Next Semantic Version Tag

Auto-Tag

PyPI PyPI - Implementation PyPI - Python Version codecov PyPI - License

Automatically tag a branch with the next semantic version tag.

This is useful if you want to generate tags every time something is merged. Microservice and GitOps repository are good candidates for this type of action.

TOC

How to install

~ $ pip install auto-tag

To see if it works, you can try

~ $ auto-tag  -h
usage: auto-tag [-h] [-b BRANCH] [-r REPO]
                [-u [UPSTREAM_REMOTE [UPSTREAM_REMOTE ...]]]
                [-l {CRITICAL,FATAL,ERROR,WARN,WARNING,INFO,DEBUG,NOTSET}]
                [--name NAME] [--email EMAIL] [-c CONFIG]
                [--skip-tag-if-one-already-present] [--append-v-to-tag]
                [--tag-search-strategy {biggest-tag-in-repo,biggest-tag-in-branch,latest-tag-in-repo,latest-tag-in-branch}]

.....

How it Works

The flow is as follows:

  • figure our repository based on the argument
  • load detectors from file if specified (-c option), if none specified load default ones (see Detectors)
  • check for the last tag (depending on the search strategy see Search Strategy
  • look at all commits done after that tag on a specific branch (or from the start of the repository if no tag is found)
  • apply the detector (see Detectors) on each commit and save the highest change detected (PATH, MINOR, MAJOR)
  • bump the last tag with the approbate change and apply it using the default git author in the system or a specific one (see Git Author)
  • if an upstream was specified push the tag to that upstream

Examples

Here we can see in commit 2245d5d that it stats with feature( so the latest know tag (0.2.1) was bumped to 0.3.0

~ $ git log --oneline
2245d5d (HEAD -> master) feature(component) commit #4
939322f commit #3
9ef3be6 (tag: 0.2.1) commit #2
0ee81b0 commit #1
~ $ auto-tag
2019-08-31 14:10:24,626: Start tagging <git.Repo "/Users/matei/git/test-auto-tag-branch/.git">
2019-08-31 14:10:24,649: Bumping tag 0.2.1 -> 0.3.0
2019-08-31 14:10:24,658: No push remote was specified
~ $ git log --oneline
2245d5d (HEAD -> master, tag: 0.3.0) feature(component) commit #4
939322f commit #3
9ef3be6 (tag: 0.2.1) commit #2
0ee81b0 commit #1

In this example we can see 2245d5deb5d97d288b7926be62d051b7eed35c98 introducing a feature that will trigger a MINOR change but we can also see 0de444695e3208b74d0b3ed7fd20fd0be4b2992e having a BREAKING_CHANGE that will introduce a MAJOR bump, this is the reason the tag moved from 0.2.1 to 1.0.0

~ $ git log
commit 0de444695e3208b74d0b3ed7fd20fd0be4b2992e (HEAD -> master)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:58:01 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

    BREAKING_CHANGE: this must trigger major version bump

commit 65bf4b17669ea52f84fd1dfa4e4feadbc299a80e
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:57:47 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

commit 2245d5deb5d97d288b7926be62d051b7eed35c98
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:52:10 2019 +0300

    feature(component) commit #4

commit 939322f1efaa1c07b7ed33f2923526f327975cfc
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:24 2019 +0300

    commit #3

commit 9ef3be64c803d7d8d3b80596485eac18e80cb89d (tag: 0.2.1)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:18 2019 +0300

    commit #2

commit 0ee81b0bed209941720ee602f76341bcb115b87d
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:50:25 2019 +0300

    commit #1
~ $ auto-tag
2019-08-31 14:10:24,626: Start tagging <git.Repo "/Users/matei/git/test-auto-tag-branch/.git">
2019-08-31 14:10:24,649: Bumping tag 0.2.1 -> 1.0.0
2019-08-31 14:10:24,658: No push remote was specified
~ $ git log
commit 0de444695e3208b74d0b3ed7fd20fd0be4b2992e (HEAD -> master, tag: 1.0.0)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:58:01 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

    BREAKING_CHANGE: this must trigger major version bump

commit 65bf4b17669ea52f84fd1dfa4e4feadbc299a80e
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:57:47 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

commit 2245d5deb5d97d288b7926be62d051b7eed35c98
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:52:10 2019 +0300

    feature(component) commit #4

commit 939322f1efaa1c07b7ed33f2923526f327975cfc
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:24 2019 +0300

    commit #3

commit 9ef3be64c803d7d8d3b80596485eac18e80cb89d (tag: 0.2.1)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:18 2019 +0300

    commit #2

commit 0ee81b0bed209941720ee602f76341bcb115b87d
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:50:25 2019 +0300

    commit #1

Detectors

If you want to detect what commit enforces a specific tag bump(PATH, MINOR, MAJOR) you can configure detectors. They are configured in a yaml file that looks like this:

detectors:

  check_for_feature_heading:
    type: CommitMessageHeadStartsWithDetector
    produce_type_change: MINOR
    params:
      pattern: 'feature'


  check_for_breaking_change:
    type: CommitMessageContainsDetector
    produce_type_change: MAJOR
    params:
      pattern: 'BREAKING_CHANGE'
      case_sensitive: false

Here is the default configuration for detectors if none is specified. We can see we have two detectors check_for_feature_heading and check_for_breaking_change, with a type, what change they will trigger and specific parameters for each one. This configuration will do the following:

  • if the commit message starts with feature( a MINOR change will BE triggered
  • if the commit has BREAKIN_CHANGE in the message a MAJOR change will be triggered The bump on the tag will be based on the higher priority found.

The type and produce_type_change parameters are required params is specific to every detector.

To pass the file to the process just use the -c CLI parameter.

Currently we support the following triggers:

  • CommitMessageHeadStartsWithDetector
    • Parameters:
      • case_sensitive of type bool, if the comparison is case sensitive
      • strip of type bool, if we strip the spaces from the commit message
      • pattern of type string, what pattern is searched at the start of the commit message
  • CommitMessageContainsDetector
    • case_sensitive of type bool, if the comparison is case sensitive
    • strip of type bool, if we strip the spaces from the commit message
    • pattern of type string, what pattern is searched in the body of the commit message
  • CommitMessageMatchesRegexDetector
    • strip of type bool, if we strip the spaces from the commit message
    • pattern of type string, what regex pattern to match against the commit message

The regex detector is the most powerful one.

Git Author

When creating and tag we need to specify a git author, if a global one is not set (or if we want to make this one with a specific user), we have the option to specify one. The following options will add a temporary config to this repository(local config). After the tag was created it will restore the existing config (if any was present)

  --name NAME           User name used for creating git objects.If not
                        specified the system one will be used.
  --email EMAIL         Email name used for creating git objects.If not
                        specified the system one will be used.

If another user interacts with git while this process is taking place it will use the temporary config, but we assume we are run in a CI pipeline and this is the only process interacting with git.

Search Strategy

If you want to bump a tag first you need to find the last one, we have a few implementations to search for the last tag that can be configured with --tag-search-strategy CLI option.

  • biggest-tag-in-repo consider all tags in the repository as semantic versions and pick the biggest one
  • biggest-tag-in-branch consider all tags on the specified branch as semantic versions and pick the biggest one
  • latest-tag-in-repo compare commit date for each commit that has a tag in the repository and take the latest
  • latest-tag-in-branch compare commit date for each commit that has a tag one the specifid branch and take the latest

Download Details: 
Author: Mateimicu
Source Code: https://github.com/mateimicu/auto-tag 
License: View license

#git #github