React — Shifting From Classes to Hooks

React — Shifting From Classes to Hooks

When coding in React, do you find yourself often wondering “Should I make this component a class component or functional component?” Then, because you’re not sure you need state, you decide with functional components for its efficiency and you don’t want to deal with class lifecycles, yadda yadda.

When coding in React, do you find yourself often wondering “Should I make this component a class component or functional component?” Then, because you’re not sure you need state, you decide with functional components for its efficiency and you don’t want to deal with class lifecycles, yadda yadda. And then much later, this decision comes back to bite you because you suddenly need state in the component. At last, you start questioning your life choices as you begin switching your code to class syntax — extend Componentthis.propsrender(), etc.

Well, you’re in luck! Hooks are your answer.

React 16.8.0 (released February 2019) introduced Hooks — a way to use state and other React features without writing a class¹. This doesn’t mean you have to go back and switch all of your class components to functional components and add Hooks. However, you can gradually start implementing Hooks as you build onto your existing code.

Quick notes —

- Hooks do not work in class components
- Only call Hooks from React function components, not regular         JavaScript functions
- Hooks can be called from custom Hooks
- Only call Hooks at the top level. Don't call Hooks inside loops, conditions, or nested functions.

Classes vs Hooks — State

useState is a Hook that allows you to add state to function components. And you don’t have to worry about binding this!

useState accepts the initial state as an argument and it returns the current state value and a function that lets you update it¹. In a class, this looks like state = {}this.state, and this.setState()².

In this example, clicking the button will add a plate to your stack of plates at this Sushi Bar. Comparing the two code, essentially this.state.plate=platethis.setState = setPlate. Note — setPlate does not merge changes with the initial state, but instead it replaces it.

In line 20, this syntax allows the return values of useState to be assigned to a variable via destructuring.

javascript components react hooks class

Bootstrap 5 Complete Course with Examples

Bootstrap 5 Tutorial - Bootstrap 5 Crash Course for Beginners

Nest.JS Tutorial for Beginners

Hello Vue 3: A First Look at Vue 3 and the Composition API

Building a simple Applications with Vue 3

Deno Crash Course: Explore Deno and Create a full REST API with Deno

How to Build a Real-time Chat App with Deno and WebSockets

Convert HTML to Markdown Online

HTML entity encoder decoder Online

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

Article covers: How native is react native?, React Native vs (Ionic, Cordova), Similarities and difference between React Native and Native App Development.

What are hooks in React JS? - INFO AT ONE

In this article, you will learn what are hooks in React JS? and when to use react hooks? Also, we will see the react hooks example.

Class-less Components in React

3 Steps to Change Class Components Into Functional Ones

The Ugly Side of React Hooks

In this post, I will share my own point of view about React Hooks, and as the title of this post implies, I am not a big fan.

Top 6 Reasons to Use React Hooks Instead of Classes

React hooks have been around for some time now, yet many React developers are not actively using them. I see two primary reasons behind this. The first reason is that many React developers are already involved in a large project, which requires a significant effort to migrate the entire codebase. The other reason is the familiarity with React Classes. With the experience, it feels more comfortable to keep using Classes. In this article, we’ll look into five reasons why you should consider React Hooks. Top 6 Reasons to Use React Hooks Instead of Classes