Automating deployments to on premise servers with Azure DevOps

As someone who has spent most of their (very short) career doing one click cloud resource deployments, I was shocked when I jumped onto a legacy project and realised the complexity of the deployment process to staging and production. Using a traditional .NET Framework application stack, the deployment process consisted of the following steps:

  1. Set the configuration target in Visual Studio to release
  2. Build the project
  3. Copy the .dlls using a USB to a client laptop which was configured for VPN access
  4. Copy the .dlls via RDP to the target server
  5. Go into IIS Manager and point the file path to the new version of the application

As you can see and may have experienced, this is a long, slow and error-prone process which can often take over an hour given likelihood of one of those steps not working correctly. For me it was also a real pain point having to use the client laptop, as it had 3 different passwords to get in, none of which I set or could remember. It also meant if we needed to do a deployment I had to be in the office to physically use the laptop — no working from home that day.

My first step was to automate the build process. If we could get Azure Pipelines to at least build the project, I could download the files and copy them over manually. There are plenty of guides online on how to set this up, but the final result meant it gave me a .zip artifact of all the files required for the project. This also took away a common hotspot for errors, which was building locally on my machine. This also meant regardless of who wrote the code, the build process was always identical.

The second step was to** set up a release pipeline**. Within Azure Pipelines, what we wanted to do was create a deployment group, and then register the server we want to deploy to as a target within that deployment group. This will allow us to deploy directly to an on premise server. So, how do we do this?

Requirements:

  • PowerShell 3.0 or higher. On our Windows Server 2003 box, we needed to upgrade from PowerShell 2.0. This is a simple download, install and restart.
  • .NET Framework x64 4.5 or higher

Steps:

  1. Navigate to Deployment Groups under Pipelines in Azure DevOps:

Image for post

Deployment groups menu item in Azure DevOps > Pipelines

2. Create a new deployment group. The idea is you can have several servers that are in the same group and deploy the code to all of them simultaneously (for example for load balancing reasons). In my case I only have one target in my deployment group, so the idea of a group is a bit redundant.

#azure #azure-pipelines #deployment-pipelines #windows-server #azure-devops #devops

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Automating deployments to on premise servers with Azure DevOps

Automating deployments to on premise servers with Azure DevOps

As someone who has spent most of their (very short) career doing one click cloud resource deployments, I was shocked when I jumped onto a legacy project and realised the complexity of the deployment process to staging and production. Using a traditional .NET Framework application stack, the deployment process consisted of the following steps:

  1. Set the configuration target in Visual Studio to release
  2. Build the project
  3. Copy the .dlls using a USB to a client laptop which was configured for VPN access
  4. Copy the .dlls via RDP to the target server
  5. Go into IIS Manager and point the file path to the new version of the application

As you can see and may have experienced, this is a long, slow and error-prone process which can often take over an hour given likelihood of one of those steps not working correctly. For me it was also a real pain point having to use the client laptop, as it had 3 different passwords to get in, none of which I set or could remember. It also meant if we needed to do a deployment I had to be in the office to physically use the laptop — no working from home that day.

My first step was to automate the build process. If we could get Azure Pipelines to at least build the project, I could download the files and copy them over manually. There are plenty of guides online on how to set this up, but the final result meant it gave me a .zip artifact of all the files required for the project. This also took away a common hotspot for errors, which was building locally on my machine. This also meant regardless of who wrote the code, the build process was always identical.

The second step was to** set up a release pipeline**. Within Azure Pipelines, what we wanted to do was create a deployment group, and then register the server we want to deploy to as a target within that deployment group. This will allow us to deploy directly to an on premise server. So, how do we do this?

Requirements:

  • PowerShell 3.0 or higher. On our Windows Server 2003 box, we needed to upgrade from PowerShell 2.0. This is a simple download, install and restart.
  • .NET Framework x64 4.5 or higher

Steps:

  1. Navigate to Deployment Groups under Pipelines in Azure DevOps:

Image for post

Deployment groups menu item in Azure DevOps > Pipelines

2. Create a new deployment group. The idea is you can have several servers that are in the same group and deploy the code to all of them simultaneously (for example for load balancing reasons). In my case I only have one target in my deployment group, so the idea of a group is a bit redundant.

#azure #azure-pipelines #deployment-pipelines #windows-server #azure-devops #devops

Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1595485380

Updated: Announcing Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1 | Azure DevOps Blog

Update: We received feedback in this blog and the Developer Community about an issue after upgrading from Azure DevOps Server 2019 Update 1.1 to Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1. Today we are re-releasing Azure DevOps Server RC1 to fix this issue.

Previously, after upgrading from Azure DevOps Server 2019 Update 1.1 to Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1 you were not able to view files in the Repos, Pipelines and Wiki of the Web UI. The error message indicated “an unexpected error has occurred within this region of the page. You can try reloading this component or refreshing the entire page.”

We identified a problem with a Feature Flag that comes with a different value when Azure DevOps Server is upgraded from Azure DevOps Server 2019 Update 1.1 to Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1. The Feature Flag was created for Azure DevOps Server 2019 Update 1.1, and defaulted to On for that release. The intent of the Feature Flag was to address the memory issues in servers with low RAM by dropping all debug files. The fix with default to On for the Feature Flag was not ported to Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1 release. In addition, we did not test the upgrade scenario with the default to On for Feature Flag in Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1. We will add this and similar scenarios to our pre-release test coverage to avoid similar issues in the future. The fix is now available in Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1 Patch 1 release.

If you have upgraded to the previous version of Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1, we recommend that you upgrade to this new release. You can use the links provided below to upgrade from Team Foundation Server 2015 or newer, Azure DevOps Server 2019 and Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1. We thank you for trying this release and reporting issue, and we apologize for the impact this may have caused.


We are very excited to announce Azure DevOps Server 2020 RC1. We’ve added a ton of new features which you can read about in our release notes. You’ll find a deeper dive into these great highlights, along with screenshots, samples and technical info to get you started.

Here are a few of the highlights:

This is a go-live release, meaning you can install it on production servers. We expect to have another RC release before our final release.

#azure devops server #devops #azure devops

How to Extend your DevOps Strategy For Success in the Cloud?

DevOps and Cloud computing are joined at the hip, now that fact is well appreciated by the organizations that engaged in SaaS cloud and developed applications in the Cloud. During the COVID crisis period, most of the organizations have started using cloud computing services and implementing a cloud-first strategy to establish their remote operations. Similarly, the extended DevOps strategy will make the development process more agile with automated test cases.

According to the survey in EMEA, IT decision-makers have observed a 129%* improvement in the overall software development process when performing DevOps on the Cloud. This success result was just 81% when practicing only DevOps and 67%* when leveraging Cloud without DevOps. Not only that, but the practice has also made the software predictability better, improve the customer experience as well as speed up software delivery 2.6* times faster.

3 Core Principle to fit DevOps Strategy

If you consider implementing DevOps in concert with the Cloud, then the

below core principle will guide you to utilize the strategy.

  • It is indispensable to follow a continuous process, including all stages from Dev to deploy with the help of auto-provisioning resources of the target platform.
  • The team always keeps an eye on major and minor application changes that can typically appear within a few hours of development to operation. However, the support of unlimited resource provisioning is needed at the stage of deployment.
  • Cloud or hybrid configuration can associate this process, but you must confirm that configuration should support multiple cloud brands like Microsoft, AWS, Google, any public and private cloud models.

Guide to Remold Business with DevOps and Cloud

Companies are now re-inventing themselves to become better at sensing the next big thing their customers need and finding ways with the Cloud based DevOps to get ahead of the competition.

#devops #devops-principles #azure-devops #devops-transformation #good-company #devops-tools #devops-top-story #devops-infrastructure

Ruthie  Bugala

Ruthie Bugala

1620435660

How to set up Azure Data Sync between Azure SQL databases and on-premises SQL Server

In this article, you learn how to set up Azure Data Sync services. In addition, you will also learn how to create and set up a data sync group between Azure SQL database and on-premises SQL Server.

In this article, you will see:

  • Overview of Azure SQL Data Sync feature
  • Discuss key components
  • Comparison between Azure SQL Data sync with the other Azure Data option
  • Setup Azure SQL Data Sync
  • More…

Azure Data Sync

Azure Data Sync —a synchronization service set up on an Azure SQL Database. This service synchronizes the data across multiple SQL databases. You can set up bi-directional data synchronization where data ingest and egest process happens between the SQL databases—It can be between Azure SQL database and on-premises and/or within the cloud Azure SQL database. At this moment, the only limitation is that it will not support Azure SQL Managed Instance.

#azure #sql azure #azure sql #azure data sync #azure sql #sql server

Nella  Brown

Nella Brown

1618684200

January patches for Azure DevOps Server and Team Foundation Server

This month, we are releasing fixes that impact our self-hosted product, Azure DevOps Server, as well as Team Foundation Server 2019.1.1. The following will be fixed with this patch:

  • Test run details do not display test step details for test data migrated using OpsHub Migration
  • Exception on initializer for ‘Microsoft.TeamFoundation.TestManagement.Server.TCMLogger’
  • Unretained builds are immediately deleted after migration to Azure DevOps Server 2020
  • Fix data provider exception

#azure devops server #devops #azure devops