How you can use Vue.js and Chatkit to build a realtime chat app

How you can use Vue.js and Chatkit to build a realtime chat app

Build a customer service chat app Vuejs, In this tutorial, I’ll describe how you can use Vue.js and Chatkit to build a realtime customer service chat app.

Good customer service plays an important role in the growth of any business. In today's world, it is important to offer some sort of live chat interface so that you can offer prompt responses to the customers who want to ask questions about your business.

If you’re looking to get a live chat system up and running for your customers, Chatkit makes it easy to do with just a few lines of code.

Here’s what the finished application will look like:

Vue.js Chat ui Prerequisites

Before you continue with this tutorial, make sure you have Node.js (version 8 or later) and npm installed on your computer. If not, you can find out how to install it for your operating system here. In addition, you need to have prior experience with building Vue.js applications, but no knowledge of Chatkit is assumed.

Sign up for Chatkit

Head over to the Chatkit page and create a free account or sign in to your existing account. By doing so, you’ll be able to create a new instance for your application and manage your credentials.

Once you’re logged in, create a new Chatkit instance for your application, then locate the Credentials tab on your instance’s dashboard and take note of the Instance Locator and Secret Key as we’ll be using later on. vue chat room

Next, click the Console tab and create a new user on your Chatkit instance. This user will be the support staff assigned to each customer when a new chat session is initialized. The user identifier for this user should be support as shown below:

You can also create users programmatically, but creating users from the dashboard inspector is useful for testing purposes.

Set up the application server

Open up the terminal app on your computer, and create a new customer-service directory for this project. Next cd into it, and run npm init -y to initialize the project with a package.json file. Following that, run the command below to install all the dependencies we’ll be making use of for building the application server:

    npm install express dotenv body-parser cors @pusher/chatkit-server --save

Once the dependencies have been installed, create a new .env file in your project root and add in the credentials retrieved from your Chatkit instance dashboard.

    // .env

    PORT=5200
    CHATKIT_INSTANCE_LOCATOR=<your chatkit instance locator>
    CHATKIT_SECRET_KEY=<your chatkit secret key>

Next, set up a new server.js file and paste in the following code into it:

    // server.js

    require('dotenv').config({ path: '.env' });

    const express = require('express');
    const bodyParser = require('body-parser');
    const cors = require('cors');
    const Chatkit = require('@pusher/chatkit-server');

    const app = express();

    const chatkit = new Chatkit.default({
      instanceLocator: process.env.CHATKIT_INSTANCE_LOCATOR,
      key: process.env.CHATKIT_SECRET_KEY,
    });

    app.use(cors());
    app.use(bodyParser.json());
    app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({ extended: true }));

    app.post('/users', (req, res) => {
      const { userId } = req.body;

      chatkit
        .createUser({
          id: userId,
          name: userId,
        })
        .then(() => {
          res.sendStatus(201);
        })
        .catch(err => {
          if (err.error === 'services/chatkit/user_already_exists') {
            console.log(`User already exists: ${userId}`);
            res.sendStatus(200);
          } else {
            res.status(err.status).json(err);
          }
        });
    });

    app.post('/authenticate', (req, res) => {
      const authData = chatkit.authenticate({
        userId: req.query.user_id,
      });
      res.status(authData.status).send(authData.body);
    });

    app.set('port', process.env.PORT || 5200);
    const server = app.listen(app.get('port'), () => {
      console.log(`Express running → PORT ${server.address().port}`);
    });

We have two routes on the server: the /users route takes a userId, and creates a Chatkit user through our chatkit instance while the /authenticate route is meant to authenticate each user that tries to connect to our Chatkit instance and respond with a token (returned by chatkit.authenticate) if the request is valid.

That’s all we need to do on the server side. You can start the server on port 5200 by running node server.js in the terminal.

Bootstrap the Vue.js application

We’ll be making use of Vue CLI to bootstrap the application frontend. Install it globally on your machine, then use it to create a new Vue.js app in the root of your project directory. When prompted, use the default preset (babel, eslint).

    npm install -g @vue/cli
    vue create client

Following that, cd into the client folder, and install the additional dependencies that we’ll be making use of on the frontend of the application including the Chatkit client SDK.

    npm install skeleton-css vue-router vue-spinkit @pusher/chatkit-client axios --save

Once the dependencies have been installed, run npm run serve to start the development server on http://localhost:8080.

Set up routing

Our application frontend will have two views: one for the customer and one for the support staff. To switch between the two views, we’ll be making use of vue-router which we already installed in the previous section.

First, create two new files for each view within the client/src directory:

    touch Customer.vue Support.vue

Next, open up client/src/main.js and change it to look like this:

    // client/src/main.js

    import Vue from 'vue';
    import VueRouter from 'vue-router';
    import Customer from './Customer.vue';
    import Support from './Support.vue';
    import App from './App.vue';

    Vue.config.productionTip = false;
    Vue.use(VueRouter);

    const routes = [
      { path: '/', component: Customer },
      { path: '/support', component: Support },
    ];

    const router = new VueRouter({
      routes,
    });

    new Vue({
      el: '#app',
      router,
      render: h => h(App),
    });

After importing the library, as you can see, we’ve set up the router to load the Customer view on the root route, and the Support view on the /support route. We also need to update App.vue so that each view is rendered there:

    // client/src/App.vue
    <template>
      <div id="app" class="App">
        <!-- component matched by the route will render here -->
        <router-view></router-view>
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    export default {
      name: 'app',
    }
    </script>
Add the application styles

Before we go further, let’s add some styles for our applications. We’re making use of the skeleton-css boilerplate to add some basic styling, and complementing it with our defined styles in client/src/App.css.

Update client/src/main.js to look like this:

    // client/src/main.js

    import Vue from 'vue';
    import VueRouter from 'vue-router';
    import Customer from './Customer.vue';
    import Support from './Support.vue';
    import App from './App.vue';

    // add the lines below
    import 'skeleton-css/css/normalize.css';
    import 'skeleton-css/css/skeleton.css';
    import './App.css';

    // rest of the code

Then create client/src/App.css and update it to look like this:

    // client/src/App.css

    html {
      box-sizing: border-box;
    }

    *, *::before, *::after {
      box-sizing: inherit;
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
    }

    .App {
      text-align: center;
      overflow: hidden;
    }

    svg {
      width: 28px;
      height: 28px;
    }

    input[type="text"]:focus {
      border: 1px solid #300d4f;
    }

    button {
      color: white;
      font-size: 14px;
      border-radius: 2px;
      background-color: #331550;
      border: 1px solid #331550;
      cursor: pointer;
      box-sizing: border-box;
    }

    button:hover {
      color: white;
      background-color: rebeccapurple;
    }

    .chat-widget {
      position: absolute;
      bottom: 40px;
      right: 40px;
      width: 400px;
      border: 1px solid #ccc;
    }

    .chat-header {
      width: 100%;
      height: 60px;
      background-color: #00de72;
      display: flex;
      align-items: center;
      justify-content: center;
    }

    .chat-header h2 {
      font-size: 18px;
      margin-bottom: 0;
    }

    .chat-body {
      height: 350px;
      overflow-y: auto;
      padding: 10px;
    }

    .status-messages {
      text-align: center;
      padding: 5px;
    }

    .message {
      background-color: #f6f6f6;
      clear: both;
      margin-bottom: 15px;
      padding: 10px;
      border-radius: 5px;
      max-width: 80%;
    }

    .message.user {
      float: right;
      background-color: peachpuff;
    }

    .message.support {
      float: left;
      background-color: #ddd;
    }

    .message-form, .message-input {
      width: 100%;
      margin-bottom: 0;
    }

    .message-input {
      border-radius: 0;
      border: none;
      border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
      height: 50px;
      padding: 20px;
      font-size: 16px;
      background-color: #f6f6f6
    }
Set up the customer view

This is where the user will initialize a chat session with a customer service agent. Open up Customer.vue in your editor and update it to look like this:

    // client/src/Customer.vue

    <template>
      <div class="customer-chat">
        <h1>Customer Service</h1>
        <p>
          Customers can interact with support using the chat widget in the
          bottom right corner
        </p>

        <button class="contact-btn">
          Contact Support
        </button>
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    export default {
      name: 'Customer',
      data() {
        return {
          title: 'Customer Support',
          userId: '',
          currentUser: null,
          currentRoom: null,
          newMessage: '',
          messages: [],
          isDialogOpen: false,
          isLoading: false,
        }
      },
    }
    </script>

Once the user hits the CONTACT SUPPORT button, a dialog should appear requesting the name of the user. This name will serve as the userId for connecting to our Chatkit instance.

Create a new Dialog.vue file inside the client/src/components directory and populate it with the following contents:

    // client/src/components/Dialog.vue

    <template>
      <div class="dialog-container">
        <div class="dialog">
          <form class="dialog-form" @submit.prevent="handleSubmit">
            <label class="username-label" for="username">
              What is your name?
            </label>
            <input
              id="username"
              class="username-input"
              autofocus
              type="text"
              name="userId"
              :value="username"
              @input="handleInput"
              />
            <button type="submit" class="submit-btn">
              Submit
            </button>
          </form>
        </div>
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    export default {
      name: 'Dialog',
      props: {
        username: String,
      },
      methods: {
        handleSubmit() {
          this.$emit('submit-username', this.username);
        },
        handleInput(event) {
          const { name, value } = event.target;
          this.$emit('update-input', name, value);
        }
      }
    }
    </script>

    <style scoped>
    .dialog-container {
      position: absolute;
      top: 0;
      right: 0;
      bottom: 0;
      left: 0;
      background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.9);
      display: flex;
      justify-content:center;
      align-items: center;
    }

    .dialog {
      width: 500px;
      background-color: white;
      display: flex;
      align-items:  center;
    }

    .dialog-form {
      width: 100%;
      margin-bottom: 0;
      padding: 20px;
    }

    .dialog-form > * {
      display: block;
    }

    .username-label {
      text-align: left;
      font-size: 16px;
    }

    .username-input {
      width: 100%;
    }

    .submit-btn {
      width: 100%;
    }
    </style>

Next, import this component into Customer.vue as follows:

    // client/src/Customer.vue

    <template>
      <div class="customer-chat">
        <!-- [..] -->

        <!-- Show the dialog when clicked -->
        <button @click="showDialog" class="contact-btn">
          Contact Support
        </button>

        <!-- Loading indicator -->
        <Spinner v-if="isLoading" name="three-bounce" color="#300d4f" />

        <Dialog
          v-if="isDialogOpen"
          :username="userId"
          @update-input="handleInput"
          @submit-username="launchChat"
          />
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    import Dialog from './components/Dialog.vue';
    import Spinner from 'vue-spinkit';

    export default {
      name: 'Customer',
      components: {
        Dialog,
        Spinner,
      },
      data() {
        return {
          title: 'Customer Support',
          userId: '',
          currentUser: null,
          currentRoom: null,
          newMessage: '',
          messages: [],
          isDialogOpen: false,
          isLoading: false,
        }
      },
    }
    </script>

Notice that, we are listening for the update-input and submit-username events on Dialog and binding those events to the handleInput and launchChat methods respectively. We’ve also bound the click event on the CONTACT SUPPORT button to the showDialog method. These methods have not been created yet, so we must do so in a new methods.js file as shown below:

    // client/src/methods.js

    import Chatkit from '@pusher/chatkit-client';
    import axios from 'axios';

    function showDialog() {
      this.isDialogOpen = !this.isDialogOpen;
    }

    function launchChat() {
      this.isDialogOpen = false;
      this.isLoading = true;

      const { userId } = this;

      if (userId === null || userId.trim() === '') {
        alert('Invalid userId');
      } else {
        axios
          .post('http://localhost:5200/users', { userId })
          .then(() => {
            const tokenProvider = new Chatkit.TokenProvider({
              url: 'http://localhost:5200/authenticate',
            });

            const chatManager = new Chatkit.ChatManager({
              instanceLocator: '<your chatkit instance locator>',
              userId,
              tokenProvider,
            });

            return chatManager.connect().then(currentUser => {
              this.currentUser = currentUser;
              this.isLoading = false;
            });
          })
          .catch(console.error);
      }
    }

    function handleInput(name, value) {
      console.log(name, value);
      this[name] = value;
    }

    export {
      handleInput,
      showDialog,
      launchChat
    };

Now we can import and use these methods in our Customer.vue file as follows:

    <template>
     <!-- [..] -->
    </template>

    <script>
    import Dialog from './components/Dialog.vue';
    import { showDialog, launchChat, handleInput } from './methods.js';

    export default {
      name: 'Customer',
      // [..]
      methods: {
        showDialog,
        handleInput,
        launchChat,
      }
    }
    </script>

Be sure to update the <your chatkit instance locator> placeholder within the launchChat() method before proceeding. Now, you should be able to launch the dialog by clicking the contact support button. If you enter a username and hit SUBMIT, we connect to our Chatkit instance and get a currentUser object which represents the current connected user. At this point, we need to show a chat widget so that the user can begin to chat with the customer service agent.

Let’s create a new component for the chat widget and import it into the Customer view. Create a new ChatWidget.vue file within the client/src/components directory and add the following code to it:

    // client/src/components/ChatWidget.vue

    <template>
      <div class="chat-widget">
        <header class="chat-header">
          <h2>Got Questions? Chat with us</h2>
        </header>
        <section class="chat-body">
          <div v-for="message in messages" :key="message.id">
            <span :class="[ message.senderId === currentUser.id ? 'user' :
            'support']" class="message">{{ message.text }}</span>
          </div>
        </section>

        <form @submit.prevent="handleSubmit" class="message-form">
          <input
            class="message-input"
            autofocus
            name="newMessage"
            placeholder="Compose your message and hit ENTER to send"
            :value="newMessage"
            @input="handleInput"
            />
        </form>
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    export default {
      name: 'ChatWidget',
      props: {
        newMessage: String,
        messages: Array,
        currentUser: {
          type: Object,
          required: true,
          default: null,
        },
      },
      methods: {
        handleInput(event) {
          const { name, value } = event.target;
          this.$emit('update-input', name, value);
        },
        handleSubmit() {
          this.$emit('send-message');
        }
      }
    }
    </script>

Next, import it in Customer.vue like this:

    // client/src/Customer.vue

    <template>
      <div class="customer-chat">
        <h1>Customer Service</h1>
        <p>
          Customers can interact with support using the chat widget in the
          bottom right corner
        </p>

        <ChatWidget
          v-if="currentUser"
          :newMessage="newMessage"
          :currentUser="currentUser"
          :messages="messages"
          @send-message="sendMessage"
          @update-input="handleInput"
          />

        <button v-else @click="showDialog" class="contact-btn">
          Contact Support
        </button>

        <Spinner v-if="isLoading" name="three-bounce" color="#300d4f" />

        <Dialog
          v-if="isDialogOpen"
          :username="userId"
          @update-input="handleInput"
          @submit-username="launchChat"
          />
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    import Dialog from './components/Dialog.vue';
    import Spinner from 'vue-spinkit';
    import ChatWidget from './components/ChatWidget.vue'
    import { sendMessage, connectToRoom, createRoom, addSupportStaffToRoom, showDialog, launchChat, handleInput } from './methods.js';

    export default {
      name: 'Customer',
      components: {
        Dialog,
        Spinner,
        ChatWidget,
      },
      data() {
        return {
          title: 'Customer Support',
          userId: '',
          currentUser: null,
          currentRoom: null,
          newMessage: '',
          messages: [],
          isDialogOpen: false,
          isLoading: false,
        }
      },
      methods: {
        sendMessage,
        connectToRoom,
        addSupportStaffToRoom,
        createRoom,
        showDialog,
        handleInput,
        launchChat,
      }
    }
    </script>

Notice that we imported a few new methods from methods.js but these haven't been created yet, so let’s do just that:

    // client/src/methods.js

    // [..]

    function sendMessage() {
      const { newMessage, currentUser, currentRoom } = this;

      if (newMessage.trim() === '') return;

      currentUser.sendMessage({
        text: newMessage,
        roomId: `${currentRoom.id}`,
      });

      this.newMessage = '';
    }

    function connectToRoom(id, messageLimit = 100) {
      this.messages = [];
      const { currentUser } = this;

      return currentUser
        .subscribeToRoom({
          roomId: `${id}`,
          messageLimit,
          hooks: {
            onMessage: message => {
              this.messages = [...this.messages, message];
            },
          },
        })
        .then(currentRoom => {
          this.currentRoom = currentRoom;
        });
    }

    function addSupportStaffToRoom() {
      const { currentRoom, currentUser } = this;

      return currentUser.addUserToRoom({
        userId: 'support',
        roomId: currentRoom.id,
      });
    }

    function createRoom() {
      const { currentUser } = this;

      return currentUser
        .createRoom({
          name: currentUser.name,
          private: true,
        })
        .then(room => this.connectToRoom(room.id, 0))
        .then(() => this.addSupportStaffToRoom());
    }

    // update launchChat
    function launchChat() {
      // [..]

      if (userId === null || userId.trim() === '') {
        alert('Invalid userId');
      } else {
        axios
          .post('http://localhost:5200/users', { userId })
          .then(() => {
            // [..]

            return chatManager.connect().then(currentUser => {
              this.currentUser = currentUser;
              this.isLoading = false;
              // add this line
              return this.createRoom();
            });

          })
          .catch(console.error);
      }
    }

    export {
      sendMessage,
      connectToRoom,
      addSupportStaffToRoom,
      createRoom,
      handleInput,
      showDialog,
      launchChat,
    };

Once the currentUser object is set in the application state, we create a new room for this chat session via the createRoom() method. We’ve opted to make the room private in this instance so that only the user and support staff are able to access it. Once the room is created, we have to connect to it before we can send any messages. This is done via the connectToRoom() method which takes the ID of the room that was created and adds the user to the room.

Chatkit’s room subscription hooks allow us to perform actions when some event occurs in the current room. In this instance, we’ve set up the onMessage hook to append new messages to the messages array so that the new message is displayed in the chat widget.

Finally, we add the support agent to the room via the addSupportStaffToRoom() method which means that the support agent will be able to login to their own interface and see all ongoing conversations instantly.

At this point, you should be able to use the chat widget to send and view messages seamlessly.

Set up the support view

The next phase is to set up the view where the support agent will be able to interact with all customers at once. Open up Support.vue in your code editor and paste the following code into it:

    // client/src/Support.vue

    <template>
      <div class="support-area">
        <aside class="support-sidebar">
          <h3>Users</h3>
          <ul v-for="room in rooms" :key="room.id">
            <li
              class="room"
              :class="[currentRoom && currentRoom.id === room.id ? 'active' : '']"
             @click="connectToRoom(room.id)"
            >
            {{ room.name }}
            </li>
          </ul>
        </aside>
        <section class="support-session">
          <header class="current-chat">
            <h3 v-if="currentRoom">{{ currentRoom.name }}</h3>
            <h3 v-else>Chat</h3>
          </header>
          <div class="chat-session">
            <div v-for="message in messages" :key="message.id">
              <span :class="[ message.senderId === currentUser.id ? 'support' :
              'user']" class="message">{{ message.text }}</span>
            </div>
          </div>
          <form @submit.prevent="sendMessage" class="message-form">
            <input
              class="message-input"
              autofocus
              placeholder="Compose your message and hit ENTER to send"
              v-model="newMessage"
              name="newMessage"
              />
          </form>
        </section>
      </div>
    </template>

    <script>
    import { sendMessage, connectToRoom } from './methods';
    import Chatkit from '@pusher/chatkit-client';
    import axios from 'axios';

    export default {
      name: 'Support',
      data() {
        return {
          newMessage: '',
          currentUser: null,
          currentRoom: null,
          rooms: [],
          messages: [],
        }
      },
      methods: {
        sendMessage,
        connectToRoom,
      },
      mounted() {
        const userId = 'support';

        axios
          .post('http://localhost:5200/users', { userId })
          .then(() => {
            const tokenProvider = new Chatkit.TokenProvider({
              url: 'http://localhost:5200/authenticate',
            });

            const chatManager = new Chatkit.ChatManager({
              instanceLocator: '<your chatkit instance locator>',
              userId,
              tokenProvider,
            });

            return chatManager
              .connect({
                onAddedToRoom: room => {
                  this.rooms = [...this.rooms, room];
                },
              })
              .then(currentUser => {
                this.currentUser = currentUser;
                this.rooms = currentUser.rooms;
                if (this.rooms.length >= 1) {
                  this.connectToRoom(this.rooms[0].id);
                }
              });
          })
          .catch(console.error);
      }
    }
    </script>

    <style>
    .support-area {
      width: 100vw;
      height: 100vh;
      display: flex;
    }

    .support-sidebar {
      width: 20%;
      background-color: #300d4f;
      height: 100%;
    }

    .support-sidebar ul {
      list-style: none;
    }

    .support-sidebar h3 {
      color: white;
      margin-bottom: 0;
      text-align: left;
      padding: 10px 20px;
    }

    .room {
      font-size: 22px;
      color: white;
      cursor: pointer;
      text-align: left;
      padding: 10px 20px;
      margin-bottom: 10px;
    }

    .room:hover {
      color: yellowgreen;
    }

    .room.active {
      background-color: yellowgreen;
      color: white;
    }

    .support-session {
      width: 80%;
      height: 100%;
      display: flex;
      flex-direction: column;
    }

    .current-chat {
      border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc;
      text-align: left;
      padding: 10px 20px;
      display: flex;
    }

    .current-chat h3 {
      margin-bottom: 0;
    }

    .chat-session {
      flex-grow: 1;
      overflow-y: auto;
      padding: 10px;
    }
    </style>

The support agent needs to be able to interact with multiple customers at once, so we have a sidebar where all the connected users are listed, and the main chat area for sending and viewing messages.

We’re immediately connecting to the Chatkit instance on page load (via mounted()) and listing all the connected customers in the sidebar. We can jump between chats by clicking on each room name via connectToRoom() . This method simply connects to the selected room and changes the value of currentRoom so that the screen is updated appropriately.

Thanks to the onAddedToRoom() connection hook, we do not need to refresh the support view to see new chats that have been initiated. Everything is updated in realtime without much effort on your part.

Before testing, make sure to update the <your chatkit instance locator> placeholder within the mounted() method.

Wrap up

In this tutorial, I've shown you how to set up a customer support application using Vue.js and Chatkit. You can checkout other things Chatkit can do by viewing its extensive documentation. Don't forget to grab the full source code used for this tutorial in this GitHub repository.

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What are the differences between the various JavaScript frameworks? E.g. Vue.js, Angular.js, React.js

What are the differences? Do they each have specific use contexts?

What are the differences? Do they each have specific use contexts?

Ember.js vs Vue.js - Which is JavaScript Framework Works Better for You

Ember.js vs Vue.js - Which is JavaScript Framework Works Better for You

In this article we will discuss full details and comparison of both Ember.js and Vue.js

JavaScript was initially created to work for web applications. But today they have become the favorite of mobile app developers. Most of the developers prefer to work with frameworks based on JavaScript. It simplifies coding. You can use JavaScript with almost any framework.

The use of a particular framework will decide how easy and fast it is to create the app. So, you must choose the best one suited for the app that you are planning to build. You must make a wise choice so that you benefit in the end. Among the crowded market, two of the frameworks stand out. We will make a comparison between Ember.js and Vue.js.

Why Do You Select A Particular Framework?

Before we start comparing the two frameworks, we should understand the factors that lead to the choice of a framework. Each developer chooses a framework before he or she goes to work on an app. Let us see the reasons for the selection.

● The codes must be easy to understand and transparent.

● The framework should give the maximum power with the least amount of coding.

● The framework should provide a well laid out structure to work on.

● Does the framework support an in-built router or an external plug-in router?

● The framework should be able to transfer more data on a full page-load so that it becomes a single-page app. A single-page app is more beneficial for the application.

● In single page architectures if there is a need for users to share links to sub-screens within the interface, then the framework should have the capacity to route based on the URL.

● A tighter template option can help in enabling two-way binding.

● The framework should not conflict any third-party library.

● Testing the codes inside the framework should be easy.

● The framework should provide the HTTP client service for AJAX calls

● The documentation is essential. It should be complete and up-to-date.

● The framework should be compatible with the latest version of the browser.

● The framework has to fulfill the above conditions for easy construction of the app. You must ensure that the framework you choose meets the conditions.

Vue.js Explained

Developers are always looking at new frameworks to build their apps. The main requirements are speed and low cost. The framework should be easy to use by even new developers. You should be able to use it at low cost. Other considerations are about simple coding, proper documentation, etc.

Vue.js combines a lot of good when it comes to software language for web app development. The architecture of Vue.js is easy to put in use. The apps developed using Vue.js are easy to integrate with new apps.

Vue.js is a very lightweight framework. It makes it fast to download. It is also much faster than other frameworks. The single-file component nature of the framework is also beneficial. The size has made it very popular.

You can further decrease weight. With Vue.js you can separate the template-to-virtual DOM and compiler. You can only deploy the minified and zipped interpreter which is only 12 KB. You can compile the templates in your machine.

Another significant advantage of Vue.js is that it can integrate easily with existing applications created with JavaScript. It will make it easy for using this framework to make changes to applications already present.

Vue.js also integrates easily with other front-end libraries. You can plug in another library and make up for any deficiency in this framework. This feature makes this tool a versatile one.

Vue.js uses the method of rendering on the streaming-side server. You can render your component and get a readable stream. You can then send this to the HTTP server. It makes the server highly responsive. Your users will get the rendered content very quickly.

Vue.js is very SEO friendly. As the framework supports server-side rendering, the views are rendered directly on the server. The search engines list these.

But the most important thing for you is the ease with which you can learn Vue.js. The structure is elementary. Even new developers will find it easy to use it to build their apps. This framework helps in developing both small and large templates. It helps to save a lot of time.

You can go back and check your errors very easily. You can travel back and inspect all the states apart from testing your components. It is another important feature as far as any developer is concerned.

Vue.js also has very detailed documentation. It helps in writing your applications very quickly. You can build a web page or app with the basic knowledge of HTML or JavaScript.

● Vue.js has pure architecture. It helps in integration with other apps

● Vue.js is lightweight and fast. It can be made lighter by deploying only the interpreter

● You can separate the compiler and the template-to-virtual DOM.

● Due to smooth integration, you can use this to make changes to existing apps

● To make up for any shortfall, you can plug-in any library and makeup.

● As Vue.js uses streaming-side server rendering, your users can get quick responses.

● The server-side rendering also helps in being ranked higher by search engines.

● It has a simple structure. Easy to use for any new developer

● You can go back and check and correct your errors.

● You can check all the existing states.

● Detail documentation also helps build the web page or application very quickly.

Ember.js Decoded

Ember.js is an MVVM model framework. It is open-source software. This platform is mostly used for creating complex multi-page applications. It maintains up-to-date features without discarding any of the old features.

With this framework, you have to follow the architecture of the framework strictly. The JS framework is very tightly organized. It reduces the flexibility that other frameworks might offer.

There is a very refined and developed control system for its platforms and tools. You can integrate it with the new version with the tools provided. There is strict guidance about avoiding outdated APIs.

You can understand Ember’s APIs easily. They are also easy to work. You can make use of highly complex functionalities simply and straightforwardly.

The performance is better as similar jobs are processed together. It creates batches of similar bindings and DOM updates to improve the performance. It means that the browser needs to process them in one go. It will avoid recomputing for each task, wasting a lot of time.

You can write the codes in a simple manner and modules. You can use any of Ember’s APIs. It is possible due to the presence of Promises everywhere.

Ember comes with a well-written guide. The API is recorded in a useful manner. It is a front-end framework that is loaded. Ember has a router, pipeline, services, etc. of its own.

The basis for views, controllers, models, and framework is the Ember Object Model. All components come from the same objects. The framework is firm and steady. The reason is that all elements have similar jobs and characteristics.

Ember has made the general application, organization, and structure clear so that you don’t make any mistakes. You will have no chance to complicate the application unnecessarily. If you have to go out of the defined limits, you will have to force your way out.

The language used for templating in Embers is Handlebars. This language helps Embers to keep its logic out of view. The clean syntax of Handlebars makes it easy for you to read and understand the templates. Handlebar templates are faster to load.

Another advantage you gain from Handlebar is that you don’t have to update your template every time you add or remove data from the page. It will be done automatically by the language itself.

A community that is continually improving the framework supports Ember. They are updating the framework with the latest technology. They also make sure that backward compatibility is possible.

● Ember.js is an open-source MVVM model framework suitable for complex multiple-page applications.

● It offers both the latest and old features.

● It has a very tightly structured framework which doesn’t offer much flexibility

● A very refined control system helps you to integrate with new versions without any problem.

● There is strict guidance about avoiding outdated API versions.

● Ember’s APIs help you to use complex functionalities in a simple manner

● There is no recomputing for each task as the framework allows the browser to do similar functions together.

● Promises allow you to write modular and straightforward code using any API of Ember.js.

● Ember.js is a fully loaded, front-end framework.

● The framework is stable because all components have the same functionalities and properties.

● It has well-defined limitations which will prevent your complicating your application

● Handlebars, the language used by Ember.js allows you to read and understand templates easily. It also helps to load the templates faster.

● Handlebars will ensure to update the template every time you add or remove data.

● Ember.js has an active community that updates the framework regularly and facilitates backward compatibility.

A Comparison Between Ember.js And Vue.js

This article intends to compare the features of both frameworks. Let us see how the characteristics of these frameworks compare. It will help you to make use of the right framework for your web application.

When you need a modern engine for an old application, it is Vue.js which will help you. It combines the best properties of other frameworks. Vue.js is a developing framework. A ready-to-use library of interface elements does not exist. However, many third-party libraries can help you.

Ember.js offers you a well-organized and trustworthy framework. When the development team is big, this is the framework that suits best. It allows everyone to understand the written code and contribute to a common project. The technology will be up-to-date, and the platform will be stable.

Vue.js can help you use the syntax of different kinds. It helps in writing the codes with ease. It is also an SEO friendly framework. Ember is a fully loaded front-end framework and can help you develop the applications very fast. But it is not suitable for developing small projects.

It is not easy to say this is better than that. It will depend on what kind of project you have undertaken. Both have their pluses and minuses. The below table will help in a better comparison.

Final Thoughts

It is not easy to conclude as to which is better. It all depends on the application that you want to develop. Both frameworks are developing. Both are getting updates. Both the communities are working on the frameworks.

While Vue.js is more comfortable for writing codes, Ember is a full-stack framework allowing the development of apps very fast. It is suitable for big projects. It is too complicated to be used for smaller projects.

We hope you had a great time reading this article. If you’ve any questions or suggestions related to this blog, then feel free to ask them in the comment section. Thank You.!