Hery  LaB

Hery LaB

1595575618

How to Use an ERC-20 Token | Solidity

ERC20 token is a like a Lego block that you can build on top of. In this video I will show you how you can code a contract that will trade one ERC20 token for another.

Code: https://solidity-by-example.org/0.6/a…

Truffle: https://www.trufflesuite.com/docs/tru…

Remix IDE: http://remix.ethereum.org

Solidity: https://solidity.readthedocs.io

#erc-20 #blockchain #bitcoin

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Use an ERC-20 Token | Solidity
Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

Mark Anderson

Mark Anderson

1616568076

Ethereum Token Development build a revenue generating crypto business

The Blockchain App Factory is a leading industry with Ethereum Token development platform that offers services like Token creation, Token migration, Token Listing, Secured Storage, ICO development, ERC token wallet. They also build and generate Ethereum tokens such as ERC 20, ERC 721, ERC 777.

#erc token development #ethereum token development company #ethereum token development services #ethereum(erc) token development services #erc 20 development #erc 721 development

RobustStats.jl: A Collection Of Robust Statistical Tests in Julia

RobustStats

This package contains a variety of functions from the field robust statistical methods. Many are estimators of location or dispersion; others estimate the standard error or the confidence intervals for the location or dispresion estimators, generally computed by the bootstrap method.

Many functions in this package are based on the R package WRS (an R-Forge repository) by Rand Wilcox. Others were contributed by users as needed. References to the statistics literature can be found below.

This package requires Compat, Rmath, Dataframes, and Distributions. They can be installed automatically, or by invoking Pkg.add("packagename").

Estimators

Location estimators:

  • tmean(x, tr=0.2) - Trimmed mean: mean of data with the lowest and highest fraction tr of values omitted.
  • winmean(x, tr=0.2)- Winsorized mean: mean of data with the lowest and highest fraction tr of values squashed to the 20%ile or 80%ile value, respectively.
  • tauloc(x) - Tau measure of location by Yohai and Zamar.
  • onestep(x) - One-step M-estimator of location using Huber's ψ
  • mom(x) - Modified one-step M-estimator of location (MOM)
  • bisquareWM(x) - Mean with weights given by the bisquare rho function.
  • huberWM(x) - Mean with weights given by Huber's rho function.
  • trimean(x) - Tukey's trimean, the average of the median and the midhinge.

Dispersion estimators:

  • winvar(x, tr=0.2) - Winsorized variance.
  • wincov(x, y, tr=0.2) - Winsorized covariance.
  • pbvar(x) - Percentage bend midvariance.
  • bivar(x) - Biweight midvariance.
  • tauvar(x) - Tau measure of scale by Yohai and Zamar.
  • iqrn(x) - Normalized inter-quartile range (normalized to equal σ for Gaussians).
  • shorthrange(x) - Length of the shortest closed interval containing at least half the data.
  • scaleQ(x) - Normalized Rousseeuw & Croux Q statistic, from the 25%ile of all 2-point distances.
  • scaleS(x) - Normalized Rousseeuw & Croux S statistic, from the median of the median of all 2-point distances.
  • shorthrange!(x), scaleQ!(x), and scaleS!(x) are non-copying (that is, x-modifying) forms of the above.

Confidence interval or standard error estimates:

  • trimse(x) - Standard error of the trimmed mean.
  • trimci(x) - Confidence interval for the trimmed mean.
  • msmedse(x) - Standard error of the median.
  • binomci(s,n) - Binomial confidence interval (Pratt's method).
  • acbinomci(s,n) - Binomial confidence interval (Agresti-Coull method).
  • sint(x) - Confidence interval for the median (with optional p-value).
  • momci(x) - Confidence interval of the modified one-step M-estimator of location (MOM).
  • trimpb(x) - Confidence interval for trimmed mean.
  • pcorb(x) - Confidence intervale for Pearson's correlation coefficient.
  • yuend - Compare the trimmed means of two dependent random variables.
  • bootstrapci(x, est=f) - Compute a confidence interval for estimator f(x) by bootstrap methods.
  • bootstrapse(x, est=f) - Compute a standard error of estimator f(x) by bootstrap methods.

Utility functions:

  • winval(x, tr=0.2) - Return a Winsorized copy of the data.
  • idealf(x) - Ideal fourths, interpolated 1st and 3rd quartiles.
  • outbox(x) - Outlier detection.
  • hpsi(x) - Huber's ψ function.
  • contam_randn - Contaminated normal distribution (generates random deviates).
  • _weightedhighmedian(x) - Weighted median (breaks ties by rounding up). Used in scaleQ.

Recommendations:

For location, consider the bisquareWM with k=3.9σ, if you can make any reasonable guess as to the "Gaussian-like width" σ (see dispersion estimators for this). If not, trimean is a good second choice, though less efficient. Also, though the author personally has no experience with them, tauloc, onestep, and mom might be useful.

For dispersion, the scaleS is a good general choice, though scaleQ is very efficient for nearly Gaussian data. The MAD is the most robust though less efficient. If scaleS doesn't work, then shorthrange is a good second choice.

The first reference on scaleQ and scaleS (below) is a lengthy discussion of the tradeoffs among scaleQ, scaleS, shortest half, and median absolute deviation (MAD, see BaseStats.mad for Julia implementation). All four have the virtue of having the maximum possible breakdown point, 50%. This means that replacing up to 50% of the data with unbounded bad values leaves the statistic still bounded. The efficiency of Q is better than S and S is better than MAD (for Gaussian distributions), and the influence of a single bad point and the bias due to a fraction of bad points is only slightly larger on Q or S than on MAD. Unlike MAD, the other three do not implicitly assume a symmetric distribution.

To choose between Q and S, the authors note that Q has higher statistical efficiency, but S is typically twice as fast to compute and has lower gross-error sensitivity. An interesting advantage of Q over the others is that its influence function is continuous. For a rough idea about the efficiency, the large-N limit of the standardized variance of each quantity is 2.722 for MAD, 1.714 for S, and 1.216 for Q, relative to 1.000 for the standard deviation (given Gaussian data). The paper gives the ratios for Cauchy and exponential distributions, too; the efficiency advantages of Q are less for Cauchy than for the other distributions.

Examples

#Set up a sample dataset:
x=[1.672064, 0.7876588, 0.317322, 0.9721646, 0.4004206, 1.665123, 3.059971, 0.09459603, 1.27424, 3.522148,
   0.8211308, 1.328767, 2.825956, 0.1102891, 0.06314285, 2.59152, 8.624108, 0.6516885, 5.770285, 0.5154299]

julia> mean(x)     #the mean of this dataset
1.853401259

tmean: trimmed mean

julia> tmean(x)            #20% trimming by default
1.2921802666666669

julia> tmean(x, tr=0)      #no trimming; the same as the output of mean()
1.853401259

julia> tmean(x, tr=0.3)    #30% trimming
1.1466045875000002

julia> tmean(x, tr=0.5)    #50% trimming, which gives you the median of the dataset.
1.1232023

winval: winsorize data

That is, return a copy of the input array, with the extreme low or high values replaced by the lowest or highest non-extreme value, repectively. The fraction considered extreme can be between 0 and 0.5, with 0.2 as the default.

julia> winval(x)           #20% winsorization; can be changed via the named argument `tr`.
20-element Any Array:
 1.67206
 0.787659
 0.400421
 0.972165
 ...
 0.651689
 2.82596
 0.51543

winmean, winvar, wincov: winsorized mean, variance, and covariance

julia> winmean(x)          #20% winsorization; can be changed via the named argument `tr`.
1.4205834800000001
julia> winvar(x)
0.998659015947531
julia> wincov(x, x)
0.998659015947531
julia> wincov(x, x.^2)
3.2819238397424004

trimse: estimated standard error of the trimmed mean

julia> trimse(x)           #20% winsorization; can be changed via the named argument `tr`.
0.3724280347984342

trimci: (1-α) confidence interval for the trimmed mean

Can be used for paired groups if x consists of the difference scores of two paired groups.

julia> trimci(x)                 #20% winsorization; can be changed via the named argument `tr`.
(1-α) confidence interval for the trimmed mean

Degrees of freedom:   11
Estimate:             1.292180
Statistic:            3.469611
Confidence interval:  0.472472       2.111889
p value:              0.005244

idealf: the ideal fourths:

Returns (q1,q3), the 1st and 3rd quartiles. These will be a weighted sum of the values that bracket the exact quartiles, analogous to how we handle the median of an even-length array.

julia> idealf(x)
(0.4483411416666667,2.7282743333333332)

pbvar: percentage bend midvariance

A robust estimator of scale (dispersion). See NIST ITL webpage for more.

julia> pbvar(x)
2.0009575278957623

bivar: biweight midvariance

A robust estimator of scale (dispersion). See NIST ITL webpage for more.

julia> bivar(x)
1.5885279811329132

tauloc, tauvar: tau measure of location and scale

Robust estimators of location and scale, with breakdown points of 50%.

See Yohai and Zamar JASA, vol 83 (1988), pp 406-413 and Maronna and Zamar Technometrics, vol 44 (2002), pp. 307-317.

julia> tauloc(x)       #the named argument `cval` is 4.5 by default.
1.2696652567510853
julia> tauvar(x)
1.53008203090696

outbox: outlier detection

Use a modified boxplot rule based on the ideal fourths; when the named argument mbox is set to true, a modification of the boxplot rule suggested by Carling (2000) is used.

julia> outbox(x)
Outlier detection method using
the ideal-fourths based boxplot rule

Outlier ID:         17
Outlier value:      8.62411
Number of outliers: 1
Non-outlier ID:     1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20

msmedse: Standard error of the median

Return the standard error of the median, computed through the method recommended by McKean and Schrader (1984).

julia> msmedse(x)
0.4708261134886094

binomci(), acbinomci(): Binomial confidence interval

Compute the (1-α) confidence interval for p, the binomial probability of success, given s successes in n trials. Instead of s and n, can use a vector x whose values are all 0 and 1, recording failure/success one trial at a time. Returns an object.

binomci uses Pratt's method; acbinomci uses a generalization of the Agresti-Coull method that was studied by Brown, Cai, & DasGupta.

julia> binomci(2, 10)           # # of success and # of total trials are provided. By default alpha=.05
p_hat:               0.2000
confidence interval: 0.0274   0.5562
Sample size          10


julia> trials=[1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0]
julia> binomci(trials, alpha=0.01)    #trial results are provided in array form consisting of 1's and 0's.
 p_hat:               0.5000
 confidence interval: 0.1768   0.8495
 Sample size          12

julia> acbinomci(2, 10)           # # of success and # of total trials are provided. By default alpha=.05
p_hat:               0.2000
confidence interval: 0.0459   0.5206
Sample size          10

sint()

Compute the confidence interval for the median. Optionally, uses the Hettmansperger-Sheather interpolation method to also estimate a p-value.

julia> sint(x)
Confidence interval for the median

 Confidence interval:  0.547483       2.375232

julia> sint(x, 0.6)
Confidence interval for the median with p-val

 Confidence interval:  0.547483       2.375232
 p value:              0.071861

hpsi

Compute Huber's ψ. The default bending constant is 1.28.

julia> hpsi(x)
20-element Array{Float64,1}:
1.28
0.787659
0.317322
0.972165
0.400421
...

onestep

Compute one-step M-estimator of location using Huber's ψ. The default bending constant is 1.28.

julia> onestep(x)
1.3058109021286803

bootstrapci, bootstrapse

Compute a bootstrap, (1-α) confidence interval (bootstrapci) or a standard error (bootstrapse) for the measure of location corresponding to the argument est. By default, the median is used. Default α=0.05.

julia> ci = bootstrapci(x, est=onestep, nullvalue=0.6)
 Estimate:             1.305811
 Confidence interval:  0.687723       2.259071
 p value:              0.026000


julia> se = bootstrapse(x, est=onestep)
0.41956761772722817

mom and mom!

Returns a modified one-step M-estimator of location (MOM), which is the unweighted mean of all values not more than (bend times the mad(x)) away from the data median.

julia> mom(x)
1.2596462322222222

momci

Compute the bootstrap (1-α) confidence interval for the MOM-estimator of location based on Huber's ψ. Default α=0.05.

julia> momci(x, seed=2, nboot=2000, nullvalue=0.6)
Estimate:             1.259646
Confidence interval:  0.504223       2.120979
p value:              0.131000

contam_randn

Create contaminated normal distributions. Most values will by from a N(0,1) zero-mean unit-variance normal distribution. A fraction epsilon of all values will have k times the standard devation of the others. Default: epsilon=0.1 and k=10.

julia> srand(1);
julia> std(contam_randn(2000))
3.516722458797104

trimpb

Compute a (1-α) confidence interval for a trimmed mean by bootstrap methods.

julia> trimpb(x, nullvalue=0.75)
 Estimate:             1.292180
 Confidence interval:  0.690539       2.196381
 p value:              0.086000

pcorb

Compute a .95 confidence interval for Pearson's correlation coefficient. This function uses an adjusted percentile bootstrap method that gives good results when the error term is heteroscedastic.

julia> pcorb(x, x.^5)
 Estimate:             0.802639
 Confidence interval:  0.683700       0.963478

yuend

Compare the trimmed means of two dependent random variables using the data in x and y. The default amount of trimming is 20%.

julia> srand(3)
julia> y2 = randn(20)+3;
julia> yuend(x, y2)

Comparing the trimmed means of two dependent variables.

Sample size:          20
Degrees of freedom:   11
Estimate:            -1.547776
Standard error:       0.460304
Statistic:           -3.362507
Confidence interval: -2.560898      -0.534653
p value:              0.006336

Unmaintained functions

See UNMAINTAINED.md for information about functions that the maintainers have not yet understood but also not yet deleted entirely.

References

Percentage bend and related estimators come from L.H. Shoemaker and T.P. Hettmansperger "Robust estimates and tests for the one- and two-sample scale models" in Biometrika Vol 69 (1982) pp. 47-53.

Tau measures of location and scale are from V.J. Yohai and R.H. Zamar "High Breakdown-Point Estimates of Regression by Means of the Minimization of an Efficient Scale" in J. American Statistical Assoc. vol 83 (1988) pp. 406-413.

The outbox(..., mbox=true) modification was suggested in K. Carling, "Resistant outlier rules and the non-Gaussian case" in Computational Statistics and Data Analysis vol 33 (2000), pp. 249-258. doi:10.1016/S0167-9473(99)00057-2

The estimate of the standard error of the median, msmedse(x), is computed by the method of J.W. McKean and R.M. Schrader, "A comparison of methods for studentizing the sample median" in Communications in Statistics: Simulation and Computation vol 13 (1984) pp. 751-773. doi:10.1080/03610918408812413

For Pratt's method of computing binomial confidence intervals, see J.W. Pratt (1968) "A normal approximation for binomial, F, Beta, and other common, related tail probabilities, II" J. American Statistical Assoc., vol 63, pp. 1457- 1483, doi:10.1080/01621459.1968.10480939. Also R.G. Newcombe "Confidence Intervals for a binomial proportion" Stat. in Medicine vol 13 (1994) pp 1283-1285, doi:10.1002/sim.4780131209.

For the Agresti-Coull method of computing binomial confidence intervals, see L.D. Brown, T.T. Cai, & A. DasGupta "Confidence Intervals for a Binomial Proportion and Asymptotic Expansions" in Annals of Statistics, vol 30 (2002), pp. 160-201.

Shortest Half-range comes from P.J. Rousseeuw and A.M. Leroy, "A Robust Scale Estimator Based on the Shortest Half" in Statistica Neerlandica Vol 42 (1988), pp. 103-116. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9574.1988.tb01224.x . See also R.D. Martin and R. H. Zamar, "Bias-Robust Estimation of Scale" in Annals of Statistics Vol 21 (1993) pp. 991-1017. doi:10.1214/aoe/1176349161

Scale-Q and Scale-S statistics are described in P.J. Rousseeuw and C. Croux "Alternatives to the Median Absolute Deviation" in J. American Statistical Assoc. Vo 88 (1993) pp 1273-1283. The time-efficient algorithms for computing them appear in C. Croux and P.J. Rousseeuw, "Time-Efficient Algorithms for Two Highly Robust Estimators of Scale" in Computational Statistics, Vol I (1992), Y. Dodge and J. Whittaker editors, Heidelberg, Physica-Verlag, pp 411-428. If link fails, see ftp://ftp.win.ua.ac.be/pub/preprints/92/Timeff92.pdf


Download Details:

Author: Mrxiaohe
Source Code: https://github.com/mrxiaohe/RobustStats.jl 
License: MIT license

#julia #statistical #tests 

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Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

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