Murray  Beatty

Murray Beatty

1592925524

Fixing Material UI’s ClassName Mismatch for React

If you’ve ever used Material UI for React and tried to test it or override certain classes, you might have come across the issue of your snapshots failing because of className mismatch or noticing that the classNames you see on local/dev server is different from what you see in another environment.
Although there are workarounds to this problem (re-rendering your snapshot, ignoring it, declaring things as important for the root className) the fix is pretty simple.

#react #javascript

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Fixing Material UI’s ClassName Mismatch for React
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

A Beginner’s Guide to React

It’s nearly the end of 2019, and you think you might finally be ready to get started learning ReactJS. You hear it’s become the most popular front end JavaScript framework. You sit down at your computer, and are ready to give it a go. Starting off, you probably jump straight in with Facebook’s official React tutorial. After that maybe another tutorial on medium. You do some reading here and there, and if you are like me, you end up pretty confused. You hear terms like “props”, “state”, “virtual dom”, “ES6”, “babel”, “webpack”, “higher-order components”, “Redux”, and much more. Soon you realise that learning React is not as easy as you once imagined and either quit or confusedly persevere on.

Does this sound like you? Because this is exactly how I felt when I started learning React. All I wanted to do was set up a simple React app, and I was getting very confused. I thought React had a fairly difficult learning curve, and I was feeling pretty overwhelmed.

I soon realised that React was fairly easy to learn, but the way I went about learning it was difficult. The problem was I didn’t know how to learn it. Firstly, I was relatively new to the world of front end development and I didn’t know what I was doing. I was somewhat familiar with HTML and only used JavaScript a few times. That certainly did not help. There were technologies and information that I should have spent a little more time learning prior to React, that would have lowered the learning curve tremendously.

This is what I would have liked to have known before I began writing a single line of React code:

Prerequisites

First, let’s nail out the basics. Before you start diving into React, you should probably have at least a little experience with each of the following:

- HTML

- CSS

- ES6 JavaScript

- NodeJS + NPM

If you are familiar with each of the above, then learning React is going to be a lot easier for you. React is big on JavaScript and HTML.


What is React

React is a JavaScript library built in 2013 by the Facebook development team. React wanted to make user interfaces more modular (or reusable) and easier to maintain. According to React’s website, it is used to “Build encapsulated components that manage their own state, then compose them to make complex UIs.”

Understand the Basic

React has 4 ideas that are key to getting started learning with React.

1.Components

React apps have component based architectures. Conceptually, components are more like JavaScript Functions.They accept inputs(called “props”) and return React elements describing what should appear on screen. Probably a title, an author’s name, the date published, some text, some photos, like buttons, share buttons, etc. If you were building this blog in React, each of these would most likely be a component.

If you create a component for a share button, you can reuse that component to build other share buttons, or reuse it across multiple different kinds of articles. This is the idea with React. You are building components that then can be used and reused to build bigger components.

2. Props

Props is short for properties. Properties are how you pass information unidirectionally from parent to child components. I like to think of them as property attributes or parameters, since it is conceptually similar to passing arguments into a function, and syntactically similar to HTML attributes. Look at the example used previously. If this were a React component, the props would be what you are passing in as “src”, “alt”, “height”, and “width”. You can also pass in callback functions for the child to execute such as “onClick”.

3. State

Many React components will be stateful components. State is exactly what it sounds like. It’s the internal state of your component. Think of a checkbox on a web page. It can either be checked or unchecked. When the user clicks on the checkbox, it will check the box if it is unchecked, and when the user clicks it again it will uncheck the box. The checkbox is an example of a stateful component. In this example, the internal state of the checkbox would be a boolean that would either be checked true or checked false.

While many components have state, some are stateless. Just because lots of components have state doesn’t mean that every component needs to be stateful. Sometimes it makes sense to omit state from a component. Think of an image html tag.

**<img src=”smiley.gif” alt=”Smiley face” height=”42" width=”42">**

If this image tag would be an example of a stateless component. You are passing in parameters, but the image tag itself does not have an internal state that it needs to manage itself.

4. React lifecycle

React is much easier to understand if you have a basic idea behind the React component lifecycle. The React lifecycle describes when and how a component should mount, render, update, and unmount in the DOM. React has lifecycle hooks (React component methods) that help you manage state, props, and work with the lifecycle flow.

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**React component lifecycle has three categories **— Mounting, Updating and Unmounting.

  1. The render_() _is the most used lifecycle method.
  • It is a pure function.
  • You cannot set state in render()

2. The componentDidMount() happens as soon as your component is mounted.

  • You can set state here but with caution.

3. The componentDidUpdate_() _happens as soon as the updating happens.

  • You can set state here but with caution.

4. The componentWillUnmount_() _happens just before the component unmounts and is destroyed.

  • This is a good place to cleanup all the data.
  • You cannot set state here.

5. The shouldComponentUpdate_() _can be used rarely.

  • It can be called if you need to tell React not to re-render for a certain state or prop change.
  • This needs to be used with caution only for certain performance optimizations.

6.The two new lifecycle methods are getDerivedStateFromProps() and getSnapshotBeforeUpdate().

  • They need to be used only occasionally.
  • Not many examples are out there for these two methods and they are still being discussed and will have more references in the future.

Note: You can read more about React’s lifecycle here

These are only the basics to get started.

#react-for-beginner #react-lifecycle #react #react-components #ui

Anda Lacacima

Anda Lacacima

1597282669

How to Build React Native UI app with Material UI

UI design for native Android and iOS applications can be complex and demanding. However, the importance of sleek and responsive UI cannot be overstated. With the introduction of the Material Design concept in 2014, Google established a standard for mobile and web development that makes life easier for developers and UI designers.

As one of the most popular frameworks for building native Android and iOS applications, React Native ships with a lot of libraries for Material Design. With over 46,000 downloads per week, Paper is the most popular React Native library based entirely on Material UI. A fast library, Paper makes the UI design process easy, seamless and efficient.

Here is a synopsis of what we will cover:

  • Setting up React Native app using the expo CLI
  • Installing React Native Paper and other dependencies
  • Creating custom themes in React Native Paper
  • Using custom themes in React Native Paper
  • Using Material icons in React Native
  • Material UI-based components in React Native paper (eg. cards, bottom navigation, etc)

Let’s get started.

Create a new React Native project

If you don’t have the expo CLI, install it globally in your computer using the following command:

npm install -g expo-cli

Then, install a blank React Native (expo) project:

expo init --template bare-minimum

Open the project in your favorite editor. To open it in Visual Studio Code, navigate to the project root and enter the following command:

code .

The project structure will look like this:

#react native #react #material ui

Sherman  Zemlak

Sherman Zemlak

1628505060

Material UI Grid Layout Tutorial (React)

We’re going to learn how to use the Material UI Grid system using the Material UI react library. The grid system can be used to create fluid responsive elements for different screen sizes.

https://github.com/facebook/create-react-app
https://material-ui.com/

Don’t forget to Subscribe here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWkzkhQ3syxBjjAYwqCbzYg?sub_confirmation=1

#react #material ui #ui

5 Most Popular React UI Component Libraries

According to Stack Overflow Developers Survey 2020, ReactJS was voted as the most loved and wanted Javascript web framework.

Due to its popularity, many UI libraries and kits have built custom React components to facilitate easy integration and improve the developer experience.

There are many React UI libraries and kits smoothly running today. In this article, we shall highlight the ten most powerful libraries. These libraries were chosen based on the Github stars and usage plus the support community on Stackoverflow.

Note: All the statistics used in this article were extracted in August 2020 and may probably change with time.

1. Material UI

Material UI is based on Google’s Material Design. It provides easier and faster React components built with Material Design.

GitHub Repo

Material UI has the largest community support with over 8.7k questions on Stack Overflow and over 60k stars on GitHub. It is most download library on npm with over 1.2 million weekly downloads.

  • Used by: 272k + (apps)
  • Releases: 270 +
  • Contributors: 1800 +

#reactjs #react #web-development #ui #react-ui-kit #react-components #frontend #javascript