Jermey  Padberg

Jermey Padberg

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Introduction to Cloud Computing

Introduction

The impact of cloud computing on industry and end users would be difficult to overstate: many aspects of everyday life have been transformed by the omnipresence of software that runs on cloud networks. By leveraging cloud computing, startups and businesses are able to optimize costs and increase their offerings without purchasing and managing all the hardware and software. Independent developers are empowered to launch globally-available apps and online services. Researchers can share and analyze data at scales once reserved only for highly-funded projects. And internet users can quickly access software and storage to create, share, and store digital media in quantities that extend far beyond the computing capacity of their personal devices.

Despite the growing presence of cloud computing, its details remain obscure to many. What exactly is the cloud, how does one use it, and what are its benefits for businesses, developers, researchers, government, healthcare practitioners, and students? In this conceptual article, we’ll provide a general overview of cloud computing, its history, delivery models, offerings, and risks.

By the end of this article, you should have an understanding of how the cloud can help support business, research, education, and community infrastructure and how to get started using the cloud for your own projects.

What is Cloud Computing?

Cloud computing is the delivery of computing resources as a service, meaning that the resources are owned and managed by the cloud provider rather than the end user. Those resources may include anything from browser-based software applications (such as Tik Tok or Netflix), third party data storage for photos and other digital media (such as iCloud or Dropbox), or third-party servers used to support the computing infrastructure of a business, research, or personal project.

Before the broad proliferation of cloud computing, businesses and general computer users typically had to buy and maintain the software and hardware that they wished to use. With the growing availability of cloud-based applications, storage, services, and machines, businesses and consumers now have access to a wealth of on-demand computing resources as internet-accessed services. Shifting from on-premise software and hardware to networked remote and distributed resources means cloud users no longer have to invest the labor, capital, or expertise required for buying and maintaining these computing resources themselves. This unprecedented access to computing resources has given rise to a new wave of cloud-based businesses, changed IT practices across industries, and transformed many everyday computer-assisted practices. With the cloud, individuals can now work with colleagues over video meetings and other collaborative platforms, access entertainment and educational content on demand, communicate with household appliances, hail a cab with a mobile device, and rent a vacation room in someone’s house.

Defining Cloud Computing

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce with a mission to advance innovation, defines cloud computing as:

a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.

NIST lists the following as the five essential characteristics of cloud computing:

  • On-demand self-service: Cloud resources can be accessed or provisioned without human interaction. With this model, consumers can gain immediate access to cloud services upon signup. Organizations can also create mechanisms for allowing employees, customers, or partners to access internal cloud services on demand according to predetermined logics without needing to go through IT services.
  • Broad network access: Users can access cloud services and resources through any device and in any networked location provided that they have permission.
  • Resource pooling: Cloud provider resources are shared by multiple tenants while keeping the data of individual clients hidden from other clients.
  • Rapid elasticity: Unlike on-premise hardware and software, cloud computing resources can be rapidly increased, decreased, or otherwise modified based on the cloud user’s changing needs.
  • Measured service: Usage of cloud resources is metered so that businesses and other cloud users need only pay for the resources they use in any given billing cycle.

These characteristics offer a wide variety of transformative opportunities for businesses and individuals alike, which we’ll discuss later in the section Benefits of Cloud Computing. To gain some additional context, let’s briefly review the emergence of cloud computing.

History of Cloud Computing

Many aspects of cloud computing can be traced as far back as the 1950s, when universities and companies rented out computation time on mainframe computers. At the time, renting was one of the only ways to access computing resources as computing technology was too large and expensive to be owned or managed by individuals. By the 1960s, computer scientists like John McCarthy of Stanford University and J.C.R Licklider of The U.S. Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) began proposing ideas that anticipated some of the major features of cloud computing today, such as the conceptualization of computing as a public utility and the possibility of a network of computers that would allow people to access data and programs from anywhere in the world.

Cloud computing, however, didn’t become a mainstream reality and a popular term until the first decade of the 21st century. This decade saw the launch of cloud services like Amazon’s Elastic Compute (EC2) and Simple Storage Service (S3) in 2006, Heroku in 2007, Google Cloud Platform in 2008, Alibaba Cloud in 2009, Windows Azure (now Microsoft Azure) in 2010, IBM’s SmartCloud in 2011, and DigitalOcean in 2011. These services allowed existing businesses to optimize costs by migrating their in-house IT infrastructure to cloud-based resources and provided independent developers and small developer teams resources for creating and deploying apps. Cloud-based applications, known as Software as a Service (SasS) — which we’ll discuss in greater detail in the Cloud Delivery Models section — also became popular during this time period. Unlike on-premise software, or software that users need to physically install and maintain on their machines, SaaS increased the availability of applications by allowing users to access them from a variety of devices on demand.

Some of these cloud-based applications — such as Google’s productivity apps (Gmail, Drive, and Docs) and Microsoft 365 (a cloud-based version of the Microsoft Office Suite) — were offered by the same companies that launched cloud infrastructure services, while other pre-existing software products, such as Adobe Creative Cloud, were launched as cloud-based applications using the services of cloud providers. New SaaS products and businesses also emerged based on the novel opportunities of these cloud providers, such as Netflix’s streaming services in 2007, the music platform Spotify in 2008, the file-hosting service Dropbox in 2009, the video conferencing service Zoom in 2012, and the communication tool Slack in 2013. Today, cloud-based IT infrastructure and cloud-based applications have become a popular choice for both businesses and individual users and their market share is expected to grow.

Cloud Delivery Models

Cloud resources are provided in a variety of different delivery models that offer customers different levels of support and flexibility.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

IaaS is the on-demand delivery of computing infrastructure, including operating systems, networking, storage, and other infrastructural components. Acting much like a virtual equivalent to physical servers, IaaS relieves cloud users of the need to buy and maintain physical servers while also providing the flexibility to scale and pay for resources as needed. IaaS is a popular option for businesses that wish to leverage the advantages of the cloud and have system administrators who can oversee the installation, configuration, and management of operating systems, development tools, and other underlying infrastructure that they wish to use. However, IaaS is also used by developers, researchers, and others who wish to customize the underlying infrastructure of their computing environment. Given its flexibility, IaaS can support everything from a company’s computing infrastructure to web hosting to big data analysis.

Platform as a Service (PaaS)

PaaS provides a computing platform where the underlying infrastructure (such as the operating system and other software) is installed, configured, and maintained by the provider, allowing users to focus their efforts on developing and deploying apps in a tested and standardized environment. PaaS is commonly used by software developers and developer teams as it cuts down on the complexity of setting up and maintaining computer infrastructure, while also supporting collaboration among distributed teams. PaaS can be a good choice for developers who don’t have the need to customize their underlying infrastructure, or those who want to focus their attention on development rather than DevOps and system administration.

Software as a Service (SaaS)

SaaS providers are cloud-based applications that users access on demand from the internet without needing to install or maintain the software. Examples include GitHub, Google Docs, Slack, and Adobe Creative Cloud. SaaS applications are popular among businesses and general users given that they’re often easy to adopt, accessible from any device, and have free, premium, and enterprise versions of their applications. Like PaaS, SaaS abstracts away the underlying infrastructure of the software application so that users are only exposed to the interface they interact with.

Cloud Environments

Cloud services are available as public or private resources, each of which serves different needs.

Public Cloud

The public cloud refers to cloud services (such as virtual machines, storage, or applications) offered publicly by a commercial provider to businesses and individuals. Public cloud resources are hosted on the commercial provider’s hardware, which users access through the internet. They are not always suitable for organizations in highly-regulated industries, such as healthcare or finance, as public cloud environments may not comply with industry regulations regarding customer data.

Private Cloud

The private cloud refers to cloud services that are owned and managed by the organization that uses them and available only to the organization’s employees and customers. Private clouds allow organizations to exert greater control over their computing environment and their stored data, which can be necessary for organizations in highly-regulated industries. Private clouds are sometimes seen as more secure than public clouds as they are accessed through private networks and enable the organization to directly oversee their cloud security. Public cloud providers sometimes provide their services as applications that can be installed on private clouds, allowing organizations to keep their infrastructure and data on premise while taking advantage of the public cloud’s latest innovations.

Hybrid Cloud and Multicloud

Many organizations use a hybrid cloud environment which combines public and private cloud resources to support the organization’s computing needs while maintaining compliance with industry regulation. Multicloud environments are also common, which entail the use of more than one public cloud provider (for example, combining Amazon Web Services and DigitalOcean).

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Introduction to Cloud Computing
Adaline  Kulas

Adaline Kulas

1594162500

Multi-cloud Spending: 8 Tips To Lower Cost

A multi-cloud approach is nothing but leveraging two or more cloud platforms for meeting the various business requirements of an enterprise. The multi-cloud IT environment incorporates different clouds from multiple vendors and negates the dependence on a single public cloud service provider. Thus enterprises can choose specific services from multiple public clouds and reap the benefits of each.

Given its affordability and agility, most enterprises opt for a multi-cloud approach in cloud computing now. A 2018 survey on the public cloud services market points out that 81% of the respondents use services from two or more providers. Subsequently, the cloud computing services market has reported incredible growth in recent times. The worldwide public cloud services market is all set to reach $500 billion in the next four years, according to IDC.

By choosing multi-cloud solutions strategically, enterprises can optimize the benefits of cloud computing and aim for some key competitive advantages. They can avoid the lengthy and cumbersome processes involved in buying, installing and testing high-priced systems. The IaaS and PaaS solutions have become a windfall for the enterprise’s budget as it does not incur huge up-front capital expenditure.

However, cost optimization is still a challenge while facilitating a multi-cloud environment and a large number of enterprises end up overpaying with or without realizing it. The below-mentioned tips would help you ensure the money is spent wisely on cloud computing services.

  • Deactivate underused or unattached resources

Most organizations tend to get wrong with simple things which turn out to be the root cause for needless spending and resource wastage. The first step to cost optimization in your cloud strategy is to identify underutilized resources that you have been paying for.

Enterprises often continue to pay for resources that have been purchased earlier but are no longer useful. Identifying such unused and unattached resources and deactivating it on a regular basis brings you one step closer to cost optimization. If needed, you can deploy automated cloud management tools that are largely helpful in providing the analytics needed to optimize the cloud spending and cut costs on an ongoing basis.

  • Figure out idle instances

Another key cost optimization strategy is to identify the idle computing instances and consolidate them into fewer instances. An idle computing instance may require a CPU utilization level of 1-5%, but you may be billed by the service provider for 100% for the same instance.

Every enterprise will have such non-production instances that constitute unnecessary storage space and lead to overpaying. Re-evaluating your resource allocations regularly and removing unnecessary storage may help you save money significantly. Resource allocation is not only a matter of CPU and memory but also it is linked to the storage, network, and various other factors.

  • Deploy monitoring mechanisms

The key to efficient cost reduction in cloud computing technology lies in proactive monitoring. A comprehensive view of the cloud usage helps enterprises to monitor and minimize unnecessary spending. You can make use of various mechanisms for monitoring computing demand.

For instance, you can use a heatmap to understand the highs and lows in computing visually. This heat map indicates the start and stop times which in turn lead to reduced costs. You can also deploy automated tools that help organizations to schedule instances to start and stop. By following a heatmap, you can understand whether it is safe to shut down servers on holidays or weekends.

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Adaline  Kulas

Adaline Kulas

1594166040

What are the benefits of cloud migration? Reasons you should migrate

The moving of applications, databases and other business elements from the local server to the cloud server called cloud migration. This article will deal with migration techniques, requirement and the benefits of cloud migration.

In simple terms, moving from local to the public cloud server is called cloud migration. Gartner says 17.5% revenue growth as promised in cloud migration and also has a forecast for 2022 as shown in the following image.

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How Cloud Technology Reduces your App Development Cost? - TopDevelopers.co

Learn about the positive impact of cloud computing on mobile app development, and how Cloud Technology will help reduce your app development cost.
Organizations need to understand that cloud technology is pretty much necessary to maintain continuity. With truncated costing, even the bootstrapped start-ups can afford advanced level mobile app development and expand their business rapidly. Even the leading mobile app developers would prefer cloud computing for developing better solutions.
Cloud computing is the flamboyance that you need to take your business ahead as it helps you correctly structure mobile app development.

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Cloud Computing Services | SaaS, PaaS, IaaS - WebClues Infotech

Cloud Computing Services

Data Management has taken a new turn with the introduction of Cloud Storage which has resulted in requirements for Cloud Computing. It is nothing but the data processing system that takes away a load of data management from the hands of individual devices.

Want to use cloud computing like Amazon Web Services (AWS) for your business data?

WebClues Infotech has been an expert in helping businesses with AWS cloud computing for years. We have helped the majority of our client base with AWS cloud computing to solve their data management needs.

Want to know more about our AWS cloud computing services?

Visit: https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/cloud-computing-aws-services/

Share your requirements https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/contact-us/

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Best Cloud Computing (AWS) Development Company

Mobile App Development India engineers, who hold years of experience in building data centers in the cloud. Being AWS partner, our app developer’s offer spearhead integration services for Cloud to Cloud and Business-to-Business for all three models - SaaS, PaaS and IaaS.

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