Creating a RESTful Web API with Node.js and Express.js from scratch

In this article, I’ll show you step by step how to create a RESTful Web API with Node.js and Express.js by building a simple and useful Todo API. This article assumes you have basic javascript knowledge and terminal using capabilities.

You can also build a Web API in Node.js by using another framework except Express.js but Express.js is one of the most popular web framework for Node.js.

You can found the final source code of this Web API in this github repository.

Let’s start to create our mentioned Web API.

Before start

If you have never used Node.js or npm package manager you should install them.

To check whether the Node.js is already installed on your computer, open your terminal and run node -v command. If you see your Node.js version it’s installed. Otherwise go to below link.

Click here to download and install Node.js (You can choose LTS version)

And if you don’t have any IDE or text editor for writing javascript I advice you Visual Studio Code.

Click here to download VS Code (Optional)

About express-generator

In fact we could use <a href="https://expressjs.com/en/starter/generator.html" target="_blank">express-generator</a> tool which designed to creating an Express Web API quickly but I want to create this API from scratch because of that tool puts some extra files and folder structures that we don’t need them now. But you can use this useful tool next time on creating new Web API. I won’t use it now due to keep article simple.

Creating Project

Go to your workspace root folder and create a new folder there named "todo-api".

Then create "package.json" and "server.js" files into "todo-api" folder like below.

package.json

{
    "name": "todo-api",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "scripts": {
        "start": "node server.js"
    },
    "dependencies": {
        "express": "^4.16.4"
    }
}

server.js

const http = require('http');
const express = require('express');
const app = express();
app.use(express.json());
app.use('/', function(req, res) {
    res.send('todo api works');
});
const server = http.createServer(app);
const port = 3000;
server.listen(port);
console.debug('Server listening on port ' + port);

After creating above files open your terminal in the "todo-api" folder and run npm installcommand.

This command will be install your project dependencies which pointed at the "package.json" file.

After finished package download process, downloaded dependency files will be installed into"node_modules" folder at the root of the "todo-api" folder.

After finished package installing then run npm start to start our Web API.

Now our Web API listening. To see result open your web browser then write localhost:3000 to address bar and press enter.

As result you’ll see our request handler response in your browser: “todo api works”.

This is a dead simple Express.js Web API. And it needs the some development. For example we need to an api endpoint to get todo items. So let’s add a new API endpoint for this.

Create a new folder named "routes" in the root of the "todo-api" folder.

Then create a "items.js" file inside of "routes" folder and put following codes inside it.

Your final folder structure should be like below;

/todo-api
/node_modules
/routes
    items.js
package.json
server.js

items.js

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();
const data = [
    {id: 1, title: 'Finalize project', order: 1, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 2, title: 'Book ticket to London', order: 2, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 3, title: 'Finish last article', order: 3, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 4, title: 'Get a new t-shirt', order: 4, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 5, title: 'Create dinner reservation', order: 5, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
];
router.get('/', function (req, res) {
    res.status(200).json(data);
});
router.get('/:id', function (req, res) {
    let found = data.find(function (item) {
        return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
    });
    if (found) {
        res.status(200).json(found);
    } else {
        res.sendStatus(404);
    }
});
module.exports = router;

Initial code of "items.js" file contains two endpoints. First one gets all todo items and second one gets one item which matches given id parameter.

Before testing items routes we should register it in the "server.js" file.

Modify "server.js" file like below to register new item routes.

server.js

const http = require('http');
const express = require('express');
const itemsRouter = require('./routes/items');
const app = express();
app.use(express.json());
app.use('/items', itemsRouter);
app.use('/', function(req, res) {
    res.send('todo api works');
});
const server = http.createServer(app);
const port = 3000;
server.listen(port);
console.debug('Server listening on port ' + port);

Now run npm start to start our Web API.

Then open your web browser and write localhost:3000/items to address bar and press enter.

You’ll see todo items json array in the response body.

And write localhost:3000/items/3 to address bar and press enter.

You’ll see the todo item which has id 3 in the response body.

But not finished up yet.

CRUD Operations and HTTP methods

I think we’ll need CRUD operations to Create, Read, Update and Delete todo items.

We have already two endpoints for getting items. So we need Create, Update and Delete endpoints.

Let’s add also these endpoints into the items.js file.

Our final "items.js" file and endpoints should be like below.

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();

const data = [
  {id: 1, title: 'Finalize project',          order: 1, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 2, title: 'Book ticket to London',     order: 2, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 3, title: 'Finish last article',       order: 3, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 4, title: 'Get a new t-shirt',         order: 4, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 5, title: 'Create dinner reservation', order: 5, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
];

router.get('/', function (req, res) {
  res.status(200).json(data);
});

router.get('/:id', function (req, res) {
  let found = data.find(function (item) {
    return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
  });

  if (found) {
    res.status(200).json(found);
  } else {
    res.sendStatus(404);
  }
});

router.post('/', function (req, res) {
  let itemIds = data.map(item => item.id);
  let orderNums = data.map(item => item.order);

  let newId = itemIds.length > 0 ? Math.max.apply(Math, itemIds) + 1 : 1;
  let newOrderNum = orderNums.length > 0 ? Math.max.apply(Math, orderNums) + 1 : 1;

  let newItem = {
    id: newId,
    title: req.body.title,
    order: newOrderNum,
    completed: false,
    createdOn: new Date()
  };

  data.push(newItem);

  res.status(201).json(newItem);
});

router.put('/:id', function (req, res) {
  let found = data.find(function (item) {
    return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
  });

  if (found) {
    let updated = {
      id: found.id,
      title: req.body.title,
      order: req.body.order,
      completed: req.body.completed
    };

    let targetIndex = data.indexOf(found);

    data.splice(targetIndex, 1, updated);

    res.sendStatus(204);
  } else {
    res.sendStatus(404);
  }
});

router.delete('/:id', function (req, res) {
  let found = data.find(function (item) {
    return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
  });

  if (found) {
    let targetIndex = data.indexOf(found);

    data.splice(targetIndex, 1);
  }

  res.sendStatus(204);
});

module.exports = router;

Short Explanation

I wanna explain shortly some points of our last codes.

First of all you must have noticed that our api works on a static data and keeps it on memory. All of our GET, POST, PUT and DELETE http methods just manipulate a json array. The purpose of this is to keep article simple and draw attention to the Web API structure.

Due to this situation our POST method has some extra logic such as calculating next item ids and order numbers.

So you can modify logic and data structures in these http methods to use a database or whatever you want.

Testing API with Postman

We have tested the GET methods of our Web API in our web browser and seen responses. But we can’t test directly POST, PUT and DELETE http methods in web browser.

If you want to test also other http methods you should use Postman or another http utility.

Now I’ll show you how to test the Web API with Postman

Before we start click here and install Postman.

When you first launch Postman after installing you’ll see start window. Close this start window by clicking close button on top right corner. Then you must see following screen.

An empty Postman request

Sending GET Request

Before sending a request to API we should start it by running npm startcommand as we do before.

After start the Web API and seeing “Server listening on…” message write localhost:3000/itemsto address bar as seen below and click Send button. You’ll see todo items array as API response like below.

Sending a GET request with Postman

You can try similarly by giving an item id in request url like this localhost:3000/items/3

Sending POST Request

To sending a POST request and create a new todo item write localhost:3000/items to address bar and change HTTP verb to POST by clicking arrow at front of the address bar as seen below.

Sending a POST request with Postman

Before sending the POST request you should add request data to body of the request by clicking body tab and selecting raw and JSON as seen below.

Attaching a JSON body to POST request in Postman

Now click Send button to send POST request to the Web API. Then you must get “201 Created” http response code and seeing created item in the response body.

To see the last status of todo items send a get request to localhost:3000/itemsaddress. You must see newly created item at the end of the list.

Sending PUT Request

Sending PUT request is very similar to sending POST request.

The most obvious difference is request url should be pointed specific item like this localhost:3000/items/3

And you should choose PUT as http verb instead of POST and send all of the required data in the request body unlike POST.

For example you could send a JSON body in the PUT request as below.

An example JSON body for PUT request

{
    "title": "New title of todo item",
    "order": 3,
    "completed": false
}

When you click Send button you must get “204 No Content” http response code. You can check item you updated by sending a get request.

Sending DELETE Request

To send a DELETE request, change the request url to address a specific item id like this localhost:3000/items/3

And select DELETE as http verb and click Send button.

You must get “204 No Content” http response code as result of the DELETE operation.

Send a get request and see the last status of list.

About the DELETE Http Request

I want to say a few words about DELETE http request. You must have noticed something in our delete code. DELETE request returns “204 No Content” every situation.

Http DELETE requests are idempotent. So what that mean? If you delete a resource on server by sending DELETE request, it’s removed from the collection. And every next DELETE request on the same resource won’t change outcome. So you won’t get “404 Not Found” in the second request. Each request returns same response whether succeed or not. That’s mean idempotent operation.

Conclusion

Finally we’ve tested all http methods of our Web API.

As you can see, it works just fine.

Thanks for reading ❤

If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!

#node-js #javascript #express #web-development #rest #api

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Creating a RESTful Web API with Node.js and Express.js from scratch
Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

1594289280

What is REST API? An Overview | Liquid Web

What is REST?

The REST acronym is defined as a “REpresentational State Transfer” and is designed to take advantage of existing HTTP protocols when used for Web APIs. It is very flexible in that it is not tied to resources or methods and has the ability to handle different calls and data formats. Because REST API is not constrained to an XML format like SOAP, it can return multiple other formats depending on what is needed. If a service adheres to this style, it is considered a “RESTful” application. REST allows components to access and manage functions within another application.

REST was initially defined in a dissertation by Roy Fielding’s twenty years ago. He proposed these standards as an alternative to SOAP (The Simple Object Access Protocol is a simple standard for accessing objects and exchanging structured messages within a distributed computing environment). REST (or RESTful) defines the general rules used to regulate the interactions between web apps utilizing the HTTP protocol for CRUD (create, retrieve, update, delete) operations.

What is an API?

An API (or Application Programming Interface) provides a method of interaction between two systems.

What is a RESTful API?

A RESTful API (or application program interface) uses HTTP requests to GET, PUT, POST, and DELETE data following the REST standards. This allows two pieces of software to communicate with each other. In essence, REST API is a set of remote calls using standard methods to return data in a specific format.

The systems that interact in this manner can be very different. Each app may use a unique programming language, operating system, database, etc. So, how do we create a system that can easily communicate and understand other apps?? This is where the Rest API is used as an interaction system.

When using a RESTful API, we should determine in advance what resources we want to expose to the outside world. Typically, the RESTful API service is implemented, keeping the following ideas in mind:

  • Format: There should be no restrictions on the data exchange format
  • Implementation: REST is based entirely on HTTP
  • Service Definition: Because REST is very flexible, API can be modified to ensure the application understands the request/response format.
  • The RESTful API focuses on resources and how efficiently you perform operations with it using HTTP.

The features of the REST API design style state:

  • Each entity must have a unique identifier.
  • Standard methods should be used to read and modify data.
  • It should provide support for different types of resources.
  • The interactions should be stateless.

For REST to fit this model, we must adhere to the following rules:

  • Client-Server Architecture: The interface is separate from the server-side data repository. This affords flexibility and the development of components independently of each other.
  • Detachment: The client connections are not stored on the server between requests.
  • Cacheability: It must be explicitly stated whether the client can store responses.
  • Multi-level: The API should work whether it interacts directly with a server or through an additional layer, like a load balancer.

#tutorials #api #application #application programming interface #crud #http #json #programming #protocols #representational state transfer #rest #rest api #rest api graphql #rest api json #rest api xml #restful #soap #xml #yaml

Creating a RESTful Web API with Node.js and Express.js from scratch

In this article, I’ll show you step by step how to create a RESTful Web API with Node.js and Express.js by building a simple and useful Todo API. This article assumes you have basic javascript knowledge and terminal using capabilities.

You can also build a Web API in Node.js by using another framework except Express.js but Express.js is one of the most popular web framework for Node.js.

You can found the final source code of this Web API in this github repository.

Let’s start to create our mentioned Web API.

Before start

If you have never used Node.js or npm package manager you should install them.

To check whether the Node.js is already installed on your computer, open your terminal and run node -v command. If you see your Node.js version it’s installed. Otherwise go to below link.

Click here to download and install Node.js (You can choose LTS version)

And if you don’t have any IDE or text editor for writing javascript I advice you Visual Studio Code.

Click here to download VS Code (Optional)

About express-generator

In fact we could use <a href="https://expressjs.com/en/starter/generator.html" target="_blank">express-generator</a> tool which designed to creating an Express Web API quickly but I want to create this API from scratch because of that tool puts some extra files and folder structures that we don’t need them now. But you can use this useful tool next time on creating new Web API. I won’t use it now due to keep article simple.

Creating Project

Go to your workspace root folder and create a new folder there named "todo-api".

Then create "package.json" and "server.js" files into "todo-api" folder like below.

package.json

{
    "name": "todo-api",
    "version": "1.0.0",
    "scripts": {
        "start": "node server.js"
    },
    "dependencies": {
        "express": "^4.16.4"
    }
}

server.js

const http = require('http');
const express = require('express');
const app = express();
app.use(express.json());
app.use('/', function(req, res) {
    res.send('todo api works');
});
const server = http.createServer(app);
const port = 3000;
server.listen(port);
console.debug('Server listening on port ' + port);

After creating above files open your terminal in the "todo-api" folder and run npm installcommand.

This command will be install your project dependencies which pointed at the "package.json" file.

After finished package download process, downloaded dependency files will be installed into"node_modules" folder at the root of the "todo-api" folder.

After finished package installing then run npm start to start our Web API.

Now our Web API listening. To see result open your web browser then write localhost:3000 to address bar and press enter.

As result you’ll see our request handler response in your browser: “todo api works”.

This is a dead simple Express.js Web API. And it needs the some development. For example we need to an api endpoint to get todo items. So let’s add a new API endpoint for this.

Create a new folder named "routes" in the root of the "todo-api" folder.

Then create a "items.js" file inside of "routes" folder and put following codes inside it.

Your final folder structure should be like below;

/todo-api
/node_modules
/routes
    items.js
package.json
server.js

items.js

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();
const data = [
    {id: 1, title: 'Finalize project', order: 1, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 2, title: 'Book ticket to London', order: 2, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 3, title: 'Finish last article', order: 3, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 4, title: 'Get a new t-shirt', order: 4, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
    {id: 5, title: 'Create dinner reservation', order: 5, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
];
router.get('/', function (req, res) {
    res.status(200).json(data);
});
router.get('/:id', function (req, res) {
    let found = data.find(function (item) {
        return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
    });
    if (found) {
        res.status(200).json(found);
    } else {
        res.sendStatus(404);
    }
});
module.exports = router;

Initial code of "items.js" file contains two endpoints. First one gets all todo items and second one gets one item which matches given id parameter.

Before testing items routes we should register it in the "server.js" file.

Modify "server.js" file like below to register new item routes.

server.js

const http = require('http');
const express = require('express');
const itemsRouter = require('./routes/items');
const app = express();
app.use(express.json());
app.use('/items', itemsRouter);
app.use('/', function(req, res) {
    res.send('todo api works');
});
const server = http.createServer(app);
const port = 3000;
server.listen(port);
console.debug('Server listening on port ' + port);

Now run npm start to start our Web API.

Then open your web browser and write localhost:3000/items to address bar and press enter.

You’ll see todo items json array in the response body.

And write localhost:3000/items/3 to address bar and press enter.

You’ll see the todo item which has id 3 in the response body.

But not finished up yet.

CRUD Operations and HTTP methods

I think we’ll need CRUD operations to Create, Read, Update and Delete todo items.

We have already two endpoints for getting items. So we need Create, Update and Delete endpoints.

Let’s add also these endpoints into the items.js file.

Our final "items.js" file and endpoints should be like below.

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();

const data = [
  {id: 1, title: 'Finalize project',          order: 1, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 2, title: 'Book ticket to London',     order: 2, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 3, title: 'Finish last article',       order: 3, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 4, title: 'Get a new t-shirt',         order: 4, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
  {id: 5, title: 'Create dinner reservation', order: 5, completed: false, createdOn: new Date()},
];

router.get('/', function (req, res) {
  res.status(200).json(data);
});

router.get('/:id', function (req, res) {
  let found = data.find(function (item) {
    return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
  });

  if (found) {
    res.status(200).json(found);
  } else {
    res.sendStatus(404);
  }
});

router.post('/', function (req, res) {
  let itemIds = data.map(item => item.id);
  let orderNums = data.map(item => item.order);

  let newId = itemIds.length > 0 ? Math.max.apply(Math, itemIds) + 1 : 1;
  let newOrderNum = orderNums.length > 0 ? Math.max.apply(Math, orderNums) + 1 : 1;

  let newItem = {
    id: newId,
    title: req.body.title,
    order: newOrderNum,
    completed: false,
    createdOn: new Date()
  };

  data.push(newItem);

  res.status(201).json(newItem);
});

router.put('/:id', function (req, res) {
  let found = data.find(function (item) {
    return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
  });

  if (found) {
    let updated = {
      id: found.id,
      title: req.body.title,
      order: req.body.order,
      completed: req.body.completed
    };

    let targetIndex = data.indexOf(found);

    data.splice(targetIndex, 1, updated);

    res.sendStatus(204);
  } else {
    res.sendStatus(404);
  }
});

router.delete('/:id', function (req, res) {
  let found = data.find(function (item) {
    return item.id === parseInt(req.params.id);
  });

  if (found) {
    let targetIndex = data.indexOf(found);

    data.splice(targetIndex, 1);
  }

  res.sendStatus(204);
});

module.exports = router;

Short Explanation

I wanna explain shortly some points of our last codes.

First of all you must have noticed that our api works on a static data and keeps it on memory. All of our GET, POST, PUT and DELETE http methods just manipulate a json array. The purpose of this is to keep article simple and draw attention to the Web API structure.

Due to this situation our POST method has some extra logic such as calculating next item ids and order numbers.

So you can modify logic and data structures in these http methods to use a database or whatever you want.

Testing API with Postman

We have tested the GET methods of our Web API in our web browser and seen responses. But we can’t test directly POST, PUT and DELETE http methods in web browser.

If you want to test also other http methods you should use Postman or another http utility.

Now I’ll show you how to test the Web API with Postman

Before we start click here and install Postman.

When you first launch Postman after installing you’ll see start window. Close this start window by clicking close button on top right corner. Then you must see following screen.

An empty Postman request

Sending GET Request

Before sending a request to API we should start it by running npm startcommand as we do before.

After start the Web API and seeing “Server listening on…” message write localhost:3000/itemsto address bar as seen below and click Send button. You’ll see todo items array as API response like below.

Sending a GET request with Postman

You can try similarly by giving an item id in request url like this localhost:3000/items/3

Sending POST Request

To sending a POST request and create a new todo item write localhost:3000/items to address bar and change HTTP verb to POST by clicking arrow at front of the address bar as seen below.

Sending a POST request with Postman

Before sending the POST request you should add request data to body of the request by clicking body tab and selecting raw and JSON as seen below.

Attaching a JSON body to POST request in Postman

Now click Send button to send POST request to the Web API. Then you must get “201 Created” http response code and seeing created item in the response body.

To see the last status of todo items send a get request to localhost:3000/itemsaddress. You must see newly created item at the end of the list.

Sending PUT Request

Sending PUT request is very similar to sending POST request.

The most obvious difference is request url should be pointed specific item like this localhost:3000/items/3

And you should choose PUT as http verb instead of POST and send all of the required data in the request body unlike POST.

For example you could send a JSON body in the PUT request as below.

An example JSON body for PUT request

{
    "title": "New title of todo item",
    "order": 3,
    "completed": false
}

When you click Send button you must get “204 No Content” http response code. You can check item you updated by sending a get request.

Sending DELETE Request

To send a DELETE request, change the request url to address a specific item id like this localhost:3000/items/3

And select DELETE as http verb and click Send button.

You must get “204 No Content” http response code as result of the DELETE operation.

Send a get request and see the last status of list.

About the DELETE Http Request

I want to say a few words about DELETE http request. You must have noticed something in our delete code. DELETE request returns “204 No Content” every situation.

Http DELETE requests are idempotent. So what that mean? If you delete a resource on server by sending DELETE request, it’s removed from the collection. And every next DELETE request on the same resource won’t change outcome. So you won’t get “404 Not Found” in the second request. Each request returns same response whether succeed or not. That’s mean idempotent operation.

Conclusion

Finally we’ve tested all http methods of our Web API.

As you can see, it works just fine.

Thanks for reading ❤

If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!

#node-js #javascript #express #web-development #rest #api

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

An API-First Approach For Designing Restful APIs | Hacker Noon

I’ve been working with Restful APIs for some time now and one thing that I love to do is to talk about APIs.

So, today I will show you how to build an API using the API-First approach and Design First with OpenAPI Specification.

First thing first, if you don’t know what’s an API-First approach means, it would be nice you stop reading this and check the blog post that I wrote to the Farfetchs blog where I explain everything that you need to know to start an API using API-First.

Preparing the ground

Before you get your hands dirty, let’s prepare the ground and understand the use case that will be developed.

Tools

If you desire to reproduce the examples that will be shown here, you will need some of those items below.

  • NodeJS
  • OpenAPI Specification
  • Text Editor (I’ll use VSCode)
  • Command Line

Use Case

To keep easy to understand, let’s use the Todo List App, it is a very common concept beyond the software development community.

#api #rest-api #openai #api-first-development #api-design #apis #restful-apis #restful-api

Node JS Development Company| Node JS Web Developers-SISGAIN

Top organizations and start-ups hire Node.js developers from SISGAIN for their strategic software development projects in Illinois, USA. On the off chance that you are searching for a first rate innovation to assemble a constant Node.js web application development or a module, Node.js applications are the most appropriate alternative to pick. As Leading Node.js development company, we leverage our profound information on its segments and convey solutions that bring noteworthy business results. For more information email us at hello@sisgain.com

#node.js development services #hire node.js developers #node.js web application development #node.js development company #node js application