Mudit Singh

Mudit Singh

1568982499

Selenium Automation Testing with Disabled JavaScript Settings

Selenium has been a pinnacle for open-source software in the industry of automated website testing. The automation testing framework is widely adopted by the testing community to help them in automating interactions with their web-application for desktops.

I have been an automation tester from couple years now, and have been fondly towards Selenium ever since I knew what it’s capable of. Recently, I was pondering about a few questions though! What would happen if I disable JavaScript and then perform automation testing with Selenium? How would a website react then? Is it even possible? Is it even required?

The only way to know the answers to these questions was to have them tested myself. And I came up with interesting results. Which is why I am writing this article to share these results with you.

#javascript #testing #web-development

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Selenium Automation Testing with Disabled JavaScript Settings
Aurelie  Block

Aurelie Block

1598916060

Top 10 Automation Testing Tools: 2020 Edition

The demand for delivering quality software faster — or “Quality at Speed” — requires organizations to search for solutions in Agile, continuous integration (CI), and DevOps methodologies. Test automation is an essential part of these aspects. The latest World Quality Report 2018–2019 suggests that test automation is the biggest bottleneck to deliver “Quality at Speed,” as it is an enabler of successful Agile and DevOps adoption.

Test automation cannot be realized without good tools; as they determine how automation is performed and whether the benefits of automation can be delivered. Test automation tools is a crucial component in the DevOps toolchain. The current test automation trends have increased in applying artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) to offer advanced capabilities for test optimization, intelligent test generation, execution, and reporting. It will be worthwhile to understand which tools are best poised to take advantage of these trends.****

#automation-testing #automation-testing-tools #testing #testing-tools #selenium #open-source #test-automation #automated-testing

Anthony  Dach

Anthony Dach

1627025027

What's New in Selenium 4?

The newly released Selenium 4 is creating a lot of buzz and the complete testing community is looking forward to exploring its updated features.

Selenium has gone through a tremendous evolution since its introduction and that’s the reason today it is the most popular and powerful automation testing tool. The newly released Selenium 4 is creating a lot of buzz and the complete testing community is looking forward to exploring its updated features.

Before we dive into Selenium 4, let’s have a brief introduction to its previous versions. Selenium 1 was declared as the free open source automation testing framework in the year 2004 consisting of selenium IDE, RC, and web driver. Whereas, the Selenium 2 released in 2011 consisted of the IDE, Web driver, and Grid. The RC server was merged with the web driver, as the web driver facilitated easy automation scripting for the browsers. Selenium 3 was officially released in 2016. One of the most noticeable changes in selenium 3 was the replacement of the selenium core with the web driver-backed option, the introduction of the gecko driver, and W3C web driver integration.

With the aim of executing much seamless, accurate and faster test automation, Selenium 4 was released on 24th April 2019. So let’s unleash all the major features of selenium 4 which sets it apart from the earlier versions delivering better test automation. There are a lot of exciting features in Selenium 4 across the complete suite i.e. Selenium IDE, Webdriver and Grid. In Selenium 4 though the Webdriver captures the spotlight, we will cover the updated features of selenium IDE and selenium grid. So first of all let’s define the different user groups for the Selenium suite.

Selenium is a suite of tools that caters to the various requirements of the project such as:

  • Selenium IDE (Integrated Development Environment) Supports Rapid test development. This record/run tool helps in preparing test cases. Selenium IDE is an easy-to-use tool from the Selenium Test Suite which is used for developing automated test cases for web applications.
  • Selenium Webdriver provides flexible and seamless automation through a friendly and flexible API. It can perform automation in almost all programming languages.
  • The grid helps in providing automation testing by distributing and running the test cases in multiple machines simultaneously.

Let us explore the features of Selenium 4 across the different Selenium Tools.

#selenium #automation testing #selenium automation #selenium automated testing #selenium test automation #selenium 4

Anthony  Dach

Anthony Dach

1621163880

An Intro to Build Automation Tools for Selenium Automation Testing

Being an automation tester, we do realize that in a release cycle, time is always of the essence! Selenium test automation helps to save us a considerable amount of time in our test cycles. However, it is pivotal to note the way through which you are executing your Selenium testing scripts. Which frameworks are you using? Are you doing it with an in-house infrastructure or with an online Selenium Grid? Are you making use of build automation tools or not?!

Build automation tools like Maven, Gradle and ANT provide you to accelerate the Selenium test automation even further. Not only do they help you manage build lifecycles, dependencies but they also allow you to perform parallel test execution. In this post, we are going to understand why every automation tester needs a build management tool for Selenium testing.

What Are Build Automation Tools?

Build automation tools allow us to orchestrate our project builds by automating the processes for handling Selenium dependencies, compiling source code to binary & then later packages the binary. All in order to run automation testing. Build automation tools have become pivotal for the software development & testing process. These tools help developers in completing day to day activities like.

  • Downloading dependencies
  • Generation of the source code and extracting documentation from it
  • Compiling the source code
  • Packaging the compiled source code
  • Installing packaged code into a server, local or a central repository
  • Running Tests

#selenium #automation #testing #build-automation-tools #selenium-automation-testing #lambda #test-cycles #coding

Is Selenium Automation Testing with Disabled JavaScript Settings Worth Your Time?

Selenium has been a pinnacle for open-source software in the industry of automated website testing. The automation testing framework is widely adopted by the testing community to help them in automating interactions with their web-application for desktops.

I have been an automation tester from couple years now, and have been fondly towards Selenium ever since I knew what it’s capable of. Recently, I was pondering about a few questions though! What would happen if I disable JavaScript and then perform automation testing with Selenium? How would a website react then? Is it even possible? Is it even required?

The only way to know the answers to these questions was to have them tested myself. And I came up with interesting results. Which is why I am writing this article to share these results with you.

Things That Can Be Done With JavaScript & Things That Can’t Be!

I am sure you must be intrigued to know if there is a need for testing a web application after disabling the JavaScript? However, before I answer that question we need to understand what you can do as a tester with JavaScript & what you cannot!

Things You Can Do With JavaScript

  • Access and modify all the content visible on the web page such as text, images, videos or any other kind of private data.
  • Access the cookies sent by the web server.
  • Make request to other servers for data capturing.

Things You Can’t Do With JavaScript

  • Accessing files stored in your local system other than those uploaded on a web page.
  • Accessing data from other web pages open in other tabs or on different browsers.
  • Accessing and controlling the hardware capabilities of your system.
  • Accessing any kind of stuff related to extensions and plugins which have been installed.

Now that you know the purpose of JavaScript. You may be wondering about the reason for your end user to disable JavaScript in their browsers while surfing the internet?

Why Would A User Visit Your Website With JavaScript Disabled?

Believe it or not! Some of us actually prefer to surf the internet with JavaScript disabled in our browsers. Why?

Well, by disabling JavaScript we aim to achieve an interrupted user-experience of a website’s content. Doing so eliminates of the pop-ups, advertisements, warnings etc.Let us take a scenario to understand this better.

Mike, a web developer, is a curious reader who wishes to keep him up-to-date on the latest technologies by reading blogs, webinars, video tutorials. Mike visited your website from search engine and is curious to read your blog around cross browser testing. However, the moment he lands on your website, he encounters a huge pop-up asking him to enroll to your newspaper. He closes the pop-up, clicks on your cross browser testing article, and scrolled further below. Now, he unintentionally clicked on a sponsored content. As a result, a new tab opened which routed him somewhere he never wanted to be.

What do you think Mike would be feeling right now?

Well, he may feel disappointed with the overall experience of the website. And such pop-ups are quite common to encounter on any website over the internet. Which is why, Mike made sure to disable the JavaScript to ensure he doesn’t encounter more pop-ups, alerts, warnings, advertisements etc. from your website.

However, the moment Mike disables JavaScript, your website collapsed entirely! The content rendered in an absurd manner. Your website images with embedded hyperlinks to related articles broke down & started showing the links separately than image.

#selenium #test-automation #javascript #manual-testing #latest-tech-stories #hackernoon-top-story #javascript-top-story #qa-checklist

Anthony  Dach

Anthony Dach

1624261887

6 Popular Challenges In Automation Testing using Selenium

Selenium is one of the most popular automated testing frameworks, with a market share of about 26.4% in the software testing tools category. This open-source testing framework enables you to automate user actions on your software application under test.

Using this free testing framework, you can also verify & validate your software products across multiple browsers. Additionally, you can create Selenium test scripts using various programming languages such as C#, Java, Python, etc.

The Selenium automation software consists of a host of software tools to cater to an organization’s different quality engineering needs. These are:

  1. Selenium IDE (Integrated Development Environment)
  2. Selenium RC (Remote Control)
  3. Selenium WebDriver
  4. Selenium Grid

Even though Selenium is among the most preferable web-app testing frameworks, it is not completely flawless. This automation framework has its fair share of challenges that developers face while working with it. Let us discuss some of the most common challenges and how you can tackle each of them.

#selenium #selenium-webdriver #selenium-automation-testing #test-automation #software-testing-tools #deployment-challenges #software-quality-assurance #software-testing