Inside ABCD, A Dataset To Build In-Depth Task-Oriented Dialogue Systems

According to a recent study, call centre agents’ spend approximately 82 percent of their total time looking at step-by-step guides, customer data, and knowledge base articles.

Traditionally, dialogue state tracking (DST) has served as a way to determine what a caller wants at a given point in a conversation. Unfortunately, these aspects are not accounted for in popular DST benchmarks. DST is the core part of a spoken dialogue system. It estimates the beliefs of possible user’s goals at every dialogue turn.

To reduce the burden on call centre agents and improve the SOTA of task-oriented dialogue systems, AI-powered customer service company ASAPP recently launched an action-based conversations dataset (ABCD). The dataset is designed to help develop task-oriented dialogue systems for customer service applications. ABCD consists of a fully labelled dataset with over 10,000 human dialogues containing 55 distinct user intents requiring sequences of actions constrained by company policies to accomplish tasks.

https://twitter.com/asapp/status/1397928363923177472

The dataset is currently available on GitHub.

#developers corner #asapp abcd dataset #asapp new dataset #build enterprise chatbot #chatbot datasets latest #customer support datasets #customer support model training #dataset for chatbots #dataset for customer datasets

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Inside ABCD, A Dataset To Build In-Depth Task-Oriented Dialogue Systems

Inside ABCD, A Dataset To Build In-Depth Task-Oriented Dialogue Systems

According to a recent study, call centre agents’ spend approximately 82 percent of their total time looking at step-by-step guides, customer data, and knowledge base articles.

Traditionally, dialogue state tracking (DST) has served as a way to determine what a caller wants at a given point in a conversation. Unfortunately, these aspects are not accounted for in popular DST benchmarks. DST is the core part of a spoken dialogue system. It estimates the beliefs of possible user’s goals at every dialogue turn.

To reduce the burden on call centre agents and improve the SOTA of task-oriented dialogue systems, AI-powered customer service company ASAPP recently launched an action-based conversations dataset (ABCD). The dataset is designed to help develop task-oriented dialogue systems for customer service applications. ABCD consists of a fully labelled dataset with over 10,000 human dialogues containing 55 distinct user intents requiring sequences of actions constrained by company policies to accomplish tasks.

https://twitter.com/asapp/status/1397928363923177472

The dataset is currently available on GitHub.

#developers corner #asapp abcd dataset #asapp new dataset #build enterprise chatbot #chatbot datasets latest #customer support datasets #customer support model training #dataset for chatbots #dataset for customer datasets

Inside ABCD: Dataset To Build In-Depth Task-Oriented Dialogue Systems

According to a recent study, call centre agents’ spend approximately 82 percent of their total time looking at step-by-step guides, customer data, and knowledge base articles.

Read more: https://analyticsindiamag.com/inside-abcd-a-dataset-to-build-in-depth-task-oriented-dialogue-systems/

#dataset

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1620633584

System Databases in SQL Server

Introduction

In SSMS, we many of may noticed System Databases under the Database Folder. But how many of us knows its purpose?. In this article lets discuss about the System Databases in SQL Server.

System Database

Fig. 1 System Databases

There are five system databases, these databases are created while installing SQL Server.

  • Master
  • Model
  • MSDB
  • Tempdb
  • Resource
Master
  • This database contains all the System level Information in SQL Server. The Information in form of Meta data.
  • Because of this master database, we are able to access the SQL Server (On premise SQL Server)
Model
  • This database is used as a template for new databases.
  • Whenever a new database is created, initially a copy of model database is what created as new database.
MSDB
  • This database is where a service called SQL Server Agent stores its data.
  • SQL server Agent is in charge of automation, which includes entities such as jobs, schedules, and alerts.
TempDB
  • The Tempdb is where SQL Server stores temporary data such as work tables, sort space, row versioning information and etc.
  • User can create their own version of temporary tables and those are stored in Tempdb.
  • But this database is destroyed and recreated every time when we restart the instance of SQL Server.
Resource
  • The resource database is a hidden, read only database that holds the definitions of all system objects.
  • When we query system object in a database, they appear to reside in the sys schema of the local database, but in actually their definitions reside in the resource db.

#sql server #master system database #model system database #msdb system database #sql server system databases #ssms #system database #system databases in sql server #tempdb system database

Jupyter Notebook Kernel for Running ansible Tasks and Playbooks

Ansible Jupyter Kernel

Example Jupyter Usage

The Ansible Jupyter Kernel adds a kernel backend for Jupyter to interface directly with Ansible and construct plays and tasks and execute them on the fly.

Demo

Demo

Installation:

ansible-kernel is available to be installed from pypi but you can also install it locally. The setup package itself will register the kernel with Jupyter automatically.

From pypi

pip install ansible-kernel
python -m ansible_kernel.install

From a local checkout

pip install -e .
python -m ansible_kernel.install

For Anaconda/Miniconda

pip install ansible-kernel
python -m ansible_kernel.install --sys-prefix

Usage

Local install

    jupyter notebook
    # In the notebook interface, select Ansible from the 'New' menu

Container

docker run -p 8888:8888 benthomasson/ansible-jupyter-kernel

Then copy the URL from the output into your browser:
http://localhost:8888/?token=ABCD1234

Using the Cells

Normally Ansible brings together various components in different files and locations to launch a playbook and performs automation tasks. For this jupyter interface you need to provide this information in cells by denoting what the cell contains and then finally writing your tasks that will make use of them. There are Examples available to help you, in this section we'll go over the currently supported cell types.

In order to denote what the cell contains you should prefix it with a pound/hash symbol (#) and the type as listed here as the first line as shown in the examples below.

#inventory

The inventory that your tasks will use

#inventory
[all]
ahost ansible_connection=local
anotherhost examplevar=val

#play

This represents the opening block of a typical Ansible play

#play
name: Hello World
hosts: all
gather_facts: false

#task

This is the default cell type if no type is given for the first line

#task
debug:
#task
shell: cat /tmp/afile
register: output

#host_vars

This takes an argument that represents the hostname. Variables defined in this file will be available in the tasks for that host.

#host_vars Host1
hostname: host1

#group_vars

This takes an argument that represents the group name. Variables defined in this file will be available in the tasks for hosts in that group.

#group_vars BranchOfficeX
gateway: 192.168.1.254

#vars

This takes an argument that represents the filename for use in later cells

#vars example_vars
message: hello vars
#play
name: hello world
hosts: localhost
gather_facts: false
vars_files:
    - example_vars

#template

This takes an argument in order to create a templated file that can be used in later cells

#template hello.j2
{{ message }}
#task
template:
    src: hello.j2
    dest: /tmp/hello

#ansible.cfg

Provides overrides typically found in ansible.cfg

#ansible.cfg
[defaults]
host_key_checking=False

Examples

You can find various example notebooks in the repository

Using the development environment

It's possible to use whatever python development process you feel comfortable with. The repository itself includes mechanisms for using pipenv

pipenv install
...
pipenv shell

Author: ansible
Source Code:  https://github.com/ansible/ansible-jupyter-kernel
License: Apache-2.0 License

#jupyter #python 

Learn CRUD Operations in JavaScript by Building TODO APP

Today we're gonna learn how to do CRUD Operations in JavaScript by making a Todo App. Let's get started 🔥

This is the app we're making today:

App that we're making today

What is CRUD?

Image description

CRUD stands for -

  • C: Create
  • R: Read
  • U: Update
  • D: Delete

CRUD Fullform

CRUD is a type of mechanism that allows you to create data, read data, edit it, and delete those data. In our case, we're gonna make a Todo app, so we will have 4 options to create tasks, read tasks, update tasks, or delete tasks.

Understanding CRUD Principles

Before starting the tutorial, first, let's understand the CRUD principles. For that, let's create a very very simple Social Media Application.

Social Media App Project

Setup

Project Setup

For this project, we will be following these steps below:

  • Create 3 files named index.html, style.css, and main.js
  • Link the JavaScript and CSS file to index.html
  • Start your live server

HTML

Inside the body tag, create a div with a class name .container. There, we will have 2 sections, .left and .right 👇

<body>
  <h1>Social Media App</h1>
  <div class="container">

    <div class="left"></div>
    <div class="right"></div>

  </div>
</body>

On the left side, we will create our posts. On the right side, we can see, update, and delete our posts. Now, create a form inside the .left div tag 👇

<div class="left">
  <form id="form">
    <label for="post"> Write your post here</label>
    <br><br>
    <textarea name="post" id="input" cols="30" rows="10"></textarea>
    <br> <br>
    <div id="msg"></div>
    <button type="submit">Post</button>
  </form>
</div>

Write this code inside the HTML so that we can display our post on the right side 👇

<div class="right">
  <h3>Your posts here</h3>
  <div id="posts"></div>
</div>

Next, we'll insert the font-awesome CDN inside the head tag to use its fonts in our project 👇

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/font-awesome/5.15.4/css/all.min.css" />

Now, we're gonna make some sample posts with delete and edit icons. Write this code inside the div with the id #posts: 👇

<div id="posts">
  <div>
    <p>Hello world post 1</p>
    <span class="options">
      <i class="fas fa-edit"></i>
      <i class="fas fa-trash-alt"></i>
    </span>
  </div>

  <div >
    <p>Hello world post 2</p>
    <span class="options">
      <i class="fas fa-edit"></i>
      <i class="fas fa-trash-alt"></i>
    </span>
  </div>
</div>

The result so far looks like this:

HTML Markup result

CSS

Adding CSS for project 1

Let's keep it simple. Write these styles inside your stylesheet: 👇

body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  margin: 0 50px;
}

.container {
  display: flex;
  gap: 50px;
}

#posts {
  width: 400px;
}

i {
  cursor: pointer;
}

Now, write these styles for the post div and option icons: 👇

#posts div {
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.options {
  display: flex;
  gap: 25px;
}

#msg {
  color: red;
}

The results so far look like this:👇

The result after adding the css part project 1

JavaScript Part

Starting the javascript part

According to this flow chart, we will go forward with the project. Don't worry, I'll explain everything along the way. 👇

flow chart

Form Validation

First, let's target all the ID selectors from the HTML in JavaScript. Like this: 👇

let form = document.getElementById("form");
let input = document.getElementById("input");
let msg = document.getElementById("msg");
let posts = document.getElementById("posts");

Then, build a submit event listener for the form so that it can prevent the default behaviour of our App. At the same time, we will create a function named formValidation. 👇

form.addEventListener("submit", (e) => {
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log("button clicked");

  formValidation();
});

let formValidation = () => {};

Now, we're gonna make an if else statement inside our formValidation function. This will help us prevent users from submitting blank input fields. 👇

let formValidation = () => {
  if (input.value === "") {
    msg.innerHTML = "Post cannot be blank";
    console.log("failure");
  } else {
    console.log("successs");
    msg.innerHTML = "";
  }
};

Here's the result so far: 👇

7sb8faq21j5dzy9vlswj

As you can see, a message will also show up if the user tries to submit the form blank.

How to accept data from input fields

Whatever data we get from the input fields, we will store them in an object. Let's create an object named data. And, create a function named acceptData: 👇

let data = {};

let acceptData = () => {};

The main idea is that, using the function, we collect data from the inputs and store them in our object named data. Now let's finish building our acceptData function.

let acceptData = () => {
  data["text"] = input.value;
  console.log(data);
};

Also, we need the acceptData function to work when the user clicks the submit button. For that, we will fire this function in the else statement of our formValidation function. 👇

let formValidation = () => {
  if (input.value === "") {
    // Other codes are here
  } else {
    // Other codes are here
    acceptData();
  }
};

When we input data and submit the form, on the console we can see an object holding our user's input values. Like this: 👇

result so far on the console

How to create posts using JavaScript template literals

In order to post our input data on the right side, we need to create a div element and append it to the posts div. First, let's create a function and write these lines: 👇

let createPost = () => {
  posts.innerHTML += ``;
};

The backticks are template literals. It will work as a template for us. Here, we need 3 things: a parent div, the input itself, and the options div which carries the edit and delete icons. Let's finish our function 👇

let createPost = () => {
  posts.innerHTML += `
  <div>
    <p>${data.text}</p>
    <span class="options">
      <i onClick="editPost(this)" class="fas fa-edit"></i>
      <i onClick="deletePost(this)" class="fas fa-trash-alt"></i>
    </span>
  </div>
  `;
  input.value = "";
};

In our acceptdata function, we will fire our createPost function. Like this: 👇

let acceptData = () => {
  // Other codes are here

  createPost();
};

The result so far: 👇

Result so far

So far so good guys, we're almost done with project 1.

so far so good

How to delete a post

In order to delete a post, first of all, let's create a function inside our javascript file:

let deletePost = (e) => {};

Next up, we fire this deletePost function inside all of our delete icons using an onClick attribute. You'll write these lines in HTML and on the template literal. 👇

<i onClick="deletePost(this)" class="fas fa-trash-alt"></i>

The this keyword will refer to the element that fired the event. in our case, the this refers to the delete button.

Look carefully, the parent of the delete button is the span with class name options. The parent of the span is the div. So, we write parentElement twice so that we can jump from the delete icon to the div and target it directly to remove it.

Let's finish our function. 👇

let deletePost = (e) => {
  e.parentElement.parentElement.remove();
};

The result so far: 👇

deleting a post result

How to edit a post

In order to edit a post, first of all, let's create a function inside our JavaScript file:

let editPost = (e) => {};

Next up, we fire this editPost function inside all of our edit icons using an onClick attribute. You'll write these lines in HTML and on the template literal. 👇

<i onClick="editPost(this)" class="fas fa-edit"></i>

The this keyword will refer to the element that fired the event. In our case, the this refers to the edit button.

Look carefully, the parent of the edit button is the span with class name options. The parent of the span is the div. So, we write parentElement twice so that we can jump from the edit icon to the div and target it directly to remove it.

Then, whatever data is inside the post, we bring it back on the input field to edit it.

Let's finish our function. 👇

let editPost = (e) => {
  input.value = e.parentElement.previousElementSibling.innerHTML;
  e.parentElement.parentElement.remove();
};

The result so far: 👇

Editing a post result

Take a Break!

Take a Break

Congratulations everyone for completing project 1. Now, take a small break!

How to Make a To-Do App using CRUD Operations

Let's make a todo app

Let's start making project 2, which is a To-Do App.

Project Setup

Project setup

For this project, we will be following these steps below:

  • Create 3 files named index.html, style.css, and main.js
  • Link the JavaScript and CSS files to index.html
  • Start our live server

HTML

Write this starter code inside the HTML file: 👇

<div class="app">
  <h4 class="mb-3">TODO App</h4>

  <div id="addNew" data-bs-toggle="modal" data-bs-target="#form">
    <span>Add New Task</span>
    <i class="fas fa-plus"></i>
  </div>
</div>

The div with an id addNew is the button that will open the modal. The span will be displayed on the button. The i is the icon from font-awesome.

We're going to use bootstrap to make our modal. We'll use the modal to add new tasks. For that, add the bootstrap CDN link inside the head tag. 👇

<link
  href="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/bootstrap@5.1.3/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"
  rel="stylesheet"
  integrity="sha384-1BmE4kWBq78iYhFldvKuhfTAU6auU8tT94WrHftjDbrCEXSU1oBoqyl2QvZ6jIW3"
  crossorigin="anonymous"
/>

<script
  src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/bootstrap@5.1.3/dist/js/bootstrap.bundle.min.js"
  integrity="sha384-ka7Sk0Gln4gmtz2MlQnikT1wXgYsOg+OMhuP+IlRH9sENBO0LRn5q+8nbTov4+1p"
  crossorigin="anonymous"
></script>

To see the created tasks, we'll use a div with an id tasks, inside the div with the classname app. 👇

<h5 class="text-center my-3">Tasks</h5>

<div id="tasks"></div>

Insert the font-awesome CDN inside the head tag to use fonts in our project 👇

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/font-awesome/5.15.4/css/all.min.css" />

Copy and paste the code below which are from the bootstrap modal. It carries a form with 3 input fields and a submit button. If you want then you can search Bootstrap's website by writing 'modal' in the search bar.

<!-- Modal -->
<form
  class="modal fade"
  id="form"
  tabindex="-1"
  aria-labelledby="exampleModalLabel"
  aria-hidden="true"
>
  <div class="modal-dialog">
    <div class="modal-content">
      <div class="modal-header">
        <h5 class="modal-title" id="exampleModalLabel">Add New Task</h5>
        <button
          type="button"
          class="btn-close"
          data-bs-dismiss="modal"
          aria-label="Close"
        ></button>
      </div>
      <div class="modal-body">
        <p>Task Title</p>
        <input type="text" class="form-control" name="" id="textInput" />
        <div id="msg"></div>
        <br />
        <p>Due Date</p>
        <input type="date" class="form-control" name="" id="dateInput" />
        <br />
        <p>Description</p>
        <textarea
          name=""
          class="form-control"
          id="textarea"
          cols="30"
          rows="5"
        ></textarea>
      </div>
      <div class="modal-footer">
        <button type="button" class="btn btn-secondary" data-bs-dismiss="modal">
          Close
        </button>
        <button type="submit" id="add" class="btn btn-primary">Add</button>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</form>

The result so far: 👇

Html file setup

We're done with the HTML file setup. Let's start the CSS.

CSS

Adding the css part

Add these styles in the body so that we can keep our app at the exact center of the screen.

body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  margin: 0 50px;
  background-color: #e5e5e5;
  overflow: hidden;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  height: 100vh;
}

Let's style the div with the classname app. 👇

.app {
  background-color: #fff;
  width: 300px;
  height: 500px;
  border: 5px solid #abcea1;
  border-radius: 8px;
  padding: 15px;
}

The result so far: 👇

App styles

Now, let's style the button with the id addNew. 👇

#addNew {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: space-between;
  align-items: center;
  background-color: rgba(171, 206, 161, 0.35);
  padding: 5px 10px;
  border-radius: 5px;
  cursor: pointer;
}
.fa-plus {
  background-color: #abcea1;
  padding: 3px;
  border-radius: 3px;
}

The result so far: 👇

Add new task Button

If you click on the button, the modal pops up like this: 👇

Modal poping

Add the JS

Adding the JavaScript

In the JavaScript file, first of all, select all the selectors from the HTML that we need to use. 👇

let form = document.getElementById("form");
let textInput = document.getElementById("textInput");
let dateInput = document.getElementById("dateInput");
let textarea = document.getElementById("textarea");
let msg = document.getElementById("msg");
let tasks = document.getElementById("tasks");
let add = document.getElementById("add");

Form Validations

We cannot let a user submit blank input fields. So, we need to validate the input fields. 👇

form.addEventListener("submit", (e) => {
  e.preventDefault();
  formValidation();
});

let formValidation = () => {
  if (textInput.value === "") {
    console.log("failure");
    msg.innerHTML = "Task cannot be blank";
  } else {
    console.log("success");
    msg.innerHTML = "";
  }
};

Also, add this line inside the CSS:

#msg {
  color: red;
}

The result so far: 👇

Image description

As you can see, the validation is working. The JavaScript code doesn't let the user submit blank input fields, otherwise you're gonna see an error message.

How to collect data and use local storage

Whatever inputs the user writes, we need to collect them and store them in local storage.

First, we collect the data from the input fields, using the function named acceptData and an array named data. Then we push them inside the local storage like this: 👇

let data = [];

let acceptData = () => {
  data.push({
    text: textInput.value,
    date: dateInput.value,
    description: textarea.value,
  });

  localStorage.setItem("data", JSON.stringify(data));

  console.log(data);
};

Also note that this will never work unless you invoke the function acceptData inside the else statement of the form validation. Follow along here: 👇

let formValidation = () => {

  // Other codes are here
   else {

    // Other codes are here

    acceptData();
  }
};

You may have noticed that the modal doesn't close automatically. To solve this, write this small function inside the else statement of the form validation: 👇

let formValidation = () => {

  // Other codes are here
   else {

    // Other codes are here

    acceptData();
    add.setAttribute("data-bs-dismiss", "modal");
    add.click();

    (() => {
      add.setAttribute("data-bs-dismiss", "");
    })();
  }
};

If you open Chrome dev tools, go to the application and open the local storage. You can see this result: 👇

Local Storage Result

How to create new tasks

In order to create a new task, we need to create a function, use template literals to create the HTML elements, and use a map to push the data collected from the user inside the template. Follow along here: 👇

let createTasks = () => {
  tasks.innerHTML = "";
  data.map((x, y) => {
    return (tasks.innerHTML += `
    <div id=${y}>
          <span class="fw-bold">${x.text}</span>
          <span class="small text-secondary">${x.date}</span>
          <p>${x.description}</p>
  
          <span class="options">
            <i onClick= "editTask(this)" data-bs-toggle="modal" data-bs-target="#form" class="fas fa-edit"></i>
            <i onClick ="deleteTask(this);createTasks()" class="fas fa-trash-alt"></i>
          </span>
        </div>
    `);
  });

  resetForm();
};

Also note that the function will never run unless you invoke it inside the acceptData function, like this: 👇

let acceptData = () => {
  // Other codes are here

  createTasks();
};

Once we're done collecting and accepting data from the user, we need to clear the input fields. For that we create a function called resetForm. Follow along: 👇

let resetForm = () => {
  textInput.value = "";
  dateInput.value = "";
  textarea.value = "";
};

The result so far: 👇

Adding task cards

As you can see, there's no styles with the card. Let's add some styles: 👇

#tasks {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 1fr;
  gap: 14px;
}

#tasks div {
  border: 3px solid #abcea1;
  background-color: #e2eede;
  border-radius: 6px;
  padding: 5px;
  display: grid;
  gap: 4px;
}

Style the edit and delete buttons with this code: 👇

#tasks div .options {
  justify-self: center;
  display: flex;
  gap: 20px;
}

#tasks div .options i {
  cursor: pointer;
}

The result so far: 👇

Styles card templates

Function to delete a task

Look here carefully, I added 3 lines of code inside the function.

  • The first line will delete the HTML element from the screen,
  • the second line will remove the targetted Task from the data array,
  • and the third line will update the local storage with the new data.
let deleteTask = (e) => {
  e.parentElement.parentElement.remove();

  data.splice(e.parentElement.parentElement.id, 1);

  localStorage.setItem("data", JSON.stringify(data));

  console.log(data);
};

Now create a dummy task and try to delete it. The result so far looks like this: 👇

Image description

Function to edit tasks

Look here carefully, I added 5 lines of code inside the function.

  • Line 1 is targetting the task that we selected to edit
  • Lines 2, 3, and 4, are targetting the values [task, date, description] of the task that we selected to edit
  • line 5 is running the delete function to remove the selected data both from the local storage, HTML element, and data array.
let editTask = (e) => {
  let selectedTask = e.parentElement.parentElement;

  textInput.value = selectedTask.children[0].innerHTML;
  dateInput.value = selectedTask.children[1].innerHTML;
  textarea.value = selectedTask.children[2].innerHTML;

  deleteTask(e);
};

Now, try to create a dummy task and edit it. The result so far: 👇

Editing a Task

How to get data from local storage

If you refresh the page, you'll note that all of your data is gone. In order to solve that issue, we run a IIFE (Immediately invoked function expression) to retrieve the data from local storage. Follow along: 👇

(() => {
  data = JSON.parse(localStorage.getItem("data")) || [];
  console.log(data);
  createTasks();
})();

Now the data will show up even if you refresh the page.

Conclusion

Congratulations

Congratulations for successfully completing this tutorial. You've learned how to create a todo list application using CRUD operations. Now, you can create your own CRUD application using this tutorial.

Here's your medal for reading until the end. ❤️

Source: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/learn-crud-operations-in-javascript-by-building-todo-app/

#javascript #crud #operator #todoapp