PySnooper: Never Use Print for Debugging Again

PySnooper - Never use print for debugging again. Learn how PySnooper can help you debug your Python code.

I had an idea for a debugging solution for Python that doesn't require complicated configuration like PyCharm. I released PySnooper as a cute little open-source project that does that, and to my surprise, it became a huge hit overnight, hitting the top of Hacker News, r/python and GitHub trending.

In this talk I'll go into:

* How PySnooper can help you debug your code.
* How you can write your own debugging / code intelligence tools.
* How to make your open-source project go viral.
* How to use PuDB, another debugging solution, to find bugs in your code."

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ 

#python #pysnooper

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

PySnooper: Never Use Print for Debugging Again
Tamale  Moses

Tamale Moses

1669003576

Exploring Mutable and Immutable in Python

In this Python article, let's learn about Mutable and Immutable in Python. 

Mutable and Immutable in Python

Mutable is a fancy way of saying that the internal state of the object is changed/mutated. So, the simplest definition is: An object whose internal state can be changed is mutable. On the other hand, immutable doesn’t allow any change in the object once it has been created.

Both of these states are integral to Python data structure. If you want to become more knowledgeable in the entire Python Data Structure, take this free course which covers multiple data structures in Python including tuple data structure which is immutable. You will also receive a certificate on completion which is sure to add value to your portfolio.

Mutable Definition

Mutable is when something is changeable or has the ability to change. In Python, ‘mutable’ is the ability of objects to change their values. These are often the objects that store a collection of data.

Immutable Definition

Immutable is the when no change is possible over time. In Python, if the value of an object cannot be changed over time, then it is known as immutable. Once created, the value of these objects is permanent.

List of Mutable and Immutable objects

Objects of built-in type that are mutable are:

  • Lists
  • Sets
  • Dictionaries
  • User-Defined Classes (It purely depends upon the user to define the characteristics) 

Objects of built-in type that are immutable are:

  • Numbers (Integer, Rational, Float, Decimal, Complex & Booleans)
  • Strings
  • Tuples
  • Frozen Sets
  • User-Defined Classes (It purely depends upon the user to define the characteristics)

Object mutability is one of the characteristics that makes Python a dynamically typed language. Though Mutable and Immutable in Python is a very basic concept, it can at times be a little confusing due to the intransitive nature of immutability.

Objects in Python

In Python, everything is treated as an object. Every object has these three attributes:

  • Identity – This refers to the address that the object refers to in the computer’s memory.
  • Type – This refers to the kind of object that is created. For example- integer, list, string etc. 
  • Value – This refers to the value stored by the object. For example – List=[1,2,3] would hold the numbers 1,2 and 3

While ID and Type cannot be changed once it’s created, values can be changed for Mutable objects.

Check out this free python certificate course to get started with Python.

Mutable Objects in Python

I believe, rather than diving deep into the theory aspects of mutable and immutable in Python, a simple code would be the best way to depict what it means in Python. Hence, let us discuss the below code step-by-step:

#Creating a list which contains name of Indian cities  

cities = [‘Delhi’, ‘Mumbai’, ‘Kolkata’]

# Printing the elements from the list cities, separated by a comma & space

for city in cities:
		print(city, end=’, ’)

Output [1]: Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata

#Printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(cities)))

Output [2]: 0x1691d7de8c8

#Adding a new city to the list cities

cities.append(‘Chennai’)

#Printing the elements from the list cities, separated by a comma & space 

for city in cities:
	print(city, end=’, ’)

Output [3]: Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai

#Printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(cities)))

Output [4]: 0x1691d7de8c8

The above example shows us that we were able to change the internal state of the object ‘cities’ by adding one more city ‘Chennai’ to it, yet, the memory address of the object did not change. This confirms that we did not create a new object, rather, the same object was changed or mutated. Hence, we can say that the object which is a type of list with reference variable name ‘cities’ is a MUTABLE OBJECT.

Let us now discuss the term IMMUTABLE. Considering that we understood what mutable stands for, it is obvious that the definition of immutable will have ‘NOT’ included in it. Here is the simplest definition of immutable– An object whose internal state can NOT be changed is IMMUTABLE.

Again, if you try and concentrate on different error messages, you have encountered, thrown by the respective IDE; you use you would be able to identify the immutable objects in Python. For instance, consider the below code & associated error message with it, while trying to change the value of a Tuple at index 0. 

#Creating a Tuple with variable name ‘foo’

foo = (1, 2)

#Changing the index[0] value from 1 to 3

foo[0] = 3
	
TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment 

Immutable Objects in Python

Once again, a simple code would be the best way to depict what immutable stands for. Hence, let us discuss the below code step-by-step:

#Creating a Tuple which contains English name of weekdays

weekdays = ‘Sunday’, ‘Monday’, ‘Tuesday’, ‘Wednesday’, ‘Thursday’, ‘Friday’, ‘Saturday’

# Printing the elements of tuple weekdays

print(weekdays)

Output [1]:  (‘Sunday’, ‘Monday’, ‘Tuesday’, ‘Wednesday’, ‘Thursday’, ‘Friday’, ‘Saturday’)

#Printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(weekdays)))

Output [2]: 0x1691cc35090

#tuples are immutable, so you cannot add new elements, hence, using merge of tuples with the # + operator to add a new imaginary day in the tuple ‘weekdays’

weekdays  +=  ‘Pythonday’,

#Printing the elements of tuple weekdays

print(weekdays)

Output [3]: (‘Sunday’, ‘Monday’, ‘Tuesday’, ‘Wednesday’, ‘Thursday’, ‘Friday’, ‘Saturday’, ‘Pythonday’)

#Printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(weekdays)))

Output [4]: 0x1691cc8ad68

This above example shows that we were able to use the same variable name that is referencing an object which is a type of tuple with seven elements in it. However, the ID or the memory location of the old & new tuple is not the same. We were not able to change the internal state of the object ‘weekdays’. The Python program manager created a new object in the memory address and the variable name ‘weekdays’ started referencing the new object with eight elements in it.  Hence, we can say that the object which is a type of tuple with reference variable name ‘weekdays’ is an IMMUTABLE OBJECT.

Also Read: Understanding the Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) in Python

Where can you use mutable and immutable objects:

Mutable objects can be used where you want to allow for any updates. For example, you have a list of employee names in your organizations, and that needs to be updated every time a new member is hired. You can create a mutable list, and it can be updated easily.

Immutability offers a lot of useful applications to different sensitive tasks we do in a network centred environment where we allow for parallel processing. By creating immutable objects, you seal the values and ensure that no threads can invoke overwrite/update to your data. This is also useful in situations where you would like to write a piece of code that cannot be modified. For example, a debug code that attempts to find the value of an immutable object.

Watch outs:  Non transitive nature of Immutability:

OK! Now we do understand what mutable & immutable objects in Python are. Let’s go ahead and discuss the combination of these two and explore the possibilities. Let’s discuss, as to how will it behave if you have an immutable object which contains the mutable object(s)? Or vice versa? Let us again use a code to understand this behaviour–

#creating a tuple (immutable object) which contains 2 lists(mutable) as it’s elements

#The elements (lists) contains the name, age & gender 

person = (['Ayaan', 5, 'Male'], ['Aaradhya', 8, 'Female'])

#printing the tuple

print(person)

Output [1]: (['Ayaan', 5, 'Male'], ['Aaradhya', 8, 'Female'])

#printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(person)))

Output [2]: 0x1691ef47f88

#Changing the age for the 1st element. Selecting 1st element of tuple by using indexing [0] then 2nd element of the list by using indexing [1] and assigning a new value for age as 4

person[0][1] = 4

#printing the updated tuple

print(person)

Output [3]: (['Ayaan', 4, 'Male'], ['Aaradhya', 8, 'Female'])

#printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(person)))

Output [4]: 0x1691ef47f88

In the above code, you can see that the object ‘person’ is immutable since it is a type of tuple. However, it has two lists as it’s elements, and we can change the state of lists (lists being mutable). So, here we did not change the object reference inside the Tuple, but the referenced object was mutated.

Also Read: Real-Time Object Detection Using TensorFlow

Same way, let’s explore how it will behave if you have a mutable object which contains an immutable object? Let us again use a code to understand the behaviour–

#creating a list (mutable object) which contains tuples(immutable) as it’s elements

list1 = [(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6)]

#printing the list

print(list1)

Output [1]: [(1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6)]

#printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(list1)))

Output [2]: 0x1691d5b13c8	

#changing object reference at index 0

list1[0] = (7, 8, 9)

#printing the list

Output [3]: [(7, 8, 9), (4, 5, 6)]

#printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(list1)))

Output [4]: 0x1691d5b13c8

As an individual, it completely depends upon you and your requirements as to what kind of data structure you would like to create with a combination of mutable & immutable objects. I hope that this information will help you while deciding the type of object you would like to select going forward.

Before I end our discussion on IMMUTABILITY, allow me to use the word ‘CAVITE’ when we discuss the String and Integers. There is an exception, and you may see some surprising results while checking the truthiness for immutability. For instance:
#creating an object of integer type with value 10 and reference variable name ‘x’ 

x = 10
 

#printing the value of ‘x’

print(x)

Output [1]: 10

#Printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(x)))

Output [2]: 0x538fb560

#creating an object of integer type with value 10 and reference variable name ‘y’

y = 10

#printing the value of ‘y’

print(y)

Output [3]: 10

#Printing the location of the object created in the memory address in hexadecimal format

print(hex(id(y)))

Output [4]: 0x538fb560

As per our discussion and understanding, so far, the memory address for x & y should have been different, since, 10 is an instance of Integer class which is immutable. However, as shown in the above code, it has the same memory address. This is not something that we expected. It seems that what we have understood and discussed, has an exception as well.

Quick checkPython Data Structures

Immutability of Tuple

Tuples are immutable and hence cannot have any changes in them once they are created in Python. This is because they support the same sequence operations as strings. We all know that strings are immutable. The index operator will select an element from a tuple just like in a string. Hence, they are immutable.

Exceptions in immutability

Like all, there are exceptions in the immutability in python too. Not all immutable objects are really mutable. This will lead to a lot of doubts in your mind. Let us just take an example to understand this.

Consider a tuple ‘tup’.

Now, if we consider tuple tup = (‘GreatLearning’,[4,3,1,2]) ;

We see that the tuple has elements of different data types. The first element here is a string which as we all know is immutable in nature. The second element is a list which we all know is mutable. Now, we all know that the tuple itself is an immutable data type. It cannot change its contents. But, the list inside it can change its contents. So, the value of the Immutable objects cannot be changed but its constituent objects can. change its value.

FAQs

1. Difference between mutable vs immutable in Python?

Mutable ObjectImmutable Object
State of the object can be modified after it is created.State of the object can’t be modified once it is created.
They are not thread safe.They are thread safe
Mutable classes are not final.It is important to make the class final before creating an immutable object.

2. What are the mutable and immutable data types in Python?

  • Some mutable data types in Python are:

list, dictionary, set, user-defined classes.

  • Some immutable data types are: 

int, float, decimal, bool, string, tuple, range.

3. Are lists mutable in Python?

Lists in Python are mutable data types as the elements of the list can be modified, individual elements can be replaced, and the order of elements can be changed even after the list has been created.
(Examples related to lists have been discussed earlier in this blog.)

4. Why are tuples called immutable types?

Tuple and list data structures are very similar, but one big difference between the data types is that lists are mutable, whereas tuples are immutable. The reason for the tuple’s immutability is that once the elements are added to the tuple and the tuple has been created; it remains unchanged.

A programmer would always prefer building a code that can be reused instead of making the whole data object again. Still, even though tuples are immutable, like lists, they can contain any Python object, including mutable objects.

5. Are sets mutable in Python?

A set is an iterable unordered collection of data type which can be used to perform mathematical operations (like union, intersection, difference etc.). Every element in a set is unique and immutable, i.e. no duplicate values should be there, and the values can’t be changed. However, we can add or remove items from the set as the set itself is mutable.

6. Are strings mutable in Python?

Strings are not mutable in Python. Strings are a immutable data types which means that its value cannot be updated.

Join Great Learning Academy’s free online courses and upgrade your skills today.


Original article source at: https://www.mygreatlearning.com

#python 

How to Bash Read Command

Bash has no built-in function to take the user’s input from the terminal. The read command of Bash is used to take the user’s input from the terminal. This command has different options to take an input from the user in different ways. Multiple inputs can be taken using the single read command. Different ways of using this command in the Bash script are described in this tutorial.

Syntax

read [options] [var1, var2, var3…]

The read command can be used without any argument or option. Many types of options can be used with this command to take the input of the particular data type. It can take more input from the user by defining the multiple variables with this command.

Some Useful Options of the Read Command

Some options of the read command require an additional parameter to use. The most commonly used options of the read command are mentioned in the following:

OptionPurpose
-d <delimiter>It is used to take the input until the delimiter value is provided.
-n <number>It is used to take the input of a particular number of characters from the terminal and stop taking the input earlier based on the delimiter.
-N <number>It is used to take the input of the particular number of characters from the terminal, ignoring the delimiter.
-p <prompt>It is used to print the output of the prompt message before taking the input.
-sIt is used to take the input without an echo. This option is mainly used to take the input for the password input.
-aIt is used to take the input for the indexed array.
-t <time>It is used to set a time limit for taking the input.
-u <file descriptor>It is used to take the input from the file.
-rIt is used to disable the backslashes.

 

Different Examples of the Read Command

The uses of read command with different options are shown in this part of this tutorial.

Example 1: Using Read Command without Any Option and variable

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command without any option and variable. If no variable is used with the read command, the input value is stored in the $REPLY variable. The value of this variable is printed later after taking the input.

#!/bin/bash  
#Print the prompt message
echo "Enter your favorite color: "  
#Take the input
read  
#Print the input value
echo "Your favorite color is $REPLY"

Output:

The following output appears if the “Blue” value is taken as an input:

Example 2: Using Read Command with a Variable

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command with a variable. The method of taking the single or multiple variables using a read command is shown in this example. The values of all variables are printed later.

#!/bin/bash  
#Print the prompt message
echo "Enter the product name: "  
#Take the input with a single variable
read item

#Print the prompt message
echo "Enter the color variations of the product: "  
#Take three input values in three variables
read color1 color2 color3

#Print the input value
echo "The product name is $item."  
#Print the input values
echo "Available colors are $color1, $color2, and $color3."

Output:

The following output appears after taking a single input first and three inputs later:

Example 3: Using Read Command with -p Option

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command with a variable and the -p option. The input value is printed later.

#!/bin/bash  
#Take the input with the prompt message
read -p "Enter the book name: " book
#Print the input value
echo "Book name: $book"

Output:

The following output appears after taking the input:

Example 4: Using Read Command with -s Option

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command with a variable and the -s option. The input value of the password will not be displayed for the -s option. The input values are checked later for authentication. A success or failure message is also printed.

#!/bin/bash  
#Take the input with the prompt message
read -p "Enter your email: " email
#Take the secret input with the prompt message
read -sp "Enter your password: " password

#Add newline
echo ""

#Check the email and password for authentication
if [[ $email == "admin@example.com" && $password == "secret" ]]
then
   #Print the success message
   echo "Authenticated."
else
   #Print the failure message
   echo "Not authenticated."
fi

Output:

The following output appears after taking the valid and invalid input values:

Example 5: Using Read Command with -a Option

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command with a variable and the -a option. The array values are printed later after taking the input values from the terminal.

#!/bin/bash  
echo "Enter the country names: "  
#Take multiple inputs using an array  
read -a countries

echo "Country names are:"
#Read the array values
for country in ${countries[@]}
do
    echo $country
done

Output:

The following output appears after taking the array values:

Example 6: Using Read Command with -n Option

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command with a variable and the -n option.

#!/bin/bash  
#Print the prompt message
echo "Enter the product code: "  
#Take the input of five characters
read -n 5 code
#Add newline
echo ""
#Print the input value
echo "The product code is $code"

Output:

The following output appears if the “78342” value is taken as input:

Example 7: Using Read Command with -t Option

Create a Bash file with the following script that takes the input from the terminal using the read command with a variable and the -t option.

#!/bin/bash  
#Print the prompt message
echo -n "Write the result of 10-6: "  
#Take the input of five characters
read -t 3 answer

#Check the input value
if [[ $answer == "4" ]]
then
   echo "Correct answer."
else
   echo "Incorrect answer."
fi

Output:

The following output appears after taking the correct and incorrect input values:

Conclusion

The uses of some useful options of the read command are explained in this tutorial using multiple examples to know the basic uses of the read command.

Original article source at: https://linuxhint.com/

#bash #command 

Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

Duong Tran

Duong Tran

1646796864

Sắp Xếp Danh Sách Trong Python Với Python.sort ()

Trong bài viết này, bạn sẽ học cách sử dụng phương pháp danh sách của Python sort().

Bạn cũng sẽ tìm hiểu một cách khác để thực hiện sắp xếp trong Python bằng cách sử dụng sorted()hàm để bạn có thể thấy nó khác với nó như thế nào sort().

Cuối cùng, bạn sẽ biết những điều cơ bản về sắp xếp danh sách bằng Python và biết cách tùy chỉnh việc sắp xếp để phù hợp với nhu cầu của bạn.

Phương pháp sort() - Tổng quan về cú pháp

Phương pháp sort() này là một trong những cách bạn có thể sắp xếp danh sách trong Python.

Khi sử dụng sort(), bạn sắp xếp một danh sách tại chỗ . Điều này có nghĩa là danh sách ban đầu được sửa đổi trực tiếp. Cụ thể, thứ tự ban đầu của các phần tử bị thay đổi.

Cú pháp chung cho phương thức sort() này trông giống như sau:

list_name.sort(reverse=..., key=... )

Hãy chia nhỏ nó:

  • list_name là tên của danh sách bạn đang làm việc.
  • sort()là một trong những phương pháp danh sách của Python để sắp xếp và thay đổi danh sách. Nó sắp xếp các phần tử danh sách theo thứ tự tăng dần hoặc giảm dần .
  • sort()chấp nhận hai tham số tùy chọn .
  • reverse là tham số tùy chọn đầu tiên. Nó chỉ định liệu danh sách sẽ được sắp xếp theo thứ tự tăng dần hay giảm dần. Nó nhận một giá trị Boolean, nghĩa là giá trị đó là True hoặc False. Giá trị mặc định là False , nghĩa là danh sách được sắp xếp theo thứ tự tăng dần. Đặt nó thành True sẽ sắp xếp danh sách ngược lại, theo thứ tự giảm dần.
  • key là tham số tùy chọn thứ hai. Nó có một hàm hoặc phương pháp được sử dụng để chỉ định bất kỳ tiêu chí sắp xếp chi tiết nào mà bạn có thể có.

Phương sort()thức trả về None, có nghĩa là không có giá trị trả về vì nó chỉ sửa đổi danh sách ban đầu. Nó không trả về một danh sách mới.

Cách sắp xếp các mục trong danh sách theo thứ tự tăng dần bằng phương pháp sort()

Như đã đề cập trước đó, theo mặc định, sort()sắp xếp các mục trong danh sách theo thứ tự tăng dần.

Thứ tự tăng dần (hoặc tăng dần) có nghĩa là các mặt hàng được sắp xếp từ giá trị thấp nhất đến cao nhất.

Giá trị thấp nhất ở bên trái và giá trị cao nhất ở bên phải.

Cú pháp chung để thực hiện việc này sẽ giống như sau:

list_name.sort()

Hãy xem ví dụ sau đây cho thấy cách sắp xếp danh sách các số nguyên:

# a list of numbers
my_numbers = [10, 8, 3, 22, 33, 7, 11, 100, 54]

#sort list in-place in ascending order
my_numbers.sort()

#print modified list
print(my_numbers)

#output

#[3, 7, 8, 10, 11, 22, 33, 54, 100]

Trong ví dụ trên, các số được sắp xếp từ nhỏ nhất đến lớn nhất.

Bạn cũng có thể đạt được điều tương tự khi làm việc với danh sách các chuỗi:

# a list of strings
programming_languages = ["Python", "Swift","Java", "C++", "Go", "Rust"]

#sort list in-place in alphabetical order
programming_languages.sort()

#print modified list
print(programming_languages)

#output

#['C++', 'Go', 'Java', 'Python', 'Rust', 'Swift']

Trong trường hợp này, mỗi chuỗi có trong danh sách được sắp xếp theo thứ tự không tuân theo.

Như bạn đã thấy trong cả hai ví dụ, danh sách ban đầu đã được thay đổi trực tiếp.

Cách sắp xếp các mục trong danh sách theo thứ tự giảm dần bằng phương pháp sort()

Thứ tự giảm dần (hoặc giảm dần) ngược lại với thứ tự tăng dần - các phần tử được sắp xếp từ giá trị cao nhất đến thấp nhất.

Để sắp xếp các mục trong danh sách theo thứ tự giảm dần, bạn cần sử dụng reverse tham số tùy chọn với phương thức sort() và đặt giá trị của nó thành True.

Cú pháp chung để thực hiện việc này sẽ giống như sau:

list_name.sort(reverse=True)

Hãy sử dụng lại cùng một ví dụ từ phần trước, nhưng lần này làm cho nó để các số được sắp xếp theo thứ tự ngược lại:

# a list of numbers
my_numbers = [10, 8, 3, 22, 33, 7, 11, 100, 54]

#sort list in-place in descending order
my_numbers.sort(reverse=True)

#print modified list
print(my_numbers)

#output

#[100, 54, 33, 22, 11, 10, 8, 7, 3]

Bây giờ tất cả các số được sắp xếp ngược lại, với giá trị lớn nhất ở bên tay trái và giá trị nhỏ nhất ở bên phải.

Bạn cũng có thể đạt được điều tương tự khi làm việc với danh sách các chuỗi.

# a list of strings
programming_languages = ["Python", "Swift","Java", "C++", "Go", "Rust"]

#sort list in-place in  reverse alphabetical order
programming_languages.sort(reverse=True)

#print modified list
print(programming_languages)

#output

#['Swift', 'Rust', 'Python', 'Java', 'Go', 'C++']

Các mục danh sách hiện được sắp xếp theo thứ tự bảng chữ cái ngược lại.

Cách sắp xếp các mục trong danh sách bằng cách sử dụng key tham số với phương thức sort()

Bạn có thể sử dụng key tham số để thực hiện các thao tác sắp xếp tùy chỉnh hơn.

Giá trị được gán cho key tham số cần phải là thứ có thể gọi được.

Callable là thứ có thể được gọi, có nghĩa là nó có thể được gọi và tham chiếu.

Một số ví dụ về các đối tượng có thể gọi là các phương thức và hàm.

Phương thức hoặc hàm được gán cho key này sẽ được áp dụng cho tất cả các phần tử trong danh sách trước khi bất kỳ quá trình sắp xếp nào xảy ra và sẽ chỉ định logic cho tiêu chí sắp xếp.

Giả sử bạn muốn sắp xếp danh sách các chuỗi dựa trên độ dài của chúng.

Đối với điều đó, bạn chỉ định len()hàm tích hợp cho key tham số.

Hàm len()sẽ đếm độ dài của từng phần tử được lưu trong danh sách bằng cách đếm các ký tự có trong phần tử đó.

programming_languages = ["Python", "Swift","Java", "C++", "Go", "Rust"]

programming_languages.sort(key=len)

print(programming_languages)

#output

#['Go', 'C++', 'Java', 'Rust', 'Swift', 'Python']

Trong ví dụ trên, các chuỗi được sắp xếp theo thứ tự tăng dần mặc định, nhưng lần này việc sắp xếp xảy ra dựa trên độ dài của chúng.

Chuỗi ngắn nhất ở bên trái và dài nhất ở bên phải.

Các keyreverse tham số cũng có thể được kết hợp.

Ví dụ: bạn có thể sắp xếp các mục trong danh sách dựa trên độ dài của chúng nhưng theo thứ tự giảm dần.

programming_languages = ["Python", "Swift","Java", "C++", "Go", "Rust"]

programming_languages.sort(key=len, reverse=True)

print(programming_languages)

#output

#['Python', 'Swift', 'Java', 'Rust', 'C++', 'Go']

Trong ví dụ trên, các chuỗi đi từ dài nhất đến ngắn nhất.

Một điều cần lưu ý nữa là bạn có thể tạo một chức năng sắp xếp tùy chỉnh của riêng mình, để tạo các tiêu chí sắp xếp rõ ràng hơn.

Ví dụ: bạn có thể tạo một hàm cụ thể và sau đó sắp xếp danh sách theo giá trị trả về của hàm đó.

Giả sử bạn có một danh sách các từ điển với các ngôn ngữ lập trình và năm mà mỗi ngôn ngữ lập trình được tạo ra.

programming_languages = [{'language':'Python','year':1991},
{'language':'Swift','year':2014},
{'language':'Java', 'year':1995},
{'language':'C++','year':1985},
{'language':'Go','year':2007},
{'language':'Rust','year':2010},
]

Bạn có thể xác định một hàm tùy chỉnh nhận giá trị của một khóa cụ thể từ từ điển.

💡 Hãy nhớ rằng khóa từ điển và key tham số sort()chấp nhận là hai thứ khác nhau!

Cụ thể, hàm sẽ lấy và trả về giá trị của year khóa trong danh sách từ điển, chỉ định năm mà mọi ngôn ngữ trong từ điển được tạo.

Giá trị trả về sau đó sẽ được áp dụng làm tiêu chí sắp xếp cho danh sách.

programming_languages = [{'language':'Python','year':1991},
{'language':'Swift','year':2014},
{'language':'Java', 'year':1995},
{'language':'C++','year':1985},
{'language':'Go','year':2007},
{'language':'Rust','year':2010},
]

def get_year(element):
    return element['year']

Sau đó, bạn có thể sắp xếp theo giá trị trả về của hàm bạn đã tạo trước đó bằng cách gán nó cho key tham số và sắp xếp theo thứ tự thời gian tăng dần mặc định:

programming_languages = [{'language':'Python','year':1991},
{'language':'Swift','year':2014},
{'language':'Java', 'year':1995},
{'language':'C++','year':1985},
{'language':'Go','year':2007},
{'language':'Rust','year':2010},
]

def get_year(element):
    return element['year']

programming_languages.sort(key=get_year)

print(programming_languages)

Đầu ra:

[{'language': 'C++', 'year': 1985}, {'language': 'Python', 'year': 1991}, {'language': 'Java', 'year': 1995}, {'language': 'Go', 'year': 2007}, {'language': 'Rust', 'year': 2010}, {'language': 'Swift', 'year': 2014}]

Nếu bạn muốn sắp xếp từ ngôn ngữ được tạo gần đây nhất đến ngôn ngữ cũ nhất hoặc theo thứ tự giảm dần, thì bạn sử dụng reverse=Truetham số:

programming_languages = [{'language':'Python','year':1991},
{'language':'Swift','year':2014},
{'language':'Java', 'year':1995},
{'language':'C++','year':1985},
{'language':'Go','year':2007},
{'language':'Rust','year':2010},
]

def get_year(element):
    return element['year']

programming_languages.sort(key=get_year, reverse=True)

print(programming_languages)

Đầu ra:

[{'language': 'Swift', 'year': 2014}, {'language': 'Rust', 'year': 2010}, {'language': 'Go', 'year': 2007}, {'language': 'Java', 'year': 1995}, {'language': 'Python', 'year': 1991}, {'language': 'C++', 'year': 1985}]

Để đạt được kết quả chính xác, bạn có thể tạo một hàm lambda.

Thay vì sử dụng hàm tùy chỉnh thông thường mà bạn đã xác định bằng def từ khóa, bạn có thể:

  • tạo một biểu thức ngắn gọn một dòng,
  • và không xác định tên hàm như bạn đã làm với def hàm. Các hàm lambda còn được gọi là các hàm ẩn danh .
programming_languages = [{'language':'Python','year':1991},
{'language':'Swift','year':2014},
{'language':'Java', 'year':1995},
{'language':'C++','year':1985},
{'language':'Go','year':2007},
{'language':'Rust','year':2010},
]

programming_languages.sort(key=lambda element: element['year'])

print(programming_languages)

Hàm lambda được chỉ định với dòng key=lambda element: element['year']sắp xếp các ngôn ngữ lập trình này từ cũ nhất đến mới nhất.

Sự khác biệt giữa sort()sorted()

Phương sort()thức hoạt động theo cách tương tự như sorted()hàm.

Cú pháp chung của sorted()hàm trông như sau:

sorted(list_name,reverse=...,key=...)

Hãy chia nhỏ nó:

  • sorted()là một hàm tích hợp chấp nhận một có thể lặp lại. Sau đó, nó sắp xếp nó theo thứ tự tăng dần hoặc giảm dần.
  • sorted()chấp nhận ba tham số. Một tham số là bắt buộc và hai tham số còn lại là tùy chọn.
  • list_name là tham số bắt buộc . Trong trường hợp này, tham số là danh sách, nhưng sorted()chấp nhận bất kỳ đối tượng có thể lặp lại nào khác.
  • sorted()cũng chấp nhận các tham số tùy chọn reversekey, đó là các tham số tùy chọn tương tự mà phương thức sort() chấp nhận.

Sự khác biệt chính giữa sort()sorted()sorted()hàm nhận một danh sách và trả về một bản sao được sắp xếp mới của nó.

Bản sao mới chứa các phần tử của danh sách ban đầu theo thứ tự được sắp xếp.

Các phần tử trong danh sách ban đầu không bị ảnh hưởng và không thay đổi.

Vì vậy, để tóm tắt sự khác biệt:

  • Phương sort()thức không có giá trị trả về và trực tiếp sửa đổi danh sách ban đầu, thay đổi thứ tự của các phần tử chứa trong nó.
  • Mặt khác, sorted()hàm có giá trị trả về, là một bản sao đã được sắp xếp của danh sách ban đầu. Bản sao đó chứa các mục danh sách của danh sách ban đầu theo thứ tự được sắp xếp. Cuối cùng, danh sách ban đầu vẫn còn nguyên vẹn.

Hãy xem ví dụ sau để xem nó hoạt động như thế nào:

#original list of numbers
my_numbers = [10, 8, 3, 22, 33, 7, 11, 100, 54]

#sort original list in default ascending order
my_numbers_sorted = sorted(my_numbers)

#print original list
print(my_numbers)

#print the copy of the original list that was created
print(my_numbers_sorted)

#output

#[10, 8, 3, 22, 33, 7, 11, 100, 54]
#[3, 7, 8, 10, 11, 22, 33, 54, 100]

Vì không có đối số bổ sung nào được cung cấp sorted(), nó đã sắp xếp bản sao của danh sách ban đầu theo thứ tự tăng dần mặc định, từ giá trị nhỏ nhất đến giá trị lớn nhất.

Và khi in danh sách ban đầu, bạn thấy rằng nó vẫn được giữ nguyên và các mục có thứ tự ban đầu.

Như bạn đã thấy trong ví dụ trên, bản sao của danh sách đã được gán cho một biến mới my_numbers_sorted,.

Một cái gì đó như vậy không thể được thực hiện với sort().

Hãy xem ví dụ sau để xem điều gì sẽ xảy ra nếu điều đó được thực hiện với phương thức sort().

my_numbers = [10, 8, 3, 22, 33, 7, 11, 100, 54]

my_numbers_sorted = my_numbers.sort()

print(my_numbers)
print(my_numbers_sorted)

#output

#[3, 7, 8, 10, 11, 22, 33, 54, 100]
#None

Bạn thấy rằng giá trị trả về của sort()None.

Cuối cùng, một điều khác cần lưu ý là các reversekey tham số mà sorted()hàm chấp nhận hoạt động giống hệt như cách chúng thực hiện với phương thức sort() bạn đã thấy trong các phần trước.

Khi nào sử dụng sort()sorted()

Dưới đây là một số điều bạn có thể muốn xem xét khi quyết định có nên sử dụng sort()vs. sorted()

Trước tiên, hãy xem xét loại dữ liệu bạn đang làm việc:

  • Nếu bạn đang làm việc nghiêm ngặt với một danh sách ngay từ đầu, thì bạn sẽ cần phải sử dụng sort()phương pháp này vì sort()chỉ được gọi trong danh sách.
  • Mặt khác, nếu bạn muốn linh hoạt hơn và chưa làm việc với danh sách, thì bạn có thể sử dụng sorted(). Hàm sorted()chấp nhận và sắp xếp mọi thứ có thể lặp lại (như từ điển, bộ giá trị và bộ) chứ không chỉ danh sách.

Tiếp theo, một điều khác cần xem xét là liệu bạn có giữ được thứ tự ban đầu của danh sách mà bạn đang làm việc hay không:

  • Khi gọi sort(), danh sách ban đầu sẽ bị thay đổi và mất thứ tự ban đầu. Bạn sẽ không thể truy xuất vị trí ban đầu của các phần tử danh sách. Sử dụng sort()khi bạn chắc chắn muốn thay đổi danh sách đang làm việc và chắc chắn rằng bạn không muốn giữ lại thứ tự đã có.
  • Mặt khác, sorted()nó hữu ích khi bạn muốn tạo một danh sách mới nhưng bạn vẫn muốn giữ lại danh sách bạn đang làm việc. Hàm sorted()sẽ tạo một danh sách được sắp xếp mới với các phần tử danh sách được sắp xếp theo thứ tự mong muốn.

Cuối cùng, một điều khác mà bạn có thể muốn xem xét khi làm việc với các tập dữ liệu lớn hơn, đó là hiệu quả về thời gian và bộ nhớ:

  • Phương sort()pháp này chiếm dụng và tiêu tốn ít bộ nhớ hơn vì nó chỉ sắp xếp danh sách tại chỗ và không tạo ra danh sách mới không cần thiết mà bạn không cần. Vì lý do tương tự, nó cũng nhanh hơn một chút vì nó không tạo ra một bản sao. Điều này có thể hữu ích khi bạn đang làm việc với danh sách lớn hơn chứa nhiều phần tử hơn.

Phần kết luận

Và bạn có nó rồi đấy! Bây giờ bạn đã biết cách sắp xếp một danh sách trong Python bằng sort()phương pháp này.

Bạn cũng đã xem xét sự khác biệt chính giữa sắp xếp danh sách bằng cách sử dụng sort()sorted().

Tôi hy vọng bạn thấy bài viết này hữu ích.

Để tìm hiểu thêm về ngôn ngữ lập trình Python, hãy xem Chứng chỉ Máy tính Khoa học với Python của freeCodeCamp .

Bạn sẽ bắt đầu từ những điều cơ bản và học theo cách tương tác và thân thiện với người mới bắt đầu. Bạn cũng sẽ xây dựng năm dự án vào cuối để áp dụng vào thực tế và giúp củng cố những gì bạn đã học được.

Nguồn: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/python-sort-how-to-sort-a-list-in-python/

#python 

渚  直樹

渚 直樹

1636598700

Pythonでリストを昇順および降順でソートする

リストを昇順および降順でソートするためのPythonプログラム。このPythonチュートリアルでは、リストの要素をPythonで昇順と降順で並べ替える方法を紹介します。

pythonの組み込みメソッド名sort()を使用します。これは、リストの要素/オブジェクトを昇順および降順で並べ替えるために使用されます。

ソートメソッドの基本構文:

 list.sort()

リストを昇順および降順でソートするためのPythonプログラム

  • リスト要素を昇順でソートするPythonプログラム
  • リスト要素を降順でソートするPythonプログラム

リスト要素を昇順でソートするPythonプログラム

# List of integers
num = [100, 200, 500, 600, 300]
 
# sorting and printing 
num.sort()
 
#print
print(num)
 
# List of float numbers
fnum = [100.43, 50.72, 90.65, 16.00, 04.41]
 
# sorting and printing
fnum.sort()
 
#print
print(fnum)
 
# List of strings 
str = ["Test", "My", "Word", "Tag", "Has"]
 
# sorting and  printing
str.sort()
 
#print
print(str)

Pythonプログラムを実行すると、出力は次のようになります。

[100、200、300、500、600]
[4.41、16.0、50.72、90.65、100.43]
['Has'、 'My'、 'Tag'、 'Test'、 'Word']

上で知っているように、リスト要素を昇順で並べ替える方法。次に、sort()メソッドを使用してリストを降順で並べ替える方法を説明します。

sort()メソッドを使用して引数としてreverse = Trueを渡し、リスト要素を降順で並べ替えます。

リスト要素を降順でソートする次のプログラムを見ることができます。

リスト要素を降順でソートするPythonプログラム

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
# List of integers
num = [100, 200, 500, 600, 300]
 
# sorting and printing 
num.sort(reverse=True)
 
#print
print(num)
 
# List of float numbers
fnum = [100.43, 50.72, 90.65, 16.00, 04.41]
 
# sorting and printing
fnum.sort(reverse=True)
 
#print
print(fnum)
 
# List of strings 
str = ["Test", "My", "Word", "Tag", "Has"]
 
# sorting and  printing
str.sort(reverse=True)
 
#print
print(str)

プログラムの実行後、出力は次のようになります。

[600、500、300、200、100] 
[100.43、90.65、50.72、16.0、4.41] 
['Word'、 'Test'、 'Tag'、 'My'、 'Has']

リンク: https://www.tutsmake.com/python-program-to-sort-list-in-ascending-and-descending-order/

#python