Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1598552040

Graph Analytics with py2neo

Network data is everywhere and it is becoming increasingly important for data scientists to have a working knowledge of graph analytics. One challenge that data scientists often face is the lack of scalability of graph analytics solutions. In this blog, I discuss how you can use py2neo combined with neo4j to build a scalable graph analytics solution from scratch.

Many libraries in python have been created to perform graph analytics. The most popular ones are networkxscikit-networks, and graph-tool. All of these packages are great; however, if you are working with large amounts of data, you might want to consider using the power of neo4j.

Neo4j is a graph database which means that it is designed specifically for the storage and analysis of large graph datasets. Think about transactional databases of supermarkets or network data from social media platforms. The neo4j community edition is a free version of neo4j that can be downloaded by anyone.

**Py2neo **is a python package that allows the programmer to use the power of neo4j in python. It works by establishing a connection to neo4j which allows the programmer to execute queries on the neo4j database and write the results to a pandas dataframe (or other data types). Unfortunately, the documentation of Py2neo is not perfect (see this thread). Below, I have outlined all the steps that need to be taken to start using py2neo for your next graph analytics project.y2neo


Making the py2neo connection to neo4j work will probably be the hardest part of your graph analysis project. With the steps below, however; you can get started in less than 10 minutes!

**Step 1: **download the neo4j community edition

#analytics #social-network #data-science #python #graph-analytics #neural networks

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Graph Analytics with py2neo
Art  Lind

Art Lind

1598817300

How Graph Analytics Can Transform Your Business

See how graph databases can offer data modeling and analysis capabilities your business can leverage to model real-world systems and answer challenging questions.

Introduction

Your business is operating in an ever more connected world where the understanding of complex relationships and interdependencies between different data points is crucial to many decision-making processes. This is the main reason why graph databases have gained a lot of interest in the past few years and have become that fastest-growing database category. They offer powerful data modeling and analysis capabilities your business can use to easily model real-world complex systems and answer challenging questions previously hard to address.

What Is a Graph Database?

You might not be aware of it, but many of the services you use on a daily basis are powered by a graph database. Such examples include Google’s search engine, Linkedin’s connection recommendations, UberEats food recommendations and Gmail’s autocomplete feature. Simply put, a graph database is a data management system specifically engineered and optimized to store and analyze complex networks of connected data where relationships are equally important to individual data points. As a result, they offer a highly efficient, flexible, and overall elegant way to discover connections and patterns within your data that are otherwise very hard to see.

Let’s take the example of an insurance fraud network.

#graph database #graph algorithms #graph analytics #data analytic

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1621327800

Graphs and Knowledge Connexions. The Year of the Graph Newsletter, Autumn 2020

As 2020 is coming to an end, let’s see it off in style. Our journey in the world of Graph Analytics, Graph Databases, Knowledge Graphs and Graph AI culminate.

The representation of the relationships among data, information, knowledge and --ultimately-- wisdom, known as the data pyramid, has long been part of the language of information science. Digital transformation has made this relevant beyond the confines of information science. COVID-19 has brought years’ worth of digital transformation in just a few short months.

In this new knowledge-based digital world, encoding and making use of business and operational knowledge is the key to making progress and staying competitive. So how do we go from data to information, and from information to knowledge? This is the key question Knowledge Connexions aims to address.

Graphs in all shapes and forms are a key part of this.


Knowledge Connexions is a visionary event featuring a rich array of technological building blocks to support the transition to a knowledge-based economy: Connecting data, people and ideas, building a global knowledge ecosystem.

The Year of the Graph will be there, in the workshop “From databases to platforms: the evolution of Graph databases”. George Anadiotis, Alan Morrison, Steve Sarsfield, Juan Sequeda and Steven Xi bring many years of expertise in the domain, and will analyze Graph Databases from all possible angles.

This is the first step in the relaunch of the Year of the Graph Database Report. Year of the Graph Newsletter subscribers just got a 25% discount code. To be always in the know, subscribe to the newsletter, and follow the newly launched Year of the Graph account on Twitter! In addition to getting the famous YotG news stream every day, you will also get a 25% discount code.

#database #machine learning #artificial intelligence #data science #graph databases #graph algorithms #graph analytics #emerging technologies #knowledge graphs #semantic technologies

Luna  Mosciski

Luna Mosciski

1595932020

Graph Therapy: The Year of the Graph Newsletter, June/May 2020

Parts of the world are still in lockdown, while others are returning to some semblance of normalcy. Either way, while the last few months have given some things pause, they have boosted others. It seems like developments in the world of Graphs are among those that have been boosted.

An abundance of educational material on all things graph has been prepared and delivered online, and is now freely accessible, with more on the way.

Graph databases have been making progress and announcements, repositioning themselves by a combination of releasing new features, securing additional funds, and entering strategic partnerships.

A key graph database technology, RDF*, which enables compatibility between RDF and property graph databases, is gaining momentum and tool support.

And more cutting edge research combining graph AI and knowledge graphs is seeing the light, too. Buckle up and enjoy some graph therapy.


Stanford’s series of online seminars featured some of the world’s leading experts on all things graph. If you missed it, or if you’d like to have an overview of what was said, you can find summaries for each lecture in this series of posts by Bob Kasenchak and Ahren Lehnert. Videos from the lectures are available here.

Stanford Knowledge Graph Course Not-Quite-Live-Blog

Stanford University’s computer science department is offering a free class on Knowledge Graphs available to the public. Stanford is also making recordings of the class available via the class website.


Another opportunity to get up to speed with educational material: The entire program of the course “Information Service Engineering” at KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, is delivered online and made freely available on YouTube. It includes topics such as ontology design, knowledge graph programming, basic graph theory, and more.

Information Service Engineering at KIT

Knowledge representation as a prerequisite for knowledge graphs. Learn about knowledge representation, ontologies, RDF(S), OWL, SPARQL, etc.


Ontology may sound like a formal term, while knowledge graph is a more approachable one. But the 2 are related, and so is ontology and AI. Without a consistent, thoughtful approach to developing, applying, evolving an ontology, AI systems lack underpinning that would allow them to be smart enough to make an impact.

The ontology is an investment that will continue to pay off, argue Seth Earley and Josh Bernoff in Harvard Business Review, making the case for how businesses may benefit from a knowldge-centric approach

Is Your Data Infrastructure Ready for AI?

Even after multiple generations of investments and billions of dollars of digital transformations, organizations struggle to use data to improve customer service, reduce costs, and speed the core processes that provide competitive advantage. AI was supposed to help with that.


Besides AI, knowledge graphs have a part to play in the Cloud, too. State is good, and lack of support for Stateful Cloud-native applications is a roadblock for many enterprise use-cases, writes Dave Duggal.

Graph knowledge bases are an old idea now being revisited to model complex, distributed domains. Combining high-level abstraction with Cloud-native design principles offers efficient “Context-as-a-Service” for hydrating stateless services. Graph knowledge-based systems can enable composition of Cloud-native services into event-driven dataflow processes.

Kubernetes also touches upon Organizational Knowledge, and that may be modeled as a Knowledge Graph.

Graph Knowledge Base for Stateful Cloud-Native Applications

Extending graph knowledge bases to model distributed systems creates a new kind of information system, one intentionally designed for today’s IT challenges.


The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Foundation was recently established to define best practices and mature the marketplace for EKG adoption, with a launch webinar on June the 23rd.

The Foundation defines its mission as including adopting semantic standards, developing best practices for accelerated EKG deployment, curating a repository of reusable models and resources, building a mechanism for engagement and shared knowledge, and advancing the business cases for EKG adoption.

Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model

The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model (EKG/MM) is the industry-standard definition of the capabilities required for an enterprise knowledge graph. It establishes standard criteria for measuring progress and sets out the practical questions that all involved stakeholders ask to ensure trust, confidence and usage flexibility of data. Each capability area provides a business summary denoting its importance, a definition of the added value from semantic standards and scoring criteria based on five levels of defined maturity.


Enterprise Knowledge Graphs is what the Semantic Web Company (SWC) and Ontotext have been about for a long time, too. Two of the vendors in this space that have been around for the longer time just announced a strategic partnership: Ontotext, a graph database and platform provider, meets SWC, a management and added value layer that sits on top.

SWC and Ontotext CEOs emphasize how their portfolios are complementary, while the press release states that the companies have implemented a seamless integration of the PoolParty Semantic Suite™ v.8 with the GraphDB™ and Ontotext Platform, which offers benefits for many use cases.

#database #artificial intelligence #graph databases #rdf #graph analytics #knowledge graph #graph technology

Luna  Mosciski

Luna Mosciski

1595924640

Graph Therapy: The Year of the Graph Newsletter, June/May 2020

Parts of the world are still in lockdown, while others are returning to some semblance of normalcy. Either way, while the last few months have given some things pause, they have boosted others. It seems like developments in the world of Graphs are among those that have been boosted.

An abundance of educational material on all things graph has been prepared and delivered online, and is now freely accessible, with more on the way.

Graph databases have been making progress and announcements, repositioning themselves by a combination of releasing new features, securing additional funds, and entering strategic partnerships.

A key graph database technology, RDF*, which enables compatibility between RDF and property graph databases, is gaining momentum and tool support.

And more cutting edge research combining graph AI and knowledge graphs is seeing the light, too. Buckle up and enjoy some graph therapy.


Stanford’s series of online seminars featured some of the world’s leading experts on all things graph. If you missed it, or if you’d like to have an overview of what was said, you can find summaries for each lecture in this series of posts by Bob Kasenchak and Ahren Lehnert. Videos from the lectures are available here.

Stanford Knowledge Graph Course Not-Quite-Live-Blog

Stanford University’s computer science department is offering a free class on Knowledge Graphs available to the public. Stanford is also making recordings of the class available via the class website.


Another opportunity to get up to speed with educational material: The entire program of the course “Information Service Engineering” at KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, is delivered online and made freely available on YouTube. It includes topics such as ontology design, knowledge graph programming, basic graph theory, and more.

Information Service Engineering at KIT

Knowledge representation as a prerequisite for knowledge graphs. Learn about knowledge representation, ontologies, RDF(S), OWL, SPARQL, etc.


Ontology may sound like a formal term, while knowledge graph is a more approachable one. But the 2 are related, and so is ontology and AI. Without a consistent, thoughtful approach to developing, applying, evolving an ontology, AI systems lack underpinning that would allow them to be smart enough to make an impact.

The ontology is an investment that will continue to pay off, argue Seth Earley and Josh Bernoff in Harvard Business Review, making the case for how businesses may benefit from a knowldge-centric approach

Is Your Data Infrastructure Ready for AI?

Even after multiple generations of investments and billions of dollars of digital transformations, organizations struggle to use data to improve customer service, reduce costs, and speed the core processes that provide competitive advantage. AI was supposed to help with that.


Besides AI, knowledge graphs have a part to play in the Cloud, too. State is good, and lack of support for Stateful Cloud-native applications is a roadblock for many enterprise use-cases, writes Dave Duggal.

Graph knowledge bases are an old idea now being revisited to model complex, distributed domains. Combining high-level abstraction with Cloud-native design principles offers efficient “Context-as-a-Service” for hydrating stateless services. Graph knowledge-based systems can enable composition of Cloud-native services into event-driven dataflow processes.

Kubernetes also touches upon Organizational Knowledge, and that may be modeled as a Knowledge Graph.

Graph Knowledge Base for Stateful Cloud-Native Applications

Extending graph knowledge bases to model distributed systems creates a new kind of information system, one intentionally designed for today’s IT challenges.


The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Foundation was recently established to define best practices and mature the marketplace for EKG adoption, with a launch webinar on June the 23rd.

The Foundation defines its mission as including adopting semantic standards, developing best practices for accelerated EKG deployment, curating a repository of reusable models and resources, building a mechanism for engagement and shared knowledge, and advancing the business cases for EKG adoption.

Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model

The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model (EKG/MM) is the industry-standard definition of the capabilities required for an enterprise knowledge graph. It establishes standard criteria for measuring progress and sets out the practical questions that all involved stakeholders ask to ensure trust, confidence and usage flexibility of data. Each capability area provides a business summary denoting its importance, a definition of the added value from semantic standards and scoring criteria based on five levels of defined maturity.


Enterprise Knowledge Graphs is what the Semantic Web Company (SWC) and Ontotext have been about for a long time, too. Two of the vendors in this space that have been around for the longer time just announced a strategic partnership: Ontotext, a graph database and platform provider, meets SWC, a management and added value layer that sits on top.

SWC and Ontotext CEOs emphasize how their portfolios are complementary, while the press release states that the companies have implemented a seamless integration of the PoolParty Semantic Suite™ v.8 with the GraphDB™ and Ontotext Platform, which offers benefits for many use cases.

#database #artificial intelligence #graph databases #rdf #graph analytics #knowledge graph #graph technology

Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1598552040

Graph Analytics with py2neo

Network data is everywhere and it is becoming increasingly important for data scientists to have a working knowledge of graph analytics. One challenge that data scientists often face is the lack of scalability of graph analytics solutions. In this blog, I discuss how you can use py2neo combined with neo4j to build a scalable graph analytics solution from scratch.

Many libraries in python have been created to perform graph analytics. The most popular ones are networkxscikit-networks, and graph-tool. All of these packages are great; however, if you are working with large amounts of data, you might want to consider using the power of neo4j.

Neo4j is a graph database which means that it is designed specifically for the storage and analysis of large graph datasets. Think about transactional databases of supermarkets or network data from social media platforms. The neo4j community edition is a free version of neo4j that can be downloaded by anyone.

**Py2neo **is a python package that allows the programmer to use the power of neo4j in python. It works by establishing a connection to neo4j which allows the programmer to execute queries on the neo4j database and write the results to a pandas dataframe (or other data types). Unfortunately, the documentation of Py2neo is not perfect (see this thread). Below, I have outlined all the steps that need to be taken to start using py2neo for your next graph analytics project.y2neo


Making the py2neo connection to neo4j work will probably be the hardest part of your graph analysis project. With the steps below, however; you can get started in less than 10 minutes!

**Step 1: **download the neo4j community edition

#analytics #social-network #data-science #python #graph-analytics #neural networks