Justyn  Ortiz

Justyn Ortiz

1597366800

flowtrackd: DDoS Protection with Unidirectional TCP Flow Tracking

Magic Transit is Cloudflare’s L3 DDoS Scrubbing service for protecting network infrastructure. As part of our ongoing investment in Magic Transit and our DDoS protection capabilities, we’re excited to talk about a new piece of software helping to protect Magic Transit customers: flowtrackd. flowtrackd is a software-defined DDoS protection system that significantly improves our ability to automatically detect and mitigate even the most complex TCP-based DDoS attacks. If you are a Magic Transit customer, this feature will be enabled by default at no additional cost on July 30, 2020.

"I know you call this service Magic Transit, but now I know why." - Webhost Limited, when first hearing about flowtrackd

TCP-Based DDoS Attacks

In the first quarter of 2020, one out of every two L3/4 DDoS attacks Cloudflare mitigated was an ACK Flood, and over 66% of all L3/4 attacks were TCP based. Most types of DDoS attacks can be mitigated by finding unique characteristics that are present in all attack packets and using that to distinguish ‘good’ packets from the ‘bad’ ones. This is called “stateless” mitigation, because any packet that has these unique characteristics can simply be dropped without remembering any information (or “state”) about the other packets that came before it. However, when attack packets have no unique characteristics, then “stateful” mitigation is required, because whether a certain packet is good or bad depends on the other packets that have come before it.

The most sophisticated types of TCP flood require stateful mitigation, where every TCP connection must be tracked in order to know whether any particular TCP packet is part of an active connection. That kind of mitigation is called “flow tracking”, and it is typically implemented in Linux by the iptables conntrack module. However, DDoS protection with conntrack is not as simple as flipping the iptable switch, especially at the scale and complexity that Cloudflare operates in. If you’re interested to learn more, in this blog we talk about the technical challenges of implementing iptables conntrack.

Complex TCP DDoS attacks pose a threat as they can be harder to detect and mitigate. They therefore have the potential to cause service degradation, outages and increased false positives with inaccurate mitigation rules. So how does Cloudflare block patternless DDoS attacks without affecting legitimate traffic?

Bidirectional TCP Flow Tracking

Using Cloudflare’s traditional products, HTTP applications can be protected by the WAF service, and TCP/UDP applications can be protected by Spectrum. These services are “reverse proxies”, meaning that traffic passes through Cloudflare in both directions. In this bidirectional topology, we see the entire TCP flow (i.e., segments sent by both the client and the server) and can therefore track the state of the underlying TCP connection. This way, we know if a TCP packet belongs to an existing flow or if it is an “out of state” TCP packet. Out of state TCP packets look just like regular TCP packets, but they don’t belong to any real connection between a client and a server. These packets are most likely part of an attack and are therefore dropped.

Reverse Proxy: What Cloudflare Sees

While not trivial, tracking TCP flows can be done when we serve as a proxy between the client and server, allowing us to absorb and mitigate out of state TCP floods. However it becomes much more challenging when we only see half of the connection: the ingress flow. This visibility into ingress but not egress flows is the default deployment method for Cloudflare’s Magic Transit service, so we had our work cut out for us in identifying out of state packets.

The Challenge With Unidirectional TCP Flows

With Magic Transit, Cloudflare receives inbound internet traffic on behalf of the customer, scrubs DDoS attacks, and routes the clean traffic to the customer’s data center over a tunnel. The data center then responds directly to the eyeball client using a technique known as Direct Server Return (DSR).

#ddos #security #tcp #magic transit #gatebot

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

flowtrackd: DDoS Protection with Unidirectional TCP Flow Tracking
Justyn  Ortiz

Justyn Ortiz

1597366800

flowtrackd: DDoS Protection with Unidirectional TCP Flow Tracking

Magic Transit is Cloudflare’s L3 DDoS Scrubbing service for protecting network infrastructure. As part of our ongoing investment in Magic Transit and our DDoS protection capabilities, we’re excited to talk about a new piece of software helping to protect Magic Transit customers: flowtrackd. flowtrackd is a software-defined DDoS protection system that significantly improves our ability to automatically detect and mitigate even the most complex TCP-based DDoS attacks. If you are a Magic Transit customer, this feature will be enabled by default at no additional cost on July 30, 2020.

"I know you call this service Magic Transit, but now I know why." - Webhost Limited, when first hearing about flowtrackd

TCP-Based DDoS Attacks

In the first quarter of 2020, one out of every two L3/4 DDoS attacks Cloudflare mitigated was an ACK Flood, and over 66% of all L3/4 attacks were TCP based. Most types of DDoS attacks can be mitigated by finding unique characteristics that are present in all attack packets and using that to distinguish ‘good’ packets from the ‘bad’ ones. This is called “stateless” mitigation, because any packet that has these unique characteristics can simply be dropped without remembering any information (or “state”) about the other packets that came before it. However, when attack packets have no unique characteristics, then “stateful” mitigation is required, because whether a certain packet is good or bad depends on the other packets that have come before it.

The most sophisticated types of TCP flood require stateful mitigation, where every TCP connection must be tracked in order to know whether any particular TCP packet is part of an active connection. That kind of mitigation is called “flow tracking”, and it is typically implemented in Linux by the iptables conntrack module. However, DDoS protection with conntrack is not as simple as flipping the iptable switch, especially at the scale and complexity that Cloudflare operates in. If you’re interested to learn more, in this blog we talk about the technical challenges of implementing iptables conntrack.

Complex TCP DDoS attacks pose a threat as they can be harder to detect and mitigate. They therefore have the potential to cause service degradation, outages and increased false positives with inaccurate mitigation rules. So how does Cloudflare block patternless DDoS attacks without affecting legitimate traffic?

Bidirectional TCP Flow Tracking

Using Cloudflare’s traditional products, HTTP applications can be protected by the WAF service, and TCP/UDP applications can be protected by Spectrum. These services are “reverse proxies”, meaning that traffic passes through Cloudflare in both directions. In this bidirectional topology, we see the entire TCP flow (i.e., segments sent by both the client and the server) and can therefore track the state of the underlying TCP connection. This way, we know if a TCP packet belongs to an existing flow or if it is an “out of state” TCP packet. Out of state TCP packets look just like regular TCP packets, but they don’t belong to any real connection between a client and a server. These packets are most likely part of an attack and are therefore dropped.

Reverse Proxy: What Cloudflare Sees

While not trivial, tracking TCP flows can be done when we serve as a proxy between the client and server, allowing us to absorb and mitigate out of state TCP floods. However it becomes much more challenging when we only see half of the connection: the ingress flow. This visibility into ingress but not egress flows is the default deployment method for Cloudflare’s Magic Transit service, so we had our work cut out for us in identifying out of state packets.

The Challenge With Unidirectional TCP Flows

With Magic Transit, Cloudflare receives inbound internet traffic on behalf of the customer, scrubs DDoS attacks, and routes the clean traffic to the customer’s data center over a tunnel. The data center then responds directly to the eyeball client using a technique known as Direct Server Return (DSR).

#ddos #security #tcp #magic transit #gatebot

Beth  Cooper

Beth Cooper

1659694200

Easy Activity Tracking for Models, Similar to Github's Public Activity

PublicActivity

public_activity provides easy activity tracking for your ActiveRecord, Mongoid 3 and MongoMapper models in Rails 3 and 4.

Simply put: it can record what happens in your application and gives you the ability to present those recorded activities to users - in a similar way to how GitHub does it.

!! WARNING: README for unreleased version below. !!

You probably don't want to read the docs for this unreleased version 2.0.

For the stable 1.5.X readme see: https://github.com/chaps-io/public_activity/blob/1-5-stable/README.md

About

Here is a simple example showing what this gem is about:

Example usage

Tutorials

Screencast

Ryan Bates made a great screencast describing how to integrate Public Activity.

Tutorial

A great step-by-step guide on implementing activity feeds using public_activity by Ilya Bodrov.

Online demo

You can see an actual application using this gem here: http://public-activity-example.herokuapp.com/feed

The source code of the demo is hosted here: https://github.com/pokonski/activity_blog

Setup

Gem installation

You can install public_activity as you would any other gem:

gem install public_activity

or in your Gemfile:

gem 'public_activity'

Database setup

By default public_activity uses Active Record. If you want to use Mongoid or MongoMapper as your backend, create an initializer file in your Rails application with the corresponding code inside:

For Mongoid:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongoid
end

For MongoMapper:

# config/initializers/public_activity.rb
PublicActivity.configure do |config|
  config.orm = :mongo_mapper
end

(ActiveRecord only) Create migration for activities and migrate the database (in your Rails project):

rails g public_activity:migration
rake db:migrate

Model configuration

Include PublicActivity::Model and add tracked to the model you want to keep track of:

For ActiveRecord:

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For Mongoid:

class Article
  include Mongoid::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

For MongoMapper:

class Article
  include MongoMapper::Document
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked
end

And now, by default create/update/destroy activities are recorded in activities table. This is all you need to start recording activities for basic CRUD actions.

Optional: If you don't need #tracked but still want the comfort of #create_activity, you can include only the lightweight Common module instead of Model.

Custom activities

You can trigger custom activities by setting all your required parameters and triggering create_activity on the tracked model, like this:

@article.create_activity key: 'article.commented_on', owner: current_user

See this entry http://rubydoc.info/gems/public_activity/PublicActivity/Common:create_activity for more details.

Displaying activities

To display them you simply query the PublicActivity::Activity model:

# notifications_controller.rb
def index
  @activities = PublicActivity::Activity.all
end

And in your views:

<%= render_activities(@activities) %>

Note: render_activities is an alias for render_activity and does the same.

Layouts

You can also pass options to both activity#render and #render_activity methods, which are passed deeper to the internally used render_partial method. A useful example would be to render activities wrapped in layout, which shares common elements of an activity, like a timestamp, owner's avatar etc:

<%= render_activities(@activities, layout: :activity) %>

The activity will be wrapped with the app/views/layouts/_activity.html.erb layout, in the above example.

Important: please note that layouts for activities are also partials. Hence the _ prefix.

Locals

Sometimes, it's desirable to pass additional local variables to partials. It can be done this way:

<%= render_activity(@activity, locals: {friends: current_user.friends}) %>

Note: Before 1.4.0, one could pass variables directly to the options hash for #render_activity and access it from activity parameters. This functionality is retained in 1.4.0 and later, but the :locals method is preferred, since it prevents bugs from shadowing variables from activity parameters in the database.

Activity views

public_activity looks for views in app/views/public_activity.

For example, if you have an activity with :key set to "activity.user.changed_avatar", the gem will look for a partial in app/views/public_activity/user/_changed_avatar.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

Hint: the "activity." prefix in :key is completely optional and kept for backwards compatibility, you can skip it in new projects.

If you would like to fallback to a partial, you can utilize the fallback parameter to specify the path of a partial to use when one is missing:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: 'default') %>

When used in this manner, if a partial with the specified :key cannot be located it will use the partial defined in the fallback instead. In the example above this would resolve to public_activity/_default.html.(|erb|haml|slim|something_else).

If a view file does not exist then ActionView::MisingTemplate will be raised. If you wish to fallback to the old behaviour and use an i18n based translation in this situation you can specify a :fallback parameter of text to fallback to this mechanism like such:

<%= render_activity(@activity, fallback: :text) %>

i18n

Translations are used by the #text method, to which you can pass additional options in form of a hash. #render method uses translations when view templates have not been provided. You can render pure i18n strings by passing {display: :i18n} to #render_activity or #render.

Translations should be put in your locale .yml files. To render pure strings from I18n Example structure:

activity:
  article:
    create: 'Article has been created'
    update: 'Someone has edited the article'
    destroy: 'Some user removed an article!'

This structure is valid for activities with keys "activity.article.create" or "article.create". As mentioned before, "activity." part of the key is optional.

Testing

For RSpec you can first disable public_activity and add require helper methods in the rails_helper.rb with:

#rails_helper.rb
require 'public_activity/testing'

PublicActivity.enabled = false

In your specs you can then blockwise decide whether to turn public_activity on or off.

# file_spec.rb
PublicActivity.with_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

PublicActivity.without_tracking do
  # your test code goes here
end

Documentation

For more documentation go here

Common examples

Set the Activity's owner to current_user by default

You can set up a default value for :owner by doing this:

  1. Include PublicActivity::StoreController in your ApplicationController like this:
class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  include PublicActivity::StoreController
end
  1. Use Proc in :owner attribute for tracked class method in your desired model. For example:
class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  tracked owner: Proc.new{ |controller, model| controller.current_user }
end

Note: current_user applies to Devise, if you are using a different authentication gem or your own code, change the current_user to a method you use.

Disable tracking for a class or globally

If you need to disable tracking temporarily, for example in tests or db/seeds.rb then you can use PublicActivity.enabled= attribute like below:

# Disable p_a globally
PublicActivity.enabled = false

# Perform some operations that would normally be tracked by p_a:
Article.create(title: 'New article')

# Switch it back on
PublicActivity.enabled = true

You can also disable public_activity for a specific class:

# Disable p_a for Article class
Article.public_activity_off

# p_a will not do anything here:
@article = Article.create(title: 'New article')

# But will be enabled for other classes:
# (creation of the comment will be recorded if you are tracking the Comment class)
@article.comments.create(body: 'some comment!')

# Enable it again for Article:
Article.public_activity_on

Create custom activities

Besides standard, automatic activities created on CRUD actions on your model (deactivatable), you can post your own activities that can be triggered without modifying the tracked model. There are a few ways to do this, as PublicActivity gives three tiers of options to be set.

Instant options

Because every activity needs a key (otherwise: NoKeyProvided is raised), the shortest and minimal way to post an activity is:

@user.create_activity :mood_changed
# the key of the action will be user.mood_changed
@user.create_activity action: :mood_changed # this is exactly the same as above

Besides assigning your key (which is obvious from the code), it will take global options from User class (given in #tracked method during class definition) and overwrite them with instance options (set on @user by #activity method). You can read more about options and how PublicActivity inherits them for you here.

Note the action parameter builds the key like this: "#{model_name}.#{action}". You can read further on options for #create_activity here.

To provide more options, you can do:

@user.create_activity action: 'poke', parameters: {reason: 'bored'}, recipient: @friend, owner: current_user

In this example, we have provided all the things we could for a standard Activity.

Use custom fields on Activity

Besides the few fields that every Activity has (key, owner, recipient, trackable, parameters), you can also set custom fields. This could be very beneficial, as parameters are a serialized hash, which cannot be queried easily from the database. That being said, use custom fields when you know that you will set them very often and search by them (don't forget database indexes :) ).

Set owner and recipient based on associations

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked owner: :commenter, recipient: :commentee

  belongs_to :commenter, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :commentee, :class_name => "User"
end

Resolve parameters from a Symbol or Proc

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked only: [:update], parameters: :tracked_values
  
  def tracked_values
   {}.tap do |hash|
     hash[:tags] = tags if tags_changed?
   end
  end
end

Setup

Skip this step if you are using ActiveRecord in Rails 4 or Mongoid

The first step is similar in every ORM available (except mongoid):

PublicActivity::Activity.class_eval do
  attr_accessible :custom_field
end

place this code under config/initializers/public_activity.rb, you have to create it first.

To be able to assign to that field, we need to move it to the mass assignment sanitizer's whitelist.

Migration

If you're using ActiveRecord, you will also need to provide a migration to add the actual field to the Activity. Taken from our tests:

class AddCustomFieldToActivities < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :activities do |t|
      t.string :custom_field
    end
  end
end

Assigning custom fields

Assigning is done by the same methods that you use for normal parameters: #tracked, #create_activity. You can just pass the name of your custom variable and assign its value. Even better, you can pass it to #tracked to tell us how to harvest your data for custom fields so we can do that for you.

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PublicActivity::Model
  tracked custom_field: proc {|controller, model| controller.some_helper }
end

Help

If you need help with using public_activity please visit our discussion group and ask a question there:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/public-activity

Please do not ask general questions in the Github Issues.


Author: public-activity
Source code: https://github.com/public-activity/public_activity
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Jenny Jabde

1621251999

Quick Flow Male Enhancement Reviews, Benefits Price & Buy Quick Flow?

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Garware Paint Protection Film

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What is Flow Protocol (FLOW) | What is Flow Protocol token | What is FLOW token

Introducing Flow Protocol (FLOW)

Flow is a protocol that establishes an Ethereum based self-distributing token (FLOW). FLOW is designed to facilitate token distribution without dilution.

The protocol distributes inflation of FLOW tokens to all addresses holding it without the need for a single transaction. Inflation happens daily and does not require any action on the side of the FLOW token holder or any other parties. This method of inflation allows for the token to be applied to modern DeFi use cases without diluting the token holders.

Over a period of 10 years, inflation is reduced and ends with a capped supply of FLOW tokens.

Why do we need Flow?

Until now, digital assets like Bitcoin have required participation in mining or staking in order to receive a portion of the inflating supply. This has several problems:

  • When a digital asset is tied to a consensus mechanism, it disproportionately punishes holders as their share of the supply is continuously diluted during the inflation period.
  • The long term value of these assets depends heavily on the ability of the protocol to continue to operate without inflation being paid to miners/stakers, which is a highly debated topic.
  • Protocol coins (BTC, ETH, etc) are tied to the underlying network, which can cause their value to fluctuate wildly due delays in network upgrades, bugs, etc.
  • Assets that require actions such as staking in order to receive a portion of inflation prevent them from being used easily in other applications (lending, collateral, etc.) without being diluted.

Flow solves these problems by applying the single-responsibility principle (SRP) from software engineering. The Flow protocol takes responsibility only for essential distribution functions, allowing the Ethereum network to manage everything outside that scope.

Designed for DeFI

As DeFi rapidly grows, so does the demand for collateral assets that fill specific roles. FLOW (Store of Value) can help diversify collateral by being combined with digital assets that fill other roles such as ETH (Protocol) and AMPL (Elastic Supply).

FLOW does not need to be staked or locked into a contract to receive inflation, therefore it can be applied to the full range of DeFi applications while still achieving its distribution target

The FLOW Inflation Schedule

FLOW inflation is governed by Eras. The daily inflation applied to the token supply starts at 1% during the Genesis Era and is halved at the end of every Era.

The first era, called the Genesis Era, lasts for 60 days. After the Genesis Era there are 10 additional Eras, each lasting for 365 days.

Inflation stops upon completion of the final Era and the supply becomes capped.

The initial supply of tokens started at 10,000,000 FLOW. As the daily inflation occurs over a period of 10 years, the supply will increase to just under 700,000,000 FLOW.

Image for post

You can see the total supply, current inflation rate and the next halving at https://app.flowprotocol.io/dashboard

Flow Token (FLOW)

The FLOW token and its distribution would be governed by Eras. At the end of each Era, it is expected that the inflation rate would be halved, just like how the mining rewards in Bitcoin are always halved after a certain period.

The First Era of the would-be was called the Genesis Era, and it would last for a mere 60 days. Subsequent eras would last for 356 days, and there would only be ten of them.

During the Genesis Era, the daily inflation rate would start at 1%, and at the end, it would be halved.

Benefits of Inflation with FLOW

Inflation occurs in most other cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin and Ether. However, in almost all other cases the inflation is only paid to miners or stakers. This harms holders of the token by diluting their ownership of the total token supply.

With FLOW, your share of the total supply can **never **be diluted. This means that no dilution occurs as the supply inflates. Even if you are using your tokens for yield farming or any other DeFi application, the inflation will still be applied!

FLOW inflation has several other benefits that help achieve the goal of becoming a widely adopted store of value.

As the token supply inflates, some holders may choose to sell the additional tokens. This helps achieve the wide distribution required to become a robust store of value as inflation decreases and eventually stops. This effect can already be observed by the impressive number of FLOW holders.

Demand for FLOW can also be partially absorbed by inflation rather than just by increasing price alone. This results in a different price action than a typical token, making FLOW more difficult to manipulate based on traditional metrics.

How Does it Work?

Simply put, anyone who holds FLOW tokens can become a liquidity provider on Uniswap by pooling their FLOW tokens combined with an equivalent USD value of ETH.

Upon successfully pooling, the liquidity provider will receive UNI-V2 tokens which represent their stake in the Uniswap liquidity pool.

UNI-V2 tokens can then be staked to earn additional FLOW.

How are Rewards Determined?

There are several factors that determine the amount of FLOW you will receive for staking:

The unlock rate — The total rewards will be unlocked evenly over 90 days.

The amount you have staked — The amount of FLOW rewards you receive over time depends on the percentage of the total staked tokens that belong to you. If you were the only one staking you would receive all of the rewards!

The amount of time you remain staked — The rewards you earn will have a multiplier applied to them the longer you remained staked. To achieve the full multiplier (3x), you need to remain staked for at least 60 days.

How can I participate?

You will need both FLOW and ETH to provide liquidity and earn rewards from The Tap.

For example, if you have 10 ETH total that you want to stake in The Tap, you would buy 5 ETH worth of FLOW and then add liquidity on Uniswap with the resulting ETH/FLOW.

Here are the steps required to participate:

  1. Buy FLOW:  https://app.uniswap.org/#/swap?outputCurrency=0xC6e64729931f60D2c8Bc70A27D66D9E0c28D1BF9
  2. **Provide Liquidity on Uniswap: ** https://app.uniswap.org/#/add/ETH/0xC6e64729931f60D2c8Bc70A27D66D9E0c28D1BF9
  3. **Stake your liquidity tokens at The Tap: ** https://app.flowprotocol.io/

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