Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1620544717

Build a 3D World in React with ThreeJS and React Three Fiber

This video starts with me talking about the diference between React and ReactDOM. React Three Fiber uses React to keep track of 3D objects that gets rendered in a webGL canvas via three.js . The result is the ability to code 3D environments the same way you are used to code a React Web Application. We can even add physics and animation to the 3D objects in the world. In this example we place a Box on a Plane inside a Skybox of stars. We then add physics to let the box fall on the plane and finally we interact with the box by attaching a click event to the box. For the physics we are using React hooks for Cannon.js.

Code for this video: https://github.com/danba340/react-three-fiber-example

  • 0:00 React vs ReactDOM
  • 1:13 React Three Fiber
  • 2:18 Boilerplate
  • 3:20 Creating a Box
  • 4:20 Controlling the camera
  • 5:35 Lights
  • 6:23 SkyBox of Stars
  • 7:00 Creating a Ground Plane
  • 9:00 Physics with Cannon.js
  • 11:30 Interacting via Click Event
  • 13:00 Outro

#react #threejs

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Buddha Community

Build a 3D World in React with ThreeJS and React Three Fiber
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Build a 3D World in React with Three.js - [React Three Fiber Tutorial]

This video starts with me talking about the diference between React and ReactDOM. React Three Fiber uses React to keep track of 3D objects that gets rendered in a webGL canvas via three.js . The result is the ability to code 3D environments the same way you are used to code a React Web Application. We can even add physics and animation to the 3D objects in the world. In this example we place a Box on a Plane inside a Skybox of stars. We then add physics to let the box fall on the plane and finally we interact with the box by attaching a click event to the box. For the physics we are using React hooks for Cannon.js.

Code for this video: https://github.com/danba340/react-three-fiber-example

  • 0:00 React vs ReactDOM
  • 1:13 React Three Fiber
  • 2:18 Boilerplate
  • 3:20 Creating a Box
  • 4:20 Controlling the camera
  • 5:35 Lights
  • 6:23 SkyBox of Stars
  • 7:00 Creating a Ground Plane
  • 9:00 Physics with Cannon.js
  • 11:30 Interacting via Click Event
  • 13:00 Outro

#react #three #javascript #reactjs #threejs

Create 3D Text Meshes in Three.js with React-Three-Fiber

The first time I encountered Three.js I was blown away. It was hard to believe that the intricate 3D scenes I was looking at were not videos, they were being rendered directly in the browser! I wanted to make something with it, anything, just to understand what this technology was and where it fit in the ecosystem of HTML, CSS, and JS.

While there were a few exploratory attempts to incorporate Three.js into early iterations of my site, what’s left now is the spinning text mesh on my site’s home page. In this post I’ll walk through how we can replicate it using Three.js and React, using the amazing react-three-fiber library.

We’ll be making most of what you can see in the sandbox below, so if you’re following along, you’ll need a blank React project in order to use the code.

#software-development #react #threejs #react-three-fiber #javascript

Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1620544717

Build a 3D World in React with ThreeJS and React Three Fiber

This video starts with me talking about the diference between React and ReactDOM. React Three Fiber uses React to keep track of 3D objects that gets rendered in a webGL canvas via three.js . The result is the ability to code 3D environments the same way you are used to code a React Web Application. We can even add physics and animation to the 3D objects in the world. In this example we place a Box on a Plane inside a Skybox of stars. We then add physics to let the box fall on the plane and finally we interact with the box by attaching a click event to the box. For the physics we are using React hooks for Cannon.js.

Code for this video: https://github.com/danba340/react-three-fiber-example

  • 0:00 React vs ReactDOM
  • 1:13 React Three Fiber
  • 2:18 Boilerplate
  • 3:20 Creating a Box
  • 4:20 Controlling the camera
  • 5:35 Lights
  • 6:23 SkyBox of Stars
  • 7:00 Creating a Ground Plane
  • 9:00 Physics with Cannon.js
  • 11:30 Interacting via Click Event
  • 13:00 Outro

#react #threejs

Jose Grady

Jose Grady

1609380180

Build a 3D World in React with Three.js - [React Three Fiber Tutorial]

This video starts with me talking about the diference between React and ReactDOM. React Three Fiber uses React to keep track of 3D objects that gets rendered in a webGL canvas via three.js . The result is the ability to code 3D environments the same way you are used to code a React Web Application. We can even add physics and animation to the 3D objects in the world. In this example we place a Box on a Plane inside a Skybox of stars. We then add physics to let the box fall on the plane and finally we interact with the box by attaching a click event to the box. For the physics we are using React hooks for Cannon.js.

Code for this video: https://github.com/danba340/react-three-fiber-example

  • 0:00 React vs ReactDOM
  • 1:13 React Three Fiber
  • 2:18 Boilerplate
  • 3:20 Creating a Box
  • 4:20 Controlling the camera
  • 5:35 Lights
  • 6:23 SkyBox of Stars
  • 7:00 Creating a Ground Plane
  • 9:00 Physics with Cannon.js
  • 11:30 Interacting via Click Event
  • 13:00 Outro

#react #threejs #javascript #web-development #programming