Lurline  Emard

Lurline Emard

1614218940

Privacy Preserving Tokens Wrapped by Secret Contracts

Privacy Preserving tokens wrapped by Secret contracts

Can Kisagun - Co-Founder of Enigma

UniFi DAO Demo Day

#blockchain

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Privacy Preserving Tokens Wrapped by Secret Contracts

david harper

1610429951

Hire Smart Contract Developers | Smart Contract Development Company India

What are smart contracts?

Smart contracts is a digital code stored in a blockchain and automatically executes when predetermined terms and conditions are met. In Simple terms, they are programs that run by the setup of the people who developed them.They are designed to facilitate, verify, and execute a digital contract between two parties without the involvement of third parties.

Benefits of Smart Contracts

Greater efficiency and speed
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Where could smart contracts be used?

Today Smart contracts are used in various platforms such as supply-chain management,cross-border financial transactions,document management,enforceability and more. Here are the Sectors where smart contracts plays a huge role ,

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  • Peer-to-Peer transactions
  • Product development
  • Stocktaking

Steps For Successful Smart Contract Development

There are a few Important things that you need to consider before you develop a Smart Contract,

Ask Yourself -

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Words Counted: A Ruby Natural Language Processor.

WordsCounted

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

-- Oscar Wilde

WordsCounted is a Ruby NLP (natural language processor). WordsCounted lets you implement powerful tokensation strategies with a very flexible tokeniser class.

Are you using WordsCounted to do something interesting? Please tell me about it.

 

Demo

Visit this website for one example of what you can do with WordsCounted.

Features

  • Out of the box, get the following data from any string or readable file, or URL:
    • Token count and unique token count
    • Token densities, frequencies, and lengths
    • Char count and average chars per token
    • The longest tokens and their lengths
    • The most frequent tokens and their frequencies.
  • A flexible way to exclude tokens from the tokeniser. You can pass a string, regexp, symbol, lambda, or an array of any combination of those types for powerful tokenisation strategies.
  • Pass your own regexp rules to the tokeniser if you prefer. The default regexp filters special characters but keeps hyphens and apostrophes. It also plays nicely with diacritics (UTF and unicode characters): Bayrūt is treated as ["Bayrūt"] and not ["Bayr", "ū", "t"], for example.
  • Opens and reads files. Pass in a file path or a url instead of a string.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'words_counted'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install words_counted

Usage

Pass in a string or a file path, and an optional filter and/or regexp.

counter = WordsCounted.count(
  "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
)

# Using a file
counter = WordsCounted.from_file("path/or/url/to/my/file.txt")

.count and .from_file are convenience methods that take an input, tokenise it, and return an instance of WordsCounted::Counter initialized with the tokens. The WordsCounted::Tokeniser and WordsCounted::Counter classes can be used alone, however.

API

WordsCounted

WordsCounted.count(input, options = {})

Tokenises input and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.count("Hello Beirut!")

Accepts two options: exclude and regexp. See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp respectively.

WordsCounted.from_file(path, options = {})

Reads and tokenises a file, and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("hello_beirut.txt")

Accepts the same options as .count.

Tokeniser

The tokeniser allows you to tokenise text in a variety of ways. You can pass in your own rules for tokenisation, and apply a powerful filter with any combination of rules as long as they can boil down into a lambda.

Out of the box the tokeniser includes only alpha chars. Hyphenated tokens and tokens with apostrophes are considered a single token.

#tokenise([pattern: TOKEN_REGEXP, exclude: nil])

tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise

# With `exclude`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise(exclude: "hello")

# With `pattern`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("I <3 Beirut!").tokenise(pattern: /[a-z]/i)

See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp for more information.

Counter

The WordsCounted::Counter class allows you to collect various statistics from an array of tokens.

#token_count

Returns the token count of a given string.

counter.token_count #=> 15

#token_frequency

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimensional array where each element is a token and its frequency. The array is sorted by frequency in descending order.

counter.token_frequency

[
  ["the", 2],
  ["are", 2],
  ["we",  1],
  # ...
  ["all", 1]
]

#most_frequent_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its frequency.

counter.most_frequent_tokens

{ "are" => 2, "the" => 2 }

#token_lengths

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its length. The array is sorted by length in descending order.

counter.token_lengths

[
  ["looking", 7],
  ["gutter",  6],
  ["stars",   5],
  # ...
  ["in",      2]
]

#longest_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its length.

counter.longest_tokens

{ "looking" => 7 }

#token_density([ precision: 2 ])

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its density as a float, rounded to a precision of two. The array is sorted by density in descending order. It accepts a precision argument, which must be a float.

counter.token_density

[
  ["are",     0.13],
  ["the",     0.13],
  ["but",     0.07 ],
  # ...
  ["we",      0.07 ]
]

#char_count

Returns the char count of tokens.

counter.char_count #=> 76

#average_chars_per_token([ precision: 2 ])

Returns the average char count per token rounded to two decimal places. Accepts a precision argument which defaults to two. Precision must be a float.

counter.average_chars_per_token #=> 4

#uniq_token_count

Returns the number of unique tokens.

counter.uniq_token_count #=> 13

Excluding tokens from the tokeniser

You can exclude anything you want from the input by passing the exclude option. The exclude option accepts a variety of filters and is extremely flexible.

  1. A space-delimited string. The filter will normalise the string.
  2. A regular expression.
  3. A lambda.
  4. A symbol that names a predicate method. For example :odd?.
  5. An array of any combination of the above.
tokeniser =
  WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
    "Magnificent! That was magnificent, Trevor."
  )

# Using a string
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: "was magnificent")
# => ["that", "trevor"]

# Using a regular expression
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: /trevor/)
# => ["magnificent", "that", "was", "magnificent"]

# Using a lambda
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: ->(t) { t.length < 4 })
# => ["magnificent", "that", "magnificent", "trevor"]

# Using symbol
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello! محمد")
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: :ascii_only?)
# => ["محمد"]

# Using an array
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
  "Hello! اسماءنا هي محمد، كارولينا، سامي، وداني"
)
tokeniser.tokenise(
  exclude: [:ascii_only?, /محمد/, ->(t) { t.length > 6}, "و"]
)
# => ["هي", "سامي", "وداني"]

Passing in a custom regexp

The default regexp accounts for letters, hyphenated tokens, and apostrophes. This means twenty-one is treated as one token. So is Mohamad's.

/[\p{Alpha}\-']+/

You can pass your own criteria as a Ruby regular expression to split your string as desired.

For example, if you wanted to include numbers, you can override the regular expression:

counter = WordsCounted.count("Numbers 1, 2, and 3", pattern: /[\p{Alnum}\-']+/)
counter.tokens
#=> ["numbers", "1", "2", "and", "3"]

Opening and reading files

Use the from_file method to open files. from_file accepts the same options as .count. The file path can be a URL.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("url/or/path/to/file.text")

Gotchas

A hyphen used in leu of an em or en dash will form part of the token. This affects the tokeniser algorithm.

counter = WordsCounted.count("How do you do?-you are well, I see.")
counter.token_frequency

[
  ["do",   2],
  ["how",  1],
  ["you",  1],
  ["-you", 1], # WTF, mate!
  ["are",  1],
  # ...
]

In this example -you and you are separate tokens. Also, the tokeniser does not include numbers by default. Remember that you can pass your own regular expression if the default behaviour does not fit your needs.

A note on case sensitivity

The program will normalise (downcase) all incoming strings for consistency and filters.

Roadmap

Ability to open URLs

def self.from_url
  # open url and send string here after removing html
end

Contributors

See contributors.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Author: abitdodgy
Source code: https://github.com/abitdodgy/words_counted
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1658068560

WordsCounted: A Ruby Natural Language Processor

WordsCounted

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

-- Oscar Wilde

WordsCounted is a Ruby NLP (natural language processor). WordsCounted lets you implement powerful tokensation strategies with a very flexible tokeniser class.

Features

  • Out of the box, get the following data from any string or readable file, or URL:
    • Token count and unique token count
    • Token densities, frequencies, and lengths
    • Char count and average chars per token
    • The longest tokens and their lengths
    • The most frequent tokens and their frequencies.
  • A flexible way to exclude tokens from the tokeniser. You can pass a string, regexp, symbol, lambda, or an array of any combination of those types for powerful tokenisation strategies.
  • Pass your own regexp rules to the tokeniser if you prefer. The default regexp filters special characters but keeps hyphens and apostrophes. It also plays nicely with diacritics (UTF and unicode characters): Bayrūt is treated as ["Bayrūt"] and not ["Bayr", "ū", "t"], for example.
  • Opens and reads files. Pass in a file path or a url instead of a string.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'words_counted'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install words_counted

Usage

Pass in a string or a file path, and an optional filter and/or regexp.

counter = WordsCounted.count(
  "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
)

# Using a file
counter = WordsCounted.from_file("path/or/url/to/my/file.txt")

.count and .from_file are convenience methods that take an input, tokenise it, and return an instance of WordsCounted::Counter initialized with the tokens. The WordsCounted::Tokeniser and WordsCounted::Counter classes can be used alone, however.

API

WordsCounted

WordsCounted.count(input, options = {})

Tokenises input and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.count("Hello Beirut!")

Accepts two options: exclude and regexp. See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp respectively.

WordsCounted.from_file(path, options = {})

Reads and tokenises a file, and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("hello_beirut.txt")

Accepts the same options as .count.

Tokeniser

The tokeniser allows you to tokenise text in a variety of ways. You can pass in your own rules for tokenisation, and apply a powerful filter with any combination of rules as long as they can boil down into a lambda.

Out of the box the tokeniser includes only alpha chars. Hyphenated tokens and tokens with apostrophes are considered a single token.

#tokenise([pattern: TOKEN_REGEXP, exclude: nil])

tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise

# With `exclude`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise(exclude: "hello")

# With `pattern`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("I <3 Beirut!").tokenise(pattern: /[a-z]/i)

See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp for more information.

Counter

The WordsCounted::Counter class allows you to collect various statistics from an array of tokens.

#token_count

Returns the token count of a given string.

counter.token_count #=> 15

#token_frequency

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimensional array where each element is a token and its frequency. The array is sorted by frequency in descending order.

counter.token_frequency

[
  ["the", 2],
  ["are", 2],
  ["we",  1],
  # ...
  ["all", 1]
]

#most_frequent_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its frequency.

counter.most_frequent_tokens

{ "are" => 2, "the" => 2 }

#token_lengths

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its length. The array is sorted by length in descending order.

counter.token_lengths

[
  ["looking", 7],
  ["gutter",  6],
  ["stars",   5],
  # ...
  ["in",      2]
]

#longest_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its length.

counter.longest_tokens

{ "looking" => 7 }

#token_density([ precision: 2 ])

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its density as a float, rounded to a precision of two. The array is sorted by density in descending order. It accepts a precision argument, which must be a float.

counter.token_density

[
  ["are",     0.13],
  ["the",     0.13],
  ["but",     0.07 ],
  # ...
  ["we",      0.07 ]
]

#char_count

Returns the char count of tokens.

counter.char_count #=> 76

#average_chars_per_token([ precision: 2 ])

Returns the average char count per token rounded to two decimal places. Accepts a precision argument which defaults to two. Precision must be a float.

counter.average_chars_per_token #=> 4

#uniq_token_count

Returns the number of unique tokens.

counter.uniq_token_count #=> 13

Excluding tokens from the tokeniser

You can exclude anything you want from the input by passing the exclude option. The exclude option accepts a variety of filters and is extremely flexible.

  1. A space-delimited string. The filter will normalise the string.
  2. A regular expression.
  3. A lambda.
  4. A symbol that names a predicate method. For example :odd?.
  5. An array of any combination of the above.
tokeniser =
  WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
    "Magnificent! That was magnificent, Trevor."
  )

# Using a string
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: "was magnificent")
# => ["that", "trevor"]

# Using a regular expression
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: /trevor/)
# => ["magnificent", "that", "was", "magnificent"]

# Using a lambda
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: ->(t) { t.length < 4 })
# => ["magnificent", "that", "magnificent", "trevor"]

# Using symbol
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello! محمد")
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: :ascii_only?)
# => ["محمد"]

# Using an array
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
  "Hello! اسماءنا هي محمد، كارولينا، سامي، وداني"
)
tokeniser.tokenise(
  exclude: [:ascii_only?, /محمد/, ->(t) { t.length > 6}, "و"]
)
# => ["هي", "سامي", "وداني"]

Passing in a custom regexp

The default regexp accounts for letters, hyphenated tokens, and apostrophes. This means twenty-one is treated as one token. So is Mohamad's.

/[\p{Alpha}\-']+/

You can pass your own criteria as a Ruby regular expression to split your string as desired.

For example, if you wanted to include numbers, you can override the regular expression:

counter = WordsCounted.count("Numbers 1, 2, and 3", pattern: /[\p{Alnum}\-']+/)
counter.tokens
#=> ["numbers", "1", "2", "and", "3"]

Opening and reading files

Use the from_file method to open files. from_file accepts the same options as .count. The file path can be a URL.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("url/or/path/to/file.text")

Gotchas

A hyphen used in leu of an em or en dash will form part of the token. This affects the tokeniser algorithm.

counter = WordsCounted.count("How do you do?-you are well, I see.")
counter.token_frequency

[
  ["do",   2],
  ["how",  1],
  ["you",  1],
  ["-you", 1], # WTF, mate!
  ["are",  1],
  # ...
]

In this example -you and you are separate tokens. Also, the tokeniser does not include numbers by default. Remember that you can pass your own regular expression if the default behaviour does not fit your needs.

A note on case sensitivity

The program will normalise (downcase) all incoming strings for consistency and filters.

Roadmap

Ability to open URLs

def self.from_url
  # open url and send string here after removing html
end

Are you using WordsCounted to do something interesting? Please tell me about it.

Gem Version 

RubyDoc documentation.

Demo

Visit this website for one example of what you can do with WordsCounted.


Contributors

See contributors.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Author: Abitdodgy
Source Code: https://github.com/abitdodgy/words_counted 
License: MIT license

#ruby #nlp 

Secret Email System Review - Recommended or Not?

Matt Bacak’s secret email system is one of the most successful products in the WarriorPlus marketplace in recent memory. My secret email system review will not try to hard sell you on the product – I mean, it’s pretty cheap, so if you’re going to buy it, you’re going to buy it. Instead, I’ll concentrate on explaining the benefits of email marketing and how to get the most out of Matt’s system.

Nowadays, digital marketing is essential for every business. But what is the best strategy? There are many different points of view, but one thing is certain: emails are essential. Email marketing is one of the most efficient and cost-effective ways to promote a business online, and it is simple and inexpensive to get started. The most important thing is to understand your audience and deliver content and offers that are truly relevant to them.

The PDF Download of an Honest Secret Email System Review
The front-end product
What Matt Bacak is selling, which has been promoted by such capable affiliates as Curt Maly, is a PDF ebook that you can download immediately after purchasing. However, there are a number of bonuses included to sweeten the deal. You get access to Mr. Bacak’s private Facebook group, and instead of a simple PDF download, you get a massive zip file full of useful files and videos.
Now that we know what we’re up against, let’s get into this secret email system review!

What is Included in the Secret Email System Download?
Here is a list of everything you get inside the zip file sold at the front end of the Secret Email System:

Matt Bacak’s 3x Formula Calculator (plus a video explaining how to use it)
1000 email swipe files in text format (swipe files or “swipes” are like templates you can repurpose in a variety of ways).
A 1.5-hour video session

Free access to Matt’s high-converting leadpages lead generation template
A massive book of swipe files (in PDF format)
A copy of Matt’s book, Secrets of the Internet Millionaire Mind,
A video tutorial on how to select “irresistible offers” from affiliate marketplaces.

The PDF version of The Secret Email System
The Checklist for the Secret Email System PDF
Text files containing instructions for joining the Facebook group and other bonuses
Matt was charging less than $6 for all of that value last time I checked. He is demonstrating his many years of experience in internet marketing by creating an irresistible offer that people will want to buy and affiliates will want to promote. As a result, the Secret Email System has sold more copies on Warrior Plus than any other product in recent memory.

Examine everything included in the secret email system
Who is Matt Bacak, and why should I listen to him?
Many consider Matt Bacak to be an internet marketing legend, and email marketing is his primary focus. My first encounter with Matt came in the form of some Facebook ads he ran. Matt explained who he was in the video ad (which featured a little guy dancing in the background) and invited me to visit his blog, which I did. He demonstrated a thorough understanding of online business, so it’s no surprise that he put together the ultimate email marketing package.
headshot of Matt Bacak

Overall, Matt’s ad was one of the strangest Facebook ads I’ve ever seen. It was also one of the most effective and memorable. I didn’t buy whatever Matt was selling that day, but I read his blog and remembered his name and who he was. When I saw Curt Maly running ads for Matt Bacak’s Secret Email System months later, it made a big difference.

When I saw that the price was under $6 and that the bonuses were included, I knew I had to buy the product. I didn’t buy it right away because I was too busy, but it stayed in the back of my mind until I had the opportunity to do so.
If it isn’t obvious, I’ll explain: the reason you should listen to Matt Bacak is that he knows how to get inside people’s heads and stay there, both as a marketer and as a public figure.

Is the Secret Email System Training of Good Quality?
At first glance, the training does not appear to be groundbreaking, but this is because the creator is unconcerned about flashy packaging. You literally get a zip file full of stuff that most people would put on a membership website. I can see how this would irritate some people who are used to flashy ClickFunnels and Kajabi courses.

If that describes you, you’re missing out. Matt’s training isn’t flashy, but it describes a solid system that most businesses can implement in some way. As the name implies, it all revolves around building a list and emailing it on a regular basis. Did I ruin the surprise?
Front end offer and upsells from a secret email system
Bonuses from the Secret Email System (and a Bonus From Me)
I’ve already outlined everything you get in the zip file that serves as the funnel’s front-end offer. Everything else, other than the Secret Email System PDF itself, is considered a bonus, and the total value could easily be in the hundreds of dollars.

That’s why purchasing this product was such a no-brainer for me. I already knew how to write good marketing emails, but I really wanted to look inside Matt’s system.
In addition to everything else, you’ll get lifetime access to Matt’s private Facebook community. He answers questions from people here on a daily basis, and it can be a great place to learn.

The truth is that you get so much value and stuff from purchasing this product that adding another bonus is almost pointless. But I’m a bonus machine, so be prepared.
In 2020, I published my first book on email marketing, How to Build Your First Money Making Email List. You’re already getting a lot of reading material, but if you purchase Matt’s product through my link, I’ll add it to the stack. Most of the books I write sell for $27, so this just adds to the ridiculous valuation of this sub-six-dollar product.
Bonuses Bonuses for Matt Bacak’s Secret Email System
Will This Product Really Help You Make Money Online?

It all depends on whether or not you use the secret email system. According to multiple sources, Matt Bacak is in charge of millions of dollars in sales for both himself and his clients. And the best thing about this guy is that he’s upfront and honest, and he puts his money where his mouth is. What I mean is that he doesn’t hold anything back in the books he writes. That is another reason he has amassed such a large and devoted fan base.

Finally, if your business can profit from email marketing or if you want to use email marketing to become an influential public figure, I believe this ebook can assist you. It helped me improve my understanding of the business side of being an affiliate marketer and is far more valuable than the price tag. This product will be especially useful if you want to get started in affiliate marketing with a small investment.

matt bacak’s business model
Going Beyond My Review – Secret Email System
The book itself goes beyond email marketing, but I don’t want to give too much away. Instead, I’ll go over some of the finer points of lead generation quickly so you can get started building your email list as soon as possible.

Now, I’m guessing that roughly 90% of people reading this review are affiliate marketers or are interested in affiliate marketing. As a result, I’m going to focus on lead generation strategies used by many successful affiliates. If you want to learn more about my favorite affiliate marketing strategies, click on that link to read my in-depth guide.

The Most Effective Methods for Building an Email List
Here’s a rundown of some of the best (and quickest) ways to build an email list. First, you’ll need a way to collect emails, and it must be a high-converting method. My favorite lead generation tools are:
ConvertBox (on-site messaging software/advanced popup builder)
ConversioBot (website chatbot platform)

You may have noticed that the majority of them are chatbots. Chatbots, on the other hand, are one of the best ways to not only capture an email address, but also to obtain additional customer information and even directly sell products.
The following are the most effective ways to drive traffic to these tools:
Facebook ads (particularly effective when paired with ConvertBox)
Google Ads and YouTube Ads (a killer combination with ConvertBox or Conversiobot)

Influencer Marketing
Facebook organic marketing
Search Engine Optimization
Secret Email System sales page Matt Bacak

If you can master even one of those traffic methods and use it to drive people to a high-converting optin or sales funnel, you’ll be well on your way to creating a recurring income.
Whether or not you choose to purchase this product through my link, I wish you the best of luck with your online business. If you do purchase the system, I hope to see you in the Facebook community! Please feel free to contact me via message or email at any time.

And if you do get the ebook through my link, please let me know so I can send you a copy of my book as a bonus!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About The Secret Email System
Here are some frequently asked product-related questions.
Is the secret email system bonus worth it?

In my opinion, the front end product and the majority of the bonuses are worth the price. I would have paid more just to gain access to Matt’s Facebook group!
What are the benefits of a hidden email system?
The main benefit is that you will learn one of the highest ROI business practices (email marketing) from someone who has built a seven-figure online business.

What do you call email marketing?
Email marketing is an important component of digital marketing for many businesses. Email marketing software is frequently referred to as an autoresponder, but a good email marketing platform will have more functionality.

Is this a legitimate way to make money online?
My secret email system review says it’s a great way to make money online as long as your online business uses marketing emails. It does require a list, but Matt teaches several methods for creating one.

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