A Rust Version Of The Super Tiny Compiler

The (Rust) super tiny compiler

This project is a rust version of the super tiny compiler (the original one (JS) was created by Jamie Kyle).

The output (C-like) and input (Lisp-like) syntax are the same. The Lexer and Parser created here were heavily inspired by the super-tiny-compiler.js.

Examples

cargo run --example tokens
cargo run --example ast
cargo run --example compiler

Test

cargo test

Cargo.lock

# This file is automatically @generated by Cargo.
# It is not intended for manual editing.
version = 3

[[package]]
name = "compiler-lib"
version = "0.1.0"

Cargo.toml

[package]
name = "compiler-lib"
version = "0.1.0"
edition = "2021"

# See more keys and their definitions at https://doc.rust-lang.org/cargo/reference/manifest.html

[dependencies]

Download Details:

Author: eduardostuart
Source Code: https://github.com/eduardostuart/rust-the-super-tiny-compiler

License: MIT license

#rust 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

A Rust Version Of The Super Tiny Compiler

Serde Rust: Serialization Framework for Rust

Serde

*Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.*

You may be looking for:

Serde in action

Click to show Cargo.toml. Run this code in the playground.

[dependencies]

# The core APIs, including the Serialize and Deserialize traits. Always
# required when using Serde. The "derive" feature is only required when
# using #[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)] to make Serde work with structs
# and enums defined in your crate.
serde = { version = "1.0", features = ["derive"] }

# Each data format lives in its own crate; the sample code below uses JSON
# but you may be using a different one.
serde_json = "1.0"

 

use serde::{Serialize, Deserialize};

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize, Debug)]
struct Point {
    x: i32,
    y: i32,
}

fn main() {
    let point = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };

    // Convert the Point to a JSON string.
    let serialized = serde_json::to_string(&point).unwrap();

    // Prints serialized = {"x":1,"y":2}
    println!("serialized = {}", serialized);

    // Convert the JSON string back to a Point.
    let deserialized: Point = serde_json::from_str(&serialized).unwrap();

    // Prints deserialized = Point { x: 1, y: 2 }
    println!("deserialized = {:?}", deserialized);
}

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

Download Details:
Author: serde-rs
Source Code: https://github.com/serde-rs/serde
License: View license

#rust  #rustlang 

Awesome  Rust

Awesome Rust

1654894080

Serde JSON: JSON Support for Serde Framework

Serde JSON

Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.

[dependencies]
serde_json = "1.0"

You may be looking for:

JSON is a ubiquitous open-standard format that uses human-readable text to transmit data objects consisting of key-value pairs.

{
    "name": "John Doe",
    "age": 43,
    "address": {
        "street": "10 Downing Street",
        "city": "London"
    },
    "phones": [
        "+44 1234567",
        "+44 2345678"
    ]
}

There are three common ways that you might find yourself needing to work with JSON data in Rust.

  • As text data. An unprocessed string of JSON data that you receive on an HTTP endpoint, read from a file, or prepare to send to a remote server.
  • As an untyped or loosely typed representation. Maybe you want to check that some JSON data is valid before passing it on, but without knowing the structure of what it contains. Or you want to do very basic manipulations like insert a key in a particular spot.
  • As a strongly typed Rust data structure. When you expect all or most of your data to conform to a particular structure and want to get real work done without JSON's loosey-goosey nature tripping you up.

Serde JSON provides efficient, flexible, safe ways of converting data between each of these representations.

Operating on untyped JSON values

Any valid JSON data can be manipulated in the following recursive enum representation. This data structure is serde_json::Value.

enum Value {
    Null,
    Bool(bool),
    Number(Number),
    String(String),
    Array(Vec<Value>),
    Object(Map<String, Value>),
}

A string of JSON data can be parsed into a serde_json::Value by the serde_json::from_str function. There is also from_slice for parsing from a byte slice &[u8] and from_reader for parsing from any io::Read like a File or a TCP stream.

use serde_json::{Result, Value};

fn untyped_example() -> Result<()> {
    // Some JSON input data as a &str. Maybe this comes from the user.
    let data = r#"
        {
            "name": "John Doe",
            "age": 43,
            "phones": [
                "+44 1234567",
                "+44 2345678"
            ]
        }"#;

    // Parse the string of data into serde_json::Value.
    let v: Value = serde_json::from_str(data)?;

    // Access parts of the data by indexing with square brackets.
    println!("Please call {} at the number {}", v["name"], v["phones"][0]);

    Ok(())
}

The result of square bracket indexing like v["name"] is a borrow of the data at that index, so the type is &Value. A JSON map can be indexed with string keys, while a JSON array can be indexed with integer keys. If the type of the data is not right for the type with which it is being indexed, or if a map does not contain the key being indexed, or if the index into a vector is out of bounds, the returned element is Value::Null.

When a Value is printed, it is printed as a JSON string. So in the code above, the output looks like Please call "John Doe" at the number "+44 1234567". The quotation marks appear because v["name"] is a &Value containing a JSON string and its JSON representation is "John Doe". Printing as a plain string without quotation marks involves converting from a JSON string to a Rust string with as_str() or avoiding the use of Value as described in the following section.

The Value representation is sufficient for very basic tasks but can be tedious to work with for anything more significant. Error handling is verbose to implement correctly, for example imagine trying to detect the presence of unrecognized fields in the input data. The compiler is powerless to help you when you make a mistake, for example imagine typoing v["name"] as v["nmae"] in one of the dozens of places it is used in your code.

Parsing JSON as strongly typed data structures

Serde provides a powerful way of mapping JSON data into Rust data structures largely automatically.

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};
use serde_json::Result;

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)]
struct Person {
    name: String,
    age: u8,
    phones: Vec<String>,
}

fn typed_example() -> Result<()> {
    // Some JSON input data as a &str. Maybe this comes from the user.
    let data = r#"
        {
            "name": "John Doe",
            "age": 43,
            "phones": [
                "+44 1234567",
                "+44 2345678"
            ]
        }"#;

    // Parse the string of data into a Person object. This is exactly the
    // same function as the one that produced serde_json::Value above, but
    // now we are asking it for a Person as output.
    let p: Person = serde_json::from_str(data)?;

    // Do things just like with any other Rust data structure.
    println!("Please call {} at the number {}", p.name, p.phones[0]);

    Ok(())
}

This is the same serde_json::from_str function as before, but this time we assign the return value to a variable of type Person so Serde will automatically interpret the input data as a Person and produce informative error messages if the layout does not conform to what a Person is expected to look like.

Any type that implements Serde's Deserialize trait can be deserialized this way. This includes built-in Rust standard library types like Vec<T> and HashMap<K, V>, as well as any structs or enums annotated with #[derive(Deserialize)].

Once we have p of type Person, our IDE and the Rust compiler can help us use it correctly like they do for any other Rust code. The IDE can autocomplete field names to prevent typos, which was impossible in the serde_json::Value representation. And the Rust compiler can check that when we write p.phones[0], then p.phones is guaranteed to be a Vec<String> so indexing into it makes sense and produces a String.

The necessary setup for using Serde's derive macros is explained on the Using derive page of the Serde site.

Constructing JSON values

Serde JSON provides a json! macro to build serde_json::Value objects with very natural JSON syntax.

use serde_json::json;

fn main() {
    // The type of `john` is `serde_json::Value`
    let john = json!({
        "name": "John Doe",
        "age": 43,
        "phones": [
            "+44 1234567",
            "+44 2345678"
        ]
    });

    println!("first phone number: {}", john["phones"][0]);

    // Convert to a string of JSON and print it out
    println!("{}", john.to_string());
}

The Value::to_string() function converts a serde_json::Value into a String of JSON text.

One neat thing about the json! macro is that variables and expressions can be interpolated directly into the JSON value as you are building it. Serde will check at compile time that the value you are interpolating is able to be represented as JSON.

let full_name = "John Doe";
let age_last_year = 42;

// The type of `john` is `serde_json::Value`
let john = json!({
    "name": full_name,
    "age": age_last_year + 1,
    "phones": [
        format!("+44 {}", random_phone())
    ]
});

This is amazingly convenient, but we have the problem we had before with Value: the IDE and Rust compiler cannot help us if we get it wrong. Serde JSON provides a better way of serializing strongly-typed data structures into JSON text.

Creating JSON by serializing data structures

A data structure can be converted to a JSON string by serde_json::to_string. There is also serde_json::to_vec which serializes to a Vec<u8> and serde_json::to_writer which serializes to any io::Write such as a File or a TCP stream.

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};
use serde_json::Result;

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)]
struct Address {
    street: String,
    city: String,
}

fn print_an_address() -> Result<()> {
    // Some data structure.
    let address = Address {
        street: "10 Downing Street".to_owned(),
        city: "London".to_owned(),
    };

    // Serialize it to a JSON string.
    let j = serde_json::to_string(&address)?;

    // Print, write to a file, or send to an HTTP server.
    println!("{}", j);

    Ok(())
}

Any type that implements Serde's Serialize trait can be serialized this way. This includes built-in Rust standard library types like Vec<T> and HashMap<K, V>, as well as any structs or enums annotated with #[derive(Serialize)].

Performance

It is fast. You should expect in the ballpark of 500 to 1000 megabytes per second deserialization and 600 to 900 megabytes per second serialization, depending on the characteristics of your data. This is competitive with the fastest C and C++ JSON libraries or even 30% faster for many use cases. Benchmarks live in the serde-rs/json-benchmark repo.

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries, so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo, but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

No-std support

As long as there is a memory allocator, it is possible to use serde_json without the rest of the Rust standard library. This is supported on Rust 1.36+. Disable the default "std" feature and enable the "alloc" feature:

[dependencies]
serde_json = { version = "1.0", default-features = false, features = ["alloc"] }

For JSON support in Serde without a memory allocator, please see the serde-json-core crate.

Link: https://crates.io/crates/serde_json

#rust  #rustlang  #encode   #json 

Super Affiliate System Review - Recommended or Not?

Is it worth your money?

John Crestani created the Super Affiliate System, an ideal program to equip people with information and skills to achieve affiliate marketing success. In this system, learners need to participate in a module-based learning setting that will help them get started with affiliate marketing by using a simplified system that consists of a single website, buyers, and regular quality traffic. Go through the super affiliate system review to find out more!

John Crestanis’s extensive knowledge and skills in this industry set the Super Affiliate System far apart from competitor affiliate marketing systems. But is the Super Affiliate Commission System a genuine deal? Is it worth investing in? Today, in this Super Affiliate System review, we will take a look at what the system requires and decide whether it’s a real deal affiliate marketing enthusiasts should invest in.

What is the Super Affiliate System?

This is a complete training course that assists people in becoming successful affiliate marketers. The guide uses videos to lead you through the tools and processes you need to become a super affiliate marketer. The program creator has shared thriving, in-depth strategies to give you a life of freedom if you pay heed to them.

The Super Affiliate System is a training guide to equip you with knowledge and skills in the industry. The system will also allow a list of tools needed for affiliate marketers to fast-track their potential.

Super Affiliate System Review: Pros and Cons

There are a few pros and cons that will enlighten beginner affiliates on whether to consider this system or not. Let’s have a look at them one by one:
Pros:-

The system has extensive and informative, easy to follow modules.

The system is designed in a user-friendly manner, especially for beginners.

Equipped with video tutorials to quickly guide you through the process.

The system gives affiliates niche information to provide them with a competitive advantage.

Equipped with revision sections, weekly questions, and daily assignments to help you grasp all the course ideas.

The system extends clients to a 24/7 support system.

It allows clients to have monthly payment plans that can be suitable for those who can’t bear the price of a single down payment. It offers

clients a lot of bonuses.

Clients are allowed a 60-day Super Affiliate System refund guarantee.

Cons:-

It’s very expensive.

Limited coverage of affiliate networks and niches.

Who created the Super Affiliate System?

John Crestani, a 29-year-old expert in affiliate marketing from Santa Monica, California, is the program’s creator. The veteran left out of college and chose to earn money online since there are low job prospects. He failed several times, striving to make ends meet for quite some time until he successfully built a successful affiliate site dealing with health-related products.
He is currently a seven-figure person making more than $500 per month. His remarkable success in affiliate marketing has made him a featured in Yahoo Finance, Inc., Forbes, Business Insider, and Home Business magazine.

With the enormous success he has seen in affiliate marketing, John has designed an easy-to-follow guide to provide people with the skills to make money as an affiliate marketer. He has described all the strategies and tools he used to lead him to success.

Super Affiliate System Review: Does it Work?

The system accommodates affiliate marketers with in-depth details on how to develop successful affiliate networks. The Super Affiliate System review has a positive impact on different affiliate marketers who have tried it and noticed impressive results. But then, does it work?

The program doesn’t promise you overnight riches; it demands work and application to perform it. After finishing the Super Affiliate System online video training course, attaining success requires you to put John’s strategies into practice. A lot of commitment, hard work, and time are required in order to become a successful affiliate marketer.

How Does It Work?

As its name suggests, the Super Affiliate System is there to make you a super affiliate. John himself is an experienced affiliate, and he has accumulated all the necessary tools to achieve success in training others to become super affiliates. The Super Affiliate Network System members’ area has outlined everything that the veteran affiliate used to make millions as an affiliate.
The guide will help you set up campaigns, traffic resources, essential tools you need as an affiliate, and the veteran affiliate networks to achieve success.

Most amateur affiliates usually get frustrated as they might demand time to start making money. Those who succeed in getting little coins mainly do the following to earn;

They first become Super Affiliate System affiliates.

They promote the Super Affiliate System in multiple ways.

They convert the marketing leads they get into sales.

They receive a commission on every sale they make.

Affiliate marketing involves trading other people’s products and earning commissions from the sales you make. It’s an online business that can be done either with free or paid traffic. With the Super Affiliate System, one of the basic teachings you’ll get in the guide is how to make money by promoting the course itself using paid traffic Facebook ads.

What’s in the Super Affiliate System?

The system is amongst the most comprehensive affiliate marketing courses on the market. The Super Affiliate System comprises more than 50 hours of content that takes about six weeks to complete. The Super Affiliate System also includes several video lectures and tutorials alongside several questions and homework assignments to test its retention.

What Does the Super Affiliate Program Cover?

This program aims to provide affiliates with comprehensive ideas and tactics to become successful affiliate marketers. Therefore, their online video training course is comprehensive. Below are areas of information included within the modules;

Facebook ads

Native ads

Website creation

Google ads

Social ads

Niche selection

YouTube ads

Content creation

Scaling

Tracking and testing

Affiliate networks

Click funnels

Advanced strategies

Besides the extensive information the creator has presented on these topics, he also went an extra mile to review the complete material and also guide marketers through the course.

Who is the Super Affiliate System for?

There are a number of digital products out there that provide solutions to techniques to earn money online. But not all options offer real value for what you want. John gives people a Super Affiliate System free webinar to allow them to learn what the system entails. It will help if you spare time to watch it, as it takes 90 minutes to get through. 
Below is a brief guide to who this system is for:

  1. It is for beginners who can equip themselves with appropriate affiliate marketing skills. People who are still employed and want to have an alternative earning scheme fit here.

  2. The system is also suitable for entrepreneurs who need to learn to earn money online, mainly using paid ads.

  3. The Super Affiliate System also suits anyone who is looking for another alternative stream of income.

Making money online has many advantages at large. You have the flexibility to work from any place, in the comfort of your home, with just an internet connection. Even though John has stated that there are no special skills needed to achieve success in affiliate marketing, there are little basics necessary to keep you on track. 
Having a proper mindset is also vital to attaining success in affiliate marketing. So, affiliates who believe in the system working for them need to be dedicated, focused, and committed. 
They incorporate;

Keep in mind that you have more than $895 in advertisements to get started. Furthermore, set aside a couple of dollars so that you keep on the right track.
There is also additional software you require to get started. It needs an extra of between $80 and $100 a month to get it.

Where to Buy a Super Affiliate System?

If you are interested in joining this big team, you have to get into the Super Affiliate System on the official website, superaffiliatesystem.org, and get it from there. You have to pay their set fees to get their courses and other new materials within their learning scope.

Super Affiliate System Review: Is it Worth the Money?

It depends on an individual whether the system is worth it or not. The system is worth the money for serious people who want to go deep into an affiliate marketing career and have the time to put the Super Affiliate System strategies into practice. Super Affiliate System Review, Is it worth your money?
But people who also look forward to becoming rich overnight need to get off as this is not your way. Hard work and commitment are paramount to getting everything that works best for you.

**Visit The Officail Website

#super affiliate system review #super affiliate system #super affiliate system 3 #super affiliate system 3.0 review #super affiliate system pro #super affiliate system john crestani

Joseph  Murray

Joseph Murray

1624471200

Beginner's Guide to Compilation in Java

Java applications are complied to bytecode then JIT and JVM takes care of code execution. Here you will find some insights about how JIT compiler works.

I am guessing that many of you use Java as your primary language in your day-to-day work. Have you ever thought about why HotSpot is even called HotSpot or what the Tiered Compilation is and how it relates to Java? I will answer these questions and a few others through the course of this article. I will begin this by explaining a few things about compilation itself and the theory behind it.

Turning Source Code to Machine Code

In general, we can differentiate two basic ways of translating human readable code to instructions that can be understood by our computers:

Static (native, AOT) Compilation

  • After code is written, a compiler will take it and produce a binary executable file. This file will contain set of machine code instructions targeted for particular CPU architecture. Of course the same binary should be able to run on CPUs with similar set of instructions but in more complex cases your binary may fail to run and may require recompiling to meet server requirements. We lose the ability to run on multiple platforms for the benefit of faster execution on a dedicated platform.

Interpretation

  • Already existing source code will be run and turned into binary code line by line by the interpreter while the exact line is being executed. Thanks to this feature, the application may run on every CPU that has the correct interpreter. On the other hand, it will make the execution slower than in the case of statically compiled languages. We benefit from the ability to run on multiple platforms but lose on execution time.

As you can see both types have their advantages and disadvantages and are dedicated to specific use cases and will probably fail if not used in the correct case. You may ask – if there are only two ways does it mean that Java is an interpreted or a statically compiled language?

#java #jvm #compiler #graalvm #hotspot #compilation #jit compiler #native image #aot #tiered compilation

A Rust Version Of The Super Tiny Compiler

The (Rust) super tiny compiler

This project is a rust version of the super tiny compiler (the original one (JS) was created by Jamie Kyle).

The output (C-like) and input (Lisp-like) syntax are the same. The Lexer and Parser created here were heavily inspired by the super-tiny-compiler.js.

Examples

cargo run --example tokens
cargo run --example ast
cargo run --example compiler

Test

cargo test

Cargo.lock

# This file is automatically @generated by Cargo.
# It is not intended for manual editing.
version = 3

[[package]]
name = "compiler-lib"
version = "0.1.0"

Cargo.toml

[package]
name = "compiler-lib"
version = "0.1.0"
edition = "2021"

# See more keys and their definitions at https://doc.rust-lang.org/cargo/reference/manifest.html

[dependencies]

Download Details:

Author: eduardostuart
Source Code: https://github.com/eduardostuart/rust-the-super-tiny-compiler

License: MIT license

#rust