Arjun  Goodwin

Arjun Goodwin

1626315819

HOW TO INSTALL & SETUP UNITY 🎮 | Unity Tutorial | Make Video Games For Free

In this Unity tutorial I will teach you how to install and setup Unity so it’s ready for you to get started with! 😊 We will also learn how to install Visual Studio, which is the IDE we will use to write code in for our Unity games.

Download Unity here: https://unity3d.com/get-unity/download

➤ TIMESTAMPS

  • 00:00:00 - Why should you choose Unity?
  • 00:00:51 - What does it cost to make games?
  • 00:01:28 - Installing Unity & VS!
  • 00:04:58 - How to get a licence.
  • 00:06:02 - Creating our first project (game)!
  • 00:07:35 - How to connect Unity with VS.
  • 00:11:46 - Conclusion!

#unity #game-development

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HOW TO INSTALL & SETUP UNITY 🎮 | Unity Tutorial | Make Video Games For Free
Arjun  Goodwin

Arjun Goodwin

1626315819

HOW TO INSTALL & SETUP UNITY 🎮 | Unity Tutorial | Make Video Games For Free

In this Unity tutorial I will teach you how to install and setup Unity so it’s ready for you to get started with! 😊 We will also learn how to install Visual Studio, which is the IDE we will use to write code in for our Unity games.

Download Unity here: https://unity3d.com/get-unity/download

➤ TIMESTAMPS

  • 00:00:00 - Why should you choose Unity?
  • 00:00:51 - What does it cost to make games?
  • 00:01:28 - Installing Unity & VS!
  • 00:04:58 - How to get a licence.
  • 00:06:02 - Creating our first project (game)!
  • 00:07:35 - How to connect Unity with VS.
  • 00:11:46 - Conclusion!

#unity #game-development

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1602565700

Game Development with .NET

We’ve launched a new Game Development with .NET section on our site. It’s designed for current .NET developers to explore all the choices available to them when developing games. It’s also designed for new developers trying to learn how to use .NET by making games. We’ve also launched a new game development Learn portal for .NET filled with tutorials, videos, and documentation provided by Microsoft and others in the .NET game development community. Finally, we launched a step-by-step Unity get-started tutorial that will get you started with Unity and writing C## scripts for it in no time. We are excited to show you what .NET has to offer to you when making games. .NET is also part of Microsoft Game Stack, a comprehensive suite of tools and services just for game development.

A picture of a game controller

.NET for game developers

.NET is cross-platform. With .NET you can target over 25+ different platforms with a single code base. You can make games for, but not limited to, Windows, macOS, Linux, Android, iOS, Xbox, PlayStation, Nintendo, and mixed reality devices.

C## is the most popular programming language in game development. The wider .NET community is also big. There is no lack of expertise and support you can find from individuals and user groups, locally or online.

.NET does not just cover building your game. You can also use it to build your game’s website with ASP.NET, your mobile app using Xamarin, and even do remote rendering with Microsoft Azure. Your skills will transfer across the entire game development pipeline.

logos of some gaming platforms supported by .NET

Available game engines

The first step to developing games in .NET is to choose a game engine. You can think of engines as the frameworks and tools you use for developing your game. There are many game engines that use .NET and they differ widely. Some of the engines are commercial and some are completely royalty free and open source. I am excited to see some of them planning to adopt .NET 5 soon. Just choose the engine that better works for you and your game. Would you like to read a blog post to help you learn about .NET game engines, and which one would be best for you?

#.net #.net core #azure #c# #game development #azure #cryengine #game developers #game development #game development with .net #game engines #games #monogame #playfab #stride #unity #visual studio #waveengine

The  NineHertz

The NineHertz

1630909606

How to Hire Video Game Developers For Video Game Development Company?

The gaming industry has taken a boom in the last few years. If we talk about numbers, according to NewZoo, the worth of the video gaming industry was $159.3 Billion in 2020. Video games are not just something for fun now, players and users expect much more from video game developers. Creating such products that just do not satisfy the player’s needs and exceed their expectations is what video game development company are thriving for.

Though kickstarting a new game-making studio is not an easy task. This business requires a team with a huge passion to create games and earn money from these video games. The idea of the approach is to create such unique games that will reach millions of people in the world and gain popularity. This growth demands more professionals in this field.

This just can not be obtained by finding someone with a good CV, the whole process includes a deep dig down to grab the right talent. Read on to learn more about Mobile game developers and the process of hiring video game developers.

Read Complete Blog Here -  https://theninehertz.com/blog/how-to-hire-video-game-developers-video-game-development


#Video Game Development

#Video Game developers

#Video game development studio

#Video game development services

 

Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

1602766800

Video-Game Piracy Group 'Team Xecuter' Leaders in Custody

The Department of Justice (DoJ) has nabbed two alleged leaders of a global, notorious video-game piracy group called Team Xecuter.

The two leaders in custody, Max Louarn (48, a French national of Avignon) and Gary Bowser (51, a Canadian national from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic), allegedly led the criminal enterprise’s efforts to hack popular video-game consoles so they could be used to play pirated copies of video games. The DoJ also charged Team Xecuter member Yuanning Chen, 35, a Chinese national of Shenzhen, China.

Video-game manufacturers govern the use of major consoles to play copyrighted video-game titles with end-user licensing agreements, which prevents anyone from duplicating, modifying and selling the software. In addition, console manufacturers and game developers implement various technical measures – from specific game cartridge designs to cryptographic keys on the software – to prevent the use of unauthorized firmware that could be used to play pirated video games.

Team Xecuter, which says in underground advertisements that it’s been around since 2001, has bypassed these measures by developing and selling illegal “circumvention” devices. One example is a USB device that the group sold starting in 2018 called the SX Pro, which allows the Nintendo Switch console to run pirated games.

Beyond the Nintendo Switch, the cybercrime group also targeted popular consoles such as the Nintendo 3DS, the Nintendo Entertainment System Classic Edition, the Sony PlayStation Classic and Microsoft Xbox.

“These defendants were allegedly leaders of a notorious international criminal group that reaped illegal profits for years by pirating video game technology of U.S. companies,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, in a Friday announcement. “These arrests show that the department will hold accountable hackers who seek to commandeer and exploit the intellectual property of American companies for financial gain, no matter where they may be located.”

According to court documents, the Team Xecuter group is comprised of more than a dozen individual members worldwide. That includes: Developers who exploit vulnerabilities in video-game consoles and design the circumvention devices; website designers who create the various websites promoting and advertising these devices; suppliers who manufacture the devices; and resellers who distribute the devices.

According to the DoJ, the group has continuously evaded law-enforcement efforts by using a wide variety of brand names, websites and distribution channels. Between June 2013 through August 2020, for instance, Team Xecuter used a variety of product names for its devices, such as the Gateway 3DS, the Stargate, the TrueBlue Mini, the Classic2Magic and the SX line of devices (that includes the SX OS, as well as the SX Pro, the SX Lite and the SX Core). The group also allegedly masked its illegal activity by pretending to support gaming enthusiasts who wanted to design their own video games for non-commercial use.

The DoJ also said that behind the scenes, Team Xecuter was supporting online libraries of pirated video games for its customers, and several of the devices also came preloaded with numerous pirated games. Ironically, the group also used a licensing scheme to protect its circumvention software from being pirated, the department said.

“According to the indictment, Team Xecuter was so brazen that it even required customers to purchase a ‘license’ to unlock the full features of its custom firmware, the SX OS, in order to enable the ability to play pirated video games,” according to the DoJ.

The video-game and enthusiast markets are lucrative industries for cybercriminals. A recent report highlighted that credential-theft targeting hardcore gamers has hit an all-time high as scams, illicit markets and account takeovers have become a booming business. Meanwhile, hackers are scoring more than a million dollars annually selling compromised accounts for the popular Fortnite video game in underground forums.

Video-game companies are cracking down on these security challenges, and in particular the issue of piracy – with Nintendo filing two lawsuits against Nintendo Switch piracy resellers that were part of Team Xecuter, as well as against UberChips, a website that sold Team Xecuter’s hardware. Last week, UberChips agreed to a $2 million settlement with Nintendo.

#hacks #web security #criminal charges #department of justice #firmware #gary bowser #indictment #max louarn #microsoft xbox #nintendo #nintendo 3ds #nintendo entertainment system classic edition #nintendo switch #piracy #pirated games #sony playstation classic #sx pro #team xecuter #video game #video game console #video game software

Juanita  Apio

Juanita Apio

1621083660

Making a RTS game #10: Moving the camera (Unity/C#)

In this post, we’ll talk a bit about graphical projections and camera set up, and then we’ll do some user input handling and reuse the notion of coroutines we saw last time.

Graphical projections: perspective, orthographic, axonometric…

Video games are displayed on 2D screens. So, as they started to put more and more 3D objects in our games, engineers and programmers have had to find various views of representing this 3D in a 2D space. Luckily, graphical projections (techniques used to show 3D objects in a 2D view) are hardly new stuff — scientists have been drawing complex 3D machines on paper for centuries. Over the years, plenty of ideas have come up on how to best represent the 3rd dimension in 2D: some try and reproduce the way our human eye sees things by incorporating perspective with vanishing points, others decompose the 3D object to show all of its sides separately, others try and mix the two to show as much of the object as possible while not deforming it too much…

In a RTS game, we are confronted to this question since we have 3D objects (our units, the trees and rocks on the ground, etc.). In those games, the camera is very often orthographic — this way, you get a literal bird’s eye-view of the world which helps with micro- and macro-management of your armies and production. More precisely, we usually use the isometric projection — this type of projection is a subtype of parallel orthographic axonometric projections, as shown below:

“Classification of the orthographic projection and some 3D projections”, by Cmglee — Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=83384053

When computers were not as efficient as they are now, orthographic projections were an amazing way of simulating 3D for video games because they’d let artists create sprites that programmers could then paste next to each other in a neat grid — and you’d get a 3D feel. Also, you didn’t need to worry about scaling the visuals depending on the distance to the camera: your sprites had one set size and there was no need to dedicate compute power to recomputing it live. It also let the game take care of the camera for the players so they could focus on the game at hand, rather than moving both the characters and the camera.

Isometric projection in itself is interesting because it gives quite a comprehensive and well-proportioned 2D representation of our 3D objects: if you have a cube, so with edges of the same length, an isometric projection will scale them proportionally in the 2D representation, thus we still get the same equal lengths.

However, it is way harder to mentalize the directions with this rotation. If you’re going “up” in your view, then you should actually be moving along a diagonal in the world space. This will make camera movement more complex and it will become particularly cumbersome in later episodes, when we want to make a minimap (that will not be rotated 45°). So, instead, we’ll be using a pseudo-axonometric projection where we face the objects (on the left), compared to the “real” isometric projection (on the right)!

We can still simulate the isometric view (and in particular take advantage of it showing objects proportions better) by rotating the objects mesh in the scene at a 45° angle on the global Y-axis. More precisely, we’ll apply a rotation on the “Mesh” sub-object in our unit prefabs, for example for the “House” building:

This way, we get the best out of both world while reducing the mental overhead of computing the camera field of view ;)

Note: even in a true isometric projection, the vertical axis may not be scaled the same; plenty of old “isometric video games” actually used the dimetric projections, in particular to avoid pixel aliasing. Nowadays, computer graphics have improved enough for anti-aliasing to kick in spontaneously and take care of this, so we can revert to “true” isometric projections if we want. But most of the RTS games you might think of (for example the ones I cited in the first article of this series like Age of Empires, Caesar, StarCraft…) have this orthographic view that gives a unique feel to the game.

#games #csharp #tutorial #unity #game #rts