Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1616205780

Spring Boot with Embedded Tomcat Pros and Cons

Zuul gateway and spring-boot-admin to the rescue

If you work with web services in Java, chances are you work with Spring Boot as well or at least is considering it.

When you build your web service using Spring Boot the default setup is to generate a .jar file. The .jar comes with a web server embedded, and you just need to execute it to have the application up and running. The web servers can be Tomcat, Jetty, or Undertow [1]. I’m going to focus on Tomcat.

It’s also possible to use Spring Boot and deploy as a .war file. That’s how I’m more accustomed to it. It feels more natural to me. It’s how I learned — one single Tomcat installation in the server, with multiple applications deployed as .war files.

In this article, I’m going to address the pros and cons of building a Spring Boot application with an embedded Tomcat. It’s the best way (in my view) if you are working with  Microservices.

Pros

The pros are not an extensive list, but they are quite significant.

1. Isolation

For me, this is the driving force. Isolation means that the applications are not dependent on a single Tomcat installation. If the  embedded Tomcat in service A fails, it won’t impact service B or C as each one has its own  Tomcat. Unless the services call each other (which it shouldn’t )— but that’s a different problem. With one single Tomcat, with services calling each other or not, if the Tomcat is shut down, all services are impacted.

Such isolation also means that using Docker may be overkill (don’t beat me just yet). I’ve never used Docker, to be honest, I don’t feel comfortable elaborating too much on this argument. I’m pretty sure it provides many benefits. Based on what I’ve read, it involves much more than just building an application with embedded Tomcat.

#java #microservices #tomcat #spring-boot

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Spring Boot with Embedded Tomcat Pros and Cons

How to Configure the Interceptor With Spring Boot Application

In the video in this article, we take a closer look at how to configure the interceptor with the Spring Boot application! Let’s take a look!

#spring boot #spring boot tutorial #interceptor #interceptors #spring boot interceptor #spring boot tutorial for beginners

Spring vs Spring BooDifference Between Spring and Spring Boot

As an extension of the Spring Framework, Spring Boot is widely used to make development on Spring faster, more efficient and convenient. In this article, we will look at some of the parameters were using Spring Boot can drastically reduce the time and effort required in application development.

What is Spring?

Spring Boot

Difference between Spring and Spring Boot

Advantages of Spring Boot over Spring

Conclusion

#full stack development #spring #spring and spring boot #spring boot

Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1616205780

Spring Boot with Embedded Tomcat Pros and Cons

Zuul gateway and spring-boot-admin to the rescue

If you work with web services in Java, chances are you work with Spring Boot as well or at least is considering it.

When you build your web service using Spring Boot the default setup is to generate a .jar file. The .jar comes with a web server embedded, and you just need to execute it to have the application up and running. The web servers can be Tomcat, Jetty, or Undertow [1]. I’m going to focus on Tomcat.

It’s also possible to use Spring Boot and deploy as a .war file. That’s how I’m more accustomed to it. It feels more natural to me. It’s how I learned — one single Tomcat installation in the server, with multiple applications deployed as .war files.

In this article, I’m going to address the pros and cons of building a Spring Boot application with an embedded Tomcat. It’s the best way (in my view) if you are working with  Microservices.

Pros

The pros are not an extensive list, but they are quite significant.

1. Isolation

For me, this is the driving force. Isolation means that the applications are not dependent on a single Tomcat installation. If the  embedded Tomcat in service A fails, it won’t impact service B or C as each one has its own  Tomcat. Unless the services call each other (which it shouldn’t )— but that’s a different problem. With one single Tomcat, with services calling each other or not, if the Tomcat is shut down, all services are impacted.

Such isolation also means that using Docker may be overkill (don’t beat me just yet). I’ve never used Docker, to be honest, I don’t feel comfortable elaborating too much on this argument. I’m pretty sure it provides many benefits. Based on what I’ve read, it involves much more than just building an application with embedded Tomcat.

#java #microservices #tomcat #spring-boot

Sigrid  Farrell

Sigrid Farrell

1622691420

SpringBoot Configure DataSource Using JNDI With Example Using Tomcat 9 Server

In the video within this article, we take a closer look at the SpringBoot Configure DataSource Using JNDI, alongside an example using a Tomcat 9 Server

In the video within this article, we take a closer look at the SpringBoot Configure DataSource Using JNDI, alongside an example using a Tomcat 9 Server. Let’s get started!

#spring boot #tomcat #springboot #spring boot application #jndi #tomcat server #tomcat 9

Sigrid  Farrell

Sigrid Farrell

1622601303

How to Configure log4j2 In a Spring Boot Application? | Spring Boot Logging [Video]

Configuring log4j2 is really quick and simple; this tutorial video explains the entire process in only 5 minutes, while you wait for your coffee to brew.

In the video below, we take a closer look at the How to configure log4j2 in the Spring boot application using log4j2.xml? | Spring Boot logging. Let’s get started!

#java #spring boot #video #log4j #spring boot tutorial #spring boot tutorial for beginners